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Full text of "Duluth Evening Herald"

THE DULUTH 




VOLUME XXXI— NO. 305. 



MONDAY EVENING, MARCH 30, 1914. 



TWO CENTS. 



SEELY QUITS AGAIN 
AND ASQUITH TAKES 
THE WAR PORTFOLIO 



DES MOINES NO REPORTS 
ELECTION ON FRONMIATTLE 

Heaviest Vote In Years Is Fighting at Torreon Is Sup- 



Predicted in That 
City. 



Premier Resigns From 

House and Will Seek 

Re-Electlon. 



TAKES SEEIY'S PIACE 

AS WAR SECRETARY 



posed to Be Keep- 
ing Up. 



RAILROADS 
COMPLAIN 

Say Net Operating Income 

Is 22.5 Per Cent Under 

Last Year. 



PRESIDENT SAYS STORY 
OF TOLLS DARGAIN WITH 
im M IS AN INSULT 



Socialists Are Active in Carranza Heartily Cheered Statement Is Given at 



French and Ewart Refuse 

to Return to Army 

Service. 



Dramatic Scene Accom- 
panies Announcements 
to Commons. 



Lnrdon. ^r.Tr 1) ^O.-Tol. .John Sp^ly. 
tv'i. TriKvy t'<: wiir, replRned his port- 
folio tn thf Friti.Hh rablnet to»lay !\nd 
his reFtgiiation was accepted by the 
premier. 

iTi !» • '-■iiiith tiim«elf <1erided to 

lnl<e t! •t«ry>hip of war in place 

I ■ -ly. 

i.lo.id f;<-orjrr Slrk. 

David Lioyd 'Jeorgre. ohancellor of 
the t-Xi luqutr. was taken ill at Wal- 
ton 11(1 -Thame*. Sarrey, where he 
I -A . t .V • rid playlnir arolf. The 

cii.-u' • ii.T. It was stated, was unable 
to parlivipHte in the critical discus- 
•lon in the house of I'ommons today 
on the situation brought about by the 
resignation of army officers In I'lster. 
•Jlie debating pow»r of Mr. Lloyd- 
GtofRe tiad been regarded a.-* u gri'at 
»>stt b> I he government. 

Morlcy* May Re.Hli!;n. 

Filil Miirsh.il Sir John French, chief 
ff !lu imperial general staff of the 
Bniinh army, and Sir John Ewart. ad- 
Jiilaut general to the forces, deAnitely 
rtsigned fii>m the service today. 

Vl-scount Morjey. in replying: to a 
ftiKstion put by Lord Turzon tn the 
l-iouae of lords, admitted that he had 
I " '■ d ag:»iiist a cj-binet rule. Asked 
' iiappened that "if the govern- 

iiit i,i t'. It compelled to withdraw the 
paragraiihs and f'ol. Si ely to resign, 
we i-^'- The good fortune of .'seeing 
Vi.-- "vioi-ley still in charge of this 

hov. ue prtsident of the council 

rt ptird: 

"1 n lil nn.«*wer that question more 
or 1« Fs .'^Htif f.j'-toi-ily tciiHiiTuw, pcr- 
hap.« " 

•Tol. - ^ !.>i^natiou hns been 

accept' ■■ 

This was the euphemistic cxpres- 
nion employed by Premier Asquith in 
«nnotincing iti the house of commons 
today thj.t his wrrr secretary had p.iid 
th.e ptn.nlty of his indiscretions In 
adding tti ;i c: bluet docunsent the two 
paragraphs which have aroused such 
fesllng as to threaten the existence of 
th<i entire cabinet. 

Tlie first information recelvod by 
members c>f parliament ihat <'ol. Secly 
had d« finitely r« tir»d from the cabinet 
was vv hen lie entered the house and 
took iii.<! -se.-it on the hack benches In- 
BttiKl of .-imong his h'te colleatfuea. 
Caunr of rrl>tlH. 

The parnuiaphs which catised th« 
erisis were contained in a memoran- 
clum written to UriR-^Jen. Hubert 
Couf-'h. and cr>ntained the following: 

"The govcrnntent must retain its 
right to u?e all the forces of the crown 
In Ireland or elsewhere to maintain 
crder and support thf civil power in 
the ordinary execution of their duty, 
but it ha.*^^ no intention whatever of 
taking advantaso of thi.s right in or- 
der tf> ( rush political opposition to ih" 
polirv 'ir the principles of the home 
r-.iM h !!.•■ 

iater repuiiintion of these guar- 

(<"(i.>luuied on page 8. second column.) 

PEOPLERAISEFUND 
TO DEFEND AMERICAN 




the Election at 
Burlington. 



Pes Moines, Iowa, March 30. — Voters 
were out early in the municipal elec- 
tion here, and by noon It was freely 
predicted In official circles that the 
largest total of ballots since the com- 
mission form of government became 
effective will have been cast when the 
polls close tonight. For the first timo 
In the memory of local politicians, 
Sunday meetings were addressed yes- 
terday by campaign orators. 

The activity of women In connection 
with the proposition of municipal own- 
ership of the waterworks system was 
a distinct feature of the voting, len- 
der the law, women are permitted the 
ballot on bond questions. In several 
of the residence precincts women were 
in line when the polls opened at 7 
o'clock. 

Mayor J. R. Hannn, a candidate for 
re-election, has for his opponent Zell 
R. Roe, who, as police commissioner 
in 1?11, during the street car strike, 
achieved considerable notice by refus- 
ing to permit policemen to man street 
cars operated by strikebreakers.' He 
Is the candidate of some of the labor 
unions, a split on his candidacy hav- 
ing developed in labor ranks "during 
the last week. Four commissioners 
are also to be chosen. 



PREMIER ASQUITH, 

Who Must Now Stand for Re-election 

tt> Parliament. 



SAVER &F FIFTY IS 

IN BRAWL 



Soelalista Artlve. 

Burlington. Iowa, March 30. — Social- 
ism Is making a bitter fight for su- 
premacy In the city election today, 
wherein a mayor and four councilmen 
are to be chosen. There are three So- 
cialist candidates on the ticket. The 
weather Is cloudy. 



E. D. O'Donnell of Chicago 
Held on Murder 



Charge. 



Chicago, ? 
O'Donnell. bt 
nell, president 
Trades counci 
lice early tod 
charge of mu 
beachcomber 
having saved 
from <Irownlii 

De Rock wj 
a fight Satui 
Witnesses tol 
fired the shot 
On the advlct 
nell refused 
The police b 
plead self-def 



larch 30. — Edward D. 
other of Simon O'Don- 

of the Chicago Building 
I, surrendered to the po- 
ty and was booked on a 
rderlng I'eter de Rock, a 
who was credited with 
more than fifty persons 
g on lake ice. 
s shot and killed during 
day night in a saloon. 
1 the police O'Donnell 
B which killed de Rock. 

of his attorney, O'Don- 
to talk after his arrest, 
elleve the prisoner will 
ense. 



NORTHWEST RATES 
ON BliER SUSPENDED 



increases 
to 75 



\-f'w (r.j'fis. T.a , M.inh 30 -Dr. Ben- 
Ja! ! 1! r.. I.tiph, forinerly of Jack- 
son v 1. r!a., facing charges (»f arson 
In I..^ I eiba. Honduras, has enlisted 
the «> lupaihy of the people, who have 
rai«<d .Tl.t)00 to defend him. according 
to .statement"* today of papsengers ar- 
riving on tiie steamship Rosina. The 
blaze, it is declared, originated in the 
drugstore of which Dr. I.,eigh was man- 
ager. Sixteen blocks were fireswept.- 
ttjtailiiig a loss estimated at $1,000,000. 

When the Hosinn sailed from I^.i 
Ceiba. passengers said, the fi:nd prac- 
ti<ally had been completed and an 
attorney had been engaged to defend 
the American, who has been a resldoit 
of Honduras for two years. 

FARMERS MAY JOIN 
HANDS WITH UNIONS 



^\"ashingtor 
in lije freijihl 
malt products 
to approxinia 
Crosse, Wis., 
points to de.i 
today were ; 
state commer 
30. 

The Fitger 
other similar 
involved in i 
the operation 
were to hav< 
\\ edn«':-day. 
was made thi 
slon of the < 
meantime pre 
the hearing t 
No local not 
celved other 



Range From 16 
Per Cent Over 
d Charge. 

March SO. — Advances 
rates on beer and other 
varying from 10 per cent 
ely 75 per cent from La 
M. I'aul, Minn., ,ind other 
tlnations In other states, 
•uspended by the inter- 
.*e commission until July 



Brewing company and 

concernn in Duluth were 

he protest made agaln.^t 

of the new rates, which 

gone Into effect 'ast 
Protest from this point 
ough the traffic commls- 
'ommercial club. In the 
saration w til be made for 
lat naturally will follow, 
ce has as >et been re- 
than that contained in 



Hravr Vote a< SUnx City. ' 

Sioux City, Iowa, March 30. — Great 
interest Is being taken In the city 
election tod.iy. A »nayor and four 
councilmen will be chosen. The con- 
test for the mayoralty between Mayor 
A. A. Smith and Jonathan Brown, a 
former councilman, is the feature. "The 
early vote was heavy. 

kirbyYeadswith 
8v0tesini3iji2 

Arkansas Senatorial Pri- 
mary Is Not Yet 
Decided. 

L:ttle Rock, Ark.. March 30— Officlnl 
repor*n of the county central commit- 
tee, which will meet today to canvass 
the vote cast In the Democratic pri- 
mary election of last Wednesday, are 
awaited to determine whether United 
Slates Senator James P. Clarke has 
been renominated or will be succeeded 
l>y William F. KIrby, associate Justice 
of the Arkansas supreme court. 

With aht>ut 100 small townships 
mi.'^^sing. the normal vote of which 
does not exceed 3,000, returns made 
unofficially give Mr. KIrby a lead of 
eight votes In 131.112 reported. 

Official returns also will be required 
to determine at Ic.tst one «>f the three 
congressional contests. In the Second 
dL'trlct Representative W. A. Oldfleld 
seems assured of renomi nation, and In 
the Seventh, Representative W. S. 
• loodwln Is well in the lead. In the 
Third, however, the race Is close be- 
tween John N. Tillman of Fayette- 
ville. former president of the I'nlver- 
sity of Arkan.sas. and Claude Fuller 
of Eureka Spihigs. Six candidates en- 
tered the primary in the Third dis- 
trict. 



By People at 
Juarez. 



Juarez. March 30.— ?fo reports from 
Gen. Villa were received this morning 
and If was assumed that fighting at 
Torreon continues. 

When Venustlano Carranra, first 
chief of the revolution, entered this 
city yesterday in » nerican flag was 
carried by the side ••? the Mexican em- 
blem. Americans in the crowd cheered 
and were joined In some extent by the 
native spectators. 

The Incident came as a surprise to 

the spectators. Gen. Carranza, on 

foot, had passed and behind came a 
troop of his soldiers. As they entered 
the main street only the Mexican flag 
was visible, but at that moment th« 
Stars and Stripes was suddenly un- 
furled and the two emblems were car- 
ried through th« streets to the Juarez 
monument. 

On Hor«el»ark 2.0M) Miles. 

In the last few weeks the general 
has ridden horseback for 500 miles and 
In the last two months he has traveled 
2,000 miles In the same way. 

He looked the plc'ure of health and 
vigor, a living contradiction to stories 
that he was feeble and that he had 
constant recourse to stimulants In or- 
der to bear up and cit^«r stories of a 
similar nature. 

Gen. Manuel Chao. military governor 
of the state of Chlhuah\ia, who came 
here to formally wel< om« the Jefe 
suprema, galloped with his staff to a 
point three miles south of the city. 
Here Gen. Carranza and his staff and 
the reception committee met, and there 
ensued a long wait for the troop train 
bringing the horses and men of Car- 
ranza's own army. 

No Xevvs FroM Torreon. 

Visitors were eager to catch a 
glimpse of the one man In Mexico 
whom Gen. Villa owns as chief. To 
those who were presented to him, he 
stretched out u big, .strong hand with 
a firm, want* grip. 

"Have you any adv!ces from Tor- 

(Contlnutid on page 8. fourth column) 



Commerce Commission 
Hearing. 



NO PROTEST MADE 
ON GERMAN SCHEME 



President Says W/^shington 

Only Asked .T' '"" 
formation. 

Washington, March 20. — President 
Wilson today described the recent in- 
structions to Ambassador Gerard at 
Berlin, in connection with the German 
oil monopoly bUl pending In the reich- 
stag, a«! merely in the nature of an In- 
quiry, and not a protect. He told call- 
ers that the ambassador -had been In- 
structed to ascertain if there were any 
discriminations against American In- 
dustry, and to report his findings to 
Washington. 

The attitude of this government has 
been that the German government 
was within its rights In creating an 
oil monopoly, and that the controversy 
Ir.rgely was between American con- 
cerns, the Standard OV company and 
Irdependent corporations. It Is be- 
lieved that the instructions to Mr. Ger- 
ard were to learn particularly If any 
American property was to be confis- 
c.'tted as the result cf the bill, without 
due compensation. 

Recent reports tliat the bill might 
be killed In the reichi»**g on accotint 
of Socialist opposition have been 
noted with interest here. 



"Washington, March 30. — A decrease 
In net operating Income of $61,026,936, 
or 22.6 per cent, of the eastern rail- 
roads. Is described In a statement sub- 
mitted to the interstate commerce 
commission today at the resumption of 
hearings In the advance rate case, cov- 
ering a period of seven months ended 
Jan. 31, 1914, as compared with the 
corresponding period of last year. 

The statement was presented on be- 
half of the railways by George Stuart 
Patterson, general counsel for the 
Pennsylvania railroad, who advised 
the commission that the flg\!res had 
been tabulated from reports made to 
the commission by the roads. 
More From PaMsengers. 

The figures Indicated a decrease in 
total freight revenues of $16,999,330; 
an Increase In passenger revenues of 
$7,734,227; an Increase of $2,269,674 In 
other sources of Income, and a de- 
crease In total operating revenues of 
$6,995,529, or 1.6 per cent. 

The total operating expenses showed 
an Increase of $39,210,233, or 6.3 per 
cent. A general Increase also was 
shown In various phases of railroad 
transportation, the aggregate showing 
the decrease above stated In net oper- 
ating Income. 

Clifford Thome, chairman of the 
Iowa state railroad commission, repre- 
senting eight western states In oppo- 
sition to the proposed advance in rates, 
presented a synopsis of his recent 
testimony before the commission. He 
maintained that the contest was one 
between the carriers and shippers, and 
that any Increase In rates would be 
unjustified. 

ELEVENGIVlSKIN 
FOR BURNED WOMAN 






HE DENIES THri?,VAS 
ANY CA^- /(Oils DEAl 




Flatly Denies Any "Deal" 

With the British 

Government. 



Talks Frankly of Situation, 

Wiilch "Reminds Him 

of a Story." 



Doremus of Michigan Opens 
Third Day's Debate- 
in House. 



Coach and Students of 

West Virginia University 

Offer Aid. 

Morgantow-n, W. Va., March 30. — In 
an effort to save the life of Mrs. Albert 
O. Price, a leader among West Vlr- 

flnla club women, physicians here to- 
ay began a skin grafting operation 
which, they say, will not be completed 
until tomorrow. Kdwin R. Sweetland, 
director of athletics, and ten students 
of the West Virginia tmiversity volun- 
teered the necessary skin to make toe 
operation successful — about 260 square 
Inches. Mrs. Price was burned a month 
ago. Sweetland formerly was coach of 
the football teams and rowing crews 
at Syracuse university. 



SIR EDWARD GREY, 

Secretary for Foreign Affairs for 

England. 

London, March 80. — Sir Edward Grey, 
British foreign secretary, today denied 
in the house of commons the pub- 
lished allegations that the action of 
President Wil.^on in regard to the 
question of Panama canal tolls was the 
result of an understanding between 
the governments of the United States 
and Great Britain. 

"It has been asserted." he said, "thaf 
tinder the terms of the understanding 
Great Britain had undertaken- to as- 
sist President Wilson's policy in re- 
gard to Mexico. There is no founda- 
tion whatever for these reports, and 1 
am glad to say so." 



COAL STRIKE IS 

BEGUN IN ENGUND 



MYSTERIOUS SHOTS 
AT GERMAN SOLDIER. 

.Strassburg, Germany, March 30. — A 
niys.teriou3 attack on a soldier on 
giiard at the Kirclibach fort was made 
Friday at midnight, according to a re- 
port Issued by the military authorities 
here today. 

When a sergeant opened the portal 
In reply to the bell, which he assumed 
had been rung by the commandant re- 
turning from the city, he heard a shot 
fired and a btiUet grazed his chest. He 
advanced to investigate and a second 
shot was fired. The bullet struck him 
in the groin, tlnttening on a coin In 
his pocket and only slightly bruising 
him. 

An armed patrol was sent out to 
search for the assailant, but without 
result. 



One Hundred and Seventy 

Thousand Men in tork- 

sliire Quit Work. 

Leeds, Eng., March 30. — Thirty-five 
thousand coal miners In the Yorkshire 
pits laid down their tooLs today, de- 
manding the Introduction of a mini- 
mum rate of wages. Notices have been 
handed In by a further 35.000 men who 
will quit work on Thursday. 

The Miners' Federation of Great 
Britain has given its support to the 
strike, and a long struggle Is expected. 

Later in the day it was announced 
that another 100,000 miners had been 
given notice to quit work, bringing the 
total to 170.000. 

BOY "PLAYS SUICIDE" 
WITH OLD REVOLVER 



Wsfthlrpton, March 30. — President 
Wilson today declared that on account 
of the contradictory statements in tha 
Baltimore platform. Democrats should 
have no hesitation in voting for the 
r«peal of the I'anama canal tolls ex- 
emption. 

The president emphatically charac- 
terized the exemption as a subsidy, 
janJ pointed out that one plank In the 
: Baltimore pJalform expressed opposl- 
j tion to iny subsidy, direct or indirect, 
while another plank declared for tolls 
I exemption. The president asserted 
I there should be no doubt among Dem- 
I ocrats as to which should take prece- 
' dence, 

JVewer Policy of Party. 
The president reiterated that th© 
exemption never was a policy of th© 
; Democratic house, because it w-aa 
i passed through a coalition of Repub- 
licans and a minority of Democrats, 
the majority of Democrats voting 
against it on the ground that it was a 
subsidy. 
I The president explained, that even If 
I the international situation to which he 
referred in his message, had not aris- 
en, he would have been opposed to the 
^ tolls exemption as against Democratic 
i doctrine. He indicated, however, that 
I if It were not for the international 
situation, he would not feel that it was 
proper for him to question the acts of 
a previous administration. 

Mr. Wilson talked freely about the 
tolls controversy in congress, saving 
that the story that he had entered "into 
a bargain with Great Britain 'through 
Sir William Tyrrell, private secretary 
to Sir Edward Grey, was one of a 
number of insults that had been in- 
i troduced in the congressional debate. 
I RefcretM Xatnrr of Fisiit. 

! The president declared he wanted 
: to express his regret that what had 
I promised to be a dignified contest with 
I genuine dilferences of opinion, seemed 
to be degenerating-, fn hfs opinion, into 
an attempt to discredit the administra- 
tion. He remarked that while It mad© 
all the more certain the result in favor 
of the administration, he thought It a 
j ffreat pity that public affairs should be 
i handled in that way. H e did not think 

; (Continued on page 8. third column.) 

I MEXICANS^ RELEASE 
AMERICAN DOCTOR 



SAUCE FOR THE GOOSE IS SAUCE FOR THE GANDER. 



the above disoatch. 



AMERICAN KIUED 
BY CRAZY JAPANESE 



Chicago, March 30. -Application of 
the Sherman anti-trust law to farmers' 
organizations will be the principal 
topic for discussion at the second an- 
nual conference on marketing and 
farm credits, to be held in this city 
three days beginning April 14. 

Representatives of organized labor 
will be admitted to the sessions of the 
convention, and it was intimated today 
that a deferislve alliance between the 
farmers" co-operative selling organi- 
zations and organized labor might re- 
sult. According to a proposed new In- 
terpretation of the Sherman act. the 
l«w may bt- applied to labor unions 
and farnii rs' -irfianiiiatioiis. 

S«aie Frtintlnriit Speakrra. 

Samuel Internievf r. the New York 
attorney, will address the convent it>n 
on "Tlie Relation of Farn»»rs to the 
Trust Questions." «"hurles R. Van 
Hlse, president of the I'niversity of 
Wlsconjiin, will speak on "The Rela- 
tion of the Farmers' Co-operative Sell- 
ing Organizations to the Sherman 
Anti-Tru.«t Law." Rural credit sys- 
tems and the standardization of mar- 
ket packages t>f farm products also 
will be discussed. 

«.>ther speakers will be Hatton W. 
Sumners. congressman from Texas; 
T. N. »'arver of the United States de- 
partment of agriculture: .lohn Graham 
Brooks of Cambridge. Mass.; R. A. 
Campbell, secretary of the Wisconsin 
beard of public affairs; F. R. Gurtis of 
i'blcago; .1. W. Shorthlll of Hampton, 
Neb.; William Stickney of Chicago, 
and H. .1. Waters, president of the 
Kansas Agricultural college. 

David Friday, professor of political 
economy at the I'niversity of Michi- 
gan, will speak on "The ^ronomlc 
Functions of the Middleman," and 
Charles W. Holman of the I'niversity 
of Wi.vconsin will give an addre.^s on 
"The Tenant Farmer and the Market- 
ing Problem." 



Dr. Edgai 
Murd( 



Xew York. 
Mott Stryker. 
charge of a 
Korea, was f 
a Japanese, t 
received by }■ 
Mrs. Stryker, 
The message, 
said her li 
"crazy" and 
ately. 

Dr. Stryke 
known Amerl 



DeMott Stryker 
jred at Holkol, 
Korea. 

March 30. — Dr. Edgar De 

an .\merican surgeon In 
large hospital at Holkol, 
lot and killed Sunday by i 
ccording to a cablegram 
dward H. I.iOud, father of 

at his Brooklyn home. 

signed by Mrs. Stryker, 
usband's ."assassin was 
hat death came immedi- 

r was one of the best 
:ans in Korea. 



TRY FIFTEEN FOR 
MURDER OF FEUDIST 



Alleged S ayers of Ed Calla- 
han Finally Face 
Court. 



Winchester 
chapter in t 
county feuds 
sjjecial term 
vened for tht 
are charged 
Former Sherl 
county. <'all 
1912, and th 
have been dn 
ever since. 

Two men 
victed. Thes 
for new trial; 
decision In t 
down during 
court. 

Nearly all 
under 30 yea 
the evidence 
by Mrs. Llll 
Callahan. 



Ky.. March 30. — Another 
le" history of Breathitt 
began here today when a 
of the circuit court con- 
trial of llfteen men who 
with the assassination of 
T Kd Callahan of Breathitt 
ihan was assassinated in 
1 caiics of those accused 
tgglng through the courts 

have already been con- 
e two have filed motions 
'. and it is probable that a 
he cases will be handed 
th© special term of the 

of the accused men are 
rs of age. It is said that 
in the cases was gathered 
an Gross, a daughter of 




Six - Year - Old's Younger 

Brothers See Him Kill 

Himself. 

Kansas City, Mo., March 30.— Play- 
ing suicide with an old revolver he be- 
lieved to be not loaded, Virgil Wyatt, 
6 years old, son of Mrs. Lucinda Wyatt, 
shot and killed himself today while 
two younger brothers looked on, wait- 
ing for him to fall down and "play 
dead." 

The mother, a widow, left the chil- 
dren plaving in the attic while she 
went to call on a neighbor. The boy 
found the revolver in an old trunk. 

TWO TMUEYCARS 
CRASH IN CHICAGO 



Warship's Arrival Changes 

Minds of Lambert's 

Captors. 

Wa«»hlngton, March 30. — Dr. Lam- 
bert, an American physician arrested 
by Mexican authorities at Los Mochls, 
after a Constitutionalist officer upon 
whom he had performed an operation 
had died, has been released &» the re- 
sult of energetic action of Secretary 
Daniels. On the recommendation of 
the vice consul at Xogales, Mr. Dan- 
iels ordered Rear Admiral Howard to 
K'^^nd a warship to Topolobampo. Th© 
cruiser New Orleans steamed at one© 
and Dr. Lambert was released. 



YOUTH CONFESSES 
MURDERING TEACHER 



Nine People Seriously Hurt; 

Some Get Broken 

Bones. 

Chicago, March 30-. — Nine persons 
were seriously injured today when two 
trolley cars collided with passengers 
on their way to work crashed togeth- 
er at a crossing on the West side. The 
brakes of an Archer avenue car failed 
to hold it.jon the wet rails, and it slid 
In front 6' n .speeding HaL'^ted street 
car. Shatti » glass caused most of 
the Injuries, ^everal women suffered 
broken bone^^ 



Expelled Pupil Responsible 

for Crime Near 

Poland, N. Y. 

Little Falls, N. Y., March 30.— Jean 
Glanini, under arrest for the murdar 
of Mlss'Lydia Beecher, the young 
school teacher who was found beat©n 
and stabbed to death In the woods near 
Poland, has confessed his guilt, ac- 
cording to District Attorney l<arrell. 

Gianini says In the confession, which 
was made Saturday and disclosed to- 
day, that he had asked Miss Beecher to 
go with him to see his parents In re- 
gard to his reinstatement In the Poland 
high school, from which he had been 
expelled at the young woman's In- 
stigation, and that he killed her on 
the way to his home. 
1 The body of the murdered girl warn 
today taken by her parents to their 
home in Sennett. where funeral serv- 
ices will be held tomorrow. 
j The evidence against Glanini wa* 
1 presented to the grand jury this after- 
noon. 



^if^^^t^^f^ 



* 




THE DAY IN CONGRESS ? 



« 



NO DOUBT WOMEN'S 
VERY PUEER^ TO 



MEN'^S CLOTHES PROBABLY 
LOOK JUST AS FUWNV TO THE. LADIES' 



^ SENATE. 

^ Met at noon. 

^ Recalled a defeated bill to lenxe ^ 
^ Montana Innd.i to the Republic ^ 
^ Coal company, and placed It on ^ 
•* calendar. ^ 

^ Leaders discuHscd probable nc- ^ 
^ tion on the Panama tolln repeal ^ 
^- and decided to await action of the ^ 

* house. 4 

4K HOUSE. ^ 

^ Met at nuon. .)(( 

^ Debate \%»n resunied on the re- ^ 
^ peal of the Panama canal toll* ex- ^ 
4( emptlon. ^ 

^ Independent oil operator* op- ^ 
^ poned the prexent form of the ^ 
^ bill to leawe mlnernt and oil land* ^ 
^ before the public lands commit- ^ 

* tee. ^ 
^ Representative Burke. i\ho ^on ^ 
^ the Republican primary nomina- 4E 
^ tion for Senator In Soutli Dakota, ^ 
ir was cheered ivhcn he returned $ 
ik to hia acat. 4. 

* ,. . , ■ * 

* *^ * ^a|C Y 9 ^ 3r 'Y 'l^ ^ j^ 



SEEK TO REUNITE 
NEBRASKA G. 0. P. 



Representatives of Both 

Factions Gather at 

Lincoln. 

Lincoln, Neb., March 30. — Seeking for 
a reunion of the conservative and pro- 
gressive wings of the Republican party 
In Nebraska, representatives of th© 
two factions met here today in separate 
sessions, and in each took up a dis- 
cussion of the propo.sals to reunite for 
the campaign next fall. The conser- 
vatives, under the leadership of Frank 
M. Currle, and the progressive sup- 
porters, with A. C, Epperson at th© 
head, are expected to name conference 
committees to meet and discuss a plan 
for reunion. If their report is accepted 
by the two wings, a reorganization of 
the Nebraska Republican parly is ex- 
pected under one central committee. 



1" 



<f 




-- 



" ■ —■' 



-■-« - 




Monday, 



THE DiJlUTH herald 



March 30, 1914. 




GEN. BELL WILL 

QUIT PHILIPPINES. 

Washington. Marr-h 30.— Maj. Gen. J, 
Franklin Bell will turn over command 
of the T>hUipplne division to Maj. (ien. \ 
Barry. April 15. and returning to the 
1 nited States via Siberia and Europe, 
■will hrive a months' leave of absenee 
before taking up his new assignment ' 
as commander of the Central division, i 



with headquarters in 'hicago. 

However, his stay in Chicago prob- 
ably will be short, as He also has been 
assigned to command of the Second 
division, with headqu irters at Texaa 
City. 

The present plan \> that den. Bell 
will relieve F.rlg. r„t\. Funston as 
commander of the Sec )nd division, and 
Hmu. Fun.sion's futur.< assignujent in 
a measure depends up. »n who is select- 
ed for chief of staff when Maj. (Jen. 
Wood retires. April 2:. 





Wi:.VTMER — Generally cloudy weather tonight and Tuesday; mod- 
erate northeasterly winds. 

COMPLETE SHOWING 

OF MEN'S NEW HATS 

FOR SPRING 

The Knox Hat. Ststson, Roel- 
of. Beacon and Roswelle makes 
— new colors — n;w blocks — 
prices, $3, $3.50. $4 and $6. 

Hundreds of spic span, brand 
new Soft and Derby Hats are in, 
lust in time to afford excellent va- 
riety for the many nen who will 
.splect their Easter fat during th» 
u^xt two weeks. 



ITWO SALOONS 
MAY_CLOSE 

Matel and Timlin Places Are 

in Disfavor With 

Hicken. 



boy had oKi^nd^ b^r 1 
and takinf^>heT^|phai;;< 
the house lVrofP5>r." H 

'W" 



realize*^ h 
go back. 
Dakota. 



by mi.sbehaving 

e literally, left 

e says he now 

^m^ftke and is ready to 

t^'B father is in South 



SS: 



*MWM| 



ITSI — 

In thek_Lat^ Spring Styles. 

m^ Melville 

H8 )^'*^ Vvurih Street. 




OAK HALL SLDO. 



S 



You'll Do Better at KeUy'9 



PRICES TALK 

Kelly always sells 
it for less. 



Commissioner W. A. Hicken, head of 
the safety division, will recommend to 
the city council this afternoon that a 
renewal of the saloon license of Alex- 
ander Matel. 419 West Michigan street, 
be refused. The license expires April 16. 
Matel has employed an attorney to 
appear before the coun<il to urge that 
his application be acted upon favor- 
ably, but in view of past history, it is 
improbable that any plea, no matter 
how fervent it may be, will opejrale to 
save him. All indications are that the 
Matel saloon will be the next to go 
into the discard. v. ^ «„ 

The safety commissioner has hart an 
investigation made of the Matel place, 
and It is not such that it Is an argu- 
ment to his advantage. 

The application of M. R. Timlin for 
a renewal of his license at 30« Central 
avenue, which expires April 22, Is due 
to come up today, but owing to the 
fact that his attorney, A. E. McManus, 
is engaged in district court in the 
Gran divorce case, action will probably 
be postponed for a week. As Commis- 
sioner Hicken will recommend that this 
application also be refused, the odds 
are that the Timlin saloon will follow 
Matel's into the has-been class. 

The question of letting an exclusive 
contract for the collection of garbage 
and the application of the Gowan- 
Lenning-Krown company that the city 
cede its rights to l:;0 feet of Minnesota 
avenue where it abuts the l>ake avenue 
slip, received much attention last week 
and' may come up again at this after- 
noon's meeting. 

The ordinance prohibiting employ- 
ment offices on West Michigan street 
between Fourth and Fifth avenues may 
be introduced today. This is part of 
Commissioner Hicken's program for 
improving the appearance of the city s 
gateway. 

The twelve ordinances governing 
miscellaneous licenses, being consoli- 
dations and revisions of old ordinances, 
will be given their third reading and 
passed. 

RUNAWAY BOY ~ 

HELD BY POLICE 



PERSONAL 



iZli Ucfiiiovich and John Skul of Me- 
saba were in i^uliith Saturday. 

C. J. Becker of St. Paul is at the 
Spalding. 

A. W. Floyd of Minneapolis U at 
the Spalding. 

F. Colvln' of Biwabik is a guest at] 
the Spalding. i 

Mr. and Mrs. .1. S. Lutes of Blwablk , 
are in Duluth today. 

C. C. Cheney of Toledo Is at the St. 
Louis. 

Peter McDonald of Chisholm Is at 
the St. Louis. 

E. C. Eane of Bralnerd Is registered 
at the St. Louis. 

M. R. Koons of Stillwater is at the 
St. Louis. 

D. F. Tanford of Minneapolis is at 
the McKay. 

C. K. Malent of St. Paul is registered 
at the McKay. 

t A. R. Munro arid William Munro of 
Chisholm are at the McKay. 

George H. Williams of Eau Claire Is 
at the Holland. 

T. F. Remson of Milwaukee Is at 
the Holland. 

J. T. Walker of Minneapolis Is a 
guest at the HoHand. 

Albin «lustaf.<»OJn. 2306 West Eighth 
street, left yesterday for Everett. 
Wash., where he will visit relatives. 
He experts to spend the summer on 
the coast. , .. fJi 



Duluth. The Mutual Transit company 
also announces that it will hav^ one 
of Its lake boats in shape by May 1 
for refrigerating of dairy products. 

Die* ia Dakota. 

Word has been received here of the 
' death Saturday of Miss Clara Opdahl, 
' formerlv an employ© of the Glass 

Block millinery department, at her 

home in Volga, S. l>. 

m 

Married By .»ndge. 

.Judge S. W. CUlnin of tlio iirobate 
' court today officiated at the marriage 
I of Frank Oskar Merisno and Tyyne 
! Alltanen. The bride i-* a reJident of 
1 Marqu< tte. Mich., but the bridegroom 
I lives In St. Louis county. 

I * 

Sar For T.vntbvr. 
i The Colvin-Robb Lumber com^wnjr 
started suit in di.st lot court thl.s 
morning- to recover $1.0T<.68 from > 
Warner Fleet. The action is based on : 
an account for lumber and materials , 
furnished the defendants by the lum- ' 
ber company between Sept. 1. 1912 and 
' March 27, 1914. ; 

I ■ 

I Hair cut 35 cents in all barber shops , 
In citv of Duluth after April 1, 1914. 



not guilty wi:: n arraigned in poll e 
co-irt thUs inortiidg a;id declared t'-it 
he purchased tiie suit last week. Ho 
was released and the charg-s against 
I him diamisded. 



Seiitenoeil For Theft. 

George Malowski, 19 years eld, went 
in the barn of A. Zerum, 403 Ea.'^t 
Ninth street, Sati'rdav afternoon, stole 
a sack of cats and then went n.:xt 
door to Sam PoUnsky, 409 Va E- .-t 
Ninth ftreet. and attempted to sell the 
oats. Polinsky recognized the hack and 
t(dd his neighbor, who had Mah-wski 
arrested on a chai'ge of petit larceny. 
The prisoner plead'd guilty in police 
court this morning and was lined |40 
and costs or thirty d-xyn on the work 
farm.' 



CITY BRIEFS 



Our Leader, 

Steel. 4 -drawer letter file. |27.50. M. 
Stewart Co. 







nssi 



Because his mother became angry at 
lilm and told him to leave the house, 
Leonard Johnson. 14 years old, took 
the declaration literally and left his 
home at Chisholm Saturday noon to 
make his own way in the world. He 
got as far as Duluth and now he is 
at police headquarters awaiting thfr 
arrival of a Chisholm oflTlcer, who lb 
expected hero this afternoon and who 
will take the runaway boy back to 
the range town. 

Before leaving his home. Leonard 
sold his three pet rabbits for >» M. 
and with proceeds o* *'. -..•- "i«d 60 
cents that he ..eta saved up. he started 
c:: .us" journey. He bought a half fare 
ticket to Duluth for |1.60. 

About 6 o'clock Saturday evening 
Patrolman Andree saw Leonard walk- 
ing aimlessly about the station and 
1 suspecting something wrong, he ques- 
' tloned the boy and learned that the 
1 latter had run away from home that 
1 noon. Ho took Leonard to police head- 
I quarters, and he Is being held there 
j pending the arrival of the Chisholm 

I officer, , . II 

This morning Leonard was in a taiK- 
atlve mood and he told now his mother 
had ordered him out of the house. The 



Rate* oa Butter and Rggi. i 

The traffic coAmission of the Com- ' 
merclal club h^ received word from 
Harry Noble, assistant manager of the , 
Mutual Transtt-jcompany. to the effect 
that the raftcHlKl lake lines Involved 
are taking up with the trunk lines 
the matter of minimum rates on but- 
ter and eggs shipped eastbound from, 



Leave* For West. 

James M. Smith, who has been em 
ploved for several months with F. A. 
Patrick & Co.. of this city, severed his 
connections with that firm Saturday - 
and left vesterday afternoon for Mi« 
soula. Mont. He will lo<^ate on a fruit 
ranch near Stevensonville. in the I'.'it- 
ter Root valley, twenty miles out of 

Misbovila. 

. ^ — - 

ToM«rro%v Mglit Blur Night 

at the Auditorium. Dancing in center 

of hall on portable floor; skating on 

I outside. 8:30 to 11:30 p. m. Band mu- 

, sic. 

^ 

Mother Seelis Lost Son. 

The local police have been requested 
to locate Lawrence La Forge, 32 years 
'old. whose mother is reported dying 
I at the family hom.e at Cathro, Mien. It 
! was learned this morning that La 
1 Forge worked for the Marshall-Wells 
I Hariware ci)mpany about three years, 
I but hlo present whereabouts are ur.- 
I krown. He is described as being about 
. 6 feet, 5 inohts tall, weiring a mus- 
tache and being dark comple: ioned. 

! "VaK" Sent to Farm. 

I Sergeant P.oberg haJ seen George 
Mill;-'r. 33 years old. about town for 

' several day.s, and this morning he ar- 
rested the Litter on a charge of va- 
grancy Miller pleaded guilty when 
arraigned in police court following his 
arrest and was sentenced to serve 
twenty days on the work farm. 

{ GoeM Kant on BnitineM*. 

Capt. John Monahan. inspector of 
' hulls, left vesterday for a short busl- 
I ness trip in the East. He will be home 
within the next ten days. 



GraiK Fmlt. 

Insist on the Black Diamond Brand. [ 

Raral Carrier Exams. , 

Civil service examinations will bet 
held at Duluth and Virginia on April, 
26 to fill the po.sitions of rural mall 
carrier In St. Louis county. A rural 
carrier after a year's service is usu- '■ 
ally transferred to the position of 
clerk or carrier at a second-class post- 
office. Information regarding the ex- 
aminations may be obtained from E. 
M. Barker, superintendent of the reg- 
istry department at the local post- 
offlce. 

GETS $900 FOR 

FR ACTU RED BONE 

.Tohn Cullen, 40. Virginia, will re- 



' celve SOOO from his cmploycr.<=. the Vir- 
ginia & Rainy I-^ke company {^r in- 
juries which ho received while at work 
on Dec 9 Irist. A .••eltlement under tno 

1 terms of the workingmen's compensa- 
tion act was approved in district court 

I today. CuUen's injury con.sl.«ted of a 

I fracture of the bone of the left elbow. 

I extolTduluth'scenery. 

; Should Attract Many Tourists, Says 
Montreal Hotel Manager. 

Duluth's natural scenic beauty ought 
to be a great drawing card for summer 
tourists, in the opinion of Lawrence 
Muldoon. assistant manager of the 
Windsor, the leading hotel at Montreal. 
Que.. Can., who is spending a short 
vacation In the city as the guest of 
friends. 

Mr. Muldoon expressed himself as 
being quite favorably impressed on 
his first visit to Duluth. and ventured 
the opinion that Duluth should not lose 
any time in advertising its advantages 
to the summer tourist trade. 

Mr. Muldoon is a guest at the home 
of Mrs. Thomas Doyle, 30 Washington 
avenue. 



— ^ ' I* 

Mrs. B. S. Bra|tSL,11l. , l- 

Fond du Lac, Wis.. M*fth 3f>.— Mr^ 
Edward S. Bragg, widuv^'dt the *ojn» 
mander of the famous -Wtm Tingadej^ 
in the Civil war, is seripuSJ^y lU « 
her home here. She is 84 y»?>»r3 olff. 



'•n- 




Outfitttr* to Women, Misses 




and Oirls 



Sot 4;ality of Theft. 

John Smith, 26 years old. wa.s ar- 
rested Saturday evening on a charge 
of petit larceny preferred against him 
by Joe Per fin. who alleged that Sm-th 
stole his suit of clothes from the 
Bethel list Wednesday. Smith pleaded 



1 




iSS' 



t 



^' 






Cowen & Zimmerman, inc. 

53 1 EAST SUPERIO R STREET\_DljUmL 

Take Great Pleasure in Inviting You 

to Inspect Tlieir 

Spring Display 

. ==0F^=—=— 

Decorations at Their Studio and 
Furniture of ail Periods: 

Art Stuff, Foreign and Domestic 

Fatrics, Draperies, Rugs, 

Tatle Cov(jrs and all Otker Articles 

Necessary for tlie Artistic 

FurnisK- ag of a Home. 



\-r 



Tomorrow Last 
Day of Our 

^ MarckSale 

grr The one and best opportunity of 
nl the year to buy Easter Gifts. An- 
ticipate wedding or anniversary 
needs and buy tomorrow. 






Hetirickflen Jewelry 



A\ 



c 



lompany 

332 West Superior Street 



GET mimi FOB iraiiiQ 



night aow li» the time to have y 
wear ^vheit needed. Only two more 
throngli yoar wardrobe and hare yo 
Our prtces are reasonable and our w 

When yoa ■ start house 

olranlng Bnd oat from 

us how mnrh It will 

cost to have your 
I , portieres, rags 
I rarpets and 

other fnralsh- 

IngM dry- 
cleaned. 



oar nprlng clothing fixed up ready to 
weekn before lOnwter Sunday. Look 
ur clothef* flxed up before the ruah. 
ork cannot be excelled anywhere. 

The cost l« very reasonable 
and the goodn will come 
back looking like 
new. We havejuwt 
Installed our com- 
pr.fHNed air 
method for 
cleaning rug« 
and carpet*. 



ii£N 





The New Cravats 

Chaine Imprime Jacquard 

)VEN on band looms and designed ex- 
pressly for girdles which are the di.^tinctive 
note of Parisian gowns of the period adapted 
to cravats. These and many beautiful 

br^.ken figure designs have just been opened. It 
is by far the most pleasing collection cf pure, silk 

•'(h-avats Duluth has ever seen. Get yours for Easter. 




With Easter less than two weeks 
away, the social calendar will again 
be crowded with the many functions 
of the Easter Holidays— and every 
woman will do well to look over her 
wardrobe to see just what garments 
she needs. 

flThen, too, the woman or miss who is dis- 
criminating in her tastes will make her selec- 
tions early, before the choice things are picked 
up; for while our collection is at all times un- 
usually large, the much-wanted imported 
fabrics are soon gone and cannot again be du- 
plicated. - 

French Millinery 

All the c/itc of Paris finds expression 
in this comprehensive display of ex- 
quisite Millinery from the foremost 
Parisian modistes. 

C Original models, identical styles and refined 
adaptations; Hats conspicuous for their ex- 
treme smartness. New and charming styles in 
Watteau plaques, bicorn, tricorn and four-cor- 
nered effects, together with individual styles 
in the modish Lisere and other new straws, 
with trimmings of fruits, flowers, foliage, burnt 
ostrich, glycerined ostrich, tiny wing novelties, 
satin-verni ribbons, etc. 

Tailleur and Demi'Tailleur Suits 

C Featuring the new Watteau styles— charm- 
ing two and three-piece models of silk and 
cloth fabrics, such as Cascadeau, Crepe Faille, 
Broadtail Moire, Chiffon Taffeta, Gabardine, 
Barathea, Serge and Callot Checks, 

Gowns and Dresses for the Easter 
Social Affairs 

C Exquisite models, reproductions from the 
foremost Paris artists, such as Worth, Agnes, 
Premet, Doucet, Larwin, Bulloz and others, of 
bullion embroidered Satins and Laces, Ro- 
maine Stripes, with black velvet bandings. Taf- 
feta in many exclusive patterns. Nutmeg 
Crepes, Japona Crepes and many other new 
fabrics selected by our fashion experts for our 
individual models. 

— ALSO— 

French Blouses, Separate Skirts for Street and 
Dress Wear, Golf Capes, Coats, Tea Jaquettes 
and Mantles. 



^m§£^ Upwards 



Make An Appointment 

Sulpliiir Vapor 
Bath 



H.XTTKRS AND 
HABERDASHERS. 



304 WEST 
SUPERIOR ST. 



Save th« time and ex- 
pf^nse of going away to the 
springs, as these hatha 
are equally aa beneflclaL 
An especially efficient 
treatment for rheumatism. 
For men and women. 
Melrose 3»" 




Parlors— 426 West First Street 



I- 

Melrose, 337 




DEFCCnVT^AGE 




Monday, 



Boys* 
School 
Shoes 
$L75to$3 




a 



Sprin^ 

Hats& 

Caps 

50c to $2 



^^^,? 



For That Boy of Yours 



Ihihith bovs — Po full of life and energy — need clothes that will 
■withstand the greatest wear, so If you want clotl es that are durable 
and hardy tnough to stand the hard wear Duluth boys give them. 

You Should Outfit Your Boy 
for Easter at the Big Duluth 

And parents with limited means will find that heir dollars go far- 
there here In outfitting boys than in any other stcre in Duluth. 



Special for Easter 



Boys' Blue Serge Knickerbocker Suits for 
confirmation and Easter. (}reat values at 
$3.95 and $4.95. 

Other grades from $6.45 io $15. 

Special for £aster 

Young Men's Long Pants Confirmation and 
Easter Suits. Great value at $10 and $12.50. 
Other grades from $13.50 io $25. 
Nobby Reefers and Overcoats for E ister Wear 

And All The Little Fixings for His Easter 
and Confirmation Outiit 

"White Shirts and Hiouscs, Nobbv Easter Ties, 'Massy Easter Gloves, 
Xlfty Hats and Caps. Strong Sturdy Shoes for tl ose never tired feet, 
and every little apparel want a young man or boy can have, can be 
tupi'li^d liv this Good Old Store. 

DLI>VTH'S BEST BOYS* STOIIE. 



L 




WILLIAMSON & MENDENHALL 




Duluth 



Chicago 



Quincy 




Kansas City 



24 and 26 West Superior Street, Near First Avenue West. 



WISE 



F.a>ter will ?oon be here — and with its coining will 
bf experienced the inevitable mad m.^h for Spring 
T«'«^L'crv, so it behooves vou to make }OUr selections 
now before the busiest weeks of the se;ison are on us. 

Our Styles Are Correct^ 

Our Merchandise the New^ 

est and Our Prices 

the Lowest. 

Just think! When you enter our store, there is ab- 
solutely not a garment to greet the eye that bears the 
slightest mar of age. Every model is lew, fresh, up- 
to the minute in even the most minute detail. You 
have here a Dependable Place to shop; a store ever 
zealous to meet the demands of the people in the- best 
possible nianne*-. and to prove ourselves we are oflfer- 
jng for the benefit of our patrons 

Easter Specials That Witt Awaken 
Early Shopping Enthusiasm. 

SEE OUR WINDOW DISILAYS. 





) 




THE DULUTH HER.\LD 



March 30, 1914. 



3 



MUST AWAIT 
THEIR TURN 

Twenty-threeTubercular Pa- 
tients on Sanitarium 
Waiting List. 



The visiting nuraes of the health de- 
partment have twenty-three patients 
on the waitiHK list of those desiring 
admittance to sanitariums. 

Every institution for handling tuber- 
culosis Is crowded to capacity, and new 
cases can be received only as some one 
is discharged. 

Ml«s Schneller and Miss Kerr say 
that this is the largest waiting list 
which Duluth has ever had. not because 
the disease is more prevalent, but that 
more cases are being discovered. It 
shows that the educational campaign 
which is bfing conducted is having 
positive results, and that the public 
K«^nerally is beginning to really ap- 
preciate the advantages of proper 
treatment. Those on the waiting list 
are not in advanced stages. The nurses 
aim to have as many of the incipient 
cases go to a sanitarium as possible. 
i There they It-arn how to treat them- 
' selves, absorbing much knowledge 
' which could not be Imparted to them 
by the nurses, whose time with each 
is necessarily limited, as they have 
many calls to make each day. 

The attendance at the clinics, which 
are held at the courthouse each Tues- 
day and Saturday morning, is steadily 
increasing. The examinations are free 
of charge and many new cases have 
been discovered through them. When a 
case is found in a family, or where the 
patient has been associating with 
others constantly, the nurses endeavor 
to have all those with whom the 
patient has come in contact attend the 
clinic. Quite often one or more of 
the others have been found to have 
tuberculosis. Frequently these have 
been incipient cases, and prompt treat- 
ment has resulted In cures which would 
have been much more difficult had the 
disease been allowed to continue with- 
out Intelligent efforts being made to 
check It. 




Hill, is Washington correspondent of 
the New York Tribune. 

Mr«. Rllxabeth .leffrlea died suddenly 
at her home in rhilaUelph.a March 29 
on the 101st anniversary of her blrtu 

George Brrck, master of transporta- 
tion for the past twelve years for the 
Yellowstone Park Transportation com- 
pany, died at Livingstone. Mont., from 
heart disease on March 26. He walked 
into his cabin apparently well, and ten 
minutes later a friend found him dead. 
Mr. Breck was known to all tourists 
who visited the Yellowstone park. He 
had full charge of transportation pur- 
chasing equipment and similar duties 
and was one of the most valued and 
honored employes In the park. He 
leaves two sons and a married daugh- 
ter. 



WILL. BE AT 

Spalding Hotel, Dalnth, 

Monday and Tuesday, 

March 30 and 31 

DR. BUOBEE: relieves all eyestrain 
that causes cataract, blindness, -d, 
sore and inflamed eyes, headaches, diz- 
zyness, black and floating spots, nerv- 
ousness, etc.. without drugs or pain. 
Unexcelled by Ocular or Medical Sci- 
ence. All cases thoroughly examined 
under Bugbee's Skiascopy, revealing 
the slightest errors of refraction as 
well as any diseased or abnormal con- 
dition of the eyes. (Glasses made that 
I WILL FIT.) New lenses put In old 
I frames if desired. Replaces lenses 
I from prescription or from pieces .sent 
by mail. A complf te record kept of 
every case and a guarantee and pre- 
scription number given with every 
pair of glasses fitted. ArtWclal Kjrea. 
Special attention to relief of nervous 
troubles which come from irritation 
of the vital nerve and brain centers 
caused from uncorrected eyestrain 
and the wearing of properly fitted 
glasses will relieve these conditions. 

Hotel Superior, 

Superior, Wis., 

Saturday, Marcli 28 



W. D. Storey, a former resl^Jent of 
Milwaukee and well known as a jour- 
nalist in Wisconsin, is dead at Los 
Angeles on March 26. Mr. Storey was 
one of the pioneer residents of Fond 
du Lac, Wis., and a classmate of for- 
mer Postmaster General Vilas. 

Tito Mattel, the noted Italian pi- 
anist, composer and cond ctf.r, died in 
London, March 30. He was born at 
Campobasso, near Naples, In 1841. 
Mattel was the composer of "Maria dl 
Gand" and other operas. He was pi- 
anist to the king of Italy, and wrote 
many popular ballads. 



Array for time put In posing a» Santa 
Claus during the holiday season last 
year. 

Olson's cause of action against the 
Army is for services rendered in solic- 
iting articles of merchandise for ba- 
zars, selling tickets for a moonlight 
excursion, distributing religious tracts 
and in making repairs to the head- 
quarters of the Swedish corps at 1631 
West Superior street. He is asking 
for $24«.34. 

FARME RS 'pr otest. 

A. L. Spiers, John Falkoner. James 
Russell, John Sampson and other farm- 
ers residing In the vicinity of Meadow- 
lands appeared before the county board 
today to protest against the assess- 
ment of benefits which had been made 
against their property to defray in 
part the cost of constructing County 
Ditch No. 3, which will drain a large 
area of low land In the Meadowlands 
district. ^, ^ ^ 

The farmers were put on the stand 
and testimony was taken as to what 
they considered the benefits should be 



assessed at. The board will probably 
concluding its hea ring this afternoon. 

ESSMANN'S WIFE 

FURNISHES BOND 

Madison, Wis., March 30.— William L. 
Essmann. former state superintendent 
of public property, pleaded not KuUty 
today to the charge of embezzling %4>l 

of state money, when ar""?,'*^"/ ♦'"«'."inrt 
nlcipal court. His bond, f xed at $2^00 
cash, was furnished by his wife. The 
preliminary hearing was set lor 
April 15. ^ 

FINAL ARGUMENTS 

IN KOETTERS' TRIAL. 

Chicago, March 30.— The final argu- 
ment by the defense for Joinn u. 
Koetters. accused of murdering Mrs. 
Emma Kraft of Cincinnati, began to- 
day and it was thought that the jury 
would have the case before the ena or 



! the day's session 



PAY TWO-THIRDS 

OF ASSESSMENT 



the cause of action which Peterson 
has against the railway cohipany. He 
is suing for $26,100 damages, alleging 
that the accident was due to the neg- 
ligence of the company in not closing 
the crossing gates at this point and In 
the failure of the crew on the engine 
which ran him down to give any sound 
of warning. Peterson's left arm was 
amputated just below the ghculder. 



Pending the detenninatlon of a suit 
to be brought in district court by the 
city of Duluth against the Duluth 
Street Railway company to collect 
from the traction company the cost of 
the paving of East Fourth street be- 
tween its tracks, property owners who 
have appealed from the assessments 
levied by the city against their hold- 
ings to defray the cost of improving 
Ea.st Fourth street have stipulated 
with the city that they will pay into 
the city treasury' two-thirds of the 
assessment and leave the disputed one- 
third in litigation until after the case 
against the street railway company 
has been disposed of. The stipulations 
were filed today in dLstrict court. 

The stipulations follow a resolution 
which was passed by the city council 
recently directing the city treasurer to 
accept from property owners two- 
thirds of the assessment levied for the 
paving of Fourth street between Four- 
teenth avenue east and Twenty-third 
avenue east and between Twenty- 
third avenue east and Twenty-seventh 
avenue east. In appeals which the 
property owners have filed, the con- 
tention Is that the street railway com- 
pany should be required to pay for the 
paving between its tracks and for a 
short distance on each side of the 
outer rails. This amounts to about 
one-third. 

The stipulation between the proper- 
ty owners and the city provides that 
in case that a recovery Is had from the 
traction company by the city the 
money Is to be applied pro rata on the 
unpaid balance due on the as.sessment. 
If there Is any sliortage. the amount 
found to be short will -be a Hen 
against the abutting property and if 
there Is an overage, the property own- 
ers who have paid In their two-third 
.•share will bo entitled to a refund. 
Under this arrangement, the rights of 
the property owners will not be jeop- 
ardized while the cost of the suit 
against the street railway will be 
borne by the city. The city is desir- 
ous of collecting as much as possible 
of the assessment for its permanent 
Improvement revolving fund. 

PATROLlAN 

IS PROMOTED 



NEVER HEARD 



OF LABOR LAW 



The local Immigration officials re- 
ceived word Saturday that the Wor- 
cester Lumber company of Chassell, 
Mich., which contracted for sixteen 
alien laborers to be brought into this 
country from Canada and who were 
detained upon reaching Duluth. has 
been fined $1,000 by the United States 
government for violating the contract 
labor law. 

Although the law places a fine of 
$1,000 for every alien imported by the 
contract system, the Worcester Lum- 
ber company entered a plea of guilty 
to one charge, while the other fifteen 
were dismissed. The company claimed 
that It had never heard of the contract 
labor law and practically threw itself 
upon the mercy of the Chicago Federal 
court. 

Last summer seventeen men brought 
to Duluth on the Bootia line boat by 
, an employment agent wtre arrested by 
'the local Immigration •'flcials. An In- 
vestlgation disclosed the fact that 
these men were being brought to this 
country for the Worcester Lumber 
company on the contract labor plan 
arranged by an employment agent at 
Port Arthur. The local officials placed 
the matter In the hands of the con- 
tract labor inspector at Chicago, who 
has Jurisdiction over the state of Mich- 
igan. One of the men was found to 
be a TTnlted States citizen and he waf 
remiltted to eo his Way. 

The charge of bringing sixteen aliens 
into this country for the purpose of 
putting them to work was made 
against the lumber company. Last 
week the decision of the court was 
announce. Word to this effect was 
received here Saturday. 



CONSUL WANTS 

AN ACCOUNTING 

Says Executor Has Paid 

Over Only Part of 

Estate. 

Objecting to the methods employed 
by John Povsha in settling the affairs 
of the estate of Vlnko Robnik, Edgar 
Prochnik, Austrian consul, has filed a 
petition In district court asking that 
Povsha, as executor of the estate, 
make an accounting to him for the 
money which has been placed in his 
hands. The Austrian consul petitions 
the court In the capacity of legal rep- 
resentative of the heirs of the estate, 
who are residents of Austria-Hungary. 

Povsha. it is claimed, settled a cause 
of^action for wrongful death brought 
against the Oliver Iron Mining com- 
pany for $1,378, but has turned over 
only $600. It is claimed by the consul 
that he attempted to get a receipt 
from the widow In the old country for 
the entire amount. 

The Austrian consul objects to the 
court allowing the executor any fee 
for his services on the ground that he 
has not faithfully discharged his du- 
ties and has not complied with for- 
mer orders of the court. "It Is not 
compliance with the court's order," 
I states the complaint, "to remit the sum 
of $600 to the widow instead of $1,378, 
besides wilfully ignoring this petition- 
er, the legal representative of the 
state." 



DID NOT ACT 

A S SAN TA CLAUS 

Harold Olson, who has started suit 
in district court against the Salvation 
Army, declares that it has been erro- 
neously stated that he is suing the 




BREITUNG EMPLOYS 

HIS SON-IN-LAW 



and Mrs. \"illiam Klelst, paretyts of 

Max Kleist. who married luliet Brel- 

tung of CI Icago, said that young 

Kleist was getting big pay from his 

, father-ln-la V, Edward Breltung, for 

„ . .. ,, w i< . k oA -iLT- Ms work In the mines. He hopes some 
MarKsttque. Mich.. March 30.— Mr. | ^^^ ^^ ^^ ^ „^,^^ manager^ 



.«,0UNCE5/<3^ 



*»tJESM 



4^ 



This Baking Powder 
Keeps Its Strength 

The large can of K C lasts longer 
than 25 cents worth ol other baking 
powders but no matte: how long it 
takes to get to the bottom the last 
spoonful is just as good as the first. 
K C raises the nicest, 1 ghtest biscuits, 
cakes and pastry you ever ate, and it 
is guaranteed pure and wholesome. 

For goodncM sake, tie K C. 



Patrolman Lambert H. Andree has 
been promoted to the position of ser- 
geant, and win assume his new duties 
on Wednesday evening, filling the 

vacancy to be left by .Sergeant Herman 
Fritz, who Is retiring tomorrow eve- 
ning on a pension. 

The announcement of Patrolman An- '. 
dree's appointment was made this 
morning by Chief Troyer. 

r.Htrolman Andree was appointed , 
patrolman on April 1'5». 1908, and Is 
considered by Chief Troyer to be one 
of the ablest men in the department. 
Me has made an enviable record the 
la.«t six years, and at the recent civil 
servic;e examination for sergeant stood , 
second among a large number of pa- i 
trolmen. Sergeant Youngberg was flrj?t 
and he received his appointment about ' 
a month ago and Is now night offli er 
In charge at the West Duluth station. 

As Lieut. John Prannen will retire 
on June 1 on a pension. It is expected 
his vacancy will be filled by a sergeant 
and another appointment made from 
among the eligible patrolmen. Officer 
Hunter Is next in line for an appoint- 
ment to the sergeancy. as he ranked 
third In the recent examination. 

It is probable that after June 1 ♦wo 
sergeants will be placed at the "V\'est 
end station instead of having a lieuten- 
ant in charge, as at present. 

LIGH-rs" cbRT s1VIADE. 

Heavy Wind Interferes With West 
End Gun Club Shoot. 

The West End Gun club held its reg- 
ular weekly meet yesterday, but owing 
to the high wind did not make any 
very startling scores. However, under 
the unfavorable conditions. It Is be- 
lieved that the results are good. The 
scores follow: 

Targets. Broke. 



I OBITUARY 

Kmest William Emery, chief of wire 
traffic in the Washington bureau of 
the Associated Press, died suddenly at 
Washington March 29 of heart disease. 
He had been in poor health in recent 
years, and was subject to attacks of 
heart trouble. Early Sunday he cele- 
brated the twenty-thirA anniversary of 
his marriage. Besides being one of 
the early press operatol-s In thl.s coun- 
tr>-. Mr. Emory was one of., the oldest 
employes of the Associated Press and 
widely known In telegraph and news- 
paper circles. • ; 

George W. Hill, for many years a 
prominent official of the agrrlcultural 
department, died March 30 after a pro- 
tracted illness at Franklin Va. W hen 
the secretary of agriculture first be- 
came a member of the cabinet Mr. 
Hill organized the editorial branch and 
developed the plan of Widespread cir- 
culation of agricultural literature to 
farmers, agricultural journals and inf 
press gen«Tally. His knowledge of de- 
partmental affairs led Roosevelt, when 
civil service commissioner, to urge Mr. 
Hill's selection for that board. He was 
I born m England, educated at Paris and 
Montreal, and formerly wa"< on the 
editorial staff of the Montreal Herald. 
, His surviving son, George Grlswold 



NOW IS THE TIME 

TO LEAVE YOUR 

ORDER FOR A 

SPRING 

SUIT 



or 



OVERCOAT 

FOR HIGHEST GRADE 
IMPORTED WOOLENS 

AND FIRST-CLASS 
WORKMANSHIP SEE 

Donald Mackenzie, 

218 West First Street. 



Hood's 



care constipation, 
biliousness and all 
liver Ills. Do not 
gripe or Irritate. 25c 



Pills 




16 

I'C 
17 
26 
14 
6 



Gustafson 26 

CuUen 25 

Morrison 36 

i Kearns 25 

Miklska 36 

' Olson 26 

Hanson 16 

SUES FOR $i25,T08 
FOR LOSS OF ARM 



While attempting to cross the Du- 
luth, Mlssebe & Northern railway 
tracks at a grade crossing at Proctor 
on June 27 last, Martin Peterson was 
so Intent upon watching a moving 
eastbound train that he did not ob- 
serve the approach of another train 
from the opposite direction. The re- 
sult was that ho stepped In front of 
an oncoming locomotive. He escaped 
with his life, but lost his arm. 

In distiict court today, a jury was 
drawn in Judge Dancers room to try 



THE 1- 

BEST BUG KILLER 

on the market. Kills bedbugs, 
rooches, vermin and eggs in one or 
two applications. Get it at once. 2ec 
a bottle. Special rates to hotels. 

liflDTU'C PRESCRIPTION 
fflKIn 5 DRUGSTORE, 

13 Went Superior Strert. 

People In Doloth 

Are Ainazed 

No medicine has ever OBlised such 
amazement in Duluth as the simple 
mixture of buckthorn bark, glycerine, 
I etc., known as Adler-l-ka. This rein- 
! edy drains such surprising amounts 
'of foul inatter from'rthe body that 
; it Is known as the tcioat thorough 
I bowel cleanser sold, .^dl^t-l-ka acts 
' on BOTH the upper and lower bowel 
and JUST ONE DOSE relieves con- 
stipation and gas on the stomach al- 
! most IMMEDIATELY. W. A. Ab- 
I bett, drusrgist, 205 West Superior St 



The Store That Serves You Twenty- 
four Hours a Day. 

^^ Cor. 5!h Ave. W. ^ 
^ and Superior SI. "^ 

For This 
Week Only! 

A 50c Briar Pipe and a 50c Jar 
Tu.xedo — This Si 00 Value for 




Royal A«eot Clgaretteii, a 15e cig- 
arette, and a regular 50c Cigarette 
Ca«c (or 25 cent*. 

SMOKE AN AL PLANCO, HAVAN- 
NA CIGAR. MADE IN ALL SIZES. 

Cor. Fifth Avenue West 
and Superior Street 




ilberstein& 

Company 




Our Display of W^omen s 

O 'j. Is Unrivalledln Variety, 
ring DultS Beauty and style. 



Sp 



Spring-Likc In Our Suit Salon. 



Rather pleasant to know that spring is here and with it such lovely 
Salts, Wraps and Dresses. 

Suits of every fashionable crepe weave. Suits of all kinds of smart 
spring suitings. Dozens of new models with short coats Joose and 
easy and reveling in soft frills, ruffles, with the skirts ^pHowmg the 
lines of the jacket and boasting ruffles— flares andtumcs In equal 
variety, many models equally new, equally fashionable bt^t each wltn 
some feature distinctly its own, at $25.00, $29.50, $3o.00 up to $5..&o. 

Tke Newest Coats and Wraps 

The latest models from the best designers are here as soon as 
they can be brought from the place of making to our show cases. 
Dozens of exclusiv-e models are always on hand and new ones arri%- 
ing daily. 

Tkese Beautiful Hats at $7.50 and $10 

have the atmosphere of Paris all around them, and well they should; 
they come to the showcases fresh from our workrooms, where Paris 
Hats guTde our artists at every "turn of the way." No monotony of 
style in our millinery; though a hundred hats have the same name, 
thev show a hundred points of difference. «„♦» 

This cSlectlon Includes many plain Black Hats, many Black Hats 
trimmed with color, and many In the pretty new co ors of spring, 
wiJh^fbbons, wings/flowers and feather fancies, posed in Innumerable 
fashionable ways. 



New Silk 



Rich and beautiful weaves of springlike newness which are ex- 
tremely desirable for gowns and costumes, here on sale. 

Showing endless variety of Imported Beads in all colors. Black 
Moire Bais. Moire Ribbons In all colors, also Roman striped Rib- 
bons. Fresh new stock of Kaysers Silk Gloves. 




WatcK Our 

Window 

for Exceptional 

Values m 



lamon 



Engagement Rings 

Priced from $25 to $125 



Bagley ^ Company 

Jewelers and ailvtrsmi'ht 

315 West Superior St. 

EUabliehcil 1886 



'^. 





OPEN UNDER 
MANAGEMENT 



OTTO F. HESSERT 



H 



(Successor to J. H, Constantinc Co.) 

MANUFACTURERS' OF 

ARNESS AN. CADDLERY 



Si 





Special attention given to harness repairing. We are 
showing a complete line of Horse Furnishings. 



OTTO F. HESSERT, 

105 WEST FIRST STREET. 



imm^ttm 



umUm 





Wfonday, 




THE DUI^UTH HERALD 



March 30, 1914. 






I 



Beauteous 
Display 

-of- 

K^ aster Jf^illi 

DURING OUR OPENING DAYS 

We show a beauteous assortment of Easter IT its, original 
models and copies of Parisian importations. 

We have a hat fur your every need from the simplest tai- 
lored design to the most exquisite afternoon chapeau. 

Let our expert milliners assist you in selecting just the 
right hat to give the finishing touch of smartness to your 
costume. Our prices — 

$3.50, $5.00, $6.00, 
$7.50, $9.00, $10,00, 

%P±^9%JU wards 

Your Credit Is Good 







7im 



wmira— siPERioR— viRiiNU 



Vacuum Cleaners 

Vow ttrit hoiiseclt-aning time is drawing near, you will bo 
more iiittreriled than ever in the vacuum cleaner quiSlloa, 
how are you going to clean your ruga" 

BratluK niKs only rnlim thrm, but does not get out th » dlrt- 
V good vaouuni cleaner will take from a cup to a quart it dirt 
from any rug that has just been thoroughly beaten, 
f'hone us' to leave a cleaner at your home on trial, 
our best electric machines sell from $30.00 up. hand 
niarhirus with brushes, yttMW to 912.50. 

THE MOORE COMPANY 

ai» \\fc:sT FIRST strkkt. 

MelroHe Si:48. liwnnd 20W-T. 



Illertrir Marliine* 
l»r reut, $1 a day. 




BEGINS WEEK'S 

REVIVAL SERIES 

Rev. George Silloway Hold- 
ing Services at Grace 
Methodist Church. 

Rev. George E. Silloway, pastor of 
the Grace Methodist church. Twenty- 1 
second avenue west and Third stretit, j 
ust evening began a week's series of 
Lenten revival services. The pastor 
spoke on "Growth Through Failure." 
taking the text from Acts 17:80: "God 
Commandeth All Men Everywhere to 
Kepent." Special music was also fur- 
nished by the choir under the leader- 
ship of Mrs. David Adam.s. 

Rev. Mr. Silloway said in part: 
"There are startling surprises In 
store for anyone who ^oes back to his 
childhood home after flrteen or twenty 
years absence and meets his playmates 
of long ago. He will discover some 
one who wa.s at the toot of the laddor 
and scarcely noticed as a boy, in a po- 
sition of highest honor. He may find 
the one who, In childhood, was most 
promising, today a dissolute wreck and 
a complete failure in the sight of God 
and man. 

"What has been the cause of the 
unexpected shifting of places. Just 
I his; one has been growing, the other 
has been going backward. No man 
can stand still. He must either be 
growing better or worse. The fact of 
' utmost Importance in every life is 
I not where it is today, but which way 
' It is going, up or down on the ladder 
t of life. There is one Altitude of mind 
1 that Is absolutely essential to iniprove- 
' n>ent. It is a consciousness of having 
I failed. It Is only as we feel we have 
come short of what we might have 
' been that there Is any hope of our 
; doing better in the future. That la 
I the philosophy of repentance. 
! "The building of the Panama canal 
I Is a vast task, but a far mightier task 
' is yours— just the living of your life. 
In the task of living this one brief 
life, do you feel you have failed. Has 
your past been blighted with sin? If 
you feel that it has, and deeply regret 
it. the future holds hope for you. Re- 
pentance that Cod commands is not a 
regret for the consequences of sins, 
but a turning from sin themselves. 
Then It is only a short step from a! 
repentant consciousness of sin and fail- 
ure to all the peace and joy of the 
Christian experience; for we are told 
that there are no sins that the infinite 
mercy of God cannot cover." 

Mr. Silloway will preach tonight on 
the subject, "Can a Man Know That 
He Is Saved." 

religionTn 
norway his theme 

Rev. Nils Bolt Will Give an 

Illustrated Lecture 

Here. 

Rev. Nlla Bolt of Norway, who Is In 
this country for the purpose of study- 
ing young people's religious work as 
carried out In the churches and 
among the young people's societies,' 
will speak this evening at the First 
Norwegian-Danish Methodist church. , 
Twenty-fourth avenue west and Third 
j street. Rev. Mr. Holt will give an il- ' 
I lustrated talk on religious work m 
! Norway. , . 

I Rev. Mr. Bolt has been In the United 
States since early last fall. He has. 
taken a short course in English at thai 
.N'orthweatern university at Evanston, 
111., and before returning to his native 
I country will visit many of the thickly j 
settled Norwegian communities In or- 
der to pursue further his studies. | 
' Rev Mr. Bolt is said to be a tluent 
; speaker. His address will be given In 
the Norwegian language. 

SHORT COURSE 

FOR FARMERS 



nU ■•98 

ii'.-V 
:ii ^^ 

III -t^n 




'—T"B 



m 



Opening 





//y/, 



k Showing of the New 
Spring Fashions. .... 

' Our Opening this morning, displaying the new Spring Styles, attracted throngs of pleased patrons. The 
entire store displays a complete readiness-featuring the most beautiful and cleverest of creations. This is an 
auspicious time both for those who intend selecting new styles and for those who come to Freimuth s hrst for 
, full knowledge of the accredited modes. 






Dainfy Sachet Souvenirs Free to Lady Visitors 

(Second Floor) 
Neat pocket and purse size, tastily ornamented wkh floral 
desi^g in pretty colors; finished with silk cord and tassels. Each 
©ue^ (Cptitaiua complete stord directory. 



WE INVITE ALL DULUTH to view onr 
beatitiftil displays — displays that are de- 
scribed in three words— Bright, Beautiful, Ex- 
clusive. 




tTi 



■« *.. 



J 



NO TIME LIKETHE PRESENT 

\re you still looking forward to SOME FITL K •: TIME when 
you will Hl'lLD A HOME.' DO YOU REALIZE while you are 
looking off into the future, people every day are taSiing advantage 
of our liberal proposition? 

We will build a home according to your own idea and you pay 
for it with the money you are now paying out for r» nt. 

Eet us explain our plan, you will be under no ibligation, and 
will not be bothered further if not Interested. 

LAKESIDE LAND COMPANY 

50S SELLWOOD BllLDING. Phones 408. 




PRINTING CO. 

The Best of Everytning in Printing 
cr»?^ 130 and m Wast Michigan St. 



VICTIIVI OF ALCOHOLISM. 

Finding of Jury That Investigated 
Grand Forks Death. 

Grand Forks. N. D., March 30.— 
••IK-jth due to acute alcoholism" wa^i 
the verdict returned by the coroner's 
Jury winch ins-estigated the death of 
J. (VXeil. about 50 year.s of age, who.se 
llftfless body was found in bed in a 
room above the Schave restaurant on 
De Mors avenue Saturday morning. 

In the pockets of the man were found 
a ticket from Bemidjl and also a cash 
fare slip, indicating that he had paid 
his fare, being unable to find his tick- 
et An abstract to two lots in Wil- 
lard's addition to the city was also 
found, as well as a canceled note, once 
held by the Northwestern Trust com- 



pany of this city, but paid about a 
year ago. 

Efforts will be made to locate rela- 
tives, and as the nan had been In Be- 
midjl, officials of that city wer« no- 
tilied to ttnd out what they can about 
O'Neil. 



Improved methods In farming: will 
be thft subject of a three^day course 
i to be given at the Hermantown Wood- 
1 men hall to the farmers of Herman- 
I town by experts from the state ex- 
perimental stations beginning tomor- 
I row morning at 10 o'clock. The 
I courses will be held under the auspices 
of the Farmers' and Producers' club of 
I Hermantown. 

There will be three sessions each 
I day. :nornlng, afternoc n and night. 
I Le.nures on milk testing, measure- 
I ments of cows, breeds of beef and 
I dairy cows, clearing of land, draining, 
fertilizing, chicken and hog raising, as 
well as many other subjects of Interest 
to the farming community, will be dis- 
cussed and explained. 

Arrangements have been made to 
allow the older children of the Wash- 
ington, r.arfteld and Five Corners 
I school.^ to attend the two-day sessions , 

It Is expected that every farmer In tho 
! community will attend all of the ees- i 
slcns. A committee headed by E. S. 
LJiwyer, president of the club, and J. 
P. (irady its secretary, have been In 
charge of prt paring the program for 
the three days. 

ENTERTaTn PARlTciPANTS. 

Swedish-American League Has Ban- 
quet at Sloan's Hall. 

Members of the Swedish-American Na- 
tional league who took aptr In the cele- 
bration of midsummer's day last year. 



Reports otihe various societies of the 
church MW«" «* ll** officers will be 
given. . 

Lecture on Gardening. 

An illustrated lecture on gardening 
has bven planned for tomorrow eve- 
ning at the Bryant schol social center. 
Ij. a. Simonson will speak and show a 
number of stereopticon slides showing 
how a vacant lot can be turned Into 
a handsome productive vegetable gar- 
Mr. Somlnson will also touch on the 
garden contest recently inaugurated 
by the West End Commercial club and 
explain the prizes to be awarded In the 
various school distrlcU of th« VS est 
end. 

Swedish Mission Notes. 

The ConflrmaUon Society of the 
Swedish Mission church, Twenty-flrst 
avenue west and Second street, will 
meet In the church parlors tomorrow 
evening. ,,, ,. . _ 

The Parthenoe society will be enter- 
tained in the church tomorrow n\gM. 
MlsJ»es Hulda Einne and Hllma ialK 
win be hostesses. 

The ladles' aid society will hold its 
meeting in the church Thursday after- 
noon. Mrs. A. Eys-n will bo hostess. 

The choir will hold its rehearsal In 
the church Friday evening. 

Rev C. V, S. Engstrom, pastor of the 
West Duluth Mission churcii. will 
speak at the E^ast End Mission Thurs- 
day evening. 



Methodist church. Twentieth avenue 
west and Third street, will hold its 
monthly business meeting in the 
church this evening at 7 o'clock. 

A cottage prayer meeting will be 
held at 8 o'clock at the home of B. 
Wlckstrom, 1111 Garfield avenue. 

The choir will hold its rehearsal 
Tuesday evening at the iiome of Al- 
bert Broman, 1913 West Third street. 

Rev C W. R. Wermine will hold a 
meeting at Fond du Eac Wednesday 
evening. , . 

Cottage prayer meeting will be heia 
Tuesdav evening at the home of t.mu 
Johnson, 111 Vernon street. 

The ronflrmation class will meet m 
the church Saturday evening. 

— ■ ^ 

Andrew Anderson Dies. 

Andrew Anderson, 51 years old, '303 
Restormel street, died at St. Mary s 
hospital Saturday evening. He leaves 
a widow and five children. The funeral 
will be held tomorrow afternoon at 1:30 
o'clock from Olson & Crawford's under- 
taking rooms and at 2 oclqck from the 
Bethany Swedish EutheiHn church. 
Rev C. O. Olson will officiate. Inter- 
i ment will be In Park Hill cemetery. 




West End Briefs. 



Swedish M. E. Notes. 



official board 



Swedish 



The Ladles' Aid Society of the Cen- 
tral Baptist church will be enter- 
tained Wednesday afternoon at the 
home of Mrs. W. B. Patton, 1101 East 
Fourth street. „. .„ , 

Mrs. George Chartier. 430 Nineteenth 
avenue west, has returned from a two 
weeks' visit to relatives at Bay City, 
Flint. Saginaw and other Michigan 
points. ,. . „ , 

A. E. McClelland of \aomi3. Sask. 



i Can., has left for his home after spond- 
i ing several days visiting at the home 
! of his aunt, Mrs. M. McKee, 2126 West 
I Second street. 

The Rosary Society of the St. 
I Clement's church will entertain at a 
j Lenten tea Thursday afternoon in the 
i clubrooms of the church. Mrs. L. A-. 
I Miller will be hostess. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Ketcham of Min- 

' nt-apolis have returned home after 

1 .spending a few days visiting at the 

! home of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Baxter, 

2617 West Fourth street. 

The I-.adies' Auxiliary of the Brother- 
hood of Railway Trainmen will enter- 
tain at a five hundred party Thursday 
afternoon at Sloan's hall. 

Jennie Margaret Schieb, the 12-year- 
old pianist from Fond du Lac, who ap- 
peared in a recital at the Woodmen 
hall Friday evening will repeat her re- 
cital for children of the West end 
this afternoon at 4 o'clock at the Cen- 
tral Baptist church. Twentieth avenue 
west and First street. The young mu- 
sician has been a guest at the home 
of Mrs. George Jewell, 16 United States 
block. 

ARM GROUND TO PULP. 

Larimore, N. D., Man, En Route t0| 
Duluth, Falls Under Train. | 

Grand Forks. X. D.. March 30.— (Spe- \ 
clal to The Herald.)— Harry Schrump 
of Larimore lost his left arm after j 
falling under the Great Northern pas- , 
senger train bound for Duluth. | 
Schrump's arm from the elbow to the ; 
hand wa s mashed to pulp under the 



car wheels, and amputation was tb« 
only remedy. He will recover. 

GANNEDPEASARE 
BLAMED FOR DEATHS 

Believed to Have Claimed 

Lives of Underwood, 

N. D., Pair. 

Underwood, N. D., March 30. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — The two daugh- 
ters of Mr. and Mrs. Axel Lundgren of 
this place died within several hours of 
each other, of ptomaine poisoning. 

The children ate heartily of canned 
peas several hours before taken ill, and 

It is believed that caused their death. 

. « 

Funeral at Bathgate. 

Bathgate. N. D., March 30.— Th« 
funecal of Benjamin R. James, who 
was killed in an accident at Argusville 
last Thursday, was held here Sunday 
at the Robertson home. The Brother- 
hood of Railroad Trainmen were In 
charge of the ceremonies and Ed. 
Larking read the funeral service of 
the Episcopalian church. 

Beautiful floral offerings were sent 
by the Grand Forks lodge of Elks} of 
which deceased was a member. Th« 
body was not mutilated as was at first 
reported. 



FORMER M^NKATOAN 

KICKED TO DEATH. 



Kay. X. D., M 
The Herald.)— L 
merly of Mankat 
came here ten yei 
death by a horse 
his wife, had just 
' he was unhilchin 
' let go with both 
full In the abdon 
I The body has 
I kato for burial. 



irch 30. — (Special to 
luls Whltrock, for- 
o, Minn., whence he 
rs ago, was kicked to 
Mr. Whltrock. with 
arrived In town, and 
If the animal when It 
hind feet, hitting him 
len. 
>een shipped to Man- 




COUNT FIFTY! NO RHEUMATIC PAIN 
RUB SORE, STIFF, ACHING JOINTS 



were guests of the newly organized 
league for this year's celebration at 
the Sloan's hall Saturday evening. The 
affairs was given in compliment to 
the work carried out «y the commit- 
tees last year. 

A banquet, followed by a number of 
short talks, featured the affair. Among 
the speakers were Louis Levlne, retir- 
ing president of the league; O. W. 
Olson, the newly elected president; 
C E. Johnson, retiring secretary; C. 
J Carlson. Jacob Granlund, J. O. Lar- 
Bon, Gust Hjerpe, Charles Boostrom 
and others. 

Ladies' Aid to Meet. ^ 

The Ladle.s' Aid Society of the Trin- 
Itv Eiuflish Lutheran church will plan 
for the furnishing of a kitchen and 
club rooms in the church at a meeting 
to be held at the home of Mrs. D. E. 
Seashore. 702 North Fifty-seventh ave- 
nue west. The church will be opened 
In a short tim<' and the ladles' aid so- 
ciety expects to hold several social af- 
fairs In the club rooms during April 
and May. 




Hats 



for 



men 



Quarterly Meeting. 

The quarterly meeting of the con- 
Kregallon ut the Central Baptist 
church. Twentieth avenue west and 
First street, will be held this evening' 
at 7:30 o'clock In the church parlors. 



Get a Small Trial Bottle of Old- 
time, Penetrating "St. 
Jacobs Oil." 

Rheumatisin 18 "pain onjy;* ,^ ,^4^^. 

Not one case '".""^d-u^ging: Rub 
„al treatment SP d^^^f^^^bs Oil- 
soothing. Penetj-ating ^i^ J ^^^ 
directly upon \he tender sj 
r«lief comes Instantly. bt. jacoosv. 



conqtiers pain. 
inatism cure wl 
and can not bui 
Limber up I t, 
a small trial hot 
from any drug 
moment you'll b 
pain, soreness at 
ferl Relief an« 
"St. Jacobs Oil' 
sciatica, neuralg 
and spralu*. 



't is a harmle.ss rheu- 
ich n«-ver dls^appolnta 
n or blister the skin, 
iilt com|>lalning! Ciet 
tie of "St. Jacobs Oil" 
store and in Just a 
9 free from rheumatic 
d stiffness. Don't suf- 
l a cure awaits you. 
is just as good for 
la, lumbaicu, backache 



You Will Remember 

by the photograph how he looked 
when he was home. Always pre- 
serve the family picture. Group 
Photos our specialty. 

THOMPSON, 

THE PHOTOGUAPHER, 
SO.tO West Superior Street. 



at the 



Columbia Clotbing Co 



Derbies $1.50 to $6 



Hatters to the best heads in Duluth 



Spring Caps 50c to $2 



Soft Hats $1 to $8 





Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



March 30, 1914 



IN DULUTH PULPITS 



^.*ii'-'i 



/ 



ff/A^ 



FAITH, CHIEF 
AIM OF CHURCH 

Beliefs of Man Must De- 
velop as Life Progresses, 
Says Dr. Sayles. 



"Here's the kind I wamt'' 

Yes. The whole family wants 
the same kind; wants it decidedly 
and wants it often, too — 

Campbell's Tomato Soup 

Served sometimes as a plain puree, 
sometimes as a rich creamy l^isque, 
sometimes with boiled rice c»r noo- 
dles or vermicelli or in somt; other 
tempting way, this savory 
Campbell kind provides 
many delightful variations 
upon the one piquant and 
satisfying theme. 

Why not enjoy it at youT 
table again today? 



Says Faith in God Is Neces- 
sary to Secure 
Forgiveness. 



the rest of It come. Some reject Christ, 
saying tb&t they are seeking only hap- 
piness. They do not stop to think that 
happiness is only an emotion, and as 
they go on seeking this emotion they 
sink lower and lower until they get to 
the very lowest rung of human exist- 
ence. Right living and likeness to God 
are the diviner things and through 



them 
you." 



the Divine Emancipator saves 



WOULD I39E 
FOROTHERS 

Unselfish Effort Secures 

Greatest Reward, Says 

Dr. Gebauer. 



21 kinds 10c a can 



Z\ KiNDi 






Ifcmfi^^L 5oyps 



LOOK FOR THE RED-AND-WHITI 





Wc Point \N\th 
Pride 

to the 

Almost a Century 
Record of the 




Cbickeritig 



^ 



—PIANO- 

In IS 23 the founder of this house laid the foundation for one of the 
most marvelous piano achievements In the world's history. 

In the front rank then. It holds first place today among skilled 

pianists through sheer superiority of workmanship 

and excellence of tone. 

Chlckering Pianos Are Sold iu Duluth Kxclujilvely By 

OLDK.ST KKI.IAHLE FIAXO MERCHANTS IX DULl TH 
RKX TUKATKK BM)G., 18 AND 20 SKCOND AVE. WKST 

Chas. E. Havens, Mgr. 



That the development and creation 

of faith is the main end and function 

of the church and is essential in life 

was the gist of the sermon preached 

i yesterday morning by Rev. R. Edward 

' Sayles, pastor of the First Baptist 

' churth. His subject was "The Na- 

, ture and Function of Faith." His 

sermon in part follows: 
[ "Christian faith is the attitude of 
trust in God, self-commitment. It has 
In it the element of hope when seen 
from one angle. From another angle 
it has the element of venture. In its 
i essence it is not to be confused with 
intellectual belief in doctrine. It be- 
1 longs to a sphere other than that of 
' science. It is not directed toward a 
church but toward CJod. It is a faith 
, indispensable in all use of the sen.ses, 
in all knowledge, in all social rela- 
; ticns. The only escape from faith is 
I mental nullity, writes Prof. Jame& 
Faith must be criticized by the reason 
and the untrue cast out. Its demon- 
tration is in conduct. A man may 
I profess religious faith and live like a 
' heathen. He may deceive himself but 
he cannot deceive his fellows today. 
Faith Must iiroMV. 
I "i-hanRes in faith come as one grows 
from childhood to maturity. I have a 
letter in whieh a man craves for the 
i faith of his childhood. Sometimes such 
a faith is kept at great sucrlilce. To 
' ke».p such means that while growjnK 
; in lone and mind. »> man has not 
I grown in religious life. A childhood 
fsilth Is beautiful In a child but it 
1 is a dwarfed and stunted aif.iir in a 
' man. Life and experience and knowl- 
edge in a real life will result m a 
cliastened. deepened, enrich. d faith. 
i "Faith in God does things In human 
life. All of life Is healthier. the 
. mental and moral and physical. Be 
' not deceived. God is not mocked. I'or 
whatsoever a man soweth that .shall 
be al.so reap,' is true on the right side 
of life as well as on the wrong side. 
I Faith In God secures the forgiveness 
of sin. It Is creative. 'Believe and 
I you shall be right, for you shall save 
i yourself; doubt and you shall be right 
for you shall perish. The only dlffer- 
I ence is that to believe is greatly to 
your advantage.' (James) i'aith frees 
a man's inner man with all its i-iarvel- 
lous wealth. 

JesHM Is the Piiltern. 
"Jesus Is the pattern of the * hrls- 
tlan's faith. He lived a life of faith. 
I He practiced faith. He had a confl- 
dence In God. he committed his lire to 
God even in the Garden. At the cross 
I he gave his spirit unto his Father. 
1 Christian faith In God Is to be learned 
I from Jesus. He calls us to come that 
I we may learn from Him, and here I3 a 
I matter In which he can teach us By 
I keeping close to Him faith will in- 
! crease. In the seventy-third Psalm 
1 the writer tells us of the 
' coming on of doubt and Us 
I final dissipation when he went 
to the house of the Lord and moved 
I among men of faith. Here Is another 
I secret of faith's creation. Martineau 
I writes 'the one function of a religious 
' body is to generate faith." Another 
has it: 'He will best find his way to a 
1 real manly faith by mingling In liter- 
ature and in life with men of faith. 
' and by always being obedient to such 
! heavenly vision as Is afforded him. In 
1 all your searching and striving and 
I endeavor forget not this mighty matter 
' of the soul's relation to Its God. But 
rather say with the poet: 'As the marsh 
hen secretly builds In the water sod, 
behold. I will build me a nest In the 
I greatness of God. I will fly In the 
I greatness of God. as the marsh hen 
I flies. By so many roots as the marsh 
I crass sends Into the watery sod I will 
heartily lay me ahold of the greatness 
of God.' " 

christThe 
only savior 



Urges Congregation 
Lose Sight of Self in 
World Work. 



We take pleasure in 
inviting you to the 



DANES REFUSE TO 

RATIFY TREATY. 



His Truths Alone Have Re- 
deeming Power, Says 
Hoffman. 



signed in Waslilngton Feb. B. 1914. and 

has formed the base of several other _, lUix* 

projected trea ies. Hence it becomes M/PPK Q SPPIP*5 Ol lfl66tinQS 

Important for the state department to "CCI\ 3 «JCI ic J vi iwiwv*.. ;jw 

know preciselj the reason for the ac 



Copenhagen. March 
senate has failed to 
obligatory arbitration treaty with the 
United States. The old treaty expires 
tomorro.v. 



TV r> I >i ' t'***^ °' the Dmlsh senate, as It may 
3"---T^"*^a"'*" be necessary to amend some of the 
ratify the nejy , p^j^^i^^^ cjnvintiona to ensure their 
accoptabllity. 



Surprise to Washington. 

Washington. March 30. — The refusal 
of the Danish senate to approve the 
Danish-American arbitration treaty 
greatly surprised state department of- 
ficials, although no comment was 
forthcoming in advance of formal no- 
tice of the action. That the treaty 
mitrht be rejected by the United States 
senate because of the consistent atti- 
tude of the senate against all general 
arbitration treaties or those which did 
not expressly except from compulsory 
arbitration questions involving the na- 
tional honor, matters of state legisla- 
tion and affectiiiK the Monroe doctrine, 
had been deemed a possibility. 

The action of the Danish senate was 
a genuine surprise for the reason that, 
as stated on the authority of Secre- 
tary Bryan himself, this treaty was 
Iriade at the request of the governmont 
of Denmark, which had made a similar 
treaty with Italy. The treaty was 



SENATE INCREASES 
ARMY APPROPRIATION 



Is Begun at First M. 
E. Church. 



Washington. March 30. — The senate 
passed the an lual army appropriation 
bin carryinK 1101.750,000, about 
$7,500,000 mor* than the house bill 'and 
about the same amount over the last 
army appropriation bill. 



Rdltor M ills Farmer $1,090. 

Buffalo Springs. N. D.. March SO.— 
(Special to Th» Herald.) — When Editor 
H. Butler, editor and founder of the 
News of Buffilo. N. Y.. died, among 
the bequests to relatives was 11.000 
to Edward G Straub. a farmer near 
here. He Is a relative of the late pub- 
lisher. 



religion with 



Not Since Adam Dug in tlie 
Garden of Eden 



HAS ANT TEA BEEN GROWN AS DULICI0U8 AS 

ALADA 




II 



CEYLON TEA. 



Sold in Lead Packets Only. 



Blacc, Mixed or Green. 



ALL QROOBRS* 



"The Divine Emancipator" was the 
theme on which Rev. J. W. Hoffman 
of the First Methodist church ad- 
dressed his congregation last evening. 
It was preliminary to the series of 
evengelistlc services which will begin 
in the church this evening and will 
continue on each evening during the 
week except Saturday. The services 
will begin with Kev. C. N. Thorp, pas- 
tor of Pilgrim Congregational church, 
as the preacher. On each of the other 
evenings Dr. Hoffman will preach. 
There will be a full chorus choir to 
furnish the music on each evening. 

Last evening Dr. Hoffman took for 
his texts the words. "Behold the Lamb 
of God. who takes away the sin of the 
world." During the course of his ser- 
mon Dr. Hoffman compared the de- 
mand of the Christian 
those of other kinds. 

Compares RellgtoM. 
"If we were only asking the people 
of other lands to accept our truths," 
said Dr. Hoffman. "I would be opposed 
to missions. They are overloaded with 
truths; they have truths in abundance 
and yet are dying under them. China 
has the wonderful truths given her by 
Confucius, but China is dying; India 
is loaded down with truth, but is 
honevcombed with greed and graft and 
bondage; Persia has all the truths she 
needs, but look at her deplorable con- 
dition. The Jew says that he has the 
truth and tells you that righteous liv- 
ing Is the keynote of life; bu the Jew 
gets nowhere in a spiritual way. He 
has the brilliant, dazzling works of 
Isaiah and his great truths and he has 
those of Mlcah. clear as crystal and 
sharp as a diamond, but what do they 
do for him? The Christian religion 
demands more than righteous living; 
It demands likeness to God. 

"You may take the teaching of the 
Jew If you will and have Isaiah for 
1 your savior; but for me, I will take 
' Christ. You may take Confucius if 
1 you will, but I will take Christ. When 
i Christ haa touched, righteousness and 



Dr. George R. Gebauer. pastor of the 
First Unitarian church, made a plea for 
unselfish living in his sermon yester j 
day morning, declaring that the only | 
way to live a worthy life Mas to work i 
for others and lose sight of self. His { 

subject was "Light Bearers." His ser- i 
mon In part follows: I 

"There are not a few people in the I 
world who are so entirely wrapped up ; 
In their selfish interests, that the light 
within them can not get out. They are ' 
light holders, but not light givers. The 
lamp of their being is overlaid with 
dust of selfishness and only occasion- j 
ally there is seen a dim ray of divin-j 
light. We meet constantly with such , 
people. They are often very busy and 
hard-working and speak slightingly ot I 
any one, who is not hustling. They ' 
tell us of their success, and we can 
not but admire their efficiency and 
diligence. But when we begin to think | 
of the motives that actuate their en- , 
deavor. we find that all they do is for i 
self-comfort, self-regard. And on thi j 
other side are some men and women, 
who think not so much of themselves 
as of others, not of self-interests, but 
of principles and Ideals, great truths, 
great thoughts. They are the true 
light givers, and as such fulfill their 
real mission in the world. 

Selfish Can't Sncrerd. 

"And in thus living for what Is not 
self, but higher and better, in this 
is alone strenjjth and true joy foi 
the Individual. Indeed In any higher 
sense the selfish man cannot succeed. 
We only attain to real success when 
we cut loose from all mere self con- 
sideration. Selfl&h regard acts as a 
brake upon the wheel of life. Only 
when a man loses himself in a great 
ideal will he do ideal things. He 
mounts up with wings as an eagle; he 
shall run but not be weary. Whett^« 
speaker prepares an oration to stapCie 
his friends and confound his enemies 
and put him on a pedestal, he Is most 
apt to fail. Only when a great real 
message takes hold of him. and crowds 
away his little vain self, will he do his 
best. Then he will not merely startle 
his friends but carry away his enemies. 
He will be to them a wa/ to life. And 
only by doing so will >e- find the joys 
he longs for. . , 

"If w« would give any man advise 
In his endeavor for success, it woiild 
be this: 'Get away from yourself, dis- 
count all regard for self, take hold of 
the ideal for which your work stands 
and let this Ideal dominate you. Do not 
try to glorify yourself, but give your- 
self to the glory of a high purpose. 

"It Is this abandonment to a great 
cause, which makes the real hero, the 
real orator, the real actor. When a 
man Is full of his truth and empty of 
himself, then he becomes a power 

"And go above all In the realm 
morality proper, the right hand must 
not know what the left is doing. Moral- 
ity which looks in the mirror to see 
how pretty It is. is no true moral 
goodness. True goodness Is not con- 
scious of doing great things. It never 
feels how Inadequate it»-work is. The 
truly good man will Quickly forget 
the thing he did. looTtlng for better 
things to do. He will honestly say: 
•Lord when saw we thee a-hungered. 
and fed thee, and thirsty and gave thee 
drink or naked and clothed thee, or 
in prison and visited thee?' And by 
that very unconsciousness of his good 
deeds, he will prove that he Indeed. 
Is fit for heaven. Perhaps It would 
be better to say, that he is in heaven, 
for heaven Is not the place where we 
receive good, but where we do good. 

"TIs as thus, we have learned to 
live not In the self, but In the larger 
thought of man, we have 
heights of being 
go beyond this. 

I.ove Most Needed. 

"Now what we need for attaining 
this highest best Is not ethical teach- 
ing so much as a great overwhelm- 
ing love: a love for man as man witn- 
out regard to his race and language. 
Of course that love for man as man. 
In germ, is In every man; It Just /e- 
Qulres the proper occasion to call it 
forth But we know that the quick- 
ening of the Ideal Is best done by one 
who has lived the ideal Mfe. The call 
to the selfless life must come from a 
selfless liver, from a true lover from 
one who had overcome the little lire 
of self and lived In the God-Ufe. It 
will seem to me that herein Is the 
great service of Jesus. He showed the 
world how far the rays of human love 
might penetrate Into the darkness. In 
him was life and that life was the 
light of men. To be a Christian nieans 
In the end nothing, but Ipve the things 
He loved, to live in the ideal In which 
He lived, to let the divine Ught of 
love shine through us into the world. 



Spring 
Opening 



—To TakePlace-^ 

Today, Tuesday 
and Wednesday 



Of This Week 

At which time we will take occasion to present 
the newest reproductions and adaptations from 
the French and American designers in 

Afternoon and Evening 
Dresses 

Tailored and Fancy Suits 

Millinery and Wraps 

Misses' and Girls' Apparel 

We bid you welcome to this interesting occa- 
sion in which you may select those things that 
meet your individual ideas with the positive as- 
surance their style correctness and style newness 
are beyond question. 




Ck 6la$$ Block Store 

**The Shopping Center of Duluth** 



not the person sought. After seeing 
and talking with the woman. Clinton 
Cochrane, marshal of La Porte, declared 
that she is not Mrs. Gunness. 



of 

of 



reached the 
No son of man can 



IS PARDONED SO HE 

CA N BE E XECUTED. 

Little Rock. Ark., March 30. — A few 
minutes after receiving a pardon from 
Governor Hays, which released him i 
from a 115-year sentence, Fred Pelton, 
a negro, was electrocuted at the state 
penitentiary for the killing of Melvlna 
Hatton, a negress, whom he murdered 
to secure 60 cents. There was a ques- 
tion as to the legality of electrocuting 
Pelton until after he had served his 
116-year sentence, and for this reason 
the "pardon was granted. 

POSED AS WOMAN; 

G ETS TW O YEARS. 

Chicago. March 30. — August Pajonk, 
who under the names of "Mrs. Anna 
Schwartz • and "Miss Eva Kline," mas- 
queraded as a marriageable woman, 
was sentenced to two years in the pen- 
itentiary for using the mails to de- 
fraud. In addition to obtaining money 
amounting to more than $3,000 from 
swains who believed they could marry 
the original of attractive photographs 
sent them by Pajonk. the defendant 
obtained much money through mall or- 
ders for choice varieties of geraniums 
which he ne ver grew. 

CLARK TAKES RAP AT 
WHITE HOUS E BRAINS. 

New York, March 30. — "It does not 
take as much sense to be a good 



president as It does to make a good 
congressman," declared Champ Clark, 
speaker of the house of representa- 
tives last night, just before addressing 
a large audience at the Young Men's 
Christian association in Brooklyn. 

"A president," continued the speak- 
er, "has his cabinet to advise him, 
while a congressman has got to think 
for himself." 




poses for which It was built after 
eighteen years of service. The dock 
w'as erected along with the construc- 
tion of the L. S. & I. road and went 
Into commission in 1896. It was used 
for handling ore that year and also 
somewhat used last season. In th© 
Interval, however. It was largely re- 
built. In 1906 and 1907 the pockets 
were renewed, half of their number 
having been rebuilt each year, at a 
large expense, and the structure was 
also redecked twice. It is now pretty 
shaky and it would be unsafe to con- 
tinue to use It much longer for hand* 
ling ore. 



MORE LAKE FLEET 
OFFICERS NAMED 



WOMAN WHO SERVED 
AS SOLDIER INSANE 



30.— Little 



"Al- 
has 



IF KIDNEYS AND 
BLADDER BOTHER 

Take Salts to Flush Kidneys 

and Neutralize Irritating 

Acids. 



Qulncy. III.. March 
bert" rashler. the wom«n soldier. 

been taken to the stat* •«>l"'^^'°''^i| ' blood and 'pass It 
insane at Watertown. 111. Jsne was 
born In Ireland 73 years ago and came 
to America as a stowaway In boy s 
clothes. She enlisted in Company G. 
Ninety-ninth Illinois infantry, and was 
assigned to Gen. Granfm army. Partic- 
ipating In some of the bloodiest bat- 
tles of the Civil war. She later came 
to the Soldiers' home here and her sex 
was discovered by a surgeon at that 
Institution, although a nurse knew her 
secret. 



Kidney and bladder weakness result 
from uric acid, says a noted authority. 



Mines Lumber Boats and 

Mitchell Flotilla Are Ready 

for Season. 

North Tonawanda, March 30. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — Masters and en- 
gineers on the vessels owned by the 
nines Lumber company of Chicago for 
the season of 1914 have been an- 
nounced as follows: 

steamer— Captain- 
Edward Hines K. McKeiirie 

W. H. Sawyer M. Canartiies' 

Niko Jt. R. Myers 

C. F. Cunta J P. Jenliigs 

L. L. Bartli John Hayes 

Osooda A. Hansen 

Louis Palilow J. F. Hirale 

Bar^e — 

Ashland - 

Kedfeni EU Jacques 

A. C. Tuxljury • Cliailes Foumler 

J I. Case Ttieodore Burtlance 

Marvin .Fred Andersi-'U 

Ar.nleM. Peterson Jchn Walker 

R. J. Tllden ,...,,.. William Coleman 

HclT^a Ole Ste ffenson 

P. li Filer John MatUsoa 

Delta •''•• . Jolm Bates 

Alice B. Xorrls JO. Kobertson 

The captains and engineers of the 
boats of the fleet In ordinary here will 
report for duty during the week of 
April 1. 



NEARLY DOUBLE CORN 
CROP IN ARGENTINA. 

Washington, March 30. — Argentina's 
porn crop this year is officially esti- 
mated at 234,316,000 bushels, or 80.3 
per cent more than the previous year's 
crop, the department of agriculture 
was informed today In a cablegram 
from the International Institute of Ag- 
riculture at Rome. 



Ehelne«r— 
). Blinker 
James By on 
Valey Berger 
O. Campbell 
Reuben lOlis 
Jolui Uettle 
Walter PotU 

Carlain— 
v. P. Jolmson 



Cleveland, Ohio, March 30. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Engineers of the 
Mitchell fleet have been appointed as 
follows: 

gteamcr — Engineer — 

W. C. Agnew C. S. Fritz 

Hugh Kennedy C. J. Love 

S. M. Clement H. Graves 

A- C. Dusthi A. J. Hfffman 



BRITISH ROADS 

M EET UN ION MEN. 

London, March 30. — A committee of 
seven managers of different British 
railways has been appointed to meet 
a committee of the railway trades 
unions to discuss a conciliation 
scheme. This Is the first time that the 
railways have recognized the unions 
or agreed to negotiate direct with 
them. 



filter this acid from the i ^ftyg ^^^dy ■......'..*.... .'....".. w. f. Sauber 



"WHITE WOLF" AT 

WAR ON MISSIONS. 

. i 

L6ndon. March 30.— The Pekln cor- 
respondent of the Times s-ty.« that Dr. 
Parker of the China ftUand mission, 
who had a narrow escapaat the recent 
sacking of Kink Tse Kwanfj province 
of Ho Nan. declared that "White 
Wolf." the notorious bandit, has de- 
clared war on the missions. 

WOMAN IN CANADA 

NOT MRS. GUNNESS. 

Neville, Sask.. March SO.^A woman 
living on a homestead near here, .sus- 
pected of being Mrs. BeU4 Giwjness, the 
accused La Porte, iQd., murderess, Is 



on to the bladder, 
where It often remains to Irritate and 
inflame, causing a burning, scalding 
sensation, or setting up an Irritation at 
the neck of the bladder, obliging you 
to seek relief two or three times during 
the night. The sufferer Is In constant 
dread, the water passes sometimes with 
a scalding sensation and Is very pro- 
fuse; again, there is difficulty in void- 
Bladder weakness, most folks call It, 
because they can't control urination. 
While it is extremely annoying and 
sometimes very painful, this is really 
one of the most simple ailments to 
overcome. Get about four ounces of 
Jad Salts from your pharmacist and 
take a tablespoonful In a glass of wa- 
ter before breakfast, continue this for 
two or three days. This will neutralize 
the acids In the urine so it no longer 
Is a source of Irritation to the bladder 
and urinary organs which then act 
normally again. 

Jad Salts Is Inexpensive, harmless, 
and is made from the acid of grapes 
and lemon Juice, combined with llthia, 
and is used by thousands of folks who 
are subject to urinary disorders caused 
by uric acid Irritation. Jad Salts is 
splendid for kidneys and causes no 
bad effects whatever. 

Here you have a pleasant, effervescent 
llthla-water drink, which quickly re- 
lives bladder trouble. Agent, Wlrth's 
Red Cross Drug Store, IS West Supe- 
rior sUeet. 



Peiidennls WlUte J«hn FetUng 

Moses Taylor Amos Ho it on 

W. H. Grafwick V B. Parker 

J. J. Albright Otto Guy 

W. Scrauton A. JacoUi 

W. E Rels E. VolLstacdt 

E A. B. Clarke J- Wollhousen 

M A. Hanna.., i..J Cannon 

H. S. Holden F. Werner 

I.agonda P- Horrman 

J. .J. McWlUlams W. Grant. 



DISMA NTLED DOCK. 

One-Tenth of Structure at Presque 
Isle Torn Down. 

Marquette, Mich., March 26. — The 
dismantling of twenty pockets of the 
old L. S. & I. ore dock at Presque Isle 
harbor has Just been finished. As 
there are 200 pockets in the dock, that 
part of the structure that has been 
taken down is a tenth of the whole. 
The timber will be used for repair 
work on the dock structures and about 
the railroad property. The dock will 
be gradually taken to pieces during 
the winter seasons until the last of 
the superstructure is down. 

The structure still carries some ore 
that was placed In storage the latter 
part of last season, but when this Is 
loaded Into the carriers this spring It 
will be finally abandoned for the pur- 



LAYS CONSPIRACY 

TO UNDER WRITERS. 

Wilkesbarro. Pa.. March 30. — War- 
rants have been sworn out by Mayor 
Kosek for the arrest of fifty members 
of the Wllkesbarre Underwriters' as- 
sociation, charging them with crim- 
inal conspiracy to maintain fire Insur- 
ance rates. The mayor has brought 
an equity suit to dissolve the associa- 
tion. 

Mayor Kosek's accusation follows an 
investigation made by the state com- 
mission. Evidence was submitted to 
the commission In which It was al- 
leged that Insurance rates have been 
advanced 300 per cent since the local 
association was formed. 



BAD BREATH 



Dr. Edwards* Olive Tablets Get 
at the Cause and Remove It 



Dr. Edwards' Olive Tablets, the sub- 
stitute for calomel, act gently on the 
bowels and positively do the work. 

People afflicted with bad breath find 
quick relief through Dr. Edwards* 
Olive Tablets. The pleasant, sugar- 
coated tablets are taken for bad breath 
by all who know them. 

Dr. Eklwards' Olive Tablets act gently 
but firmly on the bowels and liver, 
stimulating them to natural action, 
clearing the blood and gently purifying 
the entire system. 

They do that wRich dangerous calo- 
mel does without any of the bad after 
effects. 

All the benefits of nasty, sickening, 
griping cathartics are derived from Dr. 
Edwards' Olive Tablets without griping, 
pain or disagreeable effects of any kind. 

Dr. F. M. Edwards discovered the 
formula after seventeen years of prac- 
tice among patients afflicted with bowel 
and liver complaint with the attendant 
bad breath. 

Dr. Edwards' Olive Tablets are purely 
a vegetable compound mixed with olive 
oil. you win know them by their olive 
color. . ^^ ^ 

Take one or two every night for a 
week and note the effect. 10c and 25o 
per box. The Olive Tablet Company, 
Columbus, Ohio. All drusffista. 



J 



Kiiil 




— ^ — 







NEW MILLINERY 

SMALL AND 

PICTURESQUE 



m 

t 



We are taking: to the small hat this 

■eason with a degree of approval that 

'. meevna to indicate the permanent 

Togue of the little shapes that pos- 
■ess at once chic, common sense and 
plcturesfiueness. 

Where has It ffone. the old time 

wide-spreading hat with which we 

used to associate the term picturesque 

and which, with its volume of plum- 

' tLge and masses of flower.-^, used to be 

? considered the stylish essential of 

f "dressy -up"' occasions? It has gone, 

that is enough; replaced by the tiny 

shape that, thank gf)odness. does not 

occupy a third of the space, yet into 

which has been put all the elements 

ot picturesqueness and becomlngness. 

Of course there are always some 



women who wil 
siiapes are not b 
this year their 
les3, for there Is 
small shapes, a 
type of wojnan. 

Piquancy and i 
act»'ristics of the 
made that seem 
Ing with the wo 
innumorabie act 
helpless, wide-ey 

THK STILISH 1 

i " * 

Some brims w 

did not Hare, b 

that is about 

1 tiling they can 

j side they go, str; 

I against the crov 

i balanced by a w< 

I hardly be notice« 

tipped quite dec 

Hats must tin 

i and to accentua 

ming is posed oi 

I flaunting still I 

I the feminine ou 

, feet of height 

yearns for. Ho' 

fectlon of heig 

vanity of the w 

llnery of the mr 

assumption, if r 



1 declare that small ' 
ecoming to them, but 
number is decidedly 
an infinite variety of 
lype oi hat for every 
almost. 

lertness are the char- 
little hat as It Is now 
vastly more In keep- 
nan of 1914. with her \ 
vities, than the old. j 
?d, floppy headgear. 

I.ARK IS SAFE AND ] 
•ANK. 

luld be wide if they | 
Jt they do Hare, for I 
he most fashionable 
do. Away up to one 
light into the air, flat ' 
vn. the opposite side 
e-bit brim that would 
I at all If it were not 
dcdly into one eye. 
■•e to be fashionable, 
e the flare the trim- 
top of it, flaring and 
igher and giving to 
line that general ef- 
that every woman 
vever, much this af- 
it may bespeak the 
•aker sex in tiie mil- 
ment. it bespeaks the 
ot the possession, of 



the virtue of hunrianeness. For no mat- f will l|.ave the forests full of bi^^^^ 



ter how tall and flaring the hat and 
the trimmings are, if they flare up 
toward the heavens they are not flar- 
ing Ihto the eyes of sonu- fellow-farer. 
or endangering the usually safe po:ii- 
tion of his ears and nosel So let ua 
say: "Long live the high flare!" 

As to the location of the flare, that 
is a matter of personal taste or of 
personal becomlngness. It may be at 
one side, toward the back or toward 
the front, or directly In the back; or 



ENTKn JKT AXU RIBBON. 

The sparkle of jet Is scintillating 
from half the hats of the season, the 
dressv as well as the tailored ones. 
Whole crowns are made of it; whole 
up-flaring turban brims are made ot 
it; spike? and cabochons and buckles, 
from which spring tall ornaments of 
feather or plfctoon; bands from which 
flare frills of net or horse-hair lace. 
If there .l8?yo_f)ther bit of jet on a 
hat, a string' ol' jet beads will mingle 




,f i* i,o«.^«r.a tf> milt vour peculiar' with the material after the manner of 

If It haPPepa .to f " thi f ront by all I Pearls In an Oriental turban. 

style best directly in the front. D> an i y ^^ one were to pronounce any mode 

S^M**"/. ^^^niM^'Mivr* FOR SMlf.L the favorite this season, the lot would 
SMALL TRniMIXf.S FOR SM.\i.i. ^^^^^^ ^^^^ to^ ribbon trimmings and 

Of course wi?"!hTthapes about as t Jjbbonh.b^^^^^^ , L"?t?.w^^Tbb"n! 
small as they can manage to be. we ?^,.^„'"f„d °J,,. • "i.e edces lapped and 
have to follow consistently in the mat- J^ J?.l^*^7og*thir rou.fd and round, 
ter of trimmings and have them cor- , s^. ^ • ^ ribbon^^^rve the same purpose, 
respondingly sparse, posed to the verj ^^^^ ^^ ^ draped toques are made 
best advantage in a conspicuous place I R^^^ ^^ ^oti weave, one 

So man.v a tiny 8|'^'5:"P °T„^n' ibiUtv stvle of the son being called the cock's 
must take on Itself the responsibility ^^^^ ^^ Paris, from the manner in 
of a bu.«hel full. , i -..hi«h the trimming is pleated back 

The feathers we are wearing this , J,»;V' the middle of t^he shape, 
season have to be adapted, i ne> are substitutes for feathers, 

tn-ated tnall sorts of ways to ^-?jf^bbon is 'the 'smartest, the most sat- 
them to the tiny hats a"0^„,^f»,, *»,•', • j^j-ctory. There is ultra chic In the 
them the proper degree of Pnia''"V/N iimuiA smali shape of straw, with its 
slant and slenderness O d-tlmey to- ! sh«Pl^e s^*'^^^^^^^ one 

vorites are stripped and snipped, t^^^t^.^i^bon bow conforming to the approved 
cd and singed, treated with ^ >cer»n* |^*^^^ 



width in the spot where a becoming 
bit of width may be needed, and Is a 
softening addition to any hat. „.,__ 
THE HAT THAT COMPLIES WITH 
THE LAW. 
Besides the fashionable humaneness 
of the high trimmings, there is a law- 
abiding humaneness in the numerous 
substitutes for the feathers of forest 
birds, of which the use is now p"" 



Ing to you. . ^. . ._. 

Again. If the narrowness of the brim 



I Is not exactly to your liking, you are 
I privileged to Increase it by means of 
a ribbon flange gathered about the 
outer edge to help in the softness and 
I the flare. A fashionable material for 
these flanges Is a black silk belting, 
j employed also in bows and bands, which 
i because of its stiffness has an added 
, usefulness and an added chic. 
A H.\XD"MADE SEASON EXCOL'R- 
A(tES THE HO.ME MILLINER. 
A thing of beauty and a joy forevef 
Is the fabric hat— that Is. the hat that 
is made of goods by the yard, and more 
beautiful and more joyous It is this 
season than ever before wtth the mate- 
rials so altogether lovely. Taffeta has 
been having things all to Itself, with 
satin a bit more exclusive. But as 
pretty a method as any is to make 
the hat of the same material as the 
frock, especially for the dainty dresser, 
who likes the "all-to-match" Idea. For 
this purpose the seasonable crepes are 
perhaps the best, the Egyptian crepes 
in soft Oriental prints, mandarin 
crepes, plain and In modern art color- 
ings. The crown of your straw, or the 
top of the brim, may be covered with 
vour silk, or you may have the jaunt- 
iest sort of a spring and summer mil- 
linery by means of a wire frame 
shirred over with flowered pussy wil- 
low taffeta — say. the same that you 
have In your pretty afternoon frock, 
with a bunch of flowers set snuggling 
against the side to suggest the flowers 
in the print. Could anything be more 
alluring? 

It Is In this sort of hat that tha 



home milliner has her Innings, the wire 
frame, the piece of silk that is left 
over, a bunch of flowers and an hour 
or two before the mirror — her purse 
has not suffered the usual depletion 
and her wardrobe Is the better oft for 
a very charming acquisition. 

Not the least of the material hats Is 
the lingerie affair which Is to have its 
Innings again this summer. This, too. 
Is made to match the dress. Flounced 
effects are going to match our flounced 
frocks and parasols, and what better 
than the machine-embroidei-y flounc- 
Ings? All-over embroideries, as well 
as plain cottons and linens, will go into 
plainly covered sun hats, touched wltli 
!a bit of flower or feather trimming. 

THE FORE AND AFT HAT. 

j The hat with the trimming in front, 

exactly mirrored In the back, is one 

of the smartest sorts of the season. 

I especially when the pert little fancy 

sticks up as if it were trying to give 

I vou your money's worth. Here Is a 

1 flare turban in dark blue English straw 

' with a feather fancy back and front 

' and a facing of velvet to soften it 

I against the face. 

I AN ODD FEATHER FANCY IN FRONT. 

' Small of brim Is even the sailor 

I shape that is In fashion this ye.-ir — 

j this one a natural colored hemp with a 

I rich shade of taupe in the trimmings. 

More often than not the feather or 

ribbon fancy stands up directly in 

front in a sort of military suggestion 

that Is smart Indeed. This Is one of 

the variations of coq that we are us- 



ing now. the desired slenderness jlT- 
en l)y stripping. 

FROM TURKEY VIA PARIS. 

The Turkish fez, the national head 
dress, has been the inspiration of this 
Paris hat. It Is the make of Saget. 
done In Turco red straw and black 
clipped ostrich pompons and is given 
the chic and the tilt that makes It ac- 
cepted of Paris. Such a little shape 
can ea.sily be developed in material 
like taffeta or Egytian crepe, bring- 
ing Paris chic within the reach of th« 
home milliner. 

WHEN FLOWERS ARE USED. 

Little bunches of red verbenas are 
caught in the back and the front of 
this leghorn hat, following the mode 
of the more pretentious feathers and 
carrying out the flower and color idea 
of tiie red printed silk that is shirred 
about the crown, A bit of darker red 
velvet in ptems and over the side gives 
tone to a little hat that is girlish lu 
the last degree. 

HAT, AEIL AND COLL.IR. 

A dainty hat that will serve the very 
first uses of the warm seapon Is this 
one of white Milan, demurely set with 
a summer wreath of Bermuda pink 
gardenias over a band of darker coral 
velvet. The veil that will soften th« 
wooing of the summer wind is most 
sheer of mesh, yet firm. It Is gath- 
ered at the ends and fitted with snap 
fasteners for handy fastening. A col- 
lar of exquisitely patterned machine 
embroidery is in keeping with the 
mode and the millinery. 



^^•■,^-*>^ 



■'^.-^-^■W*.-' 



TO THE NEW HOUSEKEEPER. 
Kansas City Star: If the new hou9«- 
keeper KiaKes to please her husband 

. . „^^N always ser\o hot foods in hot di.«hes 

birds, of which the use is now P.^O" ,^, * ,.".„. ,_ ^„,fl diaijo. 
h bited Some of the newest trimming and cold things in cold dishes. 



tertalns demonstrates and serves her I your husband returns from his day's | home such conditions and materials aa 

favorite dish. j work. i a'"e at haiid^ . 

I Make it a point to have order and I It is the duty and privilege of every | ■— - TTTZT^. ^^,.A.,^m 

^cleanliness reigning supreme when ! wife to convert into happiness and ^ ' g ^^"^"ffo pyj-;,^|"„f ^M^f/^^^l^.f^rl? 



modes In spring millinery are the in 
vention of clever makers, who have 
been searching about for Ideas suit- 
able for attractive development under 



Serve tU^als on time. 
Keep the table linen clean. 
Don't wear old street clothes 



for 



the^new tVrl'lTclaiise." which some time house gowns. A 7-cent print or lawn 
ago prohibited the Importation of the | ^ j^ better than a half worn 

?'„1?;;rf2rth"h1r'".%''i p^.;:k%'o'r„r/„t o.., .UR » Ur„,.c.o,h ,n .h. K..che„. 
a trimming that will please the Amer- 
icans and give a fitting substitute for 
the beauty of the banned paradise, 

aigrettes and osprey. So we are hear- apeuu «»...^ w. ,^«. "'''"-■■•--,' 
Ing much talk about the feathers of i i^g cook books, menus and food prin 

the despised barnyard fowl; about the 1 - . . .. -i us-, k^woi 

use of horse hair aigrettes, that are 



Learh to make good coffee, broil a 
steak and rilx French dressing at once. 
Spend some of your spare time study- 



almost as attractive as the real; about 
Imported grasses that have been ciired 
so that we cannot distinguish them 
from the plumage of songsters. 
THE AUDI BON HAT. 
Owing to the activity of the Audubon 
society in the promoting of laws that 
make for the protection of bird life, 
one type of hat has been appropriately 
dubbed the Audubon, a name that 
should recommend it to every bird 
lover of the world. Any hat about -■"---_- .. 
which lingers no ghost of a dead bird , aifr^r^nt noraes 
comes in the category, and you ma> 
be sure that In modl^hness, as well as 
in picturesque and poetical qualities, it 
is supreme. One man wlio Is interest- 
ed in the humanity of hats has sug- 
gested the use of machine embroidery 
in their trimming, a delightful Idea 
that will be carried out In the lingerie 
hat of the summer. A wreath of flow- 
ers, a bunch of fruit, a grass aigrette, 
a pompon of maline, or indestructibl-- 
voile, a cabochon of jet. naturally shed 
ostrich and peacock plumage — there 
are trimmings for the millions that 



ciples. Nothing will please him better. 

Learn at least one new dish every 
week and Introduce It Into your menUs. 

If you neter have gone or can t go 
now to a school of domestic science, 
ask your mother, aunt and grandmoth- 
er to teach you their favorite dishes. 

Form a housekeepers' organization 
and meet once a week to exchange 
housekeeping ideas and receipes. Such 
a club affords more real pleasure and 
profit than any of the so-called amuse- 
ment clubs. Take turns meeting at the 
The woman who en- 



lATE EVENING (jOWN 

DESIGNED IN PARIS 



THOSE 



Hew 

Rats 

We have them in all the 
different shapes and styles 
for Spring 1914. Our show- 
ing this season is the finest 
we ever had. We also wi.sh 
to call your attention to the 
beautiful designs produced 
from our own workrooms. 

Open evenings until 8:30. 

L Lemairc, 

(Both Phones) 
2518 WKST THIRD STRF.ET 



Davidson 
millinery 

1114 WEST THIRD ST. 
Kenltk phone, Lincoln 448-Y. 

You are invited to attend our 
millinery opening this week. Don't 
fall to see our up-to-date spring 
styles. 

PRICES REASONARI-R. 




JdUUe/v - jUScnkta 



t:>^CL.USIVK^^ ^HOR 



105 and 107 West Superior Street 



Make this shop your down town stop 



Authoritative Spring Exhibit! 



EVENING GOWN. 

This is on^of the latest evening 
gowns now un display in New York. 
The wide sleeves and clinging effects 
are showJl ou^the model. The gown 
waii designed iu Paris. 



LADIES' AND 
MISSES' 



and 



rm 



m 



mt 



'^i 




The season's newest examples 
inspired by models at the hands 
of authoritative designers in the 
world of fashionable dress — 
Exclusiveness of idea gives 
many an Easter suggestion. 



1 





■PCTB«f¥^ 



o^m 



-^r^.^- . "- 



Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



March 30, 1914. 




■■\V«T< 
Thf I n • 



Suident nn^inber." of ihe MaHneo Mu- 
■ uale save their vaudeville perform- 
ance Saturday afternoon in the audi- 
torium of the Masonic temple. 

Those who could not get seats were 
happy to find places on a ledge on the 
steps in the balcony. The demand was 
e.i gi^at the performance will be re- 
leaied next Tuesday night at the Ly- 
ceum theater for the benefit of the 
Children's home. Mrs. Stephen H. j 
Jones and Richard Kipling, in fact all I 
who hud anything to do with training 
those w lio took part, deserve credit 
for one of the most successful enter- 
tainments tver given by the society. 

Catchy placards decorated the foyer 
and the auditorium and the audience 
amused itself reading them while i*alt- 
Ing for the show to b^gin. The open- 
ing music, "The Whip" and "Hoop-e- 
Kafck," w«re played hy the t."tomberg 
. 1 h. stra, > onducttd by Master L.ouls 
. Q liH rjj. »g»d 6. It was amusing to 
•,' O'.e young c«>nductor, who had 

: upon a platform so his mu- 
ni !.;:s coutd 3ee him. Fy arrange- 
ment the orchestra played a terrible 
di-^ ' ttd was .^topped by a rap from 
th. ..tor with: "Here, here, play 

Ih; I i:ist movemt-nt again." 

In the pr«.U.gue T. W. Hugo reviewed 
tlie musical development of Duluth, 
fiirn the time when bands and quar- 
• ' ncre the leading things in the 
through the quiet beginning of 
... Maiiiiee Wusicale up to the pres- 
tjil time, when music occupies such an 
inip« rtant part in the lives of many 
wi-nu-u of Duluth. 

r!i.- selections from "The Mikado' 
>^ . • ( •ConifS a Train of Little Ladies, ' 
■ : i;oi a Little List," "Were You Not 

Ko I'lighled?" and "The Flowers 
Klooni in the Spring." 
ML-- ' Vewell and Charles Young 

as a. au.«ed much amuseni»»nt 

!. i! iLKrtl hits in "I've <.;ot a 
L;<i." Miss Myrtle Hobbs and 
mj; were well received in 
:\'ot to K0-K.0 Fligl»ted." 
.. little maids were Misses 
Myn'.e Hobbs, Myrtle Newell and 
' ' '; s Kt ynulds. 

Folk Danreti. 
.Id!''" fi.in Endion school, under 
ihr dtr.« Mi.«s Vellie Stoughton. 

(ff,\<- th : Ik dances; a Danish 

r • f iJreeting." a Danish "Shoe- 

'. : - I>;»nce." Cicrnjan "Kinderpolka" 

Russian "Snow Storm" danv?e. 
put all the enthusiasm into their 
il«n. ins that peasants of the respective | 
countries would be expected to give at 
!, . rry-making. The children who 
[.art in the dances were: Louise 
Irtdway. Jane Smith, Katherine Mc- 
Donald. Ethel Silver, Lucile Bayha, 
Ruth Anderson, Dorothy Merrltt, Mar- 
garet I'onner, Corlne Berne. Myrtle 
Larsen. Catherine Nordquist, Gertrude 
Carber. Sylvia Lounsberry, Sarah 
Ma'Fherson, Maxine Carson, .lames 
Dunn. « >rcn McLean. Jack Lignell, 
Charles Britts, Harold Puiman. John 
Wilde. Leslie Hemenway. Robert Ar- 
nold. <;eorge Johnson, Philip Berger, 
William Stephens. Helmer Monsea 
Teddy Boreen, Ralph White and 
Wayne Whitely. 

A "Sunbonnet Clog" was given by 
Helen Christensen, Virginia Fryberger, 
Mary Towne, William McMillan. W ill- 
irniMapie and .Margaret Mitchell. They 
t» .-i>- directed by Miss Kerta Schmied. 
being pupils of Miss Wilson's private 

school. 

Their sunbonnets and "jimmies car- 
ri«^d out the scheme of country dress. 

Prof. Leo's pupils contributed one 
of the most enjoyable numbers on the 
program. Sue Baillie and Frances | 
Barthe, 6 and 5 years old, danced a ; 
minuet. Their fifteenth century wigs 
and costumes made them look like 
little bisque statues that had stepped j 
oi t I f a cabinet for a dignified dance. 
1 h.- small cavalier was all that could i 
have been asked of the most polished \ 
gentleman of the period and the little 
lady managed her train in a way that 
would be commendable in a woman. 
Dateh llesMtitlon. 
fSertrude C.'.lins and William Magie 
d.anc»d the ' l>utch hesitation. They 
lookfd as if they had stepped off a 
I>utcU place card. Tliey greeted the 
audience with "Hello" and then bci^an 
their version of the hesitation that was 
a "scream." . _, , , , 

Miss Patsv Wat.=on. in Turkish cos- 
tume, danced a Turkish gavotte that 
bioiight out her gracefulness. 

Louis Oomb« rg. the "Little Mozarl, 
was drc-t.-ed in a pink satin suit and 
xvorc a white wig. He played Mo/Jirfs 
"Sonata in C' and a vilanelle by 
Schmoll. His small hands under ihc 
1,' re ruffles gave great promi.'^e of 
what they will do when they are fuU 
Bize. _ 

Miss CharUne Bagley gave two 
dances that had been composed for 
iier bv Miss Berta Schnieid, "The Joy 
of Living," to the music of Chamlnade's 
••Flatterer." and "The Breath of 
Fpiing." Her tJreclan costume and her 
light movements made her look like a 
character of Hellenic lore that had 
come ba' k to enjoy a dance in a beau- 
tiful grove. 

Biirleitiiue Opera. 
The burlesque tower scene from "11 
Trovatore ' was one of the most laugh- 
RMe parts of the entertainment. Misses 
Loretta O'Uormau and Myrua Newell 
Introdu' ed a new Italian dialect into 
Duluih. The wonderful optratic play 
upon the words "maccaronl ' and "spa- 
ghetti," the ample cape and sweeping 
plume of the prince and the fair maid- 
en in the tower brought grand opera 
right to the stage of the Masonic tem- 
tle. 

Miss Rebecca Freimuth as the "Suf- 
fragette" and William Craig as her 
J'oor. down- trodden worse seven- 
eighths showed Avhat home life could 
be like. She rehearsed her .^ipeech on 
the rights of women while he tried to 
ke-^^p the baby quiet and cook. Whin 
he asked how much sugar should go In 
his f.-eble attempt at cooking, did she 
tell him? Well, not exactly; she toid 
him to look in the cook book. 

The last number on H)-.' program was 
the group of social dances given by 
Mi-'d Ferta Schmied ard I-eo Schmied 
The tango, one step. Maurice valse and 
(iavotte Pavlov.a were danced with 
gr< at grace and charm. Ml.?.s and Mr. 
Schmied illustrated thes-i same dances 
Btveral weeks :igo at the Kitchl <J!am- 
mi club, but Saturday' was the first 
oppr^rtunity a large crowd has had to 



DULUTH WOMAN WHO HAD CHARGE 
OF STUDENTS* VAUDEVILLE PROGRAM 




We Are Permanently Situated in 
Our Location at the Original 
Established ^^$^m Corner. 

We vfant you to come here often, renew friendships, and avail yourselves of the wonderful purchasing 
opportunities that are constantly presented. But, buy or not, we want you to come. It may be news to 

you that right here in Duluth is located the largest retail furniture establishment 
in this section of the country. You possibly have shopped here many a time and 
yet have failed to realize the extent of our remarkable showing of dependable mer- 
chandise occupying 75,000 square feet floor space. The furniture in 
our Main Building consists of samples only, duplicate stock held in 
reserve requires a warehouse of more than ordinary capacity. To 
house this reserve stock we maintain a store- ^'-^v^ -v^ .- -n .^ 
house at 314 and 316 West Michigan street ^L^^^ ' '^ ~ 
with our private railroad trackage, which en- f^ /I^^n^ 
ables us to economically receive and handle 
our merchandise. Here in this establishment 
is shown Furniture for practically every known 
want. Furniture of Quality and Character — 
selected by a man of wide furniture experience, 
and backed by a house with years of honorable 

dealing to recommend it. We are telling you this because we believe 
it will be of interest to you and with the hope that you will more fully realize the importance of this 
great furniture showing with its actual price economies. 

Investigation Will Convince You That Our Prices Are 
Much Lower Than to Be Found Elsewhere, 

Our New Easy Terms: 






MRS. STEPHEN H. JONES. 

Mrs. Jones Had charge of the students' vaudeville Program given Satucday 
afternoon by t;ic Matinee Muslcale. It was .so successful that it will be 
repeated Tuesdty night for the benefit of the Children s honrie. . a^ 

Mr. Jones lias also taken time from his extensive grain biislnesa to a'j 
much for the musical interests of Duluth. and was one of the so-called Musical 
TriuVvlrate^^;.n8isting of himself. T. W. Hugo and the late Horace Reyner. 



FROLIC 



STUDENTS' 
VAUDEVILLE 

OF THK M.VTI>EE Ml SIC \I.K 
To be ri'peat.d for the beneSt of 
the Child ren'n Home. Tlcketw no%\ 
oil nale, 25c and 50e. L\CEU.M, 
on Male, 25c a >id 50c. 

Lyc3um Tuesday Night, March 31st. 



street, tomorrow 
o'clock. 



afternoon at 2:30 j 



^ $25. OO Purchase Requires 

$2. SO Down and $3. GO a Month 
A $35.00 Purchase Requires 

$3.50 Down and $3.50 a Month 
A $UO.OO Purchase Requires 

$U.OO Down and $U.OO a Month 
A $50.00 Purchase Requires 

$5.00 Down and $5.00 a Month 



A $60.00 Purchase Requires 

$6.00 Down and $6.00 a Month 
A $75.00 Purchase Requires 

$7.50 Down and $7.00 a Month 
An $85.00 Purchase Requires 

$S.50 Down and $7.50 a Month 
A $100 Purchase Requires 

$10.00 Down and $8.00 a Month 



THEOSOPHIST WILL 

GIVE LECTURE HERE 



see the new darces shown and the dig- 
nity that can l>e put Into them. 

Mayor Prince engagej the first box 
for the repetition of the vaudeville 
Tu^-sday eveniig. Other boy.es have 
been sold. Th< se that remain may be 
secured by applying to Mrs. U. Herbert 
Jones. 



One of the most noted theosophlsts 
In America and an authorized lecturer 
for the American section of the 
Theosophical society, David S. M. lin- 
ger of Chicago, will be in Duluth and 
give a public lecture Saturday at 8 



THE LATEST AND MOST ATTRAC- 
TlVi: STYLES IN 

GOOD LOOKING HATS 
PALMEii'TMiLLINERY 

515 KAST FOURTH STREET. 



Ladies' Literature Class. 

The Ladies' Literature class will 
have a regular meeting tomorrow aft- 
ernoon at 2:31' o'clock in the board 
looui of the 111 rary. 



Easter Dinner. 

The St. Jame.«' Junior guild will give 
a dinner and program at the St. Jumea' 
orphangae Eauter Sunday. 

Birtliday Party. 

Mrs. Irene Mi nke of 110 North Twen- 
ty-seventh avenue west entertained 
'Saturday afternoon In honor of the 
! birthday of h. r daughter. Arthena. 
Games were played and a luncheon 
served. There were twelve guests. 



Trinity Guild. 

The Trinity guild of Trinity pro- 
cathedral will meet tomorrow after- 
noon at 1 o'clock. 




^^ GOOD ^^Fl/IflV/Tim^^ 



Established 188U. 



FWfJVJTl/J^S 

First Street and Titird Avenue West 



tian phase of theosophy Mr. Unger Is 
said to be without an equal. He has 
given many years to the special study 
of the esoteric meaning of the re- 
ligions of the world, especially Chris- 
tianity. 



SALE! 

Fine Furniture, Oriental Ruga at 
greatly reduced prices for quick sale. 

401 East Superior St. 



card party for members and -their staying at the Superior hotel in Supe- i 
friends tomorrow evening at Wood- | rlor. He will leave soon for Minncapo- 
man hall > lis. where he will have charge of the i 



• * « 

Duluth council No. 3, Modern Sam- 
aritans, will hold a business meetins 
this evening from 8 to 9 o'clock at K. 
of P. hall, 118 West Superior street. 
From 9 to 10 o'clock there will be a 
mock trial. The principal characters 



production of a society play. 

* « • 

Mr. and Mrs. F. P. Tims of 514 East 
Fifth street returned yesterday from a 
six weeks' visit in Arizona. 

* « * 

Mr. and Mrs. T. Doyle. 30 Wash- 



o'clock, In the Unitarian church, cor- 
ner Eighteenth avenue east and First 
street. 

The subject of Mr. Unger's lecture 
will be on "The H'dden Side of Re- 

^ !lglons ' one of the best of his series 

_,_,,,-,, ! in which he explains that every great 

For Cr urcn Members. | religion has its hidden side and is 

I The women of Hope Evangelical taught in parables, allegories and 
1 church will be entertained at the home j symbols. 
■ of Mrs. A. K -htel, 203 East Third I As a ppoular exponent of the Chris- 




OBSERVATIONS 

By PEGGY PEABODY 



CHAR.MING 
EXPOSITION OF 

New 

Spring 

Millinery 

Til ere is no lack of be- 
coming model?. Each one 
jaunty, chic and fascinating. 
As lisual, our prices are 
niuderate. 



Woman W 11 Advance Beyond ! •^'^'•' ] ""'^^^^T. '^r^..* p^""* '^^ 

,, , _, -_ -, ■' struggle to find the better way 

Mark She Has Set. 



the 



There is much conjecture as to the j 
future woman. What will she become, | 



turn her hand to, 
not decide to ig- 



MISS HANSON, 

404 CENTRAL AVENUE 



Op 



en Evenings. 



what may sh< not 
and what ma/ she 

nore that sh. has 

heretofore a^cept- 

ed and endurid ap 

her unyielding fate 

or duty? 

Only time will 

tell. Tet the^e are 

questions that 

come to the mindt* 

of many as they 

compare conditions 
I existing a in o n g 
! women today with 
! t h o s e that pre- 
I vailed twenty year.< 
I ago. Woman must 
j progress w jether 

I she will or ro. She can't stand still. 
(She will atteiipt more, dare more, and 
j encroach mor; and more upon the pre- 
serves that iiieo have heretofore held 

for themselves alone. 

What is more natural, with centu- 
' ries of repr -ssion behind her, than 
[that it shouM take several centuries 

of unrest before she will be ready or 

willing to settle into anything like re- 

' pose? I am aghast sometimes at the 

thoughts the more advanced women 

express in all sincerity, also at thi 




Who ever believes that woman has 
been fairly dealt with, and had just 
consideration and all rightful privi- 
leges since the beginning, will not be 
I interested to pursue this. 'Twill be 
j but a waste of time on their part and 
of effort on mine. Some cannot be 
I convinced that there Is any excuse for 
I the action of woman today. 

To such as do see a glimmer of rea- 
son for all that she has done and much 
that she could do, let me say, she will 
< fulfill their expectations. She will do 
more before she will find herself. I ex- ! 
! pect in my lifetime to receive many a 
shock through her that previously 1 I 
had not dreamed possible. She will t 
follow many paths before she finds the i 
right one and she will .be retarded at 
almost every juncture. All kinds of 
obstacles will be put in her way, but ' 
eventually she will return to her des- 
' tiny better able to fulfill It than be- 1 
fore, because she will have made con- 1 
ditions favorable. 

The woman of the future will be a I 
real woman. That is what all this rest- 1 
lessness and striving signifies. Ulti- 
mately all will be made clear. She I 
will be found at her post mothering i 
the race. Instead of distaining It on 
one side and approaching It half- 
heartedly from another, as so many do 
today, she will recognize In It the 
greatest career for women. To It she 
will give all her heart and great 



Lecture on Charity. 

Much Interest is being taken in the 
lecture on "Charity" to be given by the 
Rev. James Donahue at the Catheral 
auditorium tomorrow evening at 8 
o'clock. Father Donahue Is city mis- 
sionary of St. Paul and is spiritual 

director of the guild of Catholic worn- i , p„-f,*e- vacation 
en of that city. This organization of 1 ^'»« Laeter vacation 
800 women is the largest of the kind 
In any American city the size of St. 
Paul. It has accomplished a great 
deal of good In St. Paul, especially in 
purifying the stage and in work con- 
nected with the Juvenile court. The 
members have given cl^rit^ble assis- 
tance not only in tha* way of food, 
clothing and money btft by their per- 
sonal efforts. 

Father Donahue was one of the 
strongest forces behind the mothers' 
pension law when it was passed at St. 
Paul two years ago. 

Preceedlng the lecture Mrs. valborg 
Gunderson Fnikelson will play two vio- 
lin selections: "Cavatlna," Raff, and 
"Cradle Song," Schubert. She will be 
accompanied by Miss Theresa Lynn. 
_^ 

Bridge Luncheon. 

Mrs. J. I. Thomas of 4130 McCul- 
lough street will entertain the L. and 
M. club at a bridge luncheon tomor- 
row. 

-» " 

Shakespeare Class. 

The Shakespeare class of the Twen- 
tieth Century club will meet this eve- 
ning at 7:30 o'clock in the library club- 
room. 

Bishop's Club. • 

The Bishop's club will meet this eve- 
ning at 8 o'clock in the Bishop's club 
room. Second avenue west and ""-* 
street. 



In the trial will be: Judge, John G. I l»^gton avenue have as their giiest 
Ross; clerk of court, D. J. Murphy; I their nephew, L. S. Muldoon, of Mon- 
court officer, George Faixley; court 
reporter, Fred Richardson; prosecuting 
attorney, Richard Jones. The name of 
the culprit has not been made pub- 
lic. After the trial there will be danc- 
ing. 

• - - 

Endion Circle. 

Endion circle of the First Presby- 
terian church will meet at the home of 
Mrs. Wlnton, 1509 East First street, 
tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock to sew 
for the Children's home. 
^ 

Personal Mention. 

Miss Sarah Erickson will leave this 
.rf-vening for Ironwood, Mich., to spend 



treal. 

A « • 

Mr.9. Mary A. Nelson has gone to 
Sppkane, where she was called by the 
illness of her mother. 

• • ♦ 

Mrs. A. D. Jacobs and son have re- 
turned from a two months' visit in 
Colorado Springs. 

• * * 

Miss Virginia Stone Harrison of 1614 
East Superior street, who Is a stu- 
dent at the conservatory of mu.slc 
at Oberlin, Ohio, is home for the Easter 

vacation. 

• * * 

Mr. and Mrs. W'illiam J. North have 
returned from Minneapolis. 
.• • • 

Dr. Frank L. Lynam left today for 
Boston, where he will take a course 

Mrs. M. B. Holmes has returned from Pf^.tS^lJnil^e'rsUy' '°'' ^ '"""''' 
Nashwauk. where she spent the week Harvard umversay^ ^ 

with her daughter.^ ^ ^^^ ^ ^ Drake of 031 Lake avenue 

Richard Kipling, who directed the «f>"th returned today '!;o"^/^^J^^^t ^'^^'J 
"Mikado" numbers at the Matinee Mu- her da^^ht^'^'-.^^'^s- P. Armitage or 
sicale students' vaudeville Saturday, is Kansas City. Mo. 

X 

SUFFRAGIST LEADERS CONFER" 

Mississippi Valley Leaders Meet, With Prominent Del- 
egates Present— Jane Addams of Chicago and 
Others Discuss All Phases of Movement 
—Delegates Active in City Election. 



STYLE SHOW 



IS OPENED 



New Spring Suits Are Dis- 
played in Duluth Store 
Windows. 



Fourth 



Art Departttient. 

The art department of the Twentieth 
Century club will meet tomorrow aft- 
ernoon at 3:15 o'clock in the clubroom 
of thfe library. 

♦ 

Lodge Notes. 

North Star court. No, 49, U. O. F.. 

will give a card party this evening at 

U. of F. hall. Fourth avenue west and 

First street. The hostess. Mrs. Riley, 

will be assisted by Mr. CuUen and Mr. 

Morris. 

* * « . 

The Daughters of Norway will give a 

■ . -L 



Des Moines, Iowa, March 
Mississippi valley suffrage conference 
opened for the third annual meeting 
here today with several hundred wom- 
en suffragists, includin* some of the 
most prominent leaders in the move- 
ment in attendance. The conference 
proper was begun with a mass meet- 
ing yesterday afternoon in which Miss 
Addams of Hull House, Chicago, was 
the principal speaker. 

The conference is presided over by 
Miss Harriett E. Grim of Darlington, 
Wis., and among the speakers 
today's program were Miss Pattie 
Jacobs, Birmingham, Ala.; 
L. Thompson. St. Lbuis; 



things they do, yet when. I think tbena i thought and effort. 



mis: 

MEINING 



has 



202 Fidelity Building 

ready for your 



pection 



a wonderful collection 6i high- 
grade Tailored Dress and Semi- 
dress Hats. Open until 9 
o'clock Saturday evening. 



Wilbur Trout, Chicago; Mrs. Jessie 
Hardy Stubbs, Washington, and Mrs. 
Ella McHose, Boone, Iowa. Miss Flora 
Dunlap, a leading social settlement 
worker, and member of the Oes 
Moines board of education, welcomed 
the delegates at the morning session. 
Klectlou Going: Ob. 
Of interest In connection with the 
suffrage conference was the fact that 
; in the municipal election today women 
I were voting on a proposition for mu- 
nicipal ownership of the city water- 
I works svstem. Many of the visitors 
Laidcd in 'getting out the women's vote. 
I (Jovernor Clarke welcomed the dele- 
gates to the conference in an address 
I before the mass meeting held yester- 
day afternoon. Bepides Miss Addams, 
Mrs. Ella S. Stewart of Chicago, de- 
livered an address on the "Philosophy 
of Feminism." ,»...,, 

"Methods" is the general subject of 
the sessions, and every phase of suf- 
frage work is on the program for dis- 
cussion. The leaders in the movement 
in the various Mississippi valley states 
were outlining plans they had found 
most practicable, and much interest 



30 The'nols delegation, which was to tell of 

the methods followed in that state in 
the recent campaign. 

At the morning session today. Dr. 
Anna Blount of Oak Park, 111., dis- 
cussed "Victories Since the Last Con- 
ference," while Mrs. Draper Smith of 
Omaha, told the delegates "How We 
Did It in Nebraska." 

ProgrrMK of Suffrage. 

Mrs. W. H. Miller of Columbia, Mo., 
outlined "The Progress of the Suf- 
frage Movement in Missouri," and Dr. 
Amelia Keller of Indianapolis per- 
formed the same service for the or- 
ganization in Indiana. The general 
discussion of the session was led by 
Mrs. Harriett Taylor Upton of War- 
ren, Ohio. 

Other speakers were Mrs. Theodora 
Youmans of Waukesha. Wis., on "The 
President's Job," and Misa Agnes 
Ryan of Boston. 

Mrs. Edna F. Gellhorn of St. Louis, 
was to lead the discussion on tne sub- 
ject "Working With the Legislature;" 
experiences in Minnesota being de- 
tailed by Mrs. Emily H. Bright of Min- 
neapolis: In Iowa by Mrs. Ella McHose 
of Boone; in North Dakota, by Mrs. 
Clara L. DarrtJW. of Fargo, and in 
Wisconsin by Miss Ada L. James of 
Richmond Center. 



on 
R. 
Miss Clara 
Mrs. Grace 



MINNEAPOLIS EASTER 
PLUMAGE IS STOLEN 



Trouserette Gowns, Bloom- 
ers and Bustles Are 
Being Shown. 

Duluth's shop windows in all their 
splendor and beauty mirror the season's 
correct styles for women, dispiayingr 
some of the most extreme gowns for 
milady's wear the coming spring and 
summer, as well as the most conserva- 
tive styles. 

First of all, there are the trouserette 
gowns, which are a close rival of mera 
man's apparel since the reign of the 
knee breeches and silk stockings of the 
davs of "the father of our country." Of 
course, there is the regular skirt, but 
the trousers are exactly like those 
worn by the male sex and are made a 
part of the skirt. There are the up- 
turned cuffs, and the trouser is seea 
through the slit of the skirt, which Is 
I made .somewhat longer and wider this 
' season. 

j Looking through the shop windows, 
! one naturally draws the conclusion that 
I the clothes this year resemble those 
of Colonial days and of the ClvU war 
times more than any other time. There 
are the large wide bustles, ruffles ga- 
lore, and last but not least, the bloom- 
ers of forty and sixty years ago, which 
are probably remembered by many of 
the older residents of Duluth. 

This is apparently the season of 
suits sans everything else. Woman ia 
to wear very little underneath her 
outer dress this year,«and the dresseti 
will appear tighter and will cling more 
to the body than heretofore. The 
bloomers come down to the ankles and 
will be easily visible through the slit 
skirts. Of course, those wearing the 
trousers will not wear the bloomers. 

Some very beautiful gowns and suits 
are being shown in the windows and 
are in almost all imaginable colors. 
Green is an extremely popular color. 
The "pussy-willow" taffeta is the nov- 
elty this season, and promises to be 
exceedingly popular with fashionable 
drt-wcf/i 

Floral designs seem to be the craze, 
and these are seen in almost every 
gown shown. The suits are plain 
colored or checks, the latter having a 
tendency to be tailored somewhat 
mannishly, and with the trouserette 
look even more like a man's suit. 

Local department stores have gone 
to the extreme In arranging their dis- 
play windows, which are veritable 
bowers of beauty and loveliness. They 
are tastefully arranged, catch the eye 
and are most creditable to the local 
.•stores. 



Minneapolis. Minn.. March 30. — fSpe- 
cial to The Herald.) — Easter millinery 
goods of a large downtown store were 

ransacked today for expensive plumage 
and only the most valuable taken by 
the robbers, who were declared evident 



experts. The loss reported to the po- 
lice, it was said, would amount to sev- 
was expected to center about the Illi- I eral thousand dollars. 



THE PALM ROOM 

AT THE SPALDING 

MOST DELIGHTFUL AND LUX- 
URIOUS RESTAURANT IN 
DULUTH. 



.«"-* 




: 



T 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 





Wonday, 



THE DULU^tH HERALD 



March 30, 1914. 



TWENTY-FIVE 
NOWJ LINE 

Naval Militia Gets Behind 

Plan for Midsummer 

Festival. 



not be present, is A. C "Weiss, who Is 
convalescing at Rochester, after a 
severe operation. Most of the others 
will attend. 

It is requested that all members of 
vhe St. L^uls couUy del*g-atton meet 
tomorrow rooming at 9:36 o'clock at 
the Merchants' h< tel, St. Paul, for a 
county conference b«fore groins to the 
general conferen< e. The St. Louis 
county delegation Is pledged to the 
1 unit rule on all m ittera that come be 



bound to take the rame course and re- 
sign from the secrelary;-hip fur war. 
Sprung a SrnNatlon. 

Mr. Asqultli thtn sprung his senaa- 
tion on the house. He said: 

"In the circumstances and after murU 
consideration. 1 have felt it my duty to 
assume the office of secretary of <?tate 
for war. although I have taiicn the step 
only with the greatest relu«:tance 'n 



half way tt^flfh his speech when It 
became f^^»i^thnt he was convin- 
cing the ajuil&oce. when one of Tom's 
parti.saiia 'In the bacit of the room 
cried out:' 'Tom, Tom, call him a liar 
and make U a tight.' That is the 
stase this to.ft.4X-aohed." 

Th.' president's auditors asked htm 
if he was going to tight, and he smil- 
ingly an&wcred that he did not need 



I / 



6^ 



Effort Will Be Made to Hold 

Naval Maneuvers 

Here. 






Ftill another Duluth organization 
ha* come out for the proposed mid- 
summer festival to be staged in 1915. 
This makes twenty-live in all. 

This time it Is the naval militia, 
which, from the standpoint of availa- 
bility for service, is one of the most 
important organizations on the list. 
This announcement is made doubly ini- 
portanl by the plan of Commaiuler 
(Uiv Eaton to make all possible effort 
to "secure for Duluth In 1915 th- an- 
nual summer naval maneuver-^*, whicn 
so far have never been held at the 
Head of the Lakes, provided the festi- 
val committee desires them. 

The summer naval maneuvers to- 
gether with the part the naval nulitia 



fore the conferen-e. The delegation 

as el»^ted last Tutsday night follows: ' a complete 

Duiuth — John Jinswold, A. C. Weiss. I every hand „ „. 

C O. Baldwin. Charles McEwen, An- Isterlal side of the house were moment_ 
drew Nelson, F J. Voss. Alfred arily sUuck dumb. Then they jumped 
Jaques. John T. P.*rsoB. M. L. Fay. D. i up on the seats and broke out in wild 

D. Murray. John Kenney. W. E. Mc- hurraAa. 
Ewen, Charles d'Autreraont. Emerson 
Yokes. Harris Bennett, William Miller. 
Frank Makowskl, Frank Jordan. John 
Brown, E. A. Teas* man. Michael Lynch, 
George Xeff. H. P. Curran, W. F. Dacey, 

E. R. Ribenack. J-hn Hogan. O. Vr. Ol- 
son, E. A. Furnl, 1 . McDonnell. Charles 
Hoar, Louis Levi« e. August Hagburg, 
P. H. Martin and W. B. Cietchell. 

Virginia— MUhad Boylan, M. H. Mc- 
Mahon and Charle i Eaton. 

Eveleth — Charle t Josmore. 

Chlsholm — J. H. Harrington and A. 
H. Kit-ffnmn. 

Hlbbing — J. B. Connors. Victor B^noe. 
J. L. i..ewis and Biyan O'Rourke. 

Buhl— F. J. Dan el. 

Aurora — Louis 1 illman. 

Ely — John Harr . 

Tower — J. D. Mi rphy. 

Flood wood— M. V. Triplett. 

Proctor — Pat M'Cabe. 

Gilbert — T. L. Morrison. 



what I believe a great public emer- ^ to. ^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^ „^^.^. 

■That the premier's announcement was I Repref eigaUv^ D-.rcmus of M'chlgan. 

inat tne p ^ ^^^ ^^.j^,^„^ on ; chairnxan |^«^ ^T^ff^'the fl.rl?t on 

Th4 members on the mln- slun*l com^ffK »«^<*^"«."'« " xe^i^' 

repealing the .Panama tolls exemp- 



KENWOOD GETS 

IMPROVEMEIITS 



Buluth. A movement has been started 
among these friends to raise a sum of 
money with ^hich to fight an appeal 
of the case. 

A meeting of those Interested is to 
be held tomorrow night in the West 
■ I end. 

Club Committee Secures l weeks a^*^ aTt" *^a"Ie'^nlatlona? M^l 

i io which witnesses claimed tbat he 
Appropriations for Roads ^"^ *'^^" instrumental m entlcmg a 



large number of young women from 
their homes under the guise of reli- 
gion. Some of these young women 
were brought to the stand and tes- 
tified that he had gone through a 
form of marriage with them. Dahl- 
strora was in Duluth for some time, 
several years ago. and had quite a 
following in this city. 






and Bridges. 



SEELY QUITS AGAIN 
AND ASQIITH TAKES 
THEWAtRPORTFOLIO 

(Continued from page 1.) 



would play in the festival, would, u is 
believed, prove a valuable feature, and 
■would help direct the attention of 
whole country to Duluth. The summer 
maneuvers of the naval ^liitia are , 
each year a feature that a^'arls 
sightseers. With this feature staged 
a<. a part of the festival it would no 
doubt be staged on a much larger 
.so.*lt and with other naval features of 
national importance. 4,, _ ' 

The naval militia at Its last meeting, 
took unanimous action In favor of tne, 
fe<^tlval and the announcement of 
I'ommandcr Eaton is that it will "be 
there with bells on." The militia as 
a whole offers to do everything in its 
power to boost the project and to take 
part in any cap:xcity In making a sac-. 
ces.<ful program. , ^ , ' 

A committee of three was appointed 
to act with the general commutee , 
composed of repn sentatives of other, 
orgnniz.otion.". The committee consists , 
of N F. Hugo, Fred Engels and Clyde! 
Kflly. i 

COUNTY DEMOCRATS I 
OFF FOR ST. PAUL 



Delegates to State Confer- 
ence to Meet at Mer- 
chants in Morning. 



antees bv the caMnet was taken as a 
rebuff by Field Marshal Sir John 
^"* I French, virtual c« mmander-ln-chief of 
the army, and by yir John Ewart. the 
adjutant general to the forces. The 
two generals immidiately resi|:ned. and 
all efforts made )>y the king, the pre- 
mier and the other ministers failed 
to induce them tt change their minds. 
Their resignation) were made definite 
today. 

Premier Asqvilth's further announce- 
ment that he hisriself would take tip 
the portfolio of si cretary for war came 
in the nature of a surprise. Having 
announced his intention to take up the 
office, he declar 'd he would retire 
from the house ol commons, in accord- 
ance with the lam. "until It pleases my 
constituents to Si.nction ray return." 
Uramatlealir I<eft Chaaiber. 
The premier then dramatically 
walked out of th* chamber amid fran- 
tic cheers from he Liberals, the Xa- j 
tionalists and th« Labor members, the , 
whole body of wliom rose to their feet ' 
and waved handlierchiefs and papers 
as he left. . I 

Mr. Asquith, having accepted "an ' 
office of profit u ider the crown." must i 
now return to hi: constituency of East j 
Fife, Scotland, f< r re-election. On the I 
last occasion he received 5,149 votes 
against the 3,35i< of his Unionist op- 
ponent. 

When Premier Asquith entered the 
house today he was greeted with a 
great ovation f ro n the members oq the 
ministerial side. He shortly afterward 
rose before the crowded chamber to 



ANNOUNCEMENT ! 

After March 31 

THE BOARD OF 
TRADE LIVERY 

Will be located in the 
quarters now occupied by 
Lyceum Livery. 

16 East First St. 

Both Phones 440 



tion in the hOMKe today. It was the 
third day of liebate on the question. 

Expressing .regret that he differed 
with the president, he declared that 
Grt^at Britain had admitted the Ameri- 
can right vto exempt coastwise trade 
from tolls, 

"If we cannot grant free transit to 
our ships through the canal," he said, 
"its ben»ats will accrue to England 
and not to ourselves." 

He declared that the Carnegie peace 
endowment, "which derives an annual 
income of $500,000 from Steel trust 
londs, was most active in rescuing the 
national honor by promoting the re- 
peal of the lav*, that CJreat Britain had 
admitted we had a treaty right to en- 
*^ct." „ ., 

New Bill by Senator Fall. 
Senator Fall, R- publican, of New 
Mexico, gave the controversy a new 
as'pcct by introducing a bill to forbid 
that tolls be levied on American coast- 
wise ve.'^sels or those belonging to 
"citizens of any country upon this con- 
tinent and engaged solely in trade be- 
tween ports of North and South Amer- 
ica, or both, and duly registered under 
the laws of the country of which the 
.owners of said vessels are citizens.' 

He contended it would work out to 
I a logical conclosion the policies as 
I originally contemplated in the Monroe 
: doctrine. „ 

i "It would be 'Convincing to Brazil. 
I Argentina. CMle, Mexico and other 
Latin-American countries upon this 
i continent," said he. "that the United 



A meeting of the Kenwtmd club w «s 
held at the* schoolhouse at Kenwi>od 
park, Sntunlay evening, at R o'clock, 
thj following uiembers being present: 
(Jcorge Kreager, Bert FarrcU, F. L. 
CuUer. Jotn Dinkle, W. D. iicLaln, 
S. Keller, A. Leon. Joe Kreisel, K. 
Teske, Joseph Lafarve, M. Bryan, 
Thonms Holder, Jr.. Thomas Holder, 
ar., Juluis Gatzke, John iCozloskl, 
Henry Kassett. Frank Barsauloux. 
Otto Zeigler. Thomas Burke, F. Mc- 
Cumber. John Molitor. George Jiclitor, 
Mike vliernet, John CHemet, Mike 
Kuroski. A. Piering. Frank Piering, 
John Tischer, L. Dinkle, Fred Dinkle. 
A. M?C amber, A. S. O'Brien, August 
Cismonski. H. Sjall, George Gamble, A. 
Swans>.>. August Johnson. Joseph 

The meeting was held for the pur- 
pose of hearing the report of the com- 
mittee appointed at the meeting held 
Feb. 2«, to call upon the city and 
county comralspionc-rs regarding the 
promised inipiovenaents on th<- bridge* 
at Keiwood park, and the grading of 
the Kenwood and Farrell roads. 

Ttie report of the committee was 
received with much enthusiasm by tiie 
members of the club. 

The comm.ttee re^-orted that County 
Commissioner John Tischer had set 
aside 18.000. and the city commission- 
ers ? 3,000 for the Kenwood bridges and 
road, and that County Commt&sionor 
Alex Fraser had set aside 51,000 for 
the Farrell road, and that the com- 
missioners promised to push the work 



Missonrl broke all records last year 
for the value of Its mineral production. 



States Is in good faith in its annoonced i to c3mpletic'n at once. 

policy of friendship and willingnes.s to | The plans call for a four-foot square 




¥>km 




The People's 
Handy ^ g- 
Column *^ 



CWith the approach of winter come thoughts of houseclean- 
ing, when many articles considered useless are sentenced to 
tiic junk pile. Before executing the sentence, it will pay you 
to consult the advertisements in The Herald "Repair" columns, 
where you will find reliable repair firms, who can put the dam- 
aged articles in first-class condition. 



-. >« 



Key, Lock and Safe Works 

Gun Repairing a Specialty. 

DULUTH GUN SHOP. 

SOS ^>>t Ftnt Str**t. 

Melrose 3469. Grand 22«8-A. 

We Do All Kinds of Metal Work. 




Most com- 

V\X> wei«.' sNiM 



w 
rv orders _|rWt— ^ 
4, proTr.pt" i** 
attention. >>*• 
MeerschauBBi 
colored. "' 

Jos. Vanderjaclit, Board of Trade Bld« 



Grassinger, the Tailor, 



Maker of Good Clotbes. 



assist these countries, not only agxinst 
i aggressions of foreicrn powers, but in 
j the development of their own re- 
I sources." 

Speaks From Invalid Chair. 
' From an invalid chair In the hoi'se, 
i Representative L'Engle, Democrat, of 

Horida, made a vigorous speech oppos- 
I ing the repeal and denouncing the at- 
I titude of Great Britain. 

Senator Owen, one of the admlnistra- 



concrete culvert over the first creek 
and an eight-foot SQuare reinforced 
con?'-ete culvert over Chester creek, 
with a solid fill over both. 

About lO.OfO cubic yards of earth 
will be moved and the hills on both 
sides of the creeks cut down to an 
easy grade. 

A resolution was passed extending 
a vote of thanks to Commissioners 
Tischer and Fraser. and to Mayor 



PRESIDENT SAYS STORY 
OF TOLLS BARGAIN WITH 
ENGLA ND IS A N INSULT 

(Continued from pag e 1.) 

all the opponents of the repeal feltjtion's staifntjlifeit supporters, expressed j p^jncX' and"*Co'mniisrio7»ers Murchism*. 

that way. but such color^ had been In- ^ the opinio^ todtp' that two weeks would ' voss.IIerritt and Hicken, for their 

- — ^^^^^^^^^^ treatment of the committee 
which called uimjii ibem. aloiO for the 
money set aside for the improvements, 
and for their decision to proceed with 
this much needed work, and finish it at 
the eerliest possible moment. 

A r'd'MDiuticn W4S also pas.sed ex- 
ten ling a separate vote of thanks to 
John Tischer and Bert Farrell, for th^Mr 
indivi.loal efforts in connection with 
the proposed improvements. 

Interesting talks were given by John 
Tischer, Bert Farrell, Tom Holder. Jr., j 
and other members of the club. The 
following officers were elected for the 
ensuing vear: John Molitor, president; 
W. D. McLain, treasurer; F. E. Culver, 
secretary. 

FARMERS PUNNING 
ON SPRING WORK 




Altering, 
cleaning 
and repair 
work done. 

211 West 

Superior 
Street. 

(Upstairs) 




LUDWIG WOLF 

Graduate of the Glashuetta 
Watchmaking college Sax- 
ony. Germany. 
Office and workroom at 
residence, 

127 Tenth Ave. East 

Phone, Grand 1488-X. 



. . ,,^ , _._ make his promi ed statement on the 

The members of the St. Louis county army crisis. 

delegation to the state Democratic rrt^mlew'% Statement. 

conference to be held in St. Paul to- The premier si Id: 

morrow are leaving -today for the "^/^fj ^"." '^^i \*^7«;,'°"- J''^^* ^*''- 
,.= .., #..™. i„«* ._„ shall P rencn and Adjt. Gen. Lwart have 
scene of activities. A few left last i persisted in thel desire to be relieved 
evening to find out the lay of the j of their offices. In the public interest, 
land and confer with the powers. Some, I deeply deplore the decision of these 



left this afternoon, and others will lake 
the night train. Just how many of the 
delegation, as appointed at the county 
conference held last Tuesday evening,; 
will attend cannot yet be learned, but 
a full delegation of flfty-two will be 
on hand at the conference. The only 
one who. it is known positively, will , 



gallant officers, and I cannot spenk 
too warmly or gi.itefully of the ability, 
loyalty and dev* tion with which they 
have served the state and the army, 
and wilL I hope, continue to serve." 

The prime mil i.'>ter proceeded to tell 
the house that Col. Seely had informed 
him, to his greit regret, that he filt 



teijecied Into the controversy and he 
did not understand the motives for it. 
The president said he had no anxiety • 
as to any political friction in the Dem- I 
, ocratic party over the result, and re- 
i ferred to the repeal contest as not a 
j "capital operation." but just a "con- 
I valscence." 

I Mr. Wilaon let it be known that he 
i was unqualifiedly opposed to any com- 
promise or amendments, such as have 
I been proposed in the senate. He is 
I for a straight repeal without equivo- 
cation. 

Reminded of a Story. 
The White House later authorized 
quotation of what the president had 
said in answer to the charge to tlie 
effect that the president had made a 
deal with Sir William Tyrrell, private 
secretary to Sir Edward Grey, the 
British foreign secretary. The presi- 
dent had been asked if the charge 
were true. The president repliod: 

"Of course, that answers itself. It Is 
just the crowning insult of a number 
of insults which have been introduced 
in this debate. 

"This w^hole thing reminds me of a 
story I used to be fond of telling, of a 
very effective debater — I need not say 
where this happened — who sent a chal- 
lenge down into a county very hostile 
to him, to debate. The people down 
there did not like the job very much, 
but they put up the man they liked 
best, and who Is generally put up on 
such occasions, a great big husky fel- 
low whom they all called Tom. The 
challenger was given the first hour 



Supporiedt, nepoal T 

The presid'-ntJlrroiirs.- wa 



be all the soi^te would require for 
debate. v 

Senator Kerr>> the Democratic lead- 
er, told the president that while (he 
debate woul^>'lte longer than at first 
had been cxn^eti^-d. the question would 
be disposed <wVithout delay. 

mil. 

as vlgor-^iis- 
ly defend, d by ^Representative Hamll- 
tcn of Michignn, Tiepublican. 

"Thl« If p»t |L matter of party poll- 
tics," sanLYitf.. ^o Republicans, Dcino- 
crats and Proerresslves it ought to be 
fufficlert to remind them tliat all have 
declared against monopolies." 

Representative Montague. Democrat, 
of Virginia, supported the repeal bill. 



Jewelry and Watch Hospital, 



E. C. Lange 
J. A. Herbert 

IS Ijake 
Ave. North. 



Public Dance! 



— (iivery Bv — 
SOCIALIST rART%', 
ALDITOKII >l, A1>KI1. 

Admission -5 cents. 
Di Marco's Orchestra. 



1. 




Established 

in 

Duluth 

21 years. 



428 West 




Reference—. 
City 
National 
Bank. 



SMMMG l^ pEWELERI 



Sup. St, 



SHOPS: 



YOUR OLD 

SHOES MADE 

LIKE NEW. 

17 SECOND AAT:. W 
12 Fourth Ave \V. 
10 First --Vve, W. 




i*r 



of the two hours allotted to the de- 
bate, and he had not got more than 



D. H., 3-30-14. 

Hanan Shoes 



Columbia $3,50 Shoes 



Shoes for men 



at the 



Columbia Clothing Co. 

We fit all feet and guarantee all shoes 




NO REPORTS 

; FROM BATTLE 

(Cont^-ed^from page 1.) 

reonr* he "was 'Bi^ed. ' 

"1 think there has been no news since 

last night." was the reply. "Perhaps 

Gen. Villa has not yet taken the city.'* 
He added that he had no occasion to 

modify hip: decree- <ȣ several months 
I ago whai|(Sn he 6tat«il that no act or 

contrac|! of the Huerta govermment 

would be recognized should the revolu- 
t tion aucceed In capturing-^t^xico City. 
Wnen the newspaper men were In- 
jiarodnced to Gen. Carranza, he smiled 
, and said: 
I "Well, t suppose you want me to 

say something." 

"Better Thing* Coming." 

The Insinuation was admitted and the 
general, afttff the manner of a man 
who recognises a rather wearisome 
duty, orated: 

"The time ,1s coming when the whole 
world can pl^nly see that the great 
cause of whiA^I have the honor to be 
the head, is tne cause of justice. The 
path of better things Is opening up 

• and the d%y of retribution for treachery 
and Infafijr draws close." 

It wag dusk when the cavalcade 
mounted <Rice again and started on a 
trot for Uie city. The streets were 
illuminated and the triumphal arches 
Mazed w2b many colored incandescent 
bulbs. f^ 

I Gen. Carranza was wildly cheered. 
He spoke in acknowledgment of the 

, welcome, and then repaired to the 
house set asTde for him. 

(Jen. Carranza said he expected to 
spend seVetal ;days in .Juarez, prob- 
ably till the battle of Torreon Is de- 
cided. 



Red River Valley Soil Tillers 
Will Soon Be Seed- 
ing. 

Crookston, Minn., March 30. — The 
farmers throughout the Red River val- 
ley country are purcha.sing their seed 
for the spring season and arrange- 
ments are being made to put in many 
acres of small grains and especially 
corn this vear. Farmers from Illinois, 
Indiana. Iowa and other Central states 
are moving here and preparing for the 
spring sea.'^on. From present indica- 
tions seeding will begin in the course 
of two weeks. 

STRIKERS STONE 
FREiBHT TRAIN MEN 




Our U{)holst(iri!is <!•- 

panment, cl^n ax a 
wlilsile— «t your denuuid 
OBljr- the most coTuiietcut 
men employed. Have our 
man rail and give you 
estla]8.tes. 



Box sprliigs and hair 
mattresaes cisd^ to or- 
der: forty styles . of 
tlckla* to Bclect from. 
For a mtitlcrate cliargo 
we wUl rensTHie -jrour 
hair matires!> and rAuru 
It a« good as new. 




F. S. KELLY FURNITURE CO., 

Kelly Baildiiis, 17 aad 19 West Superior St. 



TRUNKS 

Bags and Cases. 

Most reasonable 
prices in Duluth. 

Twin Ports Trunk Co. 
21 Lake Are. Xorili. 




Call and examine 

the INDIAN 
with the electric 
starter, and try the electric equip- 
ment yourself. 

WALTER HOLMBERG, 
109 East First St. ; 



on 



Nobody Hurt in Riot 
Branch of Pennsyl- 
vania Road. 

Pittsburg, Pa.. March 30.— A freight 
crew on the Monongahela division of 
the PennsyU'anla railroad was attacked 
early today at Frcderickstown, Pa., by 
a mob of 500 or more persons. Stones 
were thrown and shots were fired, but 
no one was hurt. The crew finally was 
re.«!cued by police hurried from Browns- 
ville. 

This was the most serious of a serio.s 
of disturbances that characterized the 
strike of trainmen on the division dur- 
ing the night. 

Tlie information reached here at noon 
that leaders of the United Mine Work- 
ers at Uniontown, Pa., had called out 
members of the union in mines which 
supplied coal to I^'ennsylvania railroad 
engines, until the strike on the Monon- 
gahela division was settled. The oixler, 
effective toda>-, will bring out approxi- 
mately 6,000 men. 




Come in here 
to have your 
clothes dry 
cleaned,- 
pressed or re- 
I paired. 



Shoe Repairng 

Both hand and machine 
work. Our method of corn- 
blning both proves 
satipfactory. Let us 
do your work. 

Chris Olsen, 

523 W. Mk-higan St. 




The Duluth Artificial 
Limb House, 

Inventors and Manufacturers of 
the Factis Cushion Socket Ltmbs 
and Felten Feet. IS First Ave. 
East, Dulutlt, Bliua. 



DULUTH 

FUR 
PARLORS 

— Fine Furs — 

25 EAST SUPERIOR STREET. 

Grand 1769-Y — Melrose 5G25. 
Fiiri Made to Order and Rei>aired. 




puAirry 



tXPERT PIPE RE- 
PAIRING AT 

Gus' Shop, 

Cornw Fifth Avenue West 
and Superior Street. 

Rubber, Cenuloid, Horn 
■nd Amber Stents: also 
Bowls for Calabash, Clay 
or Hecrtehaum. 



Artistic Shoe Repairing 
Popular Prices. 

ORENSEN 

SHOE STORES 

QAINT RMJi.'M I N N EAPCM-IS-DUUUTH 
12S West Sni>eri<>r Street. 




'•X"!;id^'£,';?„"t|HAS SOME FRIENDS HERE 



Track* aad Captures Thief. 

Calvin, N. IX, March 30.— (Special to 
The Heraid.^-— ^hrongrh the desire of a 
neighbor to ^curf seed wheat. H. P 
Coder wa» rtleji to 
Foster, a bal/-breed 

load of grain. The neiifhbor was j 

searchinK for some stray horses and , Members Of HcllQa Cult MaV Coilie tO 

noticed a man loading grain at Coders "^ 

granary. Believing Coder had seed Dahlstrom'S ReSCUe. 

grain for sale the neighbor telephoned ^ , , . .. , . 

to ask the price. The conversation "Re\'." Albert Dahlstrom, founder of 

developed what had transpired and ; the "Heliga" cult, who was convicted 

Colder tracked the man seven miles and under the Mann act In Seattle. Wash.. 

captured him with the grain. ' recently has evidently some friends In 




HALL CLOCKS 

English, Swiss, Fren- :. 

Also 5fa.sic Boxes 

Ref>alr<^d. 

SO years' experience. 

Have repaired the best 

clocks In Duluth. 

Old phone. Lakeside, 

SOO-K. Work called for 

and delivered. 

HAWKHCS. JOHN R. HAWKINS. 



V 






If a man wrtt« a 
better book, prcadi a 
better seriiMm. mak* 
a better luonse trap 
than Ilia ueigUbor — 
ereu ttiougU ii« bulk! 
\Ca bou^e in the 
woods — the world 
will matte a beateii 
path to bU door. 



Complicated 
Watches. Ameri- 
can, Swiss, 
French and Eng- 
lish Clocks 
Repaired by the 
latest perfected 
factory process. 
Personal 
Attention. 

JOHN A, HAWKINS 




::ti n k^ The Comfort 
iwDPCr^l Beauty Parlors— 
.ArLniV 20 West 

Superior St. 



CWhy not have your 
card in this list? If you 
are interested, call up 
either phone 324. 



^J 



Spring Opening Days get ll^Feiiows! 



Tuesday f Wednesday and Thursday, 
March 31st and April 1st and 2nd 

Duluth 's Only All- Cash Department Store. 



^hcU- 



L atest Sty les $15 

When You've Decided You've Thrown Enough $10 

Bills Away on Clothes—Let Me IMake 

Your Spring Suit for $15.00. 



2l8t Avenue West and Superior St, 

Will Introduce to You Authentic French 
Fasfiions for Spring in 

Cloaks, $mts and Millinery 

Hi^h-class reproductions dfth€ bestforeif^n models, fashioned of the smart- 
est materials for the coming season. We cordially invite your presence. 



^J 



Why should yo\i pay *25 or |30 for 
a made-to-measure suit? What is there 
about a suit that should make it cost 
that much? Three or four yards of 

cloth — the cutting — trimming — sewing? 
No sir! It's the process by which it's 
made. 

The man who buys his cloth by the 
single piece, like the small custom 
tailor, pays a big price for it. The 
bigger man who buys by the bolt, pays 

I a big price. These men pay the man- 

; ufacturers a profit, fhe jobber, the 
wholesaler, and then ttiey add on their 
own — and you pay |26 or |30 for the 
suit. 

I That's the whole scheme, fellows. 
But listen. I am a branch of the 
c.lasgow Woolen Mills. Our woolens 
are figured in carloads. They come di- 
rect from the looms, to our big floors, 
where they are inspected, shrunk and 
rerolled. Think of what we save, fel- 
lows. Think of how little the goods 
for a suit costs us. Next to nothing. 



Then we sell direct to you. We cut 
out jobbers, sub-jobbers, whoKsalers, 
and all their profits. And the result Is, 
fellows, that I can make you the 
swellest little Spring suit that ever 
graced your back for $15. 

Break away from the old fogey idea 
that $15 can't buy a real made-to- 
measure suit. Ju.st ponder about what 
I've told vou. It's modern businesa 
that makes this low price possible. 
You've been following an old rusty 
idea that's cost you $10 more for every 
suit vou've bought — Chase it! Let ma 
make' your Spring suit. Pay me $25 
for the suit and I'll put a crisp $10 bill 
in the right hand pants pocket, or pay 
me $15 straight. Take me up? George 
Mills, Mgr. Glasgow Woolen Millj 
Store, 3J3 West Superior street. 

p. S. — Fve got the finest made-to- 
order pants proposition in town. Reg- 
ular $5, $6 and $7 trousers are going 
now for $2.76. Come In and look them 
over. — Oopyrisiit. 1914, b}- Leon SlgnuuL 



DEFECTIVE PAGE £ 



V 



t ' 

! 



. f 



\ — 



•V 



i 



V 



Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



March 30, 1914. 



TWENTY-FIVE 
NOWJ LINE 

Naval Militia Gets Behind 

Plan for Midsummer 

Festival. 



lie. ((.•.-•tt»r. after a 
M.ioL of the otlit-Td 



Effort Will Be Made to Hold 

Naval Maneuvers 

Here. 



I it '"• l>!>'S''lit. i;j 

. .)ii\ iil.-s.injr at 
^evv-rt' niH r;itit)ii. 
uiil J'lter.ii. 

It is r.-.iuoi«te<l that all inemb.rs of 
Jk- St. Louis lOii ity dclepati.in w-vt 
i.ui'.i'vruw luorninf, at ?:3u «i'i'lf>,-k at 
tti.' M- nharits" h*it'«l. St. I'aiil, for a 
tounty I otift-reiKo bef'jr»' goinB to the- 
>;»'i<»T;il «'iiKffr<Mi« e. The St. I..i'ui!* 
.uuiity iiil.'«;iti<iii Is p|..'iJ>?fd to Iho 
viiiit liilt* on all niitlera that eoi-ie b«- 
t.Tf tlu' vunfoit'i rf. The tUl.Ki»t!o'i 
■i-i ,^l..(t"il laat Tuijsilsy ri^ht f.>ll<'ws: 

I'uluth loliii J< (isw old. A. t". \N fitfs. 
»'. t». Italdvviii. riiarUsn Mi Kwcii. Ati- 
(lr«'W Nils. 111. K J. Vo.^d. Alff.'.l 
.Ijiques. .lohii T. P.'Mr.<.»n. M. I.. Kny. I>. 
I IX Murray, .lohn Kfini'-v, \V. 1'. Mi- 
l.\Vf!i, rtnrls's d' Vmrt'iiiont, i:rii»'rs.>!> 
Vok-^s, Harris Him iifit, Willniu Mitl-r. 
I'rriiik Maknw.-Ui. I'ra'ik JordMu. .l.>hii 
Urow n. i;. .\ Ti^!»:^riian. Mu-hatH I.ym h. 
'Jfori:.- -WfY. H. I', i'lirrau. \V. F. Pa-vy. 
i:. i:. UU>«i!a. k. .I'tiir. H"i;an. <». <;. »»1- 
.S.I11. U. A. I'uMii. r. Mcl'.'niiell. «'harl-'.=« 
Hoar. l.ou!s l.i\iio. Aii.misi Hajihurti. 
V. 11. Mania ami W . 1'.- «.-t-b-ll 



h.i«i.i to tak.' thf r-rn" «f.'irs« a*ii ••<•- 
.<ijiii ri-.ui tl •■ s-M r. tnr;. Sit> ''•^r war. 
.<^i«ri)?iK a **fn<»utlttn> 

Mr A^siiiiiili tiK-a •<ii;uii«; itis i»i.n-ii- 
li .11 I'U ihf u<>u.-*t- lit? silil; 

"111 tlu- » ir«timsttnie.-< ami aft'-r imiirt 
ronsi.i^ration. I lia.-- fnli u my .luiy lo 
aasuiii ■ th.- offi-t- >.t .->•. rt?tary of .-inte 
for war. allhoiiyh I hav- lak.ii thf -sl. p 
litilv wiin thf gr.ati Sl relr> ;:itir«» 'n 
what I bclKNe a jjrt^-iil VuOi. c. : 
gHi. y." 

'liia; th>' prfinuTs aiiaounrenient WH.^ 
■•I <i>iiipl>te stirj>ri«»' wa-: fvl.|.-ni on 
e\>':v haii'l. The niomb^Ts on tat» niln- 
Lslt-rlal sid • of th" hoii":.- wcrv.- niom'-rit- 
arilv ttriiok dumb. Tli-'fi thty juin!».d 
up on the seatd and br.*!..- out in wild 
hurruhs. 



Viruii'la -Mi. ti:i -I r'oyl.m. 
Mahoii .iiid t'harlr* l.aton. 
i:v»-l.>th — i'hurh < ,ti --iiior*"" 



M 



H 



I'.»l5. ' 



J-.Sil. 



r Uuluth nr?ranizati .ti 
for the prop"> — l lud- 
.1 t.. b«^ stag>'d in 
\ . »it> -live In -ill 
t i.-; the naval luilinn 
!•• .standpoint of «»vt 
.. <•, is ono of lb" 11 
/ iii/.M tii'iia I'M II 

iiiade "i '■' " ■ ■ ■ 
..f r 

ail p.>i:f"i.i- ■ > 

ith in IHl.s tn ' a.'!- 

' --tancuvcis. V. lioh 

, tri lol.l at tlio 

. ..< i ihf I'-.^Li- , 

; , 'iwr? to-: 

• part tin* nasal militia 

• li, fr*tn«l. would. i» 1*= 

.1 vahmbb* f.afur*. ai.d 

. I lb.- i'lifiiti'n of tM«' . 

'.► iMtluth. Tb.- sui:iiu'r 

th. naval m.liti.i «r.* 

ii nure that aiir.' '^ 

th this fi-aiuri- siaui-d 

r.-stival it W'".il-1 HO 

..n a niu. ii lari;. r 

t-aval r-aiuri-.-: 

• -'q Inrit m<^*-ti .-; 

• . favor oC lhi> 
■ un'-" >Ti'M' t 'tf 
.1 it wi'' "b* 

, lif mil<i..i -I - 
rytliinu it 



) 



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l^i..: 1 


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OWtT .1 


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M. 



1 A 



SEELY QUITS AGAIN 
A^JD ASQUITH TAKES 
THE WAR PORTFOLIO 



m pit;.? !.» 



» n (.*••- 
ri'biif I 
Fr.'m-t,. 
the army 
a.ljuiatit 



••1 was takvn as a , 

uld Mar.^bal Sir John 

il ci nimatid'-r-in-rhief of! 

. and by j-'ir .le.hn Kwart, tho 1 

K.*neral to ihe fi>r«a'i». Th.f , 



ANHflONCEiaE NT ! 

After March 31 

THE BOAI 
TRA0E LlVtn 

Will be located in the 
quarters now occupied by 
Lyceiun Livery. 

16 East First St. 

Both Phones 440 




CGUHTY DEfe1@CRATS 
OFF FOli ST. ?m. 



two u-n.-rals imnvdiatd.v r>si.£iiK'd. aiul 
ill .fforts made liy th.- kine, the jir.- 
uiKM- and the oibor iiili;i.-*t»-r.-s failed 
),i t>'d<i<'e iii.-ni !<■ .bantT'' th'-ir riiiiid-i 



i'l-emier Afiquii iV fuilli.-r aiuioiui-e- 

'n.Tit that bf hi ns.lf would take up 

the porifoU't of .•'i tretary for war iHni« 

it: 111.- i.riT'tre <^<|' a :*ui (.1 ise. Ha\ir.>; 

^ irit<'tilii>ii To take up the 

■ elai d ho would retire 

;e of e"iUMori.i, in atfo 1- 

. law. "until it pleases* my 

: ! - l.> :-■ ill't ji'l! lii.V r.t 11 

Ur;>ni;i<irMli,« I. eft ('liN»ilt4T. 

ler lied urailMtl.-.Tlly 

'■ tl; 1 h«>mber amid frao. - 

I.ibeia'.^J. ibe X.i- 

1.1 bor inetilbeit'. th-* 

't \\ iMM!! rose to Ib.Jr f'-^-t 



PRESlDEiMT SAYS STORY 
OF TOLLS BARGA!i\i WITH 
ENGLAND IS AN INSULT 

'oiitir.r.fd fr-M!! pnt;.' 1.) 



a: 



l,_„{.,.j,i,,,fj 



■:d I'ailer.-i 



Delegates to State Confer- 
ence to Meet at Mer- 
chants in Morning. 






Ullt.-3 ".\ 

IX- iiiaii 



. r the eri.w n, ' Poi.^t 

■'.< -titueiii y of Ea.-it 

i-ttion. On the 

ed 5.1 if> \■^i■-^ 

•" 1 1 1 .- i ■ • ■ . J I 

i'remier Asfjuith «>m.-red the i 

■ (a\- li.. wa.s er-et'-.I with a 

• r,.iti,>n fro'u the ntembers oq tl..* 

•ri.il sid.'. lie shortly afi.rward i 

re the crowded eliamber to ; 

~ I>roini ed ttat.-nieiit on th^< ' 

l*relMier'<» S*ateiiieiit. 

'i'he pr.-iiiii-t .s;.iil 

'•Afier full fo( <5j.!. ,. ! lold Mar- i 

:tll Fir-iii-fi and Ad.ii. tl.-n. Kwjrt have 
's;.--'<-.i ill tiiei ■ d*-sire to be rf-lieved ' 
■ '-s. In the publir inter, ijt. 
;lort the d.'(i.«i.in of the.*.* 
• rs. fiiid J i-annot sp. .ik 
.(• art .'(1. -fully of the .ibiiity, ' 
n wilh which tb'-» 
■iti' •tiol the ar'T.y, 



II op}) inent.-i of th'- r.i'- il f'-U 

ll v. leit SUeh Colo; i:-it :!i- 

I . A into the «-<MitriVer.-. ■ !'.'•> 

did If t. iindL-!.-' ii'.d tt;e it'tiv'-a for it. 

The pres«idei!t .>»aid he h.ad n.. anxiety 

-t to atiy pdiiic'jl fri^r jn in the iK-m- 

•laii'- party ov-r 'h- i>sul». and re- 

f..! red to th-,' rep'-al i ..nt»--" i 

"eapiial operail'jn," but ju.- 

\ als'-eii'-e." 

Mr. WiUon let it b» know: 
was I'lMjiialilie.lIy oiini».-<ei| lo :ii]> . ..ii- 
pr>Mni.-e or a!n--ndn:"nt.-«. tsiieh aa have 
b.-en prupo.-s d in tiie s.-nate. He iS 
:.>!• a ^iraisht rei>ea'. wiihoiit fftuiso- 
. at ion. 

Retiiliided of a Sti>r>. 

The WIm 11. .Uj- laiei ;i .::..; .>'d 

nuotation of what :he pre.-^idcnt had 

-aid In .'iTisw.-r to th.- eh ir»fe to iii" 

rief t that th- ;>r. siden' h:id made a 

l.-al with Sir William Tyrr-ll. priv.il-* 

>M r«'lary to t^ir FdwarJ iJre.'., the 



bntf wax ♦hrotifr'h tii.- si« -eih whrn It 
I.., •.•line ■•\'Vrt.-nt liiat b.- xxas t-onviii- 
• •mn iiie i>ull'--ui..-. wh'-n om of T<ou'.'» 
pariisai s in the bai k of the room | 
. ried out: 'Tom. 'loiii. call him a liar 
and mak- It a ti^hf That is th« 
btaye thi.s has j-taebed " 

Th.- presi.l. rifs audilor.s a><k.'l bini 
if h'- -.^ HS K->!im to ti;?h!. an. I h-- .sinii- 
ii-.ily an.-vv. i.-d that he aid not m-ed 

ni»rriiiMn Opened l»ebnl«'. 

il.-pre; lltalll e loi' li.l!:^ of Mirtii;^an, 
ehairiuaii Ot ti»e I>-moeralie <-on>;re;4- i 
' clonal i-ui.unltfc*>. led off the liuhl .mi ; 
r. pealinw the Fauama toll.s <'.\emp- 
lion in the hou.-.. today. It wa.s the j 
third day ..f deiial. ou Hie .(U.-slion. | 
I-Apre.ssjt.;? r- «ret that he diit.-red , 
with the i.iesid- til. he d.-tlar.-d that) 
t;rvat Hrjf.in liad admiilvd the .\im.rl- I 
can lijiht to e<eni|il eoa.-^lwise trade 
in>m lolls. 

•if we cannot primt free lran.«it to 
our :<''iip.-< throtiKh ih^ ean-il." lu- •■^'•'*^ 
"it.i bt-n-lils will n<-erue to lOiifiUind 
aiid not t'» oarn. Ive.s." 

H.- d.. lared that tie' I'ai nenie peace- 
er.d'>wn..Mil, -whi.-h derives an annual 
inc.-mo of .55i"»."'.im from SL ••! trti8t 
loml.->. wafi iiU'Sl artiv.- in r. s. uin.t; the 
I atioi-.al honor by promotinK th 
l.-al of the law that f.r.-.a I'.rilain ...... , 

•'dmilted we hid a treaty right l'> en- 
act." .. I 

Xew Bill !»>• Senator Fa!l. 
Senai.^r Fall. U- ir.ii.i.i. .ui. of A<-w 
Mexb .», ga,.- th.- 1 onirov- isy a new 
a.~p' <-t by inirolu.-iim a bill to loihid 
ih;il tolls be levied <'ii Atnero;in coast- I 
wise ve-:3el.=« or ih.'.-e belon;TitiK to ^ 
•i-itizeiis «t nnv ountry upon this eon- 
tiiieiit and enRaR.-d soKly in Had.- be- ' 
iw.'i^ii T'oti^ of Xorih aid South Am- r- 
I. a, ..r b.Hh. and duly refii.-.ter.'ii uml--r , 
the Inv^s of the countrv of w hi -h tise | 
owners of .said vess.ds are cl ir/,.-n:>. ' 

He conten.l.-d it would work out to 
a lo»ji< al e-oi'lnsion 1 1"' polici s as 
orifri.ially t-onieinplated in the M iiiroe , 
doctrine. . 1 

••It would be ronvinilncr to Tir.izil, 
\rs.'ntitit'. t'hile. Mexico and other 
Latin-American .ounni^s upon this 
et.niineiu." .said he. "that the liiii.d 
' State.«i i.s in sood f lith in its annonnc.-d 
poli. y of friendshit> and williimne.s.s t<j 
nspi.-~i llie.«.> <'oi.int lie.-, not only api'iist 
aBKressions of foreii^n powers, but in 
th'^ d«.vel.;ipnient of iheir ow»i re- 
sourei-s." 

Spenkw Fr«>m Invalid (lialr. 
Fr.iin an iuv-ili'l <liair in ihe lioe.'.^e. 
P.epresentative I.Engrle, ]»einoirai. ..f 
Florida, made -i viRor. >us spe. -li opf>o.= - 
inu the rep. aJ and d.noun.ina 'he at- 
titude of ' ;r-at F.t iiain. 

Senator ••w.-n. nn-' of t>ie .ndmini<i >-a- 
tjon'.^ ^*talirlChe•'*t suup.ti i.-rs. «-\|ir. >sed 
the opinion today that two we.-ks v.iKild 
be all the senate would reuuire fur 
d.b.-iie. 

S. n.^itor Kern, the Democr.nl i.'- le.ad- 
er. told tie- '.lesid. Ill that wliib- the 
d.-bate would be longer than at firt?t 
had b,-e!t . xpecti d. lie- f|U<-stion Would 
be liispos.d of W'tho-.ii delay. 
Stippirfrd itepe.il lllli. 
The T'rc.-:;i;' tii'j» ri m-^. u a.-; vjjor im- 
!y d.ren.j 1 by riei>r<-.>enta t i ve ll.iinll- 
Icn (>( Mi. hi*;. in. K'-piiblican. 

••Thi.« is not B mailer of party poU- 
tir.';," sai I he. "To R.'rnbli.aii..<. Difio- 
crat.-= an.l I'ros r.-.vsU es il oiiuht to be 
.'■eft~iri.it to remind th.-'ii th.-it all liave 
declared a^'S!i,«t nionopoli-'.s." 

n--i>ri seniativf MoM.itriie r>e!P'ierat, 
of Virginia, suiiport -d the rep.tl bill. 






Club Committee Secures 

Appropriations for Roads 

and Bridges. 

A iiieelins of the Kenwo..d dub w ts 

ii'-M al the* scnoulhoube at KenwooU 

p.ark, Sntur<!a> evening, at 8 o'clock. 

thj follow illy t.ieuib. rj be ins pre.«ciil: 

iltoryt: Kreai:'. r, li« rl larvell, F. !-. 

FuKer, Joint Dinkl.-, \v'. D. :.I.l..ain. 

S. Keller, A. Ucon, .loe Kleis.-l. 1{. 

leske, J<.:-.'i»h L.nfarv.-, M. llryan. 

i'lh'jiiii- Holder, .1 r., Thonia.s Holder. 

Sr.. .luluis tiaizke. .John jCozloski, 

ilenry Kas.si tl. Frank Bars;. ulou.v, 

lotto Zeiglvr. ThoiJiHa Furk.-, F. M( - 

, Ouinljer, Jclin ivlolilor, iJeoijje M.litoi, 

' Mil.e (.Jiernel. Jnnn 'liernei. Mike 

'Kuroi-I.i, A. iMeriiifi, Franl* l'i« riiiK. 

!.lohn 'I'isciier, L. IhnMe. Fred l>inkle. 



i>uluth. A tnov.ment ba.'^ b<-rn started 
amonK the.'^c fn.-nds to raise a sum ...f 
money with wJiicli lo tinhl an appeal 
of the c«se. 

A me. ting <^f those Interested i.« to 
be held toiuorrow niyht in the AVest 
end. 

r>ah].'=!trom was convicted about two 
weeks txi^o afi.'r a .sensational trial 
in whi'h witnesses clHini.-d that he 
had ben inst itimental in eniieii;^ a 



i!U"-b"-r of '.('ut 
hollies under th. 
Soti;t- of th.'.-'e 
brtiusht to the 



sr wo>r«n frim 

' Kuis»* 1. 1 I'-U- 

yoiinii vv.iineii 

Stan.] and te.-<- 



1 1 rii e 

tii.;r 

Kion. 

were 

tiii.-d th:it he had Rope tl;rouklh a 

forni of marriage with them. l.»ahl- 

htroiu was in l>uliilh for Pome time, 

several years ajio. and tia i tniil.' » 

1'o^o^^iIl^ in tliia city. 

— « 

Mis.'joxtrl broke all record? last year 
for ifie \ahie i>f il.s iniiieral pr'iduct i<»n. 



F.rilain h.nl ! .\. M-<Viml!-r 



Til.,- p'esi- 

the chariie 

!i'. i-'pli-d: 

I ji \ti.-If. It in 

ot a tiumber 

:i introduced 



I esitet 



ll !•! 1 

that 



ii.'r:!5 
bo f. 



11 
d 
It 



Frilish f.rc'iin s"rr-t»!>- 
deiii b-id bi-.- n aski-d if 
were true. The pi -.ill. 

•i »f I ours.-, ttiat 
just ihe < rowni!:t; 
of in.^inU.-t w hi'h ha.v- o. 
in thi.-< d'-bri l- . 

"This whid" ihini? reinind* tr.e of a 
.'lory 1 used lo be fond -.f telling, of n 
\.r>- efl'-ctive d.ba'. r — 1 m-i-.J not .>^.iy 
wler. ihij^ 'liapp.-n.-d — who >.nt a ehal- 
leii;.;e down into a tonnty v. ry hostii" 
to bun. to d.-bate. The p.-f.!)le down 
lb. re did le.t like the job ver>- nuicli, 
but tb.-y put lip the iiian the\ lik. d 
bisi. atid who is gen-rallv put up on 
.-uci» Of. ii.siins. a «reaf b'n hii..»ky f.*l- 
lov. who.'.i they all <al!w-d Tom;. The 
chaHeiiKer wa?* sriv>-n ih-- first hour 
of the two liours tilloti.'cl to ih- d'-- 
bai. . and he hit J iiot sot more tiian 



Pub^c Dance! 

- I ;i-v .-.•! I :\ 
S1)<I\l.«s| I'AIMV. 
AlOnOltll M. \I'K|{. 1. 

.\'linifsi.)n _'i . enls. 
T't M-'i'io's (M'-hestra. 



A. S. t>l'.rien, Aupu>t 
CiMnonski, H. !=;j«ll, C.-ofije Camble, .\ 
Svvaii.s . AuiiU&t Johnson, Jo.viil. 

Lifjare. 

'the ineellnEr wa.s lo^ld for the pur- 
pose of hvarins the r'-porl of tlie i cuii- 
mitt-.-e aiM'oltiua Hi lie ineelinK held 
F.-b. 25, to tall upon the riiy and 
eouTity cteniniSKioncrs reg^ardiii.c tie- 
promised injiiiovemi-ni.^ on th.- biids-^e- 
at K - iwoo.i park, and the (iradirig of 
liie K'-nwood Jiud l-'arrell roa<i.«. 

'i'lie tk port of the coniMillee was 
received with mufh tnlhu.'-iasm by t le 
member.* of the dub. 

'iTu- i.inm.lUe it p.irted Ihfit < Ouiity 
Foitimii'si.iie-r .John Tischer had stt 
aside $i{,<iOO, and the < iiy commission- 
ers fS.U'Jn for ilie Kenwood hiid^es and 
road, arl that ("oiiniy t'ounnis.^ion.r 
Ahx I'raser had s-t at id.- .$l,i!0O for 
the Farrcll road, and that th.- ^■><y^- 
mit^pioiiv-rs promise'! to pii.sh the work 
to r irj.p'..o,ii.n al once. 

The plan.s call for a four-fool square 
conti-cle culvert t>ver tiie tiisl ii.-. k 
and an eight-f.x't Fuuare reinfurt-. d 
(<>n'-.-ete luUeri over t'besler creek, 
with a .solid till over both. 

About Iti.eio cu!)ic yards of earth 
will be moved and the hiils on both 
sides of the creeks cut dox'.ii to an 
ea-»y Blade. 

A ri.<oluiion was parsed ext< r.di:i)J. 
a v.-»te of thanks to Coinmis^ionei.* 
'li-ii her and Frasor. and t> M-i.v-o- 
I'rinc.- .iiid Fomn.is? ioner.s Mur.-hisun. 
Vo.ss, Merritt and llicken. fi-r t'o-ir j 
.•.j.irieous t r.-at Mi-nt of tin < ono'iitt.-'- I 
I wii'< h called upon th-in. al-o for liie ' 
money set aside for the improvements, \ 
an.l for their ri. cision io pro.-eed wi'h | 
this mut-h needed \v».rk. and Imish it Hi | 
the epriie.-i possible moment. i 

I A r>-!oliri(in v.-is also pass<^d fv- 
t-ii liner a t^cparat'^ vole of ihank.s to 
lohn '1 isclier and I'.eri Farrell. f..r ih-ir i 
iidivi.l.ial cfforis it' connection with 
the pr.'l.osed iiipJOVemeiits. 
. Interestine: lalics wore ijiven h.v John 
Tl-'c'ier. IJeri l-'arrell, T<.in Hold.-r. .Ir.. 
and otiur members of the .lab. The 
fidl.iv.inu officeis were ek-eted foj- tl .? 
lensuins xear: .lohn Molil..r. pn .^id'-.'t : 
' W. l>. M'cl,;iin. ireasuri r; F. K. Ciilvei. 
i seeretarj . 

0^ ^mm 




The People's 
Handy ^ 
Column ' 



£j^ 



i^ 



CWith the approach of winter come thouglits of houseclean- 
ing. wlien many articles consitlere*! useless are Rciiteinetl to 
the junk pile. Before executing the sentence, it \yil! pay yuu 
to consult tlie advertisements in The ileiald ""Repair" columns, 
where you will lind reliable repair firms, who can put t!. 



aged articles in iirst-class condition. 



Key, Lock and Safe Works 

»;un Repairing a Specialty. 

DULUTH GUN SHOP. 

20.1 WcKt KIrsi Strrot. 

Melro.ve AiH.'. i:iau<i l-l'58-A. 

We Do All Kinds of Mt lal Woik. 



3D<5r r 



Grassinger, the Tailor, 

Maker of CJouJ Ciothcis. Altering:, 




cleaning 
and repair 
". ork done. 

:ii \\>st 

.*-:ireet. 
(Upstaiis) 




y -■ -'.ni- 

<h.»p In 

ll;4>-A.!rth- 

T.'-»t.: ifaS 
oidi-rs fjlv«i»- 
prf.n^pr 
nit '-n lion. 



■M. 



Hunrd ol . r 



hriuma 



de r.hig 



LUDWIG 



WOLF 



(Jraduntc of the 
\"."alchn;akin.^ t 
^£,(ay. Germany. 
^^ Otlitc- and w.irkroo::. at 
',t ^.*-*s>^S j'f residence, 

fe*.:CtA® 127 Tench Ave. East 

i'lioiie. i;r:.i:d J - • ;. 



% 



Jewelry and Watch Hospital, 

\ 17- 




UslabiisUtd 

in 

Dnlulh 

?1 x.ars. 



^^;a3d%- E. C. Lang,, -' '■»"■ /^^^^P^^ '"'"■ 

iL.t^"-^-'-""'- IslLDn^G III JEWOiRi 



Ave. North. 







feiioi: SHOPS: 



YOUR OLD 

siiOF.s MA dp: 

LIKE Nl \V. 

17 .Sl.t 0\D .\\l 
12 I'oitr'a A\.' 
10 ru'M Ave. \\. 



I 






Red River Valley Soil Tillers 
Will Soon Be Seed- 
ing. 





Our url.otr.t?a:if de- 
piiruiifiiii, clf.'V is a 
w!i!-ilc-«t j'j.ir iliNnaiid 
cn!> \\>r rios. t-.mijietrtit 
men enijiiineii. IL.tt our 
man . ijl and gne joxi 
cs'.liuaes. 



Uoi sirluRS s.: 

ilcr. I.ir'y n..-- : 

t'.-l<l:i< ;•• «!.-li-.-! fr...i', 
K.r u 111 .Joialp .Imrv'rt 
M-e «-l!l itlmTMitf j-iiiir 
lialr matUvs* umi i*tuia 
!; a... ,L.oJ a; r.t-w. 




^.^* 



S. KELLY FURNITURE CO., 

ii(-lly Biiiiditig;, 17 und 19 \\<'-t Supei-Jor St, 



( 



I 



SD8a 



Conn'ibiii 



'>0 SIh 





form 






I 



We fit all feet and ^-uarantee all slioes 



. -• .' Mi'-n.. March SO ' i , 

fali:iets lliloU^'hoUt tlie lied I'Jvel \ i' 

l..y country are purch.H.siiiK their s.-ed 
ur the .spring .season and arrans. - 
ii.enls are beintr made to |nu in m.-iny 
.icvi- of si'iall grains and e.-)>eeially 
corn this y.ar. Farnif-rs from Illinois, 
Indiana. l.'>\ a and oLli. r Central stai-.' 
are moviuK h.-re and prep.irint; for the 
tprinjj Feason. From tii.sent in.iica- 
t;(.ns see.liniBr will be^^in in the <ours<- 
of tv\ o we. ks. 



NO REPORTS 

FROM BATTLE 

.1 from pa j 

re'inV" lo- vi.-a:- a-k-Hl. i 

"I tliink ih.-re has bc-en no n.-wf since' 
last nlKht." v\u.-i tie reply. 'iv liii p.-. 
• len, \'illH has not yet laK.-ii the city.'* 

H<^ -idled th:it he h.id no oc<a>ion to 
'.e.dify bt-, decree of. !.:overnl .nonths 
ago wboti*in lo- stnl.-d th.-ii jio act or 
i-ontract of the lltn r(;i '^o. . inni'-nt 
\\..u!J h.. r.i i.un:::.-! .-;|i..uld th.- revolu- 
tion (ju'-ceed in capfurtns Mexico c'iiy. 

\\ hell tho lo-M s|i;,p,:.r men \^•ere iti- 
tr.'ilnc.-l to Oen. C'arranza, he smiled 
and sa:i|: ■ 

"Well. T Fiippo.-e you want me to I 
say ><.mi-t liitiK." I 

"Hp«»er TlilMRii roininu." 

The insinuation wasadmitt.d and the 
u -n.-ral, after th- m.inn.-r of a man 
who r.^cr.grni^ed a rather wearisome! 
duty. orat-?d: ; 

'"'I'lie time Is eoieir.tr wli. n tlie whole ! 
W'lrld can plainly se.- that th.» preat i 
< aus.' of whicll 1 have the honor to be ! 
til" head, is the .-.-tn.-e .f ju.-ti. e. The | 
patii of beti'-r things is oiieniiiB' up 
Mi'd thi' day of r-t : ibuii'.n for trr-achery 
and infamy dr.i-.\s elo^••." 

It wa-; dusk when ihe cavalcade 
iTioutit'-d or. e acain »>Tid slatted on .a 
trot for til.- city. The .-tr.-eis w^. re 
illunii e.aied and the trlunipliHl arches j.. 
i.l.ized with many colored incandescent i i<-seued by police huirie>l froii Krown.- 








TRUNKS ! 

Begs and Cases. 

Mt 'St rca.'^i.nahle 
prices in 1 )uUit]i. 

win Ports Trunk Co. 
21 Lake Axe. Xcu'lli. 




( nil i-ind examine 
tlie INDL\N 

with tlie ci.-,;^iC 

;'.c'cn iv" <-•' \\'' i',">~ 



ihc 



STRIKERS STON 
FRiigHT TH 




V \ T l^ffi"^^- Cc'inc in here 



^y^ rre..ed or re 



d. 



^^;^pa!! 



red. 



.-^tarier. ami ir_\ 
ment \<>ur-'-lf. 

V^ALTER KOLMBERG. 
109 Easi First St. 

Shoe Repairng 

P.oth lintel an I mo 
work. Our i>il th-.d > 
biiiini;: loih pr..-. 
paiisl;;rtory. 1- : - 
do \ our work. 

Chi is Olsen, 

523 W. MI'-liiqrJin : 



Wobody Hurt in Riot on 
Branch of Pennsyl- 
vania Road. 

T'itlsbnrp. I'a., March 3i'. — A freii;ht 
crew on tlie Mononpahela division .f 
the I'ennsx Ivania railr<iad wa.« atiac '.. I 
early today at Fn deriikstow n. T'a.. i. 
a n-.oU of 5'iO ..r more persons. Sloe 
Were thrown and shots were fir.-d. but 
no one V. R.^ hurl. The . «cw finally was 



The Duluth Artificial 

Limb House, \ 

i Inventors and M.inufacturers of ; 
th.- I-'uciis Cushion S.tcket I-!nib3 j 
and F.-llen Feet. i;i I'.r-i Ave. ! 
-i Kafct, Dulutli, Mlaii, 



DULUTH 

FUR 

PARLORS 

— Fine Furs — 
2r> i; A.sr si i*i lii 




Clran.l 1 
II r M:a<lf 



Tdii-V — M. ll 1 
to <>r«!rr .ip 



I t.'sLiireil. 




EXPERT PIPE RE- 

PAIRING AT 



■^ 




hiilbi 

i.en. iarrari^a wn.s wildly chepred. 
He spoke in n.-know l.rJmii.Mit of the 
v.ileonie. and then r. paired to tlie 
house pet a.siJe f.r him. 

t U-n. tlarran.^H said In- exp-rted to 
spend .sever*! da\3 in .hi-irez, prob- 
ably till the bait I- of Tone- ! 
eided. 



vi!b 

This was tin- m'..st s< rio'.is of a soi ;. ,- 
of dislurhanc -s that ehnrucl. r:z'-d th-- 
siiile c>f trainm-.-n on the division dui- 
iim the niulit. 

Ttn* information reached lure at n .on 
that baders of th' I'nited Mine Work- 
. r.'- nt Fniontown. I'a.. b.-td called oul 
n>emb.-rs of tl\e tiniori in mines which 
:ai>plied <oal t>> I/, iin.sylvanla r.-iili..^..l 
.nt:in.s. iin<il tin- strike on tin- Monon- 
nah.la .|i vision was settled. Tie old. r. 
effei tiv.- toda.v. will bring oul appioxi- 
i] Ml. i \ (1,1111(1 r.i.-n. 



lI'^-P M ? CorniT F, fill A'Pniir West 
V'*' ttr*:: I e and SiL-^friur Street. 

^ ^^Trg^'-'^ fluL'licr, CfCuluiJ, Horn 

w 



KF ••t9 rr 



and Anibir bt fis; .'lisa 
Buwis lor Cnlaliasti. Clay 
or M.:cr8Cliauiii. 



Artistic Shoe Repairing 
Popular Prices. 

OR EN SEN 

SHOE STORES 

^AINT PAU1.-M I N N EAPOLIS-DULUTH 
12S Wc-l Siiprrior Slris'l, 




TrnckH and ('MpttireK 'fiiief. 

ralvl'i. X. D., March 3'). — (.^pt.ial to 

The Herald.) — Throntjh the d.sire of a 
I neislibor to seiur*- seed wb- at. H. P. 

Coder was nble to capture Alphonse 

Fo.>«ter. a half-breed, who had stolen a 
; load of Kr<in. The n.it:hbor was 

sc-nrchinff for some stra.v h..r.«e3 ami MeiV.beiS Of Hciiga Clllt Mav Come tO 

Dahlstrom's Rescue. 



HAS SOME FRIENDS HERE 



fi.ir some str.-iy 
noticed a man loadine prain at Codt r s 
^;r-inary. Kelievift: Coder had feed 

train for .sale the neiphbor telephoned . , , . 

to ask the price. The conversation "R-v." Albert Hatilstiom. found-r of 
il.veloped what had transpir.d and the "HeliKa^' .-ult. who was conv-.-t.-d 

■" .Seattle. Wash.. 

iin»' f I iends In 




JOHN R. 



HALL CLOCKS 

F.nnlish, ."Su i.ss, Fr» a .. 

ANo >Iii>ii- Boxesj 

Kepairf'd. 

ro ycar.s' experience. 

Have repaired the best 

clock:; in Duluth. 

Old ph.inc, I.,ake.«ide, 

300-K. Work called lor 

and delivered. 

KAWKIXS. JOHN R. 



1 I.' .1 r-an wilie 3 
' tip|:e.' b'.ilt. i.ioii'li A 
bi-uer seruKJii. Uia*..' 
a lic'ttcr mouse lra|> 
llian Ills nciu'.ilK.r— 
fvcii tliO'ifcii lie liulld 
his l;.'ii.-e in Hie 
wi.Kls — tlie wor; ! 
will mal;e a iKalt-i. 
"liatli to Ills Jour. 

HAWKINS. 



Conii>lie,Tted 

Wutrlie.s, Aiii'-rl- 

can. Swi-ss, 



French and I-lng- ;t;^| 

lish Clocks 

Rrpalrt^d by the 

lat.st p.rf.-clcci 

lattoiy process. 

IVrsoiial 

Attention. 

JOHN al. H.V\VKIN.S. 




' C<ild.-r tra'ked the man Feven miles and ■ un-l.-r the Mann a«-t in .Sc 
Icaptuitd liiin with ihe grain. 're.ently has e\i.lently soi 




lErBahr' 



'I he Coniic'rt 
T'.caiitv Parlors- 
20 West 



Spring Opening Days 




Cbircpodisl 



Superior St. , 



CWhy not have your 
card in this list? If you 
are interested, call up 
either phone 324. 



Tuesday 9 Wednesday and Thursday ^ 
March 31st and April Isi and 2nd 

Duhith's Only All-Cash Dcparlmcnt Store. 




^t>£^ 



21st Xvenue \Xcst and Superior St, 

Will Introduce to You Authentic French 
Fashions ior Spring it\ 

Cloaks, Suits and Millinery 

Hfijlj-cfiiss reproductions of the best foreran moc' els, fashioned oj ihe smarf- 
esnnatcrialsfor ihe coming season. We cordially invite your presence. 




-<^«fe 




When You've DecSded You've Thrown Enoeigh $10 

Bilts Away on Clothes Let Me iVSake 

Your Spring Suit for $15.00. 



Why .=hould yo\i p-^y $25 or 530 for 
•1 made-to -niea.su re .-uiiV \\'ti:ii is there 
about a suit t'lat should make it ost 
ibat much? Three or four yards of 
. loih — the cutlins -iriinmins — -ewinj?".' 
So Fir! It's tlie pi oce..^.s by which it's 
made. 

Th'^ man who buys his cloih by the 
.--ingle piece, like tin- sniall . ustom 
laihir. pays a bis price fur It. The 
!.i)4«er man who buys by the holt, pays 
;i bit? price. The-:.e in.-n pay th< man- 
ufacturers a t)t..1it. the .iobber. the 
.vholesal.-r. and then th.-y ad.i on their 
own- -and you pay $J5 or ?30 for the 
suit. 

'ilial's the whole scheme, fcllow.s. 
\'.r,t il.-tcn. I am a bram ii of tl;e 
i:i:i=.s<JW Woiilen Mills. Our \\c.olcn.< 
• r'- Ji^ured in carloads. They come di- 
leci from the b...in.=i. to our bier lloors. 
V. h. re they ar>' inspect.d, shrunk and 
} croiltd. 'Vhink of what we save, fel- 
lows. Think of iiow little tlie ,ioods 
lor a suit eosl.? us. N'cxt to iiolhins. 



i c. Ull i. , 

yoii th« 

■ . - . L . , - • r 



Then we s«-ll direct to yon 
out jobbers, .sub-jobbers, w 
and all their proi'us. And lie 
fellows, that I «an m-ike 
..<\vellest lillh- Spriii- 
graced y<iur back' foi 

llreak awa.v fmm "■ i r.ii;..\ il- a 

that .^IS ca'i'l bii:. mali-l .- 

III. asure suit. Jiisl i>..i,.i. i .bout what 
I've I. lid you. It's modern busiu- .-.3 
th.at makes this 1 .\v price possible. 
You've b< en following an old ru.-fty 
i(i.-a tiiat's eo:-i .vou S\<> more for every 
suit vou've boiifihl — I "has... it! I...I me 
in.ike- vour Spring suit. Fay me $2Tt 
f..r the' suit and 11! nut a crisp ?]•• bill 
in tJie rinht hand pants pock' t. or p 
111.- ?15 str.'iieht. Take na.- up? i;eoix.j 
Mills. Mur. (;ias2.iw' Wctob-n 
Stor.-. 333 We.-=t i-Jiiperlor .'treet 

p. S. — I've KOt the tinest 



or pay 
Mills 



ord.-r pants pi". .position in town. IWg 
iilar S5. ■?•; and $7 ir-.user.s are j;^oinf 
now for $:i."5. Com^ in and lo.d»- tlen 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 














w»««r//4 









teCiife/a^irSU.'^c^i^' 





\ 



THE EAGER PURCHASERS POURED IN ON US ALL DAY— 

THE FIRST DAY OF 

GRAND REMOVAL 

EVERYTHING MUST GO — Beds of all kinds. Dressers, Chiffoniers, Dressing 
Tables, Rockers, Chairs, Springs, Mattresses', Bedding, Window Shades, Portieres, 

Yard Goods, Draperies, Library Tables, Book Cases, Magazine Racks, Foot Stools, Jardiniere 
Stands, Lamps, Dining Tables, Buffets, China Closets, Serving Tables, Dining Chairs. Tea Carts, 
Dinner Chimes, Dishes, Cut Glass, Rugs of all kinds ancP sizes, Davenports covered in anything 
you might wish. Kitchen Cabinets— the well known kind. Kitchen Tables, Tinware, Stoves (oil, 
aas. gasoline or coal and wood or the famous Champion Combination Gas and Coal), and a large 
line of Baby Carriages- ALL CO AT REAL REMOVAL SALE PRICES! 



'^ m a III II m ii iimm; 




mf II I II Tnininii 




i^ETiHiEiB Yoy mE fimmm to FyRiosiKi k ihiouse 

liSLE ^Oili— Oyi^ iBEM STOOeCS WBLL SME im m 



IF>LETE m A 
!¥ km TDUE 



■•its- ii.^ 





EVERYTHING FOR YOUR HOME AT BIG 
REDUCTIONS. REAL REMOVAL PRICES. 



No Exchanges 

or Approvals 

During This Sale 




There is a law prohibiting fake^ misleading 
or misrepresentation in advertising^ but 
it hasn't been enforced in Duluth as yet. 

— BEWARE OE THE EAKER! 



No Exchanges 

or Approvals 

During This Sale 





This Is the First and Only Real Removal 
Sale Now Going On in Duluth! 

We believe in, and live up to, the old saying— 

''Be Sure You Are Right and Then Go Ahead'' 

We positively announce our new location— 226 and 228 West Superior street, 

(XEXT DOOK TO .\3IKR1CAX EXCHiWGE XATION.VL BANK BUU.DIX G) 




E 





^ 



JA. 



mm, 1 Iff f 



',q;;\ ■'' ,.' Q H'O','^"^!' ^ . Q 



Hi'^ 






^OJ^lW£^%:) 





For A II Those 

Who Wish, 
Wt Can Make 
Arrangements 

for the 

Payment of 

Purchases on 

Easy 

Payment 

Plan. 




IVIay 



Second Ave. W. and First Street 




After May 1st at 226 and 228 West Superior Street — Exchang^Tak 



All Our 

Oiit'Of-Town 

Friends Need 

Not Hesitate. 

We Have Made 

Arrangements 

to Pack, Ship 

and Pay the 

Freight on 

Purchases You 

May Make. 







D Ainomhopt Original Price Tags on Every Piiece of Furniture— Everything Marlced in 
liclllclllllcl ; Plain Figures on Large "Removal" Tags. You See Your Own Savings 










>. » 


----- -V** 


^,^^.^- 












































* 


- _l 




1 1 


^■ME. 


1 




F" 




* 


























, 


• 


i 




































1 

1 


1 





Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 

'■ JO 



March 30, 1914. 




V 



K? 



t 



I 



THE DULlTfl BERALD 

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER 

Pabllnhod oery rTonli.K except S«ll- 

dar by The Herald Compauy. 

Both Telephones — Business *^ff'<^®' *-*• 
Kditorial Rooms. 1126. 



(Iter at the DuVith txwt- 



•rUca under flie trt of conireu of March ?. 15*0^ 



OFFICIAL PAPER. CITY OF DILITB 



SrBSCRIPTIOX RATES— By Ma J 1 pay- 
able In advance, one month. 35 cents 
three months. H: «»«, "»o"^^^• if; 



procc-ses of monopoly-mak 
the processes of egitiniate 
enterprises discovi^red to be 
was found necessury to abandon the 
whole project, and leave the issue of 
what constitutes monopolistic prac- 
tices to rest wht re it does now — 
largely on the m< asurc of intent as 
disclosed by evidence in court. 

It would not be surprising if, from 
this experiment, those who hold that 



iing and ii 
business J WQT' 
t, that it 1 1 



s Tasks Not All 
On the .Firing Line 






From thr (lain- of (leor«e Albert Srhrelnw, c»p- 
tiUu of atilll<«i) 111 the llocr »riiii durUia the 
Ute South Arrkaii War, yubllilKa 1" AJ 
\eutura. 



■w 



When theSap Begins to 
Run in the Sugar Trees 

Tnm the PUUartolphla Retord. 



Statesmen, Real and Near 



Bs Fred C KtOj. 



The commando to which my artillery 
unit was attached during the retreat 
from the Tugela river early In March, 
1900. was to be presented with colors. 
The good women of the district had 
turned out a work of art. A commit- 



one vear'^M- Saturdav Herald, Jl per i industrial growth, even to the point ^gg of ^en anU women, all of them 
yearT weekly Herald." $1 per year. j monopoly, is iti obedience to nat- ! Past the heyday of life, was to present 

Dally bv carrier, city and suburbs, 10 , *•'.._, .,....,._. :_ I the flag to the commando, with ap- 



nior.th. 



cents 'a week; 46 cents a 

Subwrlber, will foufer • faTor bj making known 
»ny iXJiDptalnt of servlc*. 

Wben charting the tddreas of r>ur r»P«r. » ■ 
teportant to give biith e ld ar.<i new adJre'acs. ^ 

The Duluth Herald accepts adver- 
tising contracts with the distinct guar- 
anty that It has the largest circulation 
In Minnesota outside the Twin Cities. 



ural economic lav and therefore in- j propriate speeches and prayers 
escapable, found aid and comfort and 
evidence strength<?ning their belief. 



Over In France a mountain Is mov- 
ing down over the country. How much 
faith would it ta ie to stop a moun- 
tain? 



You know that the two De la Reys 

were shot yesterday," said the veld 

cornet to me. as he watched Father , talgia of the most acute sort when he 



A little dispatch In the newspapers, 
which was probably unnoticed by per- 
sons who know nothing • of country 
life except the glimpses they get of It 
In a summer's vacation, sent thrills 
through the system of every person 
who had had the inestimable advantage 
of being brought up in the -country. 

F&rmera owning sugar busliea on the south aide of 
hUlii In Berkshire county (MadsachuselU) began 
tawing Uie maple trees today, mil tJ>e fl«t run ot 
■•p wa» roi!< rted to be unusually ^^^^^-J^" " 
the beet maple sugar seasons In years Is eipected. 

Ah. back to the farm! Who that was 
ever reared on a farm can escape nos- 



Washington, March 30.— (Special to 
I The Herald.) — Imagine the sad plight 



set his heart on 



The Herald tvIII be glad to have 
Its attenlloB c«IIe«l to any mlOrad- 
liig or untrue state ment wlilcli may 
appear In Its uew». editorial or ad- 
vertlaiuK rolumna. 



MR. MILLER AND THE CANAL TOLLS 



and Mother De la Rey get off the 
wagon that had conveyed the presen- 
tation committee to the laager. 

"You know the family well, don't 
you?" 

"Somewhat," I replied, anxious to di- 
vert a sad mission. 

"Well, it'll be up to you to break 
the news to them." 

Before I knew what had happened 
the veld cornet had walked off. Old 



Congressman Miller of this district 
was reported in Saturday's Washing- 
ton dispatches to have said that while' man De la Rey spied me. shouted, j go along after him and drive wooden 



hears that sap Is running? Just think 
of the old sugar bush and Its Joys! 
It Is still cold, and there is plenty of 
snow on the ground, but the trees and 
the birds know that spring is at hand. 
Everything freezes at night and thaws 
at noon, and the effect of that oscilla- 
tion of temperatures Is to make the 
sap run. 

Pa goes out with his auger and bores 
holes in the pugar maples. The boys 



THAT GARBAGE COLLECTION 
PROPOSAL. 

It ^as become very manifest that 
there is a good deal of opposition to 
the plan of turning the city's garbage 
collection over to a corporation. 

Nor is it confined to the many Du- 
luth citizens who now make their 
livings by collecting garbage. 

The general sentiment seems to be 
that until the city gets ready to take 
this work over itself, the present sys- 
tem is satisfactory. 

One point in The Herald's Friday 
discussion of the proposition it did 
not bring out strongly enough. That 
is that the proposed system would be 
non-competitive and monopolistic. 
That's always a dangerous condition 
to invite. 

As it is now, if our "garbage man" 
docs not satisfy us, we can get an- 
other. Competition is eager and ef- 
fective. 

Under the proposed plan, if our 
"garbage man" did not satisfy us, we 
could not get another. There would 
be no other to get. Unless we could 



he was against the toll exemption pro- 
posal on econom c grounds, he could 
not reconcile hin self to "British dic- 
tation." Tiierefore it was deemed 



"Hallo," made a 



crowd and began to pumphandle my 
arms. 

"Glad to see you." he shouted. "My 
how you huve tanned up! Whore are 
, my boys?" » • • 
likely that he would vote against re-: l don't remember under what pretext 

I finally induced old De la Rey •" 



dash through the j spouts Into the holes and hang palls on 

the spouts. And by and by they go 
around again and find the sweet juice 
In the palla, %nd they drink some of It 
— of course, Jttst a mere taste to see 
how the sap this year compares with 
that of last year. It Is nectar. Isn't It? 
And when « lot of this sap Is col- 



to 



of a boy who has 
being the champ 
nelghdorhood, b 
twine to his back. 

That was the situation of Charles F. 
Marvin, now chief of the United States 
weather bureau. 

When Marvin was a lad of 10. back 
in Columbus, Ohio, he was morally cer- 
tain that all he needed was simply a 
lot of good, fine twine to sail a kite 
so high and so far that he would have 
the whole town Inquiring his name. 

And In the face of that vaulting am- 
bition he was obliged to content him- 
self with little kites that he flew 
with thread taken from his mother's 
work basket. 

• • • 

Other boys who had more spending 
money than little Charlie Marvin built 
big kites and sailed them with gay 
abandon, unreeling yard after yard of 
twine that they had gone and bought 



Wanted— A Real Man 

for State Executive 

views of the state press on a much needed 
change. 



Twenty Years Ago 



From Tlie Herald of this date. 1S9I. 



' 



./» 



A Fimt-Rate Kind. 

Albert Lea Tribune: The Springfield 
pion kite flyer of his Republican savs: "'No fu.s3' seems to 
ut hasn't a ball of ^^ ^j^^ guiding principle of Col. Goe- 

thals' life. A man Is lucky when he 
Is too absorbed In his job to have In- 
terest In speech-making." That is the 
kind of a man Minnesota would like 
to have for governor. 



That It Would. 

Breckenridge Telegram: The Duluth 
Herald and the Fairmont Sentinel 
think that Ole Sageng should be 
chosen as the Democratic nominee for 
governor. The party would do itself 
proud to select him. 



•**Ransom Metcalfe has been ap- 
pointed postmaster at Blwabik, St. 
Louis county, vice Chester Kilburn, re- 
moved. Metcalfe is editor of the M«- 
saba Range, published at Blwabik, 



Could He Get the Komtnatlonf 

Deerwood Times: The Duluth Her- 
ald, in a very able editorial, recently 
presented Ole Sageng, the "man be- 
hind the plow" In Otter Tall county, as 



•♦*The state convention of the Re- 
publican League clubs at Minneapolis 
elected John Goodnow of Minneapolis 
president for another year. F. C. 
Stevens of St. Paul was re-elected sec- 
retary, and William E. Lee of Lon» 
Prairie treasurer. Charles A. Town« 
of Duluth was a member of the com- 
mittee on resolutions, and Dr. Fred 
Barrett of Tower was elected one of 
the delegates-at-large to the national 
convention at Denver. 



For surely, in all the mass of ridic- mind to break the news to him, 

1 » .-,* i,,e K«.r. KrMi«1it First 1 sent Sixpence, a Kaffir who 

ulous reasoning tiat has been brought l^j^ ^^^ ^^^^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ ^^ g^t 



president, this is 
ulous. 

•British dictati m?" Where is there [ 
evidence of it? Is the president a' 



P^^^' I leave the tent, but if I am not mis- | lected the greet kettle Is filled with 

We trust since.cly that Mr. Miller 'taken I offered to introduce him to a | it and a fire lighted under it and the 

was misquoted, and that the roll call ! machine gun. At any rate we got no ^ ^ater begins to go off, but the sweet- 

* , '. ... ... ., further than the fire, some thirty paces | ness stays there. Aod when it Is pretty 

on the repeal bi.l will prove it. [from the tent, when 1 made up my thick the boys gather up snow on 

maple chips and pour some of the hot 
syrup on the snow and It Is converted 

._., . Into "wax." Has any city confectioner 

forth by those v ho are fighting the some water. I wanted to get him out j ever concocted anything so delicious 
ibout the must ridic- 'of the way. On the veld white men as that "waiT- 
iDOUi inc mosi rmic ^^ ^^^ permit blacks to see their emo- 
tions. 

"Well, uncle," I said, after the Kaffir 
had gone, "I have sad news to tell i that the amount of maple sugar he 
It.' is the presiaent a you. if you had stayed at home you sells Is greatif than all his trees would 
man who is likch' to succumb to for- 1 would have heard it b<>fore now." j have produced had they 

eign dictation against his own con- ! Two gray and piercing eyes looked , «j-rup Instead of sap. 

Has he seemed so to any 



in the marts. All the time Marvin knew I a suitable, efficient and powerful can- 
that he could build bigger and better didate for governor «' Minnesota on 
kites than any of them. But what was the Democratic ticket. Those who are 
the use of building big kites when he ' firm in the belief that this Will be a 
had nothing to hitch them to but j year of victory for the Democrats, rise 
thread. He simply had to fly his little 1 to nominate Ole by acclamation. Mr. 
and get what fun I Sageng is an exceptional politician, in 



infant size kites 



••♦The Trunk Line association has 
granted to the National Education as- 
sociation a half-rate and ticket exten- 
sion, refused for Duluth by the West- 
ern Passenger association. This lo- 
cates the convention at Asbury Paris 
next July. 



•••Judge Lewis has filed his decision 
upon the motions made sofae time ago 
in the Nehemlah Hulett will, ^ cases. 
Both were appealed from the probata 
jourt, one from an order refusing to 
vacate the admission of, the lyill "' 



of 



out of life he could. He put up with | that he knows the fame from start to , NeliemlahHule^^^^ 



finish and plays It for all he is worth. 
He deals from the top of the pack and 
knows a good play when he sees It. 
As a candld«fte for governor he would, 
of our story. All this language up to I without a doubt, be a mighty strong 



the jeers and rude jests of his play- 
mates — and bided his time. 
• • * 
That brings us down to the real point 



There are scurrilous persons who 
■ay that at this season the farmer is 
a large buyer of brown sugar, and 



victions? 



et the city government to turn aside j ^.^edited among the nations as 



g 

from the many important things that 
command its attention and give heed 
to our little garbage troubles, we 
would be helpless. We might as well 
go down and tell it to the winds that 
sigh over the lake as to plead with 
a corporation with a monopoly. 

City officials approving the plan 



Killed yesterday?" echoed the old 
man. Killed? Are they 



body? 

Is it in abjec* compliance with a 
foreign bluff that the president insists ' terday," I blurted out. 
on the nation's keeping a bargain it 
made with open iyes? Who seriously 
thinks it is so? 

Even though the bargain of the 
Hay-Pauncefote treaty were a bad 
one — though we do not believe it was 
— the nation is none the less com- 
mitted to it, and none the less bound 
to carry it out jr stand forever dis 



run thick 

It Is hard to 

Into mine with disconcerting steadl- [ believe that any man who has a sugar 

bush could be so wickedly unkind to 
the multitude who have not. But It 



ness. 

"What Is It?" said the old man. no 
louder than a breath. 

"Philip and Eramus were killed yes- 



don't mean that I have lost two of my 
boys — Philip and Eramus? Philip and 
Eramus!" 

There was a vacant stare In the old 
man's eye. It seemed to me that he 
had difficulty remembering who Philip 
and Eramus were. 

"Henry Is alive, however," I said con- 
solingly. 

I grabbed the old man's shouler just 
in time. Had I not done so he would 
have fallen into the fire. But the next 
moment he had regained his com- 
posure. 

I remembered that there was some- 
, c • 1 thing I wanted to say, but for the 

\\e have yet to hear of a single ;,.j^ ^, ^^ j ^,^,^,1^ ^^^ ^,,1^^ of it. 

individual in Mr Miller's district who For a few minutes the old man gazed 
would joiu him .n co.mciling a policyl '«» ^P-. "Vh.Mo'i'.ha.^Ji'Y.uSn 
of perfidy and dishonor. It will be upon him. and trying harder to gain 
better for Mr Miller if. when the vote I control of his feelings. Big tears were 
oetier lor .ur. ,'.,.• ,,• • running down his cheeks and over his 

15 taken, he remembers that his di5-| beard. 



may be. 

The reformers tell us this Is a com- 
mercial age and what with trolley cars 
and summer boarders the farmers have 
dead? You [ become well acquainted with a good 
many city people. Let us draw a veil 
over the commercial side of maple 
syrup. whlcl\ may possibly be tainted 
with the swscursed greed of gold, and 
let us think, as we learn that the sap 
r-.ins, of that jolly fire under the kettle 
In the suear-^kush, and of the "wax," 
and of the sugar which assuredly had 
no admixture of the brown product 
of the cane and which Is so fresh that 
It is barely hard enough to handle. 
Ah. why did we leave the farm!! 



country whose p'edged word is worth- 
less. 



say it would save the city treasury I t^j^j jg compose I of honorable people 
seven thousand dollars a year, and 



"God willed It," he said finally, a« 
oat sleeves over his eyes 



who e.xpect tlu ir representatives to ; ^e passed^ h^s^^^^^^^^^^ 



act honorably ;>nj to keep holy the 
nation's good iaith. 



Speaker Clare says congres-^men 
need more braltis th»n the president. 



that it would also save money to 
home-owners. The latter point is far 
from demonstrated; as the Xews Tji- 
bune said Saturday the price for hand- 
ling ashes is higher than the present 
rates. 

Yet presumably the corporation 

that seeks this monopoly expects to 

make money out of it — probably a 

vgood deal of money, or it would not 

be so anxious to land the franchise. 

That money must come somehow ; recognized in.^titution among 
out of the public. We hear of no many that an- makinjif for better 
garbage men getting rich under pres- things in Duluth. 

cnt conditions: and how a corporation There are f e a- things more whole- 
can come in and make good money some than to .ncourage the creative 
at lower rates is not made clear at all. 1 spirit among boys 

And if money is to be made out of 
this, t\hy shouldn't the city make 
it? That is, save it to the home-own- 
ers, which is the same thing or better. 

Even if 
to go into, the city should not put its 
own garbage men out of business and 
turn this important work over to a 
corporation without knowing beyond 
question that it is financially respon- 
sible; and so far as any public dis- 
closures are concerned that is some- 
thing nobody knows anything about. 



But again and again he wiped his 
eyes with the sleeves, lapels and flap* 
of his coat. Those tears would come, 
no matter how he tried to stem them. 
There was that peculiar pucker about 
hia lips that men show when some- 



now has been simply preliminary. The 
fact that Marvin was not discouraged, 
but hopefully bided his time Is the 
essential thing to keep In mind. Today 
Charles F. Marvin not only provides 
our weather and a never-falling con- 
servational toe-hold, but is also about 
the most conspicuous example one can 
think of, right offhand, to show what 
can be done with deferred hopes. It 
was a great many years before Mar- 
vin finally put it all over those other 
boys who had jeered at him and made 
sport of his little kites sailed with 
thread. But he did it. His case should 
be a great source of encouragement, 
comfort and Inspiration to us alL 
* « * 

Marvin outgrew the regulation kite- 
flying age and got into the United 
States weather service. Then he re- 
called his throttled ambition to sail 
kites higher than anybody else. This 
time he had a government back of 
him anrt h»» <"'^ "ot have to bother wltu 
thread; Instead, he got plenty of fine 
high-priced wire and he sailed kites to 
a height and distance that would have 
made those boys back In Columbus 
heartily ashamed of themselves. Mar- 
vin not only got the laugh on those 
Columbus smart alecks, but made more 
progress and broke more height rec- 
ords In the use of kites for government 
forecasting work than has ever been 
done before or since in the whole big 
wide world. 

You see It was a mere matter of 
waiting and keeping up hope. 
*■ • • 

Weatherman Marvin was always dif- 
ferent from other youngsters. When 
the average boy of his age was utiliz- 
ing a holiday to go fishing Marvin 



i candidate, and the Democrats would 
look a long ways before they would 
find a more efficient standard-bearer. 



tha 
other from an order denying tha right 
of Lucy A. Hulett to the homestead. 
The judge decides that the only ques- 
tion to be submitted to the jury la 
whether the alleged marriage agree- 
ment was executed by Mr. Hulett. 



His Specialty Was Women 

j Rehoboth Sunday Herald: Two 
' friends started out In life, each of 
! them resolving to pursue his own 

And one of them went out to see the | would disappear from his usual_ haunts | Minnesota" wilf awake to new political 



A Sane More. 

Breckenridge Gazette: What looks 
like the first sane move the Demo- 
crats of the state have made in some 
time came to light last week. The 
move. If It Is a move, originated with 
The Duluth Herald, which excellent 
paper came out with an able editorial 
advocating the candidacy of Ole O. 
Sageng of Otter Tall county for the 
Democratic nomination for governor. 
The Herald wields the greatest single 
political influence of any paper In the 
sfate and we might say Is greater than 
any other Influence, if we did not 
have the breweries and the railroads 
in mind, and Frank Day is a Warwick 
of almost national reputation. 

Political conditions are almost iden- 
tical with those which obtained in 
1904. when Bob Dunn went down to 
defeat before John A. Johnson. Party 
lines are lax. almost obliterated; s 
Democratic national administration 
has given the adherents of that party 
in Minnesota new strength and vigor, 
and at least the semblance of an or- 
ganization; people generally are dis- 
satisfied with the present state ma- 
chine and Its methods, and will vote 
this fall for the man, rather than the 
party; and last, but not least, Ole O. 
Sageng Is a vote-getter from up the 
creek. Make no mistake about that. 
And he is a shrewd and able politician 
and his candidacy Is being urged by 
shrewd and able politicians. W^e make 
the prediction right now that if Ole O. 
Sageng gets into the game this year 



•**F. Harvey, a mining captain from 
Bessemer, Mich., was visiting in We.='t 
Duluth yesterday. He will take charge 
shortly of one of the Rockefeller 
mines on the Mesaba. 



•••At a directors' mooting held at 
the Merchants bank at West Duluth. 
Cashier Thexton reported that all de- 
positors had been paid in full. Twenty- 
five per cent of the stock was liqui- 
dated, with the prospect of cancellinif 
a like amount in about two weeks. 



•••A. Maclntyre and wife of Lake 
Linden, Mich., were guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. D. McCall at West Duluth yes- 
terday, while on their way home from 
a trip to California. 



•**Mondschine & Album, jewelers, at 
503 West Superior street, opposite tha 
Windsor hotel, have dissolved partner- 
ship. 



•••William Hoskins' residence at^ 
Lake.sido was destroyed by fire yester- 
day during the absence of the family. 
The loss on the house was $1,600, and 
the furniture was al.«o totally de- 
stroyed. 



I3 that the basji of his opinion as to thing tugs roughly at the heartstrings, 
his own fitness for the White House? "Philip and Eramus!" he moaned 

^ once or twice. "My boys, my boysl* 

With much patting on the shoulder 
THE BOYvS' EXPOSITION. ^nd consoling terms— a veritable flood 

The annual b>y5' exposition, under [of them— I finally succeeded m brine- 
iiic <iuiiuai } , , , \ „„„/ Ing old De la Key to approximately his 
the auspices of the boys department , ^^^^ ^, ^^j^ 

of the Y M C A., has come to be a i "Who is to tell my wife?" he asked 

the helplessly, when It had dawned upon 
him that he would have to share his 
burden with the mother of the boys. 

My heart fell Into my boots, figura- 
tively, and, I thought, actually. 

"I could never tell her." pleaded the 

old man. "Won't you tell her? Please 

do! I am afraid that she su.spects 

something already from the many eva- 

life their work IS to be done with their I sive answers she got. It will kill 

braii.s. and even if skill at handicraft her!^UwlilJ.ili^her!'^^^^^^ 

is to be onlv U ed as a hobby to pro-l^jQuld make a better job of It than I 

vide rela.xation and change from the can? Im f»toge^her too blunt for so 

, . .1 „, ^f , ' delicate a job. I begged. 

the deal were a eood one i daily routine, there is nothing of a, ..^. j couldn't do it." Insisted the 

the deal N\cre a goou one j - ^,^^^ j^ j,^^^^ for the ' old Boer. "If 1 told her she would 

I . , . ■ ^ ct-ill Tt mak-inir carry on something frightful. If you 

I boy than to a -quire skill at making ^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^ control herself 

I things by the I unning combination of , better. We don't want to make a 
hand and brain. 
Therefore these expositions are 



Even if in after 



world and the other became a hermit. 
Afttr many years they met again. 
And tK^ hermit said: "There Is only 
one thing that T am curious about — 
women. Htkve you met any?" 

"Have I- m«*t any!" exclaimed the 
other, smiling. "Why, women have 
been my speclaJty." 
* "Are they vainV" 
"Very." 

"Are they inquisitive?" 
"Dear me, yes." 

"Is' it true they talk continuously?" 
"Oh, i-ea." 

"Are they extravagantr* 
"Y«B, enough to suit any taste." 
"Have they any good points?" 
"Well, I should say they have." 
"What are they?" 
"Well, they can be unselfish." 
"Indeed!" 

"And they save, if they love enough. ' 
"How interesting." 

"And they are good nurses. In fact, 
they differ widely In their capabilities. 
They are constant and inconstant, 
fickie and true, small and largo, char- 
itable, good, bad and Indifferent." 

The hermit grasped his companion's 

hand eagerly. 

I "My friend," he said, "this Is all very 

I wonderful to me — your k«owledge of 

that yoti I ^omen Is evidently extensive. And now 

tell me how, .many of them have you 

really knowjtr' 

And the friend replied: 
"One." 



and get permission to go through some alignment Jan. 1, 191B. 
manufacturing plant. About the hap- 

the first 



V^'hy !»Ilik IM Expen«lve. 

E. M. Chapman in the Yale Review: 
show of ourselves In the camp." i Among farmers, while competition has, w * * 

Well I broke the news to Mefrouw of course, ejlsted. It has rarely been ! bothered with congressmen about post- 
De la Rey— in almost the same man- of so exigent a nature. Their produce ; offices or anything not of the utmost 

had so 



plest day of his life was 
time he got Inside of a big glass works. 
By the time he was 15 he had been 
through almost every big shop and 
factory In his home city. 

As a boy, too. Marvin used to delight 
In getting hold of the works of an old 
clock and. taking the wheels all apart, 
after which he would make them do 
things they were never intended to do. 

When he got Into the Instrument di- 
vision of the weather bureau he went 
right along in the same way — got a 
lot of wheels and cogs and jiggers and 
made them do things they had never 

done before. 

* * • 

In con.«equence of doing exactly wh»»t 
he likes to do all these years. Weather 
Chief Marvin is so young for his age 
as to be almost a freak. The records 
show him to be 55 vears of age, but no 
one would take him for more than 
about 39. 

One thing that has helped him to 
keep his youthful look Is our old 
friend, the Simple I.iife. Marvin doesn't 
smoke, drink, tango, overeat, or sit up 
half the night talking about the high 

cost of tires. 

* * * 

One of the rules adopted and strictly 
adhered to by Representative Fess of 
Ohio is never to bother the president. 
He and Mr. Wilson have met frequent- 
ly at educational gatherings when 
both were college presidents, but they 
have never met face to face since Wil- 
son entered the White House. 

"The president is too busy to be 



t 11- ^^A /!»c«.rvp pnrounsement ner For an hour the old woman lay , v-- generally had so wide a market ; importance," says Fess, "and I have 
vaUiable, and (le.erve encouragemen. n^er.^^I.^or^^an^^^^.^^^^ ?bat the individual has found little never yet had anything iniportant 

This years exposition, it is ;innouncea, | ^^^ washed her face and attended the ^^^^ of chance to make a price except | enough to say to him to feel like tak- 



Tlme to Iny your last bets for the 
year on the Hon and lamb handicap. 



will be held May 8 and 9, at some pr€sentatlon ceremony as If nothing , ^ commodities of a quality higher ing up time so valuable as his 

VMil ue ueiu . •> ' .^r. K^rU- ' had happened. I than the standard; and In the great Occasionally a prominent constituent 

downtown phice where everjooaj , ^^ ^^^^ ^^,^ ^^^ ^^ ^^^^ Henry into! 'lorlty of; smjill farm products, no will drop In on Fess and ask to be In- 



will have a chance to see it. It will .he presence of his parents. When 

under finally I had virtually thrown him into 
my tent I closed the flaps and walked 



be Open to a 1 Duluth boys 



twenty. There will be three classes— | 
those under thirteen, those under six- 

In, 



ONE PROJECT ABANDONED 

The one item in the president's pro- j ^^^^ ^^^^ th( se under twenty 
gram of corporation control and busi- ' ^^^j^ ^^ these classes there will be a 
ness stability that at first blush j ^^.j^^^t, competition in excellence. 



away. All night long a candle burned 
in the tent and now and then faint 
sobbing would break upon the soli- 
tude. 



A SyMtem for Saint*. 

M. Keys In The World's 



majority 

very definite standard can be said to 
have existed. Nor have the farmers 
as a cla^s been curious to study the 
business aspects of their own opera- 
tions. It Is the exception rather than 
the rule "to find a farmer who can tell 
with any approach to exactness the 
real profit or loss Involved In raising 
and marketing a given crop, or In feed- 
ing the Individual cows of his dairy 

'- "- -'- — "-y 

ion 




This is the plan of defining what , department a varied and interesting volted is that a single man or house, 
.cts shotild be held illegal and ^ jjeld is opened. . J ^:L"mVe!T;ii!ri:d!'a\?eTc;m^^^^^^^^ 

mgainst public policy, so that corpor- j fhe program is admirably devised locomotive concern, a car company, a 



ations. avoiding these, might move I .q eive play to every variety of boy J traln-llghtlng company 
,^ ., . :_ ....r__.:,j.„ r:.,j_ . ^ ^ , u... :„„.«...fx, nnH thf ' hoiise. shall use its Infl 



freely in unforbidden fields 

It was denianded by the trusts 
themselves — pleaded for earnestly and 
prayerfully. 

And now it has been abandoned, 
and its death reveals no mourners. 

For like many other apparently 
simple things, it proved to be far less 
aipiple than its seeming. A bill carry- 
ing out the plan was duly framed and 
duly considered. Its consideration 
■was brief. It was quickly found to 
be a veritable cheval-de-frisc — barbed 
and dangerous. 

While its provisions clearly forbade 
greedy corporations doing things 
tending to kill competition and create 
monopoly, there was hardly a single 
o:ie of these provisions which did not 
also forbid, under equally severe pen- 
alties, things which many of the most 
irnocent corporations do — and have 
to do — every day of their lives with- 
out a thought of any purpose to kill 
competition and create monopoly. 

Indeed, so inextricable were the 



and a banking 
uence to see to 



milk to Its market costs only about H 
cent a quart per 100 miles, the distri- 
bution to the consumer In the city It- 
self costs 2 1-5 cents a quart. When 



troduced to the president 

Fess always refuses with this ex- 
planation. 

"There are more than 400 representa- 
tives and ninety-six senators. Suppose 
each one were to take even just one 
constituent a week up to the White 
House to chat for two or three min- 
utes with the president. How would 
the man ever get anything done? " 
• * • 

Beverly T. Galloway, assistant secre- 
tary of agriculture. Is an authority on 
eggs and violets. 



But It Might Not Be That. 

Holdlngford Advertiser: The Du- 
luth Herald comes out strong for Ole 
Sageng of Otter Tall county for the 
Democratic nomination for governor. 
Senator Sageng lata personal friend of 
ours and we heartily indorse every 
word of the splendid article The Her- 
ald printed about him, but we object 
to sacrificing him at this time to the 
political Moloch, The signs of the 
times point unerringly to the triumph 
of Governor Eberhart.and two men, 
Cashman and Sageng, are too good to 
kill off by putting them up this year. 
This Is a good time to use common 
meat like Lawler and Iverson and 
such. 

■Would Contlnoe Reeord. 

Chisholm Miner: The Duluth Eve- 
ning Herald, one of the very best eve- 
ning dailies in the state, has launched 
a boom for Senator Ole O. Sageng of 
Otter Tail county as a candidate for 
governor. In the opinion of this pa- 
per Mr. Sageng has made a good rec- 
ord during the time he has served in 
the legislature and would likely make 
a good record as the state's chief ex- 
ecutive. 

Would Serve the People. 

■Wlllmar Tribune: Senator Ole O. 
Sageng of Otter Tail county has been 
prominently mentioned as a Demo- 
cratic candidate for governor. Senator 
Sageng is a farmer who has made an 
enviable record as a member of the 
house and has served with distinction 
in the senate. If, perchance, he be 
nominated and elected as governor, 
Minnesota would have a progressive 
executive who would understand the 
needs and aspirations of the common 
folks of the state and would hearken 
unto them. 



A Public Pest, 

New York Evening World: The Man 
With a Rage for Regulating Hia 
Friends. 

There are people who will never b» 
friends with you unless they can rua 
you. 

What you shall eat. what you shall 
wear, whom you shall see, how you 
shall conduct your business — all these 
things the born regulator takes upon 
himself with alacrity and enthuslasn-.. 

The conversation consists chiefly of 
"Do this," "Try that" and "I guarantee 
that so and so is just what you need." 

Whenever you meet him his main In- 
terest In you Is to hear how his ideas 
are working. You are valuable to him 
as long as you do as he tells yoy. 

Then when he has got you runnin,.? 
according to his schedule, ten to ona 
he tires of you and begins to regulate 
somebody else. 

They often mean well — these regu- 
I lators. Good Intentions, alas, are at 
the bottom of much pestiferousness! 



AMUSEMENTS. 



LYCEUM 

FRIDAY AND APRIL 3 &4 
SATURDAY Maiinee Saturday 



A Senator Dips Into 



the Future 




Chicago Record-Herald: In an ad- 
dress to the Maine Progressives In 
convention assembled Senator Moses E. 
Clapp Indulged In Interesting reflec- 
tions on past, present and future poli- 
tics He ventured to make certain pre- 
although he was careful not 



rcoT-yritUt. 1914. »J.vi"red C.Kelly. All riBtits reserved.) j ^^*^ ^° kny particular time for their 

verification. 



Thousands Idle; Thousand* Coming. 

New York World: In spite of un- 
employment In many lines that always 
attends the winter season and an un- 
usual am.ount of Idleness among corn- 



Others have seen and heard of de- 
velopments that indicated to them Re- 
publican rehabilitation and revival. 
To manv the Democratic party, as rep- 
resented by W^llson and the congres- 



JOHN CORT 

PRESENTS 

MclNTYRE 
AND HEATH 

In k magnificent revival ot thslv 
ereatsst musical comedy succes* 

THE HAM TREE 

Company et 1 00 
Special Ham Tree Orchastr* 



( 



THE WORLD'S BEST 
DANCING CHORUS 

STACCD BY NED WAYBURN 

SEATS TODAY! 

PRICES: 

NIGHTS 50c to $2 
SAT. MAT. 

50c to $1.50 
MAIL ORDERS 1\I0W 




interests and boy ingenuity, and ^^^ ■ jY j^a't V,ie railroad buys its rails from 
exoosition is thoroughly to be com-^jg gteel company, its cars from the 
mended, encouraged and supported. I -^ comnanv. its lights from the llght- 



If you want to get a real definite 
line on your winter's diet. Just gaze 
at the assortment of emptied fruit jars 

In the basement. 

•- 

BlntM at ETenlMK* 




car company. Its Ugh 

ing company, and its engines from the ^ propei.. „-„ 

locomotive company; that the steel . ty.four delivery trucks, traveling "-"--—. ^^ jj^ ^ot have so many , crats. ^"'"' "" -"tive leadership" of 

company, etc.. do their shipping by the Jjent> ^ ^^^^^ perform the . ,"^°'\,.7„„t| iT hundreds of thousands ! the ''^'^'"^'^'^^^^^^^^^"^^ave them from 

railroad company: and that_all_of them but^f«^^^.l^^ ,,, about $600 reducl^^^ labor market Is ! ^Vllson^cannot Jong^ save 



crats. they are hopelessly split a 
the "admired execxjtlve leadership 
s Wilson cannot long save them fr 
disintegration and ruin. Eventually a 



dp their borrowing through the bank , ^^^^j distribution from 2 1-5 XY,VJT.»d and when the chances of em- "'°'"^'^— "V «ni irive us two parties— 

a^d carry their deposits in the bank the^cos^ ^^^^^ ^^^_^^^^^^ ^^ ^ ^^^^ ^^^ glutted andj^nen^v^^^ i„„^,t. what Is realignment will give us two parues— 



In which he Is Interested. 
That was a beautiful system 



If the 



^^ . * r"^ ^" i P oyment are at their lowest, what Is '•^^"f "yj^^aland the other a reaction 

rt and effecting an annual saving | f^^fifiuence that sustains the moye^- I one ^J^t.eral^ and tn^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^ 



When the gul s tty homeward and the t^^-elve apostles and the pick of the 

rooks aie following high. I saints were in the banking business 

And the gra / feet of the silence with ^^^y might carry it along that prin- 

a silver dream are shod. | clple with perfect balance and with 

I mind me of the little wings abroad j perfect honesty and fair play to the 
In everj sk>. 



■V\ho seek tl'elr rest of God. 

When the dove Is hidden and the dew 
Is white on the com. 



various corporations and their stock 
holders at large; but if It were only a 
group of ordinary or second-class 
saints in business they would certainly 
commit financial murder and grand and 
petty larceny every now and again. 



of $500"000. It scarcely needs demon 
stratloti that there Is room here for a 
substantial Increase of price to the pro- 
ducer and an equal cheapening of price 
to the consumer. If a really efficient 
and economical organization could be 
effected. 



....nt? Has immigration to the United fj^ ^Jfi^ee and government of and by 
States become nothing «5°^^«^^^^^*j"^i^J ! [^e few will be In the latter, and every 



me 



And the br >wn bee in the heather „, . 

and the shepherd with the sheep. Because the banking business, so far, 
I mind me of the little wings in the . has produced only one or two men who 

holni-oak and the thorn, even claim to have divine guidance In 

Who take of Him their sleep. 



When the briar closes and the iris- 
flower Is furled. 
And over the edge of the evening the 
swallow seeks her nest, 
I mind me of the little feet abroad In 
all the world. 
Who find Ui Him their rest. 
— Marjorle L. C. Pickthall in the Uni- 
versity Masazlue. 



OelnluK Word*. 

Kokomo Times: The esteemed 
weather hureau has sprung a new one. 
It Is the word "smog," and it means 
smoke and fog. The bureau explains 
that very frequently there are times 

apparent In the 
new 



heartless money-making 
great steamship companies? 



believer In equal rights and oppor- 
tunities win be m the former. 

What a blessing such simplification 



Second Ave. 



THEATER 

E. and Superior St. 



MATINEE 

EVERY 

DAY 



and willing hands; 



Robt. T. Haines & Co. 

In "The Man in the Dark." 

James McCormack and 

Eler.nor Irving. 
J. Hunter Wiison and 
Effle Pearson. 
The Kramers. 
Nina Barbour. 
Florence. Lovett Co. 

BellclBire Brot- 

Hrartt-SelK Pictorial 

Review. 






to be a thing of the past 



hy 
end the*e? Let's call a mixture of 
Bnow and mud "amud." A mixture of 
snow and soot "snoot." and a mixture 



The Main Thing. 

•p. irk- Stage Manager — What do 

vou want fo? this musical comedy, a of snow and hall "snail." Thus we 
long-skirted or a short-skirted chorus? might have a weather .orecast. 

P^oducer-Any old length as long as "Snail today, turning to snoot to- 
it'rtiut skirted. I night; tomorrow smoggy with smud." 



Men whom the lust of office does not 

kill; ^ ^^ 

Men whom the spoils of office can- 
not buy; 
Men who possess opinions and a win; 
Men who have honor; men who will 
not lie; 
Men who can stand before a dema- 
gogue 



beautiful simplicity achieved, but It Is 
coming— and coming fast. Meantime 
the Progressive party has "only to 
stand firm." It alone Is free from dan- 
ger and conflict; everybody in it is 
tried and true; no one In It will even 
be tempted to go over to the reaction- 
ary party of the future. All the Pro- 
gressives will walk over in a body to 
the new "liberal camp" and feel at 

.. TT~«n<r Vior»r>v Tkortv! 



And'dim his. treacherous batteries kome,there^Happy,^h^^^^^^ P-ty 



without winking; 
Tall men, sun-crowned, who live above 

the fog , . X *u- 1 

In public duty and in private think- 

^"*' —J. G. Holland. 



Philosophical students of politics, of 
the rise and fall of parties, groups and 
factions, may smile at such naivete and 
innocence, but Senator Clapp Is not 
floored by -historical or psychological 
parallels. 



EMPRESS 



TODAY 



The Teasing, Tickling Sluclcal 
Farce Play, 

A HOT OLD TIME 

nv Kdcrar Selden and Geo. M. Cohan, 
w i"h a Bevy of Beautiful GirU. 

Coning Thumday, April 2, New 
BKow — The Three Dunty Roadu, 
John A, West & Co., W m. P. Burt 
and L.nUnn Doone. 



I 



I- 



. ! 



I 







I 



A Co. 




M^ 



n — 





Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



March 30, 1914. 



U 



T HE OPEN COURT 



'T«e»(I«T« rf T.e - frtM are InTtfM fo mak* Trf 
«•••• i:f tills roltinin to cirress tli»lr idfas alKJut th« 
trplcs of general IntrrcBt. but ilUcucslon^ of i«>-tarlan 
ttllaloiM dlfffirncM are bariod. Letter* murt not 
exceed ;oo Korda— the shelter the better. Th«-y must 
l« writt.Mi on on«! Bide oi the paper onlr. ami they 
Biust be a<Toropan. In erery rase bj tlie name and 
address of the writer thomh theaa need not be piib- 
Ilahed. A aisn;d letter U alnajs more effeciUe, bow- 
•Ttr.l 

A FIRESIDE DREAM. 



To the Kdltor cf The Herald: 
I sat by the fading Are 

When the flame was burning low 
And the night wind was a'siRhlng 

Till It made the embers glow. 

1 heard the solemn tlckinr 

Of the melancholy clock 
And the little restless clicking 

Of the key within the lock. 

For the cold north wind was knocking 

At the door to let him in 
While the fire on the hearthstone 

Was growing very dim. 

I saw the spark expire 

And leave me alone in the dark 
And the frozen panes of the windows 

Looked at me grim and stark 

Tlien T thousht of my love departed 

III iht- latid of eternity, 
And ii! iiij- enchanted fancy 

Hci ItnaKf I could see. 

Fair as the pure white lily 

i»r the well kept lamb of the fold; 

It rnrrfed av.ay all my troubles 
And made me forget the cold. 

For her hrart was as warm as the fire 
And lier -eyes were as bright as its 
iifeht. 

Fut the spark of that life e?ipired 
And lift me alone in the night. 

I saw the dull gray ashes 
Covering the coals among. 

As on my head growing aged 
The ashes of age had come. 

For our life Is like the Are 

That kindles and burns and dies, 
Yet in th*^ nilnd.=! of our loved ones 
Our image still stirvivea. 

FRAN'K LETHERT. 
2105 West Superior street. 
Puhith, March 28. 



cemetery. Dl. 
what you ha\ 
for a decent 1 
property out 
money than 
street. A per 
about that til 
would like to 
bring this sul 
sioners, put it 
light, get an 
cemeteries ar. 
am not right, 
for the city t' 
Is \rater and 
cars. 

Today a ma 
policy, just 
burial. 

Anywa\'. go 
— let us hear 
us get busy I 
taken up. Tl 
I remain, 

Duluth, Mar 



I you ever stop to think 
e to pay a sqtiare foot 
It in Koie.<»t Hill? Why. 
there Is bringing more 

property on Superior 
?on never stops to think 
1 he is compelled to. I 

have some good fellow 
ject before our commls- 

up to them in the right 

idea what our private 
♦ charging and see If I 

I believe it Is Important 
I own its cemetery, as It 

gas or light or street 

1 ought to carry a $1,000 
to cover expenses of 

to the idea — (somebody) 
'rom others about it. Let 
>efore all the land Is 
anking you very kindly, '. 
"DEAD ONE." I 
ch 28. 



AWAITING RESULT OF 
ST. PAUL CONFERENCE 



Minnesota Hoping for Political Re- 
lief From Democrats Who Will 
Confer in St. Paul on Tuesday- 
Republican Antis Not a Happy 
Family — Dissension Spreading 
Rapidly— Up to Democrats to 
Give State a Real Governor, as 
They Did Ten Years Ago. 



IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE. 



WOULD LOWER THE 

COST OF DYING. 



To the Edltoi 
1 wish to t 
ance that my 
dered me. I 
on Thursday 
after running 
Friday. Marcl 
were returne 
6:15 p. m. 

I wish to t 
did not have 
as he left as 
that I was th 
erty. 

Duluth, Ma 



of The Her.ild: 

^tank yoxi for the asslst- 

ad. in your paper ren- 

lost my watch and fob 

evening, March ^6, and 

my ad. in your paper 

I 27, my watch and fob 

1 to me about Friday, 

hank the finder, too. 1 

a chance to reward Itirn, 

soon as he was certain 

.' owner of the lost prop- 

MISS IRENE WEISS, 
■ch 28. 



WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION. 



To the Edito- of The Herald: 

Please give me a little space In the | 
Open Court legarding the workmen's: 
compensation act. I would like to 1 
know if a n an gets hurt is he en- | 
titled to his full wages from the day 
he gets hurt <)r Is he not? 

A WORKMAN. 
Duluth, March 28. 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

I enjoy reading letters in the Open 
Court column, but have never con- 
tributed to it. I notice right along 
what our commission form of govern- 
ment is doing. But this is what I want 
to say: I believe the city ought to 
acquire a piece of land now for a city 





b^n^^^^^T^ 




Xo, The la 
porary total < 
60 per cent c 
not to exceet 
mum allowan 
the minimum 
that if a m:i 
wt ek Is tota 
celve $6 a w 
provided it is 
Anybody re< 
week will .«ti 
man recelvlnt 
a week comi 
Ing paid $25 
more than $!• 
other provlsi" 
eye. or a le^ 
man" can pn 
giving full J 
the liability 
have these p 
distribution. - 



w provides that for tem- 
llsablllty he shall receive 
f his wages for a period 

I 300 weeks. The maxl- 
re will be |10 a week and 

$6 a week. That means 
n who Is earning $12 a 
lly disabled, he will re- 
eek while he is laid up. ' 
net more than 300 weeks, j 
eiving less than $12 a' 

II be paid $6 a week. A I 
: $20 a week will get $10 1 
ensatlon, but a man be- 
a week will not receive 

I a week. There are many 
•ns for the loss of an 

. or a hand. "A Work- 
»bably secure a pamphlet 
nformation from any of 
Insurance agents, who 
imphlets printed for free 

The Editor. 



LET THE SCHOOL 

CHILDREN TRY IT. 



7%e General 
»aya: 

"There are real 
guarantees, also 
talk imitations" 

There are a lot of guarantees 
offered jn oofings. Most of them 
are by irresponsible people or 
merely conversational guarantees. 
It's a very important thing in a 
guarantee that there should be 
responsibility, and that it should 
be in writinij. 

Certainteed 

Qualitir ly^^CZw*^ Durability 

Certified IxOOTlIlg Guar»n-(«e</ 

Since we have been giving a reg- 
ular written guarantee on Certain - 
teed Rooting, one class of com- 
petitors has been saying that their 
roofing "will generally last twenty 
years, or lonjer." They don't 
guarantee it, however, at ail. It's 
very easy to talk, talk, talk and say 
any number of years in such talk, 
but responsible concerns must 
know all about their roofing if they 
do any more than talk — they must 
know their roofings really do last 
when they sign a printed guarantee 
j of plain requirements that the roof- 
ing shall make good. Of course, 
the irresponsible type — those who 
are likely to go out of business soon 
— can sign anything. It's very im- 
portant that the buyer should not 
be caught in such a trifling manner. 
Another very important thingr Js, these 
tal k guarantees art offered on the cheapest 
goods the manufacturers make ; not being 
real guarantees, there is no risk. They say 
nothing ahout their highest priced brands' 
andqualities-justofferthe cheapest thing 
they have-offer a talk guarantee on cheap 
goods equal to the real guarantee given ort 
Certainteed Roofing. It's funny how 
many peupic they catch on such things! 
VNTien you buy a piece of roofing you 
should know — and know in writing — 
that it is the best quality — best brand 
goods made by that manufacturer. Re- 
member — make him put this in writing, 
that it is his best in every way, and then 
ha\e the guarantee in writing and prop- 
erly signed, too. 

It pavs to be careful in buying goods 
where the quality could not be judged 
by the sample — where everything must 
depend upon the standing and ability of 
the manufacturer to make good over a 
long period of years in the future. 
Certain-teed Roofing is sold at a reason- 
able price everywhere by dealers who 
believe in giving unsurpassed quality at 
a fair profit. The amount of Certain- 
teed Roofing required for an average 
roof, say ten squares, will cost less than 
$5 over the cheap mail order grade. 
This small initial cost is saved many 
times in the fifteen years' wear which is 
covered by the manufacturer's guarantee. 

General Roofing Mfg. Co. 

tturld'a largftit manufaeturera <\f rvujlng 

and biiitding papfr* 

1038 Plymonth Ballding, 

MlnnrapullN. Minn. 

MIIIh at KaMt St. I.ouln, III., York, 

I'a., Markrillex, Ind. 



I To the Editor of The Herald: 
I I-ltase puMish In the Open Court 
: what it wouM cost to shoe a horse at 
1 cent for ih« first nail and double for 
leach additlornl nail, thirty-two nails 
In all. and olllge 

H. I.. McIXTOSH. 
630 Fifth avenue west. 
Duluth, March 28. 



We make It $48,222,542.95. but we 
won't wager It Is correct. — The Editor. 

MECCAlOR 

UNSHAVED 

Applicants for Barbers' Cer- 
tificates Will Take on 
All Comers. 



Duluth wll 
shorn and ui 

Free trims 
the order of 
the state b( 
will conduct 
ing apprentl' 
full-fledged 
as such by r 
t-reign state 

In order t 
must give pi 
their ability, 
which to gi\ 
billtles in tl 
ing shears 
spread that 
gratis. Com 
spring breal 
any difficult 
obtaining wi 
be barbers, 
there will l 
them to rem 
be the jacks 
In an upho 
months. 

The Mlnm 
be held Apr 
Paul examlr 

The memb 
Walter Dun 
llamblin of I 
ker of St. T 
line its pro^ 
at the Dulu 



I be a mecca for the un- 
shaved April 20. 

and free scrapes will be 
the da>. for on that date 
ard of barber examiners 

examinations for aspir- 
es who aspire to become 
tonsorial artists, certified 
epresentatives of the aov- 
of Minnesota, 
o qualify the candidates 
actlcal demonstrations of 

To obtain material upon 
e evidence of their capa- 
le delicate art of wleld- 
and razor, the word Is 

the treatments will be 
Ing in the midst of the 
.-up it Is unlikely that 
y win be experienced In 
ling vlctms for the would- 

And in most instances 
e plenty of material for 
ove, for the clientele will 

who have not luxuriated 
stered chair for several 

apolis examinations will 

II 27 and 28 and the St. 
atlons April 29 and 30. 
!rs of the state board are 
lap of Duluth, William 
•Ilnneapolls and O. H. Bec- 
Rul. The board will out- 
ram for the current year 
th meeting. 



With William E. Lee chosen by the 
anti-Eberhart Republicans of the state 
as their banner bearer, and the an- 
nouncement within the past week of 
(jovernor Eberhart, who at la»t admits 
that he desires perpetuity in office, 
the state now looks to the Democratic 
conference which will be held In St. 
Paul tomorrow. 

Much depends on it, and many — of 
all .>artles — are hoping that its choice 
will solve the nasty and intricate 
problem that confronts Minnesota, just 
as the party solved much the same 
Question ten years ago when It nomi- 
nated the state's greatest g >vernor, 
John A. Johnson. 

The political condition in the North 
Star state Is now» It is admitted, a 
mv)9t serious one. With the mix-up in 
the Jtepubllcan ranks there is grave 
danger of the present unsatisfactory 
adml listratlon continuing in power 
and perhaps even carrying the thing so 
far as to send Mr. Eberhart to the 
L'nlled .States senate. 

Taxpayers feel that something must 
be done to reduce the drain on the 
pocketbook of property owners in the 
Stat-.— a driiln which is ndmlltoilly un- 
necessary and due largely to extrava- 
gance and carelessness. 

Who to choose is the question. 
B .th Eberhart and Lee are out on 
platforms of "economy and efficiency," 
which has become the fashionable 
phrise amoig candidates. Eberhart is 
handicapped by the fact that mucb 
wa?te and repairing has come to light 
during his tidnilnlstratlon. The future 
can be judged only by the past, and 
his p-i Jt in this line Is enoufh to con- 
demn any candidate. Good intentions 
are said to be a fine paving for a cer- 
tain Iry place of abode, but unless 
carrlid out are not good even for orna- 
ment. 

On the other hand. Mr. Lee does not 
measure up to the opportunity that lay 
before the "antls." and the general 
feeling Is that with the already grow- 
ing dissension In the anti ranks, the 
Long Prairie candidate probably will 
fall short of the goal of nomination. 
The opposition that has arisen In the 
state press — not the machine press 
alone — is rather startling. The feeling 
Is growing stronger that Mr. Lee had 
the recent Minneapolis conference 
packed, and that the other candidates 
were whipsawed and did not know it. 
In short, It Is being generally charged 
in the state press that Mr. Lee has 
formed a machine of magnificent pro- 
portions and smooth operation, and ■ 
that he had the other candidates be.iten . 
two weeks before the conference was 
held — that he knew It and simply 
played horse with them. Among the 
newspapers hinting at this Is the 
Roseau County Times of Roseau, War- 
road county. This paper was one of 
the very first to back the candidacy 
of State Auditor S. G. Iverson, who was 
eliminated. Editor Bell seems to feel 
very bitter over the affair. Whether 
or not his utterances are Inspired or 
indorsed by Mr. Iverson Is a thing 
which only they themselves know, but 
the fact remains that this paper hints 
at secession. In its latest Issue Editor 
Bell says concerning the delegates to 
the conference: 

How far these men represented 
the voters of their respective coun- 
ties remains to be seen. The In- 
dorsement of William E. Lee for 
governor will strengthen the can- 
didacy of Governor Eberhart. 

The same paper — and others, too — 
i declare that If Mr. Lee permits Peter- 
' son to carry out his promise to take 
the stump for the anti-machine candi- 
date, he will sacrifice many votes be- 
cause of I'eterson's "unwarranted at- 
tack" on Mr. Iverson, charging him 
> with being as much a machine candi- 
date us Eberhart. In general, there is 
the sweetest kind of a mix-up, and the 
end Is by no means yet. I'eterson, 
many believe, will either sulk In his 
tent or come out In the open and fight 
Lee on the grounds that be was "Jobbed" 
In the conference. 

« * « 
Hence, the solution seems to be up 
to the Democrats. Will they take full 
advantage of their opportunity? That 
I^AWler will not be indorsed by the St. 
Paul conference tomorrow there Is no 
doubt, but don't ever think that Dan 
Lawler is going to supinely He down. 
Not on your life. The conference to- 
morrow, it is generally expected, will 
be f ne of the liveliest political gather- 
' Ings that the state has seen for some 
time. Who will be the candidate 
chosen'.' Again the state pauses for 
reply. Congressman Hammond has 
given no satL^factory answer yet, but 
It is believed that If he wants to be the 
choice of the convention, there will be 
only the Lawler noise to overcome to 
arrange It, and as noise is only annoy- 
ing and not so potent as votes, the 
eruptions of Mount Lawler will matter 
but little. 

Hammond refusing, what then? 
Cashman says "no;" so does Judge C. 
W. Stanton of Bomldji. 

Some say the answer Is "Ole Sageng 
of ottertall county." 

Others say that It Isn't, because he 
has never declared himself a Demo- 
crat, being by himself, the Populist 
pjirty of the state. But In refutation 
of that It Is pointed out that this is 
not so much the matter of partisanship 
as it Is of public benefit. Somebody 
mu?t be chosen who can put a stop to 
the nonsense that has been go^ng on 
j in the state capital for the last four 
: and a half years. The only trouble 
' with Senator Sageng Is the doubt many 
leaders feel whether he could land 



m ^w 









--•— :-.t /C. •'•^-4^. 



'^^^^f^^ 






m 



wcnM 



!t^.m 



Sixty-Six Per Cent 

According to the last report of the Bureau of Labor Statistics the 

I ret ail prices of the "principal articles of food" in forty industrial 
cities advanced sixty-six per cent, in fourteen years. The price of 

Shredded Wheat 

in all that time has remained the same, and it is just as satis- 
fying, strengthening and sustaining as it was fourteen years ago 
— a complete, perfect food, supplying more real, body -building 
nutriment than meat or eggs, costing much less and much more 
easily digested. Your grocer sells it 

Always heat the Biscuit in oven to restore crispness. Two Shredcled 
Wheat Biscuits with hot milk or cream will supply aU the energy 
nee<led for a half day's work. Deliciously nourishing when eaten in 
c<Mnbination with baked apples, stewed prunes, sliced bananas or canned 
or preserved fruits. Try toasted Triscuit, the Shredded Wheat wafer, 
for luncheon with butter, cheese or marmalade. 

Made only by The Shredded Wheat Connpany, Niagara Falls, N. Y. 



^ lif if 'Jr "df '^ A # r^ ayaf.^u*af^^^.^^af^^^ ^^ 

* MERCIIINTS 1 Rfa:D « 

* lO VSE NEW STAMPS. « 

* * 

* nulnth mrrrhantn, ivho do a ^ 
^ large X'linie of malllnic. ' are lie- ^ 

to purrhaxr preeanrrled 4f 
It are now beloK offered ^ 
itoffieo official."!. TlK'.ne *f- 
<> oanrelrd before HOld In 4 
itltifM to the merchanta 4t 
the name of thr office ^ 
>h they are Nold. The i 
ncildrreil a valnable one ^ 
Ity purpoacM and alito 4 
he >vork of the loeal ^ 



nulnth 
large x'li 
^ ins urged 
MH ntRfupM th 
* hy the po 
^ KtantpM ar 
large qua 
and bear 
from '«thl 
^ plan Ih r<> 
^ for puhll< 
IlKhtenn 
poNtal rie 






IF CHILD IS CROSS, 
FEVERISH AND SICK 

Look. Mother! If Tongue Is Coated 

Give "California Syrup 

of Figs." 



* 

^ ^ 'T' -^ T* T* -^ ^> 




CORNEA FROM PIG 

GIVES BOY SIGHT. 

Baltimore, Md., March 30. — Sight has 
been given to the left eye of David 
Kane. 9-moath-old child of Mr. and 
Mrs. Herman Kane of Gettysburg:, Pa., 
through the grafting of the cornea of 
a pig's eye to the child's eyeball, ac- 
cording to % statement of physicians 
at a hospital here. Certain tests, they 
declare, ha e brought out this fact 
I without a d^ubt. 

I The disease from which David has 

' been a suflfi rer since he was 3 weetis 

old is known as stapyloma of the 

I cornea. Boih eyes became affected and 

I the child w is practically blind. Sight 

I was partially restored to the right eye, 

however, alter treatment. The left 

seemed to l«e in a hopeless condition, 

and It was only as a last resort that 

' the operatii n was decided upon. 

The oper ition was performed last 

Monday, an 1 the cornea of the pig's 

eye was u.«ed because It was said it 

more rloseiy resembles the human 

4 cornea than that ot any other animal. 



Children love this "fruit laxative." 
and nothing else cleanses the tender 
stomach, liver and bowels so nicely. 
A child simply will not stop playing 
to empty the bowels, an^ the result is, 
they become tightly clogged with 
waste, liver gets sluggish, stomach 

I sours, then your little one becomes 
cross, half-sick, feverish, don't eat, 
tleep or act naturally, breath is bad, 

j system full of cold, has sore throat, 

! stomach-ache or diarrhoea. Listen, 

: Mother! See If tongue Is coated, then 

I give a teaspoonful of "California 
Syrup of Figs," and in a few hours all 
the constipated waste, sour bile and 
undigested food passes out of the .sys- 
tem, and you have a well, playful 

] child again. 

I Millions of mothers give "California 
Syrup of Figs" because it Is perfectly 
harmless; children love It. and it never 
falls to act on the stomach, liver 
and bowels. 

I Ask your druggist for a 50-cent bot- 
tle of "Callfc*rnla Syrup of Figs," 
which has full directions for babies, 

, children of all ages and for grown- 
ups plainly printed on the bottle. Be- 

' ware of counterfeits sold here. Get 
the genuine, made by "California Fig 
Syrup Company." Refuse any other 

i kind with contempt. 



the nomination agatnst Lawler. Since 
the boom for the Ottertall statesman 
started, there have been only words 
of praise as to his record. Not a 
single paper in the state has cast a re- 
flection either directly or by innuendo 
on him or his record for the very good 
reason that the heel of this Achilles 
has not been discovered — his record is 
without blot. 

However, tomorrow night will prob- 
ably reveal what kind of a butterfly 
shall have issued from the Democratic 

chryKalls. 

• • • 

That the party has the greatest of 
opportunities, even the Cberhart press 
admits. And many believe that the 
delegate* to the conference tomorrow 
will make the most of it. 

• * * 

At the Democratic conference In 
McLeod county last Tuesday night, 
resolutions were passed which are not 
only strong In sentiment but rich In 
phrasing. The national administration 
is Indorsed, so is Secretary Bryan. 
President Wilson is commended for his 
stand on the free tolls matter and on 
his handling of the Mexican situation; 
and John Lind is conimended for his 
services In Mexico, (""oncoming the 
national business situation the reso- 
lutions say: 

Despite the calamitous prophe- 
cies of plutocracy and the lachry- 
mose lamentations of the leaders 
of the Republican party the count- 
try Is enjoying a growth and ac- 
tivity in business and commerce 
unprecedented. Democracy's 
pledges within a year after the 
parly's ascension to power have 
been fuily redeemed in striking 
contrast to the repeated double 
dealing and repudiation of plat- 
form pledges by the Republican 
party. 

Regarding state politics the resolu- 
tions go on: 

We condemn the silly, blatant, 
extravagant, venal, and maudlin 
administration of the state gov- 
ernment by Governor Eberhart 
whose Junketing, tangi.ing. turkey- 
trotting. Hirting. ballad-slnglng, 
song-writing antics and lack of in- 
terest in and gra.«»p of .= tate atlalrs 
have aroused the contempt of all 
thinking men and made the state 
administration the laughing stock 
of the nation. The wild extrava- 
gance of the Eberhart-Smith plun- 
derbund. If not checked, will bank- 
rupt the commonwealth. 

We heartily approve the recent 
efforts of the Progressive Repub- 
licans of MlnnesoU to wrest the 
control of the state from the steel 
trust and the brewery combine but 
Invite them to abandon their hope- 
oss task and unite with us in giv- 
ing the state an administration 
comparable with those of John 
Lind and John A. Johnson. 

Remembering the Perfldy and 
traitorous conduct of Daniel W. 
Lawler In the state campaign of 
1910 we disapprove hla \inworthy 
candidacy for thf Democratic nom- 

Inatlon for the governorship of 
Minnesota. 

At the conference of St. Louis county 
Democrats at the city hall last 'rues- 
day night, Andrew Nelson, one of the 
leading Democrats of this section of 
ihe state, reminded those present dur- 
ing the course of his speech, of the 
peculiar situation in which Minnesota 
lemocracv finds Itself. Only one man 
m the party— and he undesirable to 
most Democrats— wants the nomina- 
tion for the office of governor. In con- 
trast to the merry squabble and strug- 
gle for the nomination which has 
made the Republicans of the state a 
most undignified looking lot, the ideal 
•.tage has been reached In the Deinoc- 
racy the condition which for years has 
been considered the proper one— the 
; office is seeking a man in the Demo- 
cfatic party. And it is not a matter of 
I being afraid of defeat, for the time 
' was never more opportune for a vic- 
tory than now, nor is It a lack of pat- 
riotism. It Is wholly from a desire 
to remain in the ranks and work for 
the betterment of the state by back- 
ing up whoever Is elected and is sin- 
cere ill serving the state best, no mat- 
ter what party he belongs to. This is 
the motive that Is stirring the Demo- 
cratic party at this time— unselfish- 
ness. Aside from a person who shall, 
in this paragraph at least, be nameless, 
the fUglbles are willing to side-step 
the honor and help the victor. 
• • • 
The Minneapolis Journal finds in the 
passage and workings of the non-par- 
tisan primary law a series of Jokes 
on various factions, most of all on 
the brewery Interests. In citing the 
three stages of the "bill jok*" It 
says: 

The bill was first assembled by 
Senator J. E. Haycraft and his 
elections committee In the senate. 
Th^re was a hard fight on the bill, 
and some of the old line Republi- 
cans of the senate, scheming to 
kill It, sprung the amendment to 
make the legislature alsb ndn-par- 
tlM-n. Friend* of the bill fought 



this amendment and declared It 
was offered to kill the bill, but 
Democratic votes helped to pass it. 
Then, in a burst of riotous laugh- 
ter the senators passed the bill, 
sending It over to the house, where 
tliey expected It to be done speed- 
ily to death. 

That was the first joke. The 
house didn't kill the bill. The 
measure lingered a long while, and 
meanwhile the brewers' political 
managers had looked the measure 
over and concluded that It would 
fill a long felt want. Henry Klnes 
had been elected speaker by con- 
trolling the Republican caucus, 
though he could hardly have con- 
trolled a straight majority of the 
house. Under a non-partisan plan 
there would be no more party 
caucuses, the brewers argued, and 
hence no more speakers like Rines. 
So they passed the word round to 
stand for the bill, and especially 
for the non-partisan legislature. 
The county optlonlsts In the house, 
whom the bill came up, found that 
the liquor forces were for it and 
immediately smelled a rat. They 
fought the bill hard, but It had 
the whole liquor following and a 
lot of support besides, and won 
handily. 

Therein is the second joke. The 
more is seen of the new bill, the 
more it appears that the brewers 
handed themselves a lemon. It gives 
the temperance forces a chance 
to co-operate as they never have 
done before. The Prohibition party 
organization has sent out letters 
since the supreme court declared 
the law \'alid, saying th.at it is the 
greatest measure for fighting the 
liquor traffic the state has seen in 
years. The brewers are making the 
fight of their lives right now to pre- 
vent the legislature from being for 
county option in both branches. 

Now for the third and last joke. 
After the bill had passed the 
house, but before the two houses 
had come together on the amend- 
ments, the county option leaders 
In the house caught the fact that 
the title was open to challenge. 
They had it examined and were 
advised by good attornevs that the 
bill was worthless. They kept still 
about it. for fear the friends of 
the bill would fix up the title and 
make the bill good. Atter the 
measure "was passed and signed, 
they passed the word out quietly 
that It would be knocked out In 
court. In due time these enemies 
of the bill arranged to have the 
test case brought. The result Is Wf 11 
known. In spite of Its Inexpres- 
B\ve title the bill Mas declared 
valid. 

After June 16 It may be easl.-ir to 
tell Just who can have the hear- 
tiest laugh at the jokes In this 
famous bill. 




NOTICE! 



THE BOOSTER EDITION 



OF THE HERALD 

is now being compiled Those holding 
reservations please get photos in. 




YOUR 



printing Is what we want. Service and 
workmanship guaranteed. "Rush orders a 
pleasure." 

MERRITT & HECTOR 

PRINTBRS AND DIHrDBRS. 
112 West Ftr*t Street. 



mile. A heavy rumbling Indicates that 
the mass is gaining Impetus, and the 
Inhabitants are fleeing from their 
bouses. 

Government engineers are seeking a 
means to limit the extent of the dis- 
aster. 



iif lif lif ^ 



WOMAN POLICEMAN 

AMO NG BES T SHOTS. 

Chicago, March 30. — Mrs. Lulu B. 
Burt, a policewoman, has qualified as 
one of the best revolver shots on the 
Chicago police force. With a score of 
92 out of 100, she won the gold medal 
at the women's revolver match of the 
Sportsmen's Club of America, shooting 
at the regulation target at a distance 
of seventy-five yards. Miss Clara B. 
Olson and V|3. Agnes Walsji tied for 
second and tnird with 89. 

Mrs. Burt had never handled a revol- 
ver previous to her recent appointment 
to the Chicago police force. Lieut. 
Westbrook, pistol Inspector of the 
force, said that rot 36 per cent of 
the men police could shoot better than 
BO. and that Mrs. Burt must be ranked 
at least as one of the ten best shots 

on Uie force. 

• 

West Point Gets $1,008,000. 

Washington, March 30. — The senate 



passed the military academy appropri- 
ation bill carrying an appropriation of 
$1,008,000, practically In the form it 
passed the house. A bill appropriating 
$500,000 for the erection of a marine 
hospital on ground already owned by 
the government in San Francisco 
passed the senate. 

BRIDGE BREAKS; 

FIVE ARE D ROWNED. 

Fresno, Cal., March 80. — By the 
breaking of a suspension bridge across 
the San Joaquin river, four men 
and one woman, crossing in an auto- 
mobile, were plunged fifty feet into 
the swift flowing mountain stream and 
drowned. The occupants of the ma- 
chine were: 

L. N. PEART, general superintendent 
of the San Joaquin Light and Power 
company. 

J. E. BURGESS, assistant superin- 
tendent. 

PERCY MARKS, the company's 
chauffeur. 

MRS. PERCY MARKS. 

UNIDENTIFIED MAN. 

A large force of men dragged the rlve» 
and searched the country without avail, 
and the head officials of the power 
company virtually abandoned hope. 

Peart and Burgess are both gradu- 
ates of the University of California. 



% 



^ DIVORCED WOMAV * 

« DKCLIKBS ALIMOXY. ^ 

9jt '9jt 

« lUIHvaakee. Wi-o.. Mareh 30. — ^ 

* Gertrude M. Hoxcr refoNed to ac- % 
^ cept alimony from Archie O. Ilox- ^ 

i ^ er ««hen icraiited it divorce from ^ 

I %i htm. "He only carnK 965 a month ^ 

^ and I nm able to take care of * 

^ mrneli," she told, the court. 4 

* i 

POOR SAMPLE OF MUCH 
VAUNTE D HORS E SENSE. 

Having "horse sense" was not one 
of the attributes credited to an equine 
which selected the corner of Third 
avenue east and Fifth street for a 
place to die about 8 o'clock yesterday 
morning. The animal didn't know any 
better than to shuffle off right In 
front of the Polish Catholic church. 
Any other day of the week would not 
have been so objectionable, but on 
Sunday It was certainly anything but 
pleasant. 

Various city officials received num- 
erous telephone cjills. They expressed 
much sorrow that a Duluth horse didn't 
have more judgment and promised to 
i do their best to have the carcass re- 
! moved. But the bone , man was en- 
joying a day of rest — perhaps he was 
at church — so he wasn't readily acces- 
sible. He was located early In the 
afternoon, however, and the dead horse 
was hauled to 'the soap factory. 

MOUNTAIN SLIDES 

DO WN OVE R FARMS. 

Brlve. Prance, March 30. — A large 
section of a mountain has become de- 
tached by seismic disturbances and Is 
slowly sliding down the valley, sweep- 
ing over everything In its path. Al- 
readv a number of farms and cottages 
have" been blotted out, and the liigh- 
roads from Brive and Lanteuil have 
been destroyed for more than haif a 



Do you give your baby proper food? 

Your baby will keep well and happy if you give him 
proper food. A well-nourished baby is seldom sick. Every 
baby should have his mother's milk if possible. But if you 
can't nurse your baby, don't experiment with this and that and svery food 
recommended to you. And don t give your baby cow's millc, which nature 
intended only for calves, and not for tender little baby stomachs. Even 
were it possible to get absolntely pure cow's milk, your baby couldn't digest 
it. When mother's milk fails, use 

Nestles FooH. 



Nearer to niother's milk than any 
other food you can give your baby. 
In Nestles the curd of the milk is ren- 
dered soft and fleecy as in mother's 
tnilk. The best co w 's milk is the basis 
of Nestl^ Food, milk from clean. 




healthy cows in sanitary dairies, care- 
fully inspected. To it are added ths 
food elements that cows' milk does 
not contain, and that baby needs — 
the things that put rosea in your 
baby's cheeks and make his littls 
body strong and healthy. 

Send the Coupon today for 12 
free feedings of Nostl^'s Food. Do 
not delay. Your baby's future 
health may depend on it. With 
this large sample can we will 
send you our helpful Book for 
Mothers and the "Better Babies" 
Chart. It tells just what your 
baby should weigh, how tall he 
should be, what texture skin 
he should have, what his cor- 
rect measurementB should be, when 
he should begin to teeth, walk and 
taUi. Send today. 



NlteTLE'S FOOD COMPANY 
WooIwortL BU«. New York 

Plei«Besend me FREE,y our book 
and trial package. 

A'amt 

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HERALD 



March 30, 1914. 




The test that Is being applied to the 
modern home In these days of more 
sane and simple living Is: Is it liv- 
able? Does It express somebody or 
something? Does it look lived in or 
merely set together, unalive, like the 
stage' drawing room? 

If you are refurnishing for the 
spring and the summer — and you 
know nothing revives a whole house 
and household so much as the spring 
freshening — now is the time to start 
vour home expressing something or 
something different. If It Is nothing 
more than big, plain and roomy com- 
fort and hospitality. The house that 
is cluttered with things, docs not ex- 
press home necessarily, half so well 
as the simply furnished place that 
leaves room and comfort and lots of 
light and sunshine for the people who 
inhabit It. 

ARTISTICALLY RESTFUL. 
In spite of the recent vogue for 
modern art colorings, the room in 
on© color scheme, especially the living 
room, is mostly in favor, because of 
its restful effects, not a monotony of 
one shade, but tones of one color with 
pleasing touches of contrasts. Brown, 
say, with tan. Is unusually happy; 
brown wood-work and furniture; tan 
wallpaper; creamy tan window hang- 
ings that sift the light Into tints of 
softened sunshine; lampshades in t"he 
same tone and material; the hangings 
and the covers In a mingling of the 
shades. The resnlt Is vastly more to 
be desired than the muchly-mixed 
room. 

In carrying out this one-color Idea, 
and aiming for lightness, coolness In 
the summer sitting room or the nur- 
sery, and especially for daintiness in 
the boudoir and sleeping quarters, we 
are borrowing the idea of white or 
color-lined embroidery from the 
French woman, only, with an eye to 
the practical and the wearable, we are 
substituting for the perishable and 
costly hand work, the new muslin ma- 
chine embroideries that are to be 
found in designs that are wonderfully 
adapted to just such decorations. 

EMBROIDERIES AND CRETONNES. 

Especially fitting for the bride or the 
sweet-and-twenty girl Is a room done 
In white open-work embroidered ef- 
fects on very sheer stuff. For the bed 



and dresser covers a blue or pink lin- 
ing may be used. Embroidery flounc- 
Ings are most effective for valances and 
If headed wit ha ribbon-run beading 
have all the exquisite femininity of 
dainty lingerie- The Idea is worth In- 
vestigating for its fresh cleanliness, 
since nothing Is so washable as muslin 
embroidery. ^ .. ^ ^, 

The all-to-match Idea can be beauti- 
fully developed In the new cretonnes 
which come in varieties, and prices to 
suit everybody who even thinks about 
them, and in double and single widths 
beside. It is pleasingly astonishing to 
know of all the things that can be 
made of and covered with cretonnes: 
curtains and portiers; liat boxes and 
window seats; bureaus and beds, even 
to the tacking of panels on the sides 
and ends of a plain bed and the cover- 
ing of a looking-glass frame or entire 
bureau; writing sets and teatrays; 
sewing tables and lamp-shades. When 
considerable cretonne Is used In a 
room It Is well to use one of the less 
obtrusive figures of the French cre- 
tonne, or if an Oriental or modem art 
effect is employed, then balance it by 
extreme plainness in the one-color rug 
and the cream scrim sash hangings. 

SUMIHER COOLNESS. 

Are you planning to fit up your sum- 
mer porch, or lacking a porch, a city 
room that will give you all the pleas- 
ant breezy comfort of a summer 
porch? A can or two of paint will 
start the ball rolling; the man at the 
paint shop will tell you Just the kind 
and the color for getting the right 
coat of woody-green into your porch 
chairs, settees and screens and your 
floors and the walls if you want. 
Grass rugs or rag rugs, cushions and 
curtains -may all be in the same shade, 
for it Is cool and soil resisting. The 
Japanese mattings offer lovely sug- 
gestions for porch fittings, for floor 
covers, wall hangings, screens and 
even for big cushion covers. vV hile It 
cannot be tubbed, it can be found In- 
expensive and scrubable. 

The tea-table, or better the tea-wag- 
on, is an indispensable adjunct of the 
summer porch or the all-year-round 
sitting room, preferably In wicker and 
fitted with cretonne that carries out 
the general color scheme. Then its ap- 
pointment of dishes may give a pat- 
tern or the flowers in the wallpaper, 
and the tea-sipping will be attended 
with harmonies that please the eye as 
well as the taste. ., . * xi. 

Considerable might be said about the 
advisability of using limoleum for the 
living-room floor where there are many 
little feet to run in and out. A plain- 
toned linoleum, not figured, is as 
pretty as a carpet, softer than a wood 



floor, and may be swept and 'J'P** 
wUh the least possible effort »"« of- 
fers an attractive background tor anr 

*°Fo?^he'"ummer fitting, that M* to 
be put up after the spring house clean- 
ing and taken down again Just befor* 
thi first frost, and which may need 
an occasional laundering during tM 
summer, there are several convenlan 
devices that save time and labor, Dui 
the handiest of all Is the use of snap 
fasteners in every Place Possible, on 
chair and cushion covers, bed oai- 
ances, for Instance. When the snap 
fasteners are once put on they stay- 
on from season to season; they save 
repeated sewings and bastings, whicn 
are never certain, and save untoia 
nerve energy when one Is in a hurry 
to get clean and orderly before an in- 
flux of summer visitors. One mother 
has found It advisable to have snap 
fasteners on children's bedding, on 
pillow cases, on the top of sheets to 
fasten them back over blankets and 
comforts to keep them clean and to 
protect little faces. 

FOrR WALLS AND A W^NDOW. 
Makers of wallpapers have awak- 
ened to the fact that they must stop 
pouring in on a suffering public a 
flood of ugly and superfluous wall- 
paperings— horrid, ugly figures, designs 
that are at least uninteresting, and 
even plain papers that are crude and 
strong of color. Better have a paper 
that cannot be noticed at all than in- 
flict on your household the shneky 
sorts that the merchants lnsi.''t on 
buying, and which have lots to do 
with eruptions of family nerves: Oat- 
meal papers, shadow stripes, njoiro 
grounds, Japanese grass cloth etlccta 
are some good suggestions for every- 
day uses. For bedrooms you can st-lect 
silk effects In stripes or cretonne and 
chintz patterns. In these you will find 
hangings to match In some shops. 
Leather papers of the best sorts are 
appropriate for living and dining room 
purposes, embossed and in fine color- 
ings, many especially suited for wain- 
scoting and dados. . - . ,^,^w. 
If one room or one part of a room 
has seemed unusable when the glare 
and sun of the warm season comes on. 
It Is possible that an awning is tlie 
very thing needed to make that room 
the best In the home. Awning fix- 
tures are so made now that they may 
be left up for use next year when the 
awning Is taken down, and beside the 
awning cloth is being made more "sun- 
fast" and weather proof, so that one 
buying will serve for several seasons, 
and think of the extra comfort you are 
getting. 



Hi 

and wiped | 



-*^' 



This Heavy Brass Bed only 
$12 at our Salesroom; priced 
$24.00 and up in retail shops. 




CAMERON-JOHNSON-HORGAN 

The Furniture Factory Distributers 

Have Shaken the Very Foun 




This table, 54-lnch top — 
our prk-e $18.00, priced S»5 
lip In tho retail stoi-es. VVe 
liave 125 tables right here in 
our Diiluth stm'k, all go at 
practically one-half rctaU 
price. 



datlons 



of 
the 



Retail Furniture World! 



Onr Greater Salesroom prices on Bra«w Beils, Wlilte Fnameled Steel Beds 
or Vemis Martin finl-lietl Bc«ls are 40''^ ler^s than retail shops. More tliaii a 
carload go«'s In this sale. Springs and Mattresses at llke\*lse reductions. Make 
your hclei'llon right now. 



Our progressive method ot selling good Furniture, Rugs.etc-, 
for the home, the product of the world's best manufacturers, direct 
to the people through our Duluth Distributing Salesrooms 35*70, 
40% and 50% less than retail shop prices has almost paralyzed retaiHurniture stores^ 

Note the scramble to unload their out-oWate stocks by moving from pillar to post. 

The Announcement of Our 



Grater Salesroom Sale Caused a Mighty Conunotion 

Just keep in mind that we a re the "Chaps" to save you from the clutches ol the furniture combine 

rkhTnow our big glosing-out sale of the entire stock 




:> 



— ^JB in our present salesroom, 2110 «"d 2112 West Superior S«rce«^^ headquarters 

district.'* Everything will be sold af practically your own prices. j^smm^ 



i- 






HI Everybody come and buy UP-TO-DATE. FRESH STOCK for less money than the so 
Sltd bargain stuff that should have been sold 10 years or more ago, €i We deliver everywhere 
and ship to all points. Liberal cash discounts, or credit terms to suit purchasers. ^ilM 



Ton should sec tho Buffets wc sHl at 

•o;j retail shop-* Rot $S9 and don't blush 

nlien tlu'j nanie the priee. Our entire 
stoek of more than 100 Buffets, all go at 
S5% to 40% le*.s than eleswhere. 



CAMERON-JOHNSON-HORGAN 

Factory Distributers of Good Furniture 

PRESENT SALESROOM: 2110 and 2112 WEST SUPERIOR ST. 



7 




Every piece of Hejivood's Reed- 
craft Furniture will be sold at prices 
never known l>efore In this city. <^'t»me. 
make your sele<'tion and pay the bill 
bome future time If you wish. 





:>=♦.— >-<«-c-»j-;»)-f)"i»<-s»-t»^-^»^->—^'f<'i 




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THE DULUTH HERALD 




OLESALERa 



EeS°fDULUTH 





2.:£ 



BRIDGEMAN-RUSSEIL 
COMPANY 




Wholesale Dairy Products 

DULUTH, MiNN. 



fk!a 





HOME OF THE 

WINKLER BROS. 

CHOCOLATES 




PAINE & NIXON CO. 

F.uildini? rnatorlals. 
Wholesale glass, brick, paints. 





JOHN WAHL CANDY COMPANY 

Outribut^i •( Rex & Milady ChoeolatM. 
Manufaturert tf Pur* Sugar Candies. 




Home of the 



ZENITH BOX CO. 



m 








^y-:^-m¥^ 




IT.->r!ie of the 

NATIONAL CANDY CO. 

Manufacturing confectioners. 



^md^ 




HOME OF 

REX BOTTLED BEER 

DULUTH BREWING & MALTING CO. 




F. A. PATRICK & CO. 

Wholesa* Dry Gaodt and Maaufacturen. h 
kers of Uid fauious Pal rick- DulutU Northern 



Mak 



Wool Products. 




HOMK OF 



FliT@E^'$ iEEi 









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jjj^^;:^^£^: . :~ : 



yfib 



Home of the 



DULUfH IMPEBIA L FIOUH 

DUI.UTH-SUPERIOR 
{MILLING CO. 




FITZSIMMONS-PALMER CO 

Hhoksaie Fruit aod Pr«4ac;. 



DE ''•VITT-SEITZ CO., 

Wholasai* Furnitur*. 




STACY-MERRILL 
FRUIT CO. 

Wholesale 
Frnit and Produce. 



WhitneyBros.Co. 

goin%iraet©rs 

rile I»rlvers Dock Buiidera 

Ligliterii 

Gen< ral Towing and Wrecking 

SAXD AND GRAVEL 



WM. A. WfllTNEY, 

Pres. and Treas, 

EDW. H. WHITNEY, 

Vice Pr«s. and Mgr. 




Home of the 

H. J. THOMPSON FURNITURE CO. 

New Duluth, Minn. 



c5rA 




iWarshall-Welis 

■re carry inft the name of the Zenith 
City wnA the fame o£ Zenith Top* 
of-thc -world 

HARDWARE 

from the Iowa Line to the Arctio 
Circli,— from Southern California 
to AUtka and the Ha-waiian Islands. 




Northwestern Leather Co., 

109 Lake Avenue South. 

Dealers in Leather 
and Shoe Findings. 




NELSON & PETERSON 

GRAIN AND FEED. 
Elevator mill and warehouse. 




HOME OF 

NORTHERN DRUG CO. 

Successors tt LEITHHEAO DRUG CO. 




W H OL-E SALE__^m 

Both Phones 507 
Office: 306 Sellwood Bids. 



SANITARY ICE 




CAR LOTS A SPECIALTY 
JAMES HART, President. 




1 






Home of the 

NATIONAL IRON CO. 




HOME OF THE 



Zenith Furnace Co. 

Duluth, Minn. 




TWOHY-EIMON 

MERCANTILE CO. 




•iT 







ilomc of tl\e 



DULUTH PLUMBING SUPPLIES. 



Duluth 

Trunk 

CO. 

Manufacturers of 

TRUNKS AND 
TRAVEUNG 
EQUIPMENT 

Eftablished 1888 

220 West Superior Street 





SHAPIRO-TUCKER-FAUST CO. 

Wliolcsale Fruit and Produce. 








ELLIOn & CO. 

HACKERS 

WHOLESALE MEATS 



That good ■whisky, 

MARICOPA 


RYE AND BOURBON. 

L J. Selig & Co. 

Sole distributers. 
401 and 405 West Michigan Street 




USE UNION MATCH CO.*S 
MATCHES. 

A DULUTH PRODUCT. 




NORTHERN 
SHOE 
if j COMPANY 

Home 
of the 
Gitche 
Gamee 
Shoes 




Home of tne 

DULUTH CORRUGATING 
ROOFING CO. 

Manufacturers of 
Sheet Metal Good*. 



WENDIAIDT BROS. & CO., 

-Blank Book Mfs*.. Papor. Rulora. 



HOMK OF THE 

Cornplanier Lubricating &Oil Co. 



VICTOR PRODUCE 
COMPANY 

DULUTH, MINN. 



Headquarters for 
Poultry, Butter and 

Eggs. 




SCHULZE BROS. ^»'o'«»^« 8««»<"«nr 



and Leathor Good*. 




Manufactured By 

BURGESS ELECTRIC CO. 




GOWEN & ZIMMERMAN, 



Inc. 

FURNITURE AND DECORATORS. 



Home of 

BARXHE-M A.RXIN CO. 

Wboloaalo Grocora. 




D. G. ^TLER CO. 

Wholesale 
BaildinK Material and Salt. 

Agents Kelley Island Lilme Co. 




Home of 

PEOPLES BREWING CO 




Diamond Calk Horseshoe Co. 



gfi^cgyfffiis^aaB 


3 

Home 
of 
the 

Ecora 
Cigar 


M WBMi aw ■■BW f-, 
_ anoD MO HHHffi \.i 

9 bEBBkIhEbBk 




\SmmKsS^^^^^^Sib 



MARINE IRON 

& SHIPBUILDING 

WORKS 

Marine Supplies 
of All Kinds. 



tV- 



HOV^fH 



OMSONC; 



obis PAINT 
CUTLERY. 



KEUEYHflVTtMlil 

HOMEq/'THE 

HICKORYBRAND 

HARDWARE. 




iBOS. 00. 

Wholesale Fruits 



"The House With a Shipping 
Organization" 

126 and 128 
WEST MICHIGAN ST. 



ST. GERMAIN 
BROS. 

M.\NUFACTURERS AND DEALP:R3 

DULUTH'S OILY EXCLOSIVE 
GUIS HOUSE 

Complete Stocks ALL KINDS OF GL.\SS 
Lowest Prices 



BAXTER 

SASH & DOOR 

COMPANY 

Lumber^ Sash, Doors, 

Moulding, Roofing and 

Building Papers 



HARD 



SOFT 



HI6H EFFICIENCY 



COAL 

NortiiLandCoaiCo. 



Correspondence Solicited 




KETTLE RIVER CO., 



ENGINEERS AND 
CONTRACTORS 



All kinds of Buildlner Stone, 
Sandstone Paving, Creosote 
Block Paving, Creosote Timbers. 

Quarries at Port Wing, Wis., 
and Sandstone, Minn. 

Cut Stone Plants: Minneapolis, 
Superior and Sandstone. 



WESTERN 
RUG CO. 

or Bimi 




_1^ . * ♦ 




Home of the 

MAXWELL CHEMICAL Jt MFC. CO. 

Manufacturers of Chemical Oil 
Soaps and Disinfectants. 



IMesaba Boiler & 

IManuf acturing 

Co. 

Manufacturers of Stationary and 

3Iarine Boilers, Tanks and 

Smoke StacKs. 



The Largest DREDGE SPUDS 

Manufacturers in the 

A'ortltwest. 




Where the 

"STOTT BRIQUETS" 

Are Made. 




iiSy-"-i #i i i iff%iiii i m 




wf^^r^^-W ^r" 



■ W> iP»'<>"^i— ^'^ I I i^'^W 



PI II m " ^m ii'iw '^^ 



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II 



Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 




March 30, 1914. 



1 



Uneeda Biscuit 

Nourishment — fine fla- 
vor — purity — crispncss 
— Avholcsomeness. AH 
for 5 cents, in the 
moisture-proof package. 



flmuseiricnu | 




TONIGHT' S ATTF IACTIONS. 

ORPHEUM— Vaudeville. 
r.MPKESJ?— "A Hot Old Time." 




AT THE LYCEUM. 

Mcintyre & Heath Coining in Revival 
of "The Ham Free." 

Mcintyre and Heath undoubtedly 
owe much to their loi g and careful 
study of the varying dii lects and man- 
nerisms of the Southern negro as to 
their own Innate sense >f humor. They 
had the best of opporti nilies to study 
the negro at oloao rsnge during the 
early years of their paj tui-rship, when 
their first formed org.tnization, "Mc- 
Intvre and Heaths' Minstrels," was 
struggling through Southern territory 
not very long after tht rivll war. 

Mcintyre recently admitted In a rem- 
iniscent mood the following: "Some- 
times we had to go out in • ur l-urnt 
cork after moasly b«nj business ana 
bv t&lking to the negroes get enough 
to e*t." Mcintyre and Heath in a com- 
munication that was rt>*d a few yenrs 
ago bofore the New f'rk A.-^sociatlon 
of Kthnological Sclenci . as.scrtod that 



: « 



YA8 

roll 




THE STORE FOR SERVICE. 
113-11S-117.11B WBST SUPERIOR STREET. DULLTH. MIN!f. 



Craham Crackers 

A food for every day. 
Crisp, tasty and 
strengthening. Fresh 
baked and fresh de- 
livered. 10 cents. 




EASTER OPENING 

TODAY, TOMORROW AND WEDNESDAY 




McINTYRE AN13 HEATH. 



Buy biscuit baked by 

NATIONAL 

BISCUIT 

COMPANY 

Always look for that name 




-^r^ 



the colored roustabout « of Charleston, 
S. C. wharves spoke with a difciinci 
Irish dialect, due to the association 
with the Irish immigrmts who landed 
In South Carolina about seventy yeara 
ago. The New Orleans negro intro- 
duces many perversions of French and 
Spanish dialect. . , 

The negro of the New Orleans levees , 
can .-,>arcoly understand the darky deck- 
hand who comes flat-floatinir down ! 
from the Red river cuntry. the once 1 
dreaded land which was the scene of; 
many of the Incidents in "Uncle Tom's 
Cabin." Again one fiiids hfavler and , 
lower pitched voices In South Carolina i 
than in Virginia. Kentucky or Ten- . 
nessee. where today the negro con- I 
tinues to be more purely African than i 
in other sections. 

Mcintyre .speaks tl e Alabama and ! 
Heath the Georgian rtialect. A study , 
of the pronunciations proves most in- ; 
teresting. The two comedians will ap- 
pear in .rohn Corfs elaborate revival 
of their most successful musical com- 
edy. "The Ham Tree,' at the Lyceum 
Friday and Saturday, with a nmtlnee 
Saturday. _ 

AT THE ORPHEUM. 

Robert T. Haines in One-Act Drama 
Headlines Niw Bill. 





1 



4 

I 






H 



h -■" 



FOR SALE! 

NEW, LARGE SIZE 
REFRIGtiRATGR 

suitable for grocery; two new Sew- 
ing Miichine.'? and several Fire Ex- 
tinguishers all brand new, and to 
be s-'ld at bankrupt stuck prices. 



C. p. LARSON, 

113 FAST .SI PKKIOR STRKET. 
I. S. Guinn. Mgr. 



DIAMONDS 

i/i-Karat $20.00 
V2-Karat $40.00 

Diamonds Sold on Easy 
Payment I'lan. 

Keystone Jewelry Co. 

22 \V«'«-l Su|MMior Street. 




William J. Hurlbut Is doing some of I 
the best work of any of the modern 
playrights. 

With two current successes to nl« 
credit on the legitimate stage, he has 
turned his attention to vaudeville, and 
the headline sketch at the Orpheum 
this week Is the product of his pen or 
typewriter. It is called "The Man In 
the Dark" and Is being presented by 
Robert T. Haines, "ne of the be^t 
known of pre.sent day American actors, 
supported by an adetiuate company. 

The little drama H of the popular 
"crook" type, but th«) crook Is of the i 
"Raffles" class, smoi th, sauve and a 
polished man of the world. CJranting 
that such cultured cr >oks exist. It Is a 
<on.slstent. well-devel >ped little drama. 
Mr. Haines has always been at hia 
best in a society role and Gibsonesque 
features and deep vol. e lend distinction 

to the part of the g mtleman burglar. ] ^^.j-s she has chosen for her reper- time the pastor, 
who is also somewh it of a humorist 
and a philosopher. E.-ther Van K.ytinge 



Gowns Hats Suiis Coats Wraps Blouses Skirts 
Gloves Corsets Lingerie Shoes Hosiery Jewelry Belts 

Neckwear Children s Apparel Baby Wear 

Spring reigns at Gray's. . • , • n • • e 

The show windows suggest something of the charm of the second floor — which is really a vision ot 

Florida with its pahns— it flowers— and its fashions. See here the extreme and the conservative— the richest 

and the moderate priced— all of it so distinctive as to tempt the most fastidious. 

No city in the land shows finer assortments than may be seen in the Duluth stores— New York importers 
say so— and our stocks are so truly distinguished that all Duluth may well share our pride m them! 
May it please you to honor us with your presence — meet your friends here or bring them with you. 



if 

r 

4f 





If you are ii clean moral man 
the Camels want you to join them, 
and It you are contemplating do- 
ing so, they Invite you to their 
basket social on Friday evening, 
April 3rd. where you will have an 
opportunity of seeing the Camels at 
thtir oasis. <'all for Invitation at 
Ciiniel Ofliet^ — «10 AUvorili BUIs. 



1 shows intelligence aid ability in the 

part of the woman, » nd the two other 

members of the ca U, Mark Fenton 

i and Charles Wyngate. are excellent. 

I On the whole the pl.iylet Is far above 

' the vaudeville average and Is a fitting 

headllner to a very entertaining bill. 

Those who have thought that the 
last word was said in acrobatic acts 
will change their oolnlon after wit- 
nessing the work .f the Belleclalre 
Brothers. These two men are artists 
at their work. Xo ticrobats seen here 
this season have approached them lu 
the flnl.«h and styb shown. In the 
difficult closing petition they were 
greeted with hearty applause and had 
lo perform another s unt as an encore. 

Two singing and dancing turns of 
dilTerent types are ofTered on this bill. 
1.1 Hunter Wilson j nd Effie Pearson 
' have a neat little flirtation number, 
I with several catchy songs and some 
1 amusing dialogue. 

; both performers li most pleasing 
1 James McCormack und Elainor Irving 
' have a nautical sk.tch. with a most 
•attractive curtain slowing the prom- 
enade deck of an Atlantic steamer. 
' Thcv .sing, dance an.l go through some 
'clever foolery which Is very entt-rtain- 
I ing. and good, clear comedy through- 
out. 

Xina Barbour, wh 5 recently created 
a sensation in Xew York by her rise 
I overnight from a position in a sweat- 
' shop to one on the I'alace theater bill. 
i Is billed as the 'Sweatshop Prima 
I Donna." 

I usual <iuality. It is almost a baritone, 
land is most pleasing in the ballad num- 



ADVERTISE IN THE HERALD 






^\, TEETH '5^, 

GOL.D CROWNS S3.00 I 

Read what Mrs. M. Kruger, 619 
Eightli street, says: 

"I had 14 teeth extracted at the | 
Eastern Dentists with absolutely no i 

fain connected with the operation, and | 
recommend their painless method to 
any one who dreads the dental chair." 

WE'LL SAVE YOU HALE 

We Waul 

Your 

Family 

Denial Work 

MC^ff^t!' Ut all <*> wl«o«»> we ow* ■ervloe" 

Gold Crowns.»3.00 | Uridgework .W.OO 

8ut°r Filling. 5«c | <J..ld Fillings fl.OO 

Writtea i.umrnntff for 10 Yeara 

on All Work. 

EASTERN DENTISTS 

Oi.r.<..Mit. Motel .'^t. Lotii.o. 
819 %%KST SirEBIOK STRKET. 

J.ao a. m. tu « i>. m. 



situations are amusing, and the sketch 
provides a very entertaining Interlude. 

The opening act Is presented by the | 
Kramers, three gymnasts, two men 
and a woman. The woman makes a 
very charming appearance and the me& 
are clever performers. 

The motion pictures this w«.'ek show 
scenes In the spring training camps 
of the baseball clubs and the recent 
fire in St. Loui s. 

AT THE EMPRESS. 

•A Hot Old Time" Offered for First 
Half of Week. 

A chorus of nine of the prettiest 
girls that have been seen at the Em* 
The personality of theater this season, with catchy 

music and good dancing are the fea- 
tures of the new show which opened 
a four-day engagement at that popu- 
lar amusement place yesterday after- 
noon. The title of the play Is "A Hot 
Old Time," and the contents of the 
production do not belie the title. 

Being a musical comedy In tabloid 
form "A Hot Old Time" has only a 
thread of a plot, but a plentiful supply 
of jokes, dances and songs fills In the 
space so that the audience Is well en- 
tertained. The sad experiences of an 
I inventor, who Is trying to get a de- 
She has a vojce of most un- | ^.j^.^ f^^ resurrecting the dead on the 

' " market, are so extreme that they arc i 

amusing and the manner In which his | 
wife buffets him about, cause screams 
of laughter. Charles Burch has the ' 
unfortunate experience of being the 
ht-n-peckfd husband while the role of , 
his wife Is taken by a woman with a i 
h.Tppy combination of names — rather | 
Ironic for a suffragette — Miss Elysium I 
Holmes. Ned Molroy was amusing as , 
an Irish comedian and put over some j 
good songs and dances. His «xhtbl- \ 
tlon of the "Irish Tango" with Miss j 
Jo*> Taylor was a big hit. I 

Miss Dorothy Bard was one of the 
favorites and scored In her song, 
"Lonesome Baby." 

The chorus sang an iinusually good 
selection of songs, the best of which 
wore the "Racirtng of the Nursery 
Rhymes" and "The Ragtime Sailor 
Boy."' Two comedy films open the 
show. 



ANALYTICAL RESULTS 
BRIGHTS DISEASE 



, natives who attended the little mis- 

•The Tamer" Is the title of a do- slon church at Nana Kroo had In the | 
.1 „J^^Thv E^^r,.^ VnnVted bv Mabel pictures whs remarkable. The scene Is 
'^^^^^ll.iZl/ Beresfo^d Lovett The ; well dei^crlbed by Rev, Mr. Williams 
Florence and Beresford ^o^e\^-...„*.„^ ,„ ^ ^^^^^,J. ^^ ^^e Northwestern Chris- 
tian Advocate as follows: 

"In the midst of this rainy weather 
God gave us a clear, dark night so 
that the pictures showed up fln^-ly. 1 
wish I could make you see the scene, 
the Immense number of people seated 
on the ground, some of the more re- 
luctant hiding behind bushes and the 
native huts, where they could see 
without being seen; an endless num- 
ber of small naked boys and girls, 
quiet through the whole service as the 
proverbial mouse; In front the white 
screen, for a backgroimd the cocoanut 
palms waving in the breeze, and the 
ceaseless roar of the surf, softened a 
little by di-stance. At our side stood 
our native preacher Sanso (his name 
means 'glad' and fits him well), turn- 
ing the message Into Kroo as It fell 
from our lips. At the table sat the 
•white mammy,' as Mrs. Williams la 
called, operating the light. It was a 
solemn, searching time, the hush of 
the evening being broken only by the 
voices of the speakers and the deep 
sighs that came now and then from 
some heavily burdened heart; God's 
spirit sending the Word homa with 
unerring aim. 

"When the last hymn was sung and 
the benediction breathed over that 
scul-hungry people, the 'white mr.mmy' 
was lifted into a hammock and the 
party proce«ded home; pa\ising at the 
river to take the 'white daddy' on the 
back of the tallest man. as the dark 
waters were waded through without 
mishap of any kind. The next day 
broughtt good news to our hearts, as 
we heard of one man after another, 
who had had long grudges against 
others, refusing to sp»ak to them for 
months, under the Influence of that 
service going home and making their 
peace with God; then seeking out 



The interest that the ' their neighbors and making peace andum regarding; the points on which 



with them and once more establishing 
the family altar, and scores saying: 
•That be what we wanted; that be God 
truth.' " 



CLEARING HOUSE 
fOR LECTURE DATES 



they specially wish information. 

"I heartily commend ihem and their 
mission to your favorable considera- 
tion, and hope that you will be good 
enough to put such facilities at their 
disposal as will ensure that their nec- 
es.'^arily limited time may be used tc 
the best advantage, 

"I need scarcely assure that any 
courtesy shown to Bailie McMillan and 
Mr. Walker will be heartily recipro- 
cated to visitors from your city to 



will be furnished by the malntenanc« 
department. 

Instead of hauling a sprinkling: 
wagon continually the team will bo 
used on the street sweeper twice a 
week, and the commissioner points out 
that additional conipen.«atlon should 
not be asked merely for changing th« 
team from one to the other. 



-r 



- * 



"A clearing liouse for dates upon 
\\hi(h events of general Interest fall, 
is suggested as a cure for conflicts in 
engagements due to the occurrence of 
several meetings at the same time. 

B. C. Wade, secretary of the Y. M^ C. 
A., in speaking of the crowding of 
events of public interest during cer- 
tain Intervals, said something should 
be done to keep various organizations 
In touch with each other so that con- 
flicts could be avoided and Important 
entertalnment.«, lectures and other 
forms of meetings could be so ar- 
ranged that each would be well at- 
tended. 

•A clearing house for dates would be 
the best solution of the problem," said 
Mr. Wade. "Some organization could 
take the responsibility of keeping a 
bulletin of all public events and their 
dates. When any other important 
event was arranged for, those In 
chnrge could consult the bulletin, and 
make the date on such a time that con- 
flicts could be avoided." 

"HIS WORSHIP'^ 

IS NOTIHEQ 



SPRINKLING BIDS 

ARE TOO HIGH 



Elgin Cane Continned. 

Chicago, March 30. --Pending further 

negotiations looking to an amicable 

charges 
Trade, 
which Is accused of violating the anti- 
trust act, was today continued until 
next week before Judge Landis. 




Patient— Dennis Eeale. Plerson, Man- 
itoba, Canada. 

Physician — Dr. Shier, Plerson. Man- 
itoba. 

Case — Diagnosed by Dr. Shier aa 
••Chronic Bright's F isease." 

There was the usual albumen and 
necrosis was in e^rldence — knee stiff 
and foot Inverted. Recovery consid- 
ered Impossible. 

Fulton's Renal C< mpound was taken 
Into the case In Murch, 1913. Patient 
: Improved and remo' ed to Pe^rry. Iowa, 
I where the treatment was continued. 
I After taking two d )zen he writes: 
I "I had the doctor make an examina- 
I tlon. He reported no albumen. You 
may rest assured felt good. I am 
' now healthy, eat an I sleep well and am 
gaining in strength. Of <our»e my 
stiff, useless leg brthers ine and pre- 
vents my getting around. • • •" 
1 The ability of F ilton's Renal Com- 
pound to reduce albumen In many 
cases of Pright's D sease is not a mat- 
ter of opinion but a FACT IN I'HYS- 
ICS, and we will n all formula for al- 
bumen test that will ahow the percent- 
age of albumen from week to week. 
' As the albumen drcllnes Improvement 
commonly follows, recoveries having 
'been reported In Thousands of cases. 
I Formula and liternture mailed on re- 
'■ quest. .lohn .T. Vu ton C«>., .San Fran- 
i cUco. For sale at druggists. 



PLEASES MTIVES 
WITH STEREOPTICON 



POSLAM QUICK 
TO IMPROVE 
PIMPLY SKIN 



Mayor Prince Will Receive 

Visit From Glasgow 

City Officials. 



Two officials of Glasgow. Scotland, 
will visit Duluth about April 27 In the 
course of a trip to the United States 
and Canada to get Information as to 
methods of making property valua- 
tions and handling regl.strations. They 
are Bailie Thomas McMillan, senior 
magistrate, and Alexander Walker, city 
assessor. 

Their coming Is announced In an of- 
ficial communication from the lord 



Commissioner Believes the 

Specifications Were 

Misunderstood. 

New bids for sprinkling several dis- 
tricts may be asked by Commissioner 
Roderick Murchison, head of the divi- 
sion of public works. Many of the 
bids opened this morning were con- 
sidered too high. 

The commis.«ioner thinks that lliis 
was due to a misunderstanding of the 
specifications, as in some of the dis- 
tricts street cleaning will be combined 
with the sprinkling. He states that 
this will entail little, if any, extra la- 
bor, and that the cost of the two should 
hardly exceed that paid for sprinkling 
in other years. The man who gets 
the contract will be required to hitch 
his team to a street sweeper twice a 
week, while any extra labor required 



Here Is Good News 
for Stomach Victims 



Rev. W. B. Williams, Former 

Duluth Pastor, Describes 

Scene. 

Rev. Walter B. Williams, formerly a 
Duluth pastor, has been having some 
Interesting experiences with a stere- 
optlcon In Africa where he Is now i 
working as a mls.><lonary. The stere- j 
opticon was given him by the Asbury I 
M. E. church where he was at one J 



I provost, dated March 19 and addressed 

When you see a pimply, eczema-cov- i to "His Worship, the Mayor of Du- 
ered face, you may conclude that Its ; luth, Minn., U. S. A., reading as fol- 
owner doesn't know anything about lows: 

Poslam — the remedy that benefits ail- j "My esteemed colleague. Bailie Thom- 
Ing skin BO greatly and so quickly. I as McMillan, our senior magistrate. 

Overnight treatment with Poslam and Alexander Walker, our city as 
will show a startling improvement; | sessor, have been delegated by the 
complexions are cleared; blemish^ i city council to visit certain cities In 
disappear. | the United States and Canada for the 

Itching stops at once; Irritated skin | purpose of studying the methods of 
Is soothed, the trouble is soon eradl- I valuation and rating and also to lu- 
xated quire into the system of registration 

Poslam is harmless. Nothing In It ; of voter.s and other matters. They 
can injure the most delicate skin. | purpose leaving Glasgow on 28 Inst, 

Your druggist sells Poslam. 



For and expect to r'^ach your city on about 



free sample write the Emergency Lab- 
oratories. 32 West 26th .St., New York. 

Poslam Soap Is best for the skin, be- 
cause medicated with Poslam. 

New Toilet Size 16 cents. 



27th proximo, when they will take the 
liberty of waiting upon you in prosecu- 
tion of their Inquiries. In anticipation 
of Ihtlr coming th«»y have asked me 
to forward to you the inclosed memor- 



Some very remarkable results are 
being obtained by treating stomach, I 
liver and intestinal troubles with pure \ 
vegetable oils, which exert a cleans- I 
ing, soothing and purifying action i 
upon the lower bowels, removing the , 
obstructions of poisonous fecal matter > 
and gases and preventing their absorp- 
tion by the blood. This done, the food ' 
Is allowed free passage from the stom- 1 
ach, fermentation ceases and stomach 
troubles quickly disappear. | 

George H. Mayr, for twenty years a ; 
leading Chicago druggist, cured him- I 
i I self and many of his friends of stom- 
ach, liver and Intestinal troubles of 
years' standing by this treatment, and 
so successful was the remedy he de- 
vised that It has since been placed in 
the hands of druggists all over the 
country, who have sold thousands of 
bottles. 

Though absolutely harmless, the 'ef- ; 
feet of the medicine is sufficient to ] 
convince any one of Its remarkable ef- j 
fectlveness, and within 24 hours the i 
sufferer feels like a new person. Mayr's i 
Wonderful Stomach Remedy is nowl 
sold here by all druggists. 1 



Lox;? Fare Dates 

Mar. iS-Apr. 15 

Every day during this period. One Way 

Colonist Tickets ■will be on sale from 

Duludi-Superior, St. Paul and Minneapolis 

•Oia &\e 

Nor4iem Pacific Ry 

to points in Montana, IdaKo, Washington, 
Oregon, British Columbia and California 
as follows: 

'Livingston, Montana 
Bozeman 
Helena 

Butte " 

Missoula ** 

Hamilton ** 

Darbp 
Three Forks 
.Clyde Park 

I Sand Point, IdaKo 

' Rsflxdrum 
Le^wston 

Spokane, Washington 
Nor«^ Yakima " 
Tacoma " 

Seattle ** 

Aberdeen 

Vancouver, Br. Col. 
Victoria 

Oregon 




r 






i 



Limit o; Ticket. 30 
days — gcod (or .^top- 
overs. Honored m 
leather-upholjjtered 
tourist sleeping cars 
upon die ijayment oi 
berth rate. 



Portland, 
' Madras 
' Bend 
i^Weed, California 

Round Trip Homeseekers' Tickets 

On Sale 1st and 3rd Tuesdays 

One Way Settlers* Tickets 

On Sale cscry Tuesday durint March and Aprtl 

Three through trains daily to the Nor4i 

Pacific Coast. One additional train as 

far as Glendive, Montana. 

A. C. Albactiten, 

Aaeat. 

J. E. PEDERSON. 

C. P. A. 

920 Tower Ave., 

Superior; PhonM, 



J. I. Thoma*. 

fien. Ast.. 

C. P. O'Dofinell. 

C. P. A.. 

334 W. Superior St.. 

Duluth: PhoRet, 214. 




4226. 



.. 






>*OT*« 



Monday, 



THE DUI-UTH HERALD 



March 30, 1914. 



19 



SIXOND AVilXUE KAST AXD SLPEUIOR STREET. 



Great Removal Sale 

continues to do big business. We were compelled to put 
on more salespeople — people of Dulutli and adjoining 
territory know that when Forward & C'X put on a sale 
it means a real saving in new high-grade goods. 

EXTRA SPECIAL- Onie-Half 
Price Beds tor Tomorrow 



Railroads 



' have made a good Investment. I have 
I not decided at the present time wheth- 
er I win work It immediately or dis- 
I pose of It. It Is a very good property 
I and appears tu have a large amount 
of iron ore." 



PREPARE FOR 

A BUSY SEASON 



YOUNG ESSAYIST 

TO ACT AS GUIDE 






Our No. 207 Iron Bed-s, size 3-6 by 
4-6; reguiurly $4.00, ^A A A 

removal sale price ^mtm"" 

Our No. 613 Verni* Martin 4-6 Iron 
Beds, regularly $7.5t), 4Q T'll 

removal sale price ^V« ■ V 

Our No. 305 
3-6 White Iron 
regularly $T^— 

$3.50 

Our No. 11S8 
Vernis Martin 
Iron Beds — 
regularly $7.25 

$3.60 

And better Brass and Wooden Beds to $38.50 all go at 
big discount. 

Some great bargains in Mattre>scs and Box Springs. 

One-Half Price 

Please d-'n't forget that all our Lace Clurtains, Curtain 
Material, Portieres and Drapery Goods and Couch Cov- 
ers, all go at one-half former prices. 

Our Basement Is Full of Great Bar- 
gains in Crockery and Fine China 

On Tables— your choice from 

3c to 85c 



Railroads Have Inquiries 

Out for About 10,000 

New Cars. 

That officials of the Duluth. Missabe 
& Northern railroad are looking for- 
ward to an active season's iron ore 
traffic, is shown In an inquiry for 
1,000 cars sent out last week. It Is 
estimated that the tonnage offering 
I both of ore and general freight will 
j be heavy after the opening of navlga- 
I tlon, and the company Is preparing to 
take care of it. 

Other Inquiries in the market at 
present are reported by the equipment 
companies to aggregate about 10,000 
cars, and provided there Is no serious 
setback in the condition of the winter 
wheap crop, substantial improvement 
In railroad buying is looked for. 

Operations of the iron and steel 
plants at the leading centers this 
week are estimated to be on a basis 
of 76 per cent of capacity, and with 
a number of good-sized contracts pend- 
ing, rail makers are especially cheer- 
ful. Among the orders placed during 
the last few days was a small one by 
the Soo Line. An order for 150,000 
tons from the Pennsylvania railroad Is 
pending, and. is expected to be placed 
shortly. 

EXPECT HEAVY 

TRAFFIC IN WEST 



D. H., 3-30-14. 



Let The Columbia 
Be Your Hatter 



Arvid Hill of C^ric Gets Ap- 

pointment as Result of 

His^^lity. 

Arvid J. Hin oi|.k:edrlc, Minn., who 
represented St. Louis county at the 
state farm boys' encampment held in 
connection with the Minnesota state 
fair at Hamllne last year, has been 
successful in securing an appointment 
to act as representative of this con- 
gressional district at the state fair 
again this yeaV. Each congressional 
district of the state will have one rep- 
resentative at the litate fair this year 
chosen from the boys who represented 
the various counties last year. The 
duties of each district representative 
will be to act as guides for those 
chosen to represent the various coun- 
ties again this year. 

Arvid recently entered a competition 
with other farmer boys In this con- 
gressional district who represented 
their respective counties at the state 
fair last year. He submitted the best 
essay on "What I Saw and Learned at 
the Fair as a Member of the State 
Farm Boys' Camp." St. Louis county 
will have another representative at the 
state fair this year. The state fair 
association has arranged to pay the ex- 
penses of one farmer boy from each 
county, to bo selected by means of an 
essay contest. 



thousands of articles at one-half price. 
ave money. 



Act 



ARREST PROVES 

REST OF LUCK 



I perintended the work, state that the 
'joint Is better than heretofore, as al- 



lowance is now made for expansion. 



MAIN BROKEN; _ 

NOBODY KNEW IT drivers have vacation. 

; ' I 

i, . ,„ ««__i„»/>j No Use lor Police Wagon or Ambul- 

Repairs Are Completed ^^^ . ,^^ ^^^^^ J,^^^^ 

Without Shutting Off 



City Water. 



The repair of a serious bn-ak in the 
42-inch fr.rcrt main at Thlrty-fourlh 
avenue east an.l Superior street was 
completed last Sitarday by the water 
an 1 light de:>.irtr!ient without i uttlng 
off t!i-^ water supi'ly in any part of 

thf '-iiy. 

>*'.'ut a vf^r ago the same bre^^k 
1 serious trouble, cuttinjj off the 
- , . ;y of many people for several day.-?. 
This time no effort was made to re- 
place the broken flange, as was done 
before. NVnv pi^^ces were fitted and 
boiled i.n ih- out.«ide and heavily 
.sealtd with le^id Manager D. A. Ref>d 



anc) for Forty Hours. 

For forty hours not a single wheel 
turned at h jadquarters and the police 
patrols and ambulance were not put 
to use at a 1 from 8 o'clock Saturday 
evening until noon today. This Is 
considered an exceptional record by 
the police. 

At 8 o'cl'ok Saturday evening Carl 
Berg was a rested by Patrolman Mag- 
nu-?on on a charge of drunkenness and 
the prisonei had to be brought to 
headquarters in the police patrol. That 
was the la^t time the patrol was put 
to use unt I this noon, when Jailor 
Johnson took seven prisoners to the 
county jail 



Railways Look for Boom in 
North Dakota and East- 
ern Montana. 

Great Northern and Northern Pa- 
cific railroad officials are looking for- 
ward to a record business this year 
out of Western North Dakota and 
Eastern Montana. 

An agricultural boom is expected to 
develop in Montana, with settlers al- 
ready going out there in numbers this 
spring. The opening of the Fort Peck 
Indian reservation was the biggest 
single factor in promoting outside in- 
terest. 

The fact that both these railroads 
are extending their lines into territory 
west of Glendive, and that a fine agri- 
cultural country is being opened up 
.ahead of liie work. Is of Interest to 
Duluth wholesalers. It Is said that 
taking into account further construc- 
tion on the Soo Line's Montana ex- 
tension, new construction by the rail- 
roads In the Northwest will be upon 
a much heavier scale than last year. 

MEDIATORTAKES UP 
TELEG RAPHE RS' CASE. 

Chicago. March 30.— G. AV. W. Hang- 
er, assistant United States commis- 
sioner of labor, acted as mediator to- 
day at a conference called in an effort 
to adjust the wage controversy be- 
tween the Lake Shore, Big Four and 
Chicago & Southern Indiana railroads 
and the 1.800 telegraphers in their 
employ. 

J. K. Bernet, vice president of the 
New York Central lines, who is in 
charge of operations for the three con- 
stituent lines, represented the rail- 
roads at the hearing. A. J. Newman 
of Chicago represented the Lake Shore 
telegraphers. B. H. Perham, Interna- 
tional president of the Order of Teleg- 
raphers, attended the conference. 

The telegraphers began negotiations 
for an Increase In wages last August 
by appealing to the Individual com- 
panies. The railroads refused to grant 
an increase, and the telegraphers vot- 
ed to strike. Federal mediation wa."» 
then asked by the telgraphers, and 
granted. 



Plumbers Mi|pht Have Been 

Aspliyxiat^tJ Had Police 

Not Seen Them. 

Abner Oja, 32, and Jacob Laine, 30, 

were lucky that they were arrested in 

the E. S. Farrell plumbing shop at 23 

West First street early Sunday morn- 
ing, or they might have been corpses 
today due to asphyxiation. 

Oja, who works\* for the plumbing 
company, and Laine; went into the store 
shortly after midnight Saturday and 
attempted to light the gas.» They first 
turned on the gaa ana then tried their 
l>est to light it. But to no avail. Ac- 
cording to their own story in polic* 
court this morning, they were too 
drunk to see anytJitng and could not 
reach up to the fixtures. 

At any rate, the two men were 
there for some time, during wiiich the 
gas was continually escaping. A 
number of burned matches were found 
on the floor below the fixture, giving 
mute evidence of tiie many attempts 
made by the men to light the gas. It 
is possible that they might have suf- 
focated from the gas, if they had not 
been arrested. 

Oja and Laine were arrested by Ser- 
geant Butchart and "Patrolman Mona- 
han, who saw the men Inside the build- 
ing. They were arrigned In police court 
this morning on a charge of breaking 
into a building with intent to commit 
larceny. After heanrtg their story, 
the court diamlsaed the case. 



Representing the 

Stein-Bloch, 

Sincerity, 

Society, 

Sampeck 

and sundry other 

wholesale tailors 

of national fame. 



Goes to Chicago. 

C A. Mitchell, commercial agent of 

the Chicago. Milwaukee & St. Paul at 

„. ... ,_... ,.„„*^,.,„^ I Duluth. is in Chicago on business ron- 

Only one irr.-st was made yesterday, i ^^^^^^ ^-ith the local office. Mr. Mitch 



GIVES NEW LIGHT 
ON JAPAN PROBLEM 



and Engineer E. W. Kelley. who su- 'in a street :ar. 



that being at West Duluth and the 
prisoner was brought to headquarters 



Expert Hand Work 

in cleaning is the f 'u; Lli:-:. f our Glove Cleaning success, 
crowned by the additional use of a modern electrically 
heated bra'>>. form as shown herewith, which perfects the 
removing of wrinkles and smoothing the leather to an 
appearance of newness. This is the W HY the quality of 
our gluvc cleaning as well as all of our French Dry Clean- 
ing is guaranteed to be as good as that 
obtained anvwhere in America. 




ell is the agent who recently succeed- 
ed C. L. Kennedy. 

• 

Many Duiuthians in South. 

L. W. Dickenson, assistant city tick- 
et agent of the Omaha, returned yes- 
terdav from a trip to Florida, Cuba 
and New Orleans. Mr. Dickenson stat- 
ed that there Is an unusually large 

number of American tourists In Cuba I thor and mlssiona^ry 
and also that there are many Duluth 
ians in various parts of the South. 



UNDMARK BURNS 

AT GRAND FORKS 



Coming of Dr. Gglick Arous- 
ing Much Interest in 
Duluth. 

The coming of Dr. Sidney L. Gulick, 
who will give an address on Oriental 
immigration problems next Friday 
noon at the Y. M. C. A., is causing 
widespread Interest. Dr. Gulick Is a 
professor in Doshisha university, Japan 
and a lecturer for the Imperial uni- 
versity of Kyto, Japan, and Is con- 
sidered one of tixe best writers and 
lecturers on Oriental immigration In 
the world. The lecture Is not of a 
religious nature, and the Y. M. C. A. 
is bringing Dr. Gulick here because it 
has not been convenient for another or- 
ganization to do so. 

Dr. Gulick has been In Japan twen- 
ty-six years, active as an educator, au- 
thor and missionary. He has made a i 
profound study of the Oriental races 
and is a fluent speaker and writer 
In the Japanese tongue. The activities ] 




I 



Ing at the First M E. church . An ! ss the result of the overflowing of the 
appropriate sermon wHl be delivered ; Kentucky river and its tributaries. 



by the pastor. Rev. A. E. Healey, and 
spec lalmusic will be rendered by a 
large chorus choir. 



ASSISTS IN DEPORTING. 



Heavy rains have fallen In the moun- 
tains for the last three days, and all 
the streams are out of their banks. 



INSURANCE STATISTICS. 



form of losses. State Commissioner of 
Insurance W. C. Taylor, in a prelimin- 
arv report, sliows that total premium* 
paid are $2,735,892.50. of which ?1,168,- 
787.30 was returned in losses. 

American fire Insurance companlea 
received $1,913,214.26 in premiums on 
total risks of $109,742,648.61; los.sea 



aggregated $1,027,816.46. and $991,906.11 

rt '."h'e ^.'JrfcJ^f "f i« it,"»TM^; ; Sheriffs stenographer Helps Take North Dakota Insured Get Back About was p.ia__ 

to check Immigration from the Orient = -^ u-i* d«:j :- D-««,:..«,o ^„^"*V„i.5„ 



For a Strictly Guaranteed to 
Please You Service, phone 
2442 or stop the White \\ agon 
with the blue pennant. 



ingalls Hotel Gutted and 

Other Property Is 

Damaged. 

Grand Forks, N. D., March 30.— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — The Ingalls house. 
a pioneer hostelry of Grand Forks, was 
gutted by fire early today with about 
$18,000 loss. The fire was started 
probably bv faulty wiring. The Rosoff 
drug store is a heavy loser while War- 
berton confectionary. Butler's barber 
shop. Sorlle's feed store and the Postal 
telegraph had lighter losses. The 
Scandinavian-American bank owned the 
building and hotel fixtures which wore 
valued at $11,000. 

postoffice'blown 
at coude ray. wis. 

Couderav. Wis.. March 30. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — The postofflce here i 
was burglarized early Sunday morn- | 
1 Ing. An entrance was forced through ; 
a window. Some small change and a 
I book of money orders were taken. Signs 
I Indicate the work of professionals. 



to check 'Immigra 

have been of great interest to him. 
but he says he is not a partisan in any 
sense on this problem. He is not 
wholly an advocate of the coast peo- 
ple's views, but firmly believes that 
there are two sides to the matter. 
He has a view of his own as to the 
best means of settling the question. 
This Is the percentage basis of ad- 
mitting immigration. In his lecture 
here he will thoroughly discuss this 
and other views. * ,« .. 

The lecture will take place at 12:45 
p m., and be brief so that business 
and professional men may hear the 
lecture during the lunch hour and re- 
turn to their offices without unneces- 
sary delay. 

• 

Commandoo' Oolng to Churrh. 

Ironwood. Mich.. March 30.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— The Gogebic com- 
mandery. Knights Templars, will it- 
tend service on Kaster Sunday 



morn- 



l^ Dry Cleaning 





Laundry 



TRANSIT COMPANY 

N AMES O FFICERS. 

J. W. Greiner of Chicago, superin- 
tending engineer of the Canada-At- 
' lantic Transit company, yesterday an- 
' nounced appointments of officers for 
I the line as follows: 

Steamer Kearsarge — William Baxter. 
I master; A. T. Williams, engineer. 
Steamer George N. Orr — Herman 
Jaenke. master; James B. Wellman. 
, engineer. 

Steamer Newona — William Moles, 
1 master: William Pans, engineer. 

Steamer Arthur Orr — John Simons. 
. master: D. C. Mance. engineer. 
; And for the Ontario Carferry com- 
pany's carferry Ontario No. 1 Capt. 
H. D. Forrest and Chief Engineer Wil- 
liam Nlchol. 



EAT CABBAGE, nSH, 
SAUSAGE, NEW BREAD 

'Tape's Diapepsin" Digests Food 

When stomach Can't— Cures 

Indigestion. 



Undesirable Aliens to Chicago. 

Miss Elizabeth Sullivan, a stenogra- 
pher In the office of Sheriff John R. 
Meining, acted as one of a party ot 
twenty attendants who assisted United 
States immigration Inspectors in de- 
porting fifty-nine aliens from the 
country last week. 

The aliens, many of whom werft 
women, together with the officers and 
attendants, left Chicago for New Yorlf 
on two special cars last Sunday. Miss 
Sullivan returned to Duluth last eve- 
ning. ^ 

URIMORE UWYER 
VICTIM OF BURNS 

Larimore. N. D.. March 30.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— Judge O. A. Wilcox 
of Larimore, one of the pioneer attor- 
neys of North Dakota, died Saturday 
evening from burns received the night 
previous. He was found lying In his 
office, which was in flames, an over- 
turned lamp having started the blaze. 

Judge Wilcox resided here since 1882 
and was one of the best known poli- 
ticians in this section for many years. 

MISSING MAN IS 

HEIR TO $365,000. 



Do some foods you eat hit back — 
taste good, but work badly; ferment 

Into stubborn lumps and cause a sick, Kane, Pa., March 30. — A fortune of 

sour gas.sy stomach? Now, Mr. or $365,000 awaits Keith Dalrymple. aged 

Mrs.' Dvspeptlc, Jot this down: Pape's 23, of Port Allegany, who disappeared 

DiaDensln digests everything, leaving from home seven years ago. Relatives 

uiapepsin aigesis eveiyiums, it-avms y^^^.^ started a country-wide search for 



re Insurance 
Half Paid in Premiums. operating in the state received $342.. 

^ .„ 810.61 In premiums on risks totaling 
Grand Forks. N. D.. March 30. — $23,675,112. Their losses were $175,- 
(Speclal to The Herald.)— Fire Insur- 5i6!37. of which $170,986.83 was paid. 

ance compa„l,= operaUn^ In ^or^K ^^i"^ ,,'?S:;if ^^^^^X^.fi^.^l^T, 
Dakota returned slightly more than | ^,60,753.54 on risks totaling $12,314,087; 
half the total premiums received on ! their losses were $144,292.58, of which 
policies m 1913 to the insured in the ' $136,309.70 was paid. 



SPRING OPENING ALL THIS WEEK 






nothing to sour and upset you. There 



the young man. The fortune was left 



never was anything so safely quick, so ,,in/i,V ^fs father, an oil operator, who 

certainly effective. No difference how ^^^^ recently. 
I badly your stomach is disordered you 

will get happy relief in five minutes, 
I but what pleases you most Is that it 

strengthens and regulates your stom- 
1 ach so you can eat >*oVir favorite foods 
! without fear. 

I Most remedies give you relief some- 
I times — they are slow, but not sure. 
t "Pape's Diapepsin*' » quick, positive 

and puts your stomach in a healthy 

condition so the misery won't come 

back 



BUYS A MINE AT 



CREDITORS FOILED 

BY DUKE'S ACTION. 

Lelpsic, March 30. — The supreme 
court has upheld the action of the 
duke de Talleyrand, husband of Anna 
Gould who. In 1910, renounced his 
rights' to the crown fief of Sagan, In 
Sllola, In favor of his son. Prince 
Jason Howard of Sagan. The duke de 

creditors 



You feel diffcreht as soon as "Pape's Talleyrand's German creditors at- 
Diapepsin" comes in contact with the tacked the validity of the transfer, by , 
SorSS-distress just vanlshes-your which they were unable to attach the 
stomach gets sweet, no gases no belch revenues of the fief. 



BANKRUPT SALE. 'ing, no eructations of undigested food, 

I your head clears and you feel fine. 

Go now, make the best investment 
you ever made, by getting a large 
fifty-cent case of Pape's Diapepsin 
from any drug store. You realize in 
five minutes how needless It Is to suf- 
fer from Indigestion, dy:3pepsia 
any stomach disurdec. 



Nels P. Flodin of Marquette, very 
well known to many business men of 
Duluth, announced here today that he 
had purchased the McDonald mine at 
Crystal Falls, Mich., within the last 
few days. 
\ "I bought the mine In a bankrupt 
I sale," said Mr. Flodiu. "and believe 1 



FLOOD INUNDATES 

K ENTUC KY TOWN. 

L-exington. Ky., March 30.— Reports 

reached here today that the town of 

or Hazard, Ky., Is Inundated and several 

I other smaller village* are threatened 



The 

Dress-Up 
Occasion 

of the Year! 

We are showing Patent Vamp Boots with 
tops of cloth, Cuban or Spanish heels. 
Also Satin, Suede, Velvet, Tan and Dull. 
OXFORDS AND PARTY SLIPPERS. 
All the new things are here in great variety. 

Tango, Mary Jane and Colonial Pumps 

$3.00 

ORENSEN 

SHOE STORES 



Export 
Fitters 




■mxm^fm.'A^e 



lAI NT PAU L -M I N N EAPOLI S -DU LUTH 
123 WEST SLPERIOK ST. 



Yes, We 
Do 

Repairing 









\ 




""■^^ 


















, 






k 


i 












I 













!-fe.' 



LIVE SPORTING GOSSIP 

By BRUCE, 



HANDBALL TEAM OF THE DULUTH Y. M. C. A. 



RIS RAYMOND COBB 
made a speech recently tr. 
the scions of the Southland, 
(.ness he isn't strong down 
there. And another little 



all this Georges Carpcntier is some 

bo\'. 

• • • 

Right in Line, This Name. 

F.ADIXG in on: of the Kngltsh 
... ,. ,. Av 1 . A ♦i.^.r- t^ sporting paner< of the name of 
thing-hke Weddy W <^'^" ^";^,;;^';^;\ S?e of the latest fig iters on the other 
of the smart and brainy athletes cap- ^ ^^., ^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^ Pe- 

ering betore the brisk admiration of, 
the public, the Georgia Teach is some , ''^V 
press ag-.-nt. Whether Rube Waddell ^^'^^ 
was ever a conscious publicity work- 
er, you can search us. We have al- 
ways attributed it to the exuberance ! |^'^'^ 

of the youthful mind of this huge tel- I -' j . .'^^ ^^^ ^^^ < owntrodden lad- 
low. Welsh- and Cobb are smart i ^ ^^,^;„g ^o^^. purely from the stand- 
enough to realize that it pays excel- ^.^^ ^^ j^j^ name- -ever becomes fa- 
Icnt dividends to have your name on i J^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^j^ ^.. j ^^^ deserving of 
the lips of the th^^usands— and yoit ; j^^^^g ^£ golden an i brightly smiling 

credit 



is harmonizing 
some of the work of some of the 
fighters England las been plagued 
with. 

Hist: This man'i name is Percy- 



might notice that both are eating at 
first class hotels. 



Old Mike Yokel Writes. 

KE YOKEL, the postmaster of 



Fie on "Perc" Jones' parents. May- 
be, though, they wanted him to enter 
the blawsted trade md go behind the 
■fWKE YOKEL, the posimasier oi ribbon counter. However, be that as 
^] the de^ert waste of the Jackson ^ j^ j^j^y jf percy rises to fame in the 
Hole country, has not made up his | r^nks of the padded mitt artists, we 
mind as yet whether he will come ; g^all feel it a bouiden duty to send 
north and wrestle Waino Ketonen. J ^im a postal card if vivid congratu- 
lations. 

Percy is a grand old name — for a 

cat, eh, dear. 

• • • 

Uncle Niik Allen. 




HOCKEY PLACED ON LIST 
OF HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS 

Central Will Develop Team Next Season— Meet- 
ing of Athletic Association Held to 
Raise Baseball Funds. 



After Waino disposes of the aspira- 
tions of Josephius Carr there will be 
one grand wrestling character left for 
the Finn. Guess his name. It is the 
wrestling marvel of the desert. 



TOP ROW LEFT TO RIGHT-JOHNSON. WISTED. OLSON. SECOND ROW— PETKOFF, LEVINE, 
TOFKUW.i-r.ri ^^g^yj^j^ BOTTOM ROW-DREVES, WENDLANDT. HANSON. 



writes Mike. 



fHrOX one of the sporting pages of 



"I cant say as yet, >v..cc=> .«..-. ljj| ..^e of the Buff do papers appears 
'I have important business at home ^^^^ ^^^^^.^ countenance of Uncle Nick 



just now. Salt Lake City wants the 

match. I know the little Finn is j ----^ "southern character pirts with 

tough. But 111 wrestle him some - *, / ^,, ,._ v'„,.u^i.„ i^^,,,.-. 

place. I have never sidestepped any- 
one as yet." 



The Age of the Dollar. 
|N.\CK in the dear and devoted days 
ISJ of our grandfathers and likewise 
our grandmammas, the dear dollar 
consideration was often shoved behind 
the stove and left to pine away while 
principles paraded the community. 

While not in the least a pessimist 
while three healthy meals are within 
speaking distance, allow us to remark 
that it is the dollar that has the vil- 
lage spotlight nowadays. 

Fearing the financial editor would 
kick were we to allude to Messrs. 
Rockefeller and Gould and others, th*. 
baseball world will be discussed. 

Years ago, 
war, Mike K 

The great 



Allen, the gent v/ho caught and 
d southern 
Minneapolis 



the Minneapolis Northern league 
team, last season. 

Nickodemus is i ow enrolled with 
the Federals. Tht elongated come- 
dian, when thinkintc of the game, be- 
wailed the fate' tliat sent him to a 
minor league tean . He deeply de- 
plored the fact thit there were not 
more people on hand at all of the 
games to appreciate his comedy. 

Now the genial catcher is praised 
for his wonderful work in the early 
practice games. If Allen ever becomes 
serious and gets down to hard tacks, 
he will sure be a real catcher. 

Some whip! 

* • ♦ 

He Won't Fight Out There. 

nl.\rMY CLABBY won't remain in 
California 



GRAND FORKS 
LOOKS STRONG 



Manager Eddie Wheeler Has 

Signed a Large 

Squad. 



d will be discussed. .E* Calitornia M >w flo you Know. 

, . . ... 1, ^ I Cause we read in a paper that a judge 
durmg the brotherhood ,^^ J ^.^^^ ^^.^^ 5, ^^ j,^^ fitting a po- 

tlly was otfered a tor- y^^^„^^^^ ..b^ „,.,., ^ did any harm- 



<;ra.\d forks tka.m. 

ManaRer — Kddlr Wheeler. 
Pltrhem — Roy Peterson. St. Pa«l< 
Billy rollinn, Cleveland t Steke Fer- 
ri». South Bend; Bert Garter, Red 
CioHd, .\eb.; II. L. Uallman, Holy Cro«a 
univemltyi Lawrence Davi«, Mlaha- 

waka, Ind.i Bert Larson, Avktln, 

H>W do you know?|Texa»j Frank Kenvin, OiihkoKh. 



tune to desert his team. 1 ne greax^^^^ ^^^^ forbade fames from taking 

a drink in Califor lia. Therefore we 



Irishman refused— and Kelly needed 
the money. 

Adrian C. .\nson remained loyal 
throughout the tempting and parlous 
times to the Chicago baseball team — 
and he has nothing material to show 
for his manhood today— nothing but 
his own Self respect. 

Now it is different. The Feds have 
raided the roster of the regular 1 * 
leagues and now the majors are con- j ^ 
tentplating a counter raid. The dollar 
will rule supreme, for this is the age 
where tlie dollar counts. 

Let the sob writers tell of the hard- 
ness of this material age, of broken 
friendships, occasionally bringing in 



say with some assurance that James 
will not return to California for three 
years. 

Oh. rum. thou are a demon — you are 
welcome, prohibitionists. 






* 

AXOTHKR KFtORT TO * 

Bl V TUK ttllCAtiO CUBS. * 

* 

rhieinnati, Ohio. March 30. — A ^ 
local nttorn«'y. .•■aid to be repre- * 
ftentlne Herbert S. 5I1IU of Chlca- * 
go, has opened icKotlatlonft with ^ 
CbarlcM P. Taft for the purchaite 
of the Chicago XaUonal IcaKue 
elab. 

A price IiaM bpen fixed by Mr, 



Infieldcnt — M. T. JoneM, Cherry Val- 
ley, Ill.t Harry CoxKriff, MlnneapolUi 
Chick KdmlHton, E7a«t St. Louliii Carl 
Baler, Grand Rapids, MIch.i Hal 
Chaiie, .MInneapollMi CbarlcM H. Porter, 
tirand Forkit; Rube Fo«te¥, Fresno, 
C«l. 

Outfielders — Bunny Kuehn, I)nluth| | 
M. K. Culver, .Minneapolla; J. K. l>ut- 
trell, l.uvcrne, Mlnn.| R. J. Altman, 
Walthani. Minn.; Harold Bond, Mar- | 
mouth, .\. D.; "Unteh" Altman, Spo- 
kane; Pat Flaherty, Davenport. 

Catchers — .1. E. Peacock. Belvlderc, 
HI.; Leo Kerin. Dresden. \. D.; Charles 
.\lbrlKht, Mount Vernon, lona; John 
PcttTxt, Kansas City. 



shortstops you ever saw." lently were in grood condition. Manager 

The tnfteld probably will be as fol- ' Connie Mack returnL-d several days ago 
lows: Wheeler, flfst; Foster, second; j because of his daughter's illness. 
Edmlston. short; Ch#se, third. 

Among the othae infield candidates 
are M. T. Jones, ftWt base; Harry Cos- 
griff, who played 'Second for Minne- 
apolis last year; Carl Baier. third base; 
Charles H. Porter, who tried out for 
ttrst last year. ^ 1 

The catching staff also appears to 
be strong. There is John Peters of 
Kansas City, who played for Daven- 
port last y»'ar. Wh«eler declares he is 
one of the best catchers In the minors, 
and. on the playing manager's recom- 
mendation. Director Kavanaugh ex- 
pended considerable cash to get him. 
Peters is considered exceptionally 
good In coaching young pitchers. 
Aside from Peters, there are J. E. Pea- 
cock of Belvidere. 111.; I.eo Kerin, a 
North Dakota product, and Charles Al- 
bright of Mount Vernon. 

The pitching department Is the one 
doubtful feature, so far. There is no 
cause to worry, however. Eight have 
been signed, and the majority of them 
have fine records behind them. H. L. 
' Hallman, who formerly pitched for the 
Holy Cross university team, has an 
excellent record and is expected to 
make good. Hallman is at present In 
the city. Peterson of St. Paul pitched 
fine b.iscball last year, as did Billy 
Collins, who comes from Cleveland. 
Ferris. the'""South Bend man. made an 
excellent mark in the Texas league, 
and was highly recommended to Di- 
rector KavanauRh. (.barber, who hails 
from Nebraska, has a reputation for 
"burning them up." while Davis an 
Indiana man, and Larson, another 
Texas leaguer, are both fine men.. Ker- 
wln. the Oshkosh man, also has a flat- 
tering record. 



The spring sfries with the Phila- 
delphia Nationals is scheduled to be- 
gin Wednesday. 

ST. PAJJLWINS 
STATE TITLE 



Duluth Players Lose to the 
Apostles at Hand- 
ball. 



At a meeting of the Central High 

[ School Athletic association today, plans 

were adopted calling the placing of 

hockey on the same basis as football 

and baseball. 

The possibilities of the high school 
hockty team were realized when the 
players of the school made so remark- 
able a showing on several of the teams 
of the Duluth Amateur Hockey league. 

In the future players making the 
Central hockey seven will be officially 
awarded the school "D" and the sport 
will take an equal place with baseball, 
football and track work. 

Another important consideration that 
came before the attention of every 
male student of the school, was the 
plan to increase the finances of the 
High School Athletic association by 
the increase of its membership. 

It was suggested that every boy in 
the school sign a slip, indicating that 
he would become a member of the as- 
sociation. 

Principal Young and Athletic Coach 
Schilling were among those who ad- 
dressed the boys. The meeting took 
up the regular chapel period and was 
held in the assembly hall. 

Coach Schilling desires to place a 
strong baseball and track team in the 



field this year. To do this will require 
more funds than are available at tb» 
present time. To buy baseball suit* 
and to develop a real track team win 
necessitate the spending of som* 
money, and the object of the incrdas* 
of the athletic association member- 
ship is to secure the needed funds. 
BnthuHiaNm Ik Shown. 

Genuine enthusiasm was exhibited at 
the meeting. The enthusiasm of th© 
students is indicative of a revival in 
track and baseball. For several yeara 
the greatest efforts at Central have 
been centered upon the football and 
basket ball teams. Not a great dteal 
of attention has been paid to the 
development of the baseball letim and 
still less to the track squad, coach 
Schilling desires to place two strong 
teams In the field and declared that 
this could only be accomplished 
through the assistance of every 
student at school. " 

According to the statement of Coach 
Schilling, indoor work will be begun 
immediately with the candidates for 
for the baseball team and the track 
squad. Just as soon as the candidates 
can get out of doors, real hard work 
will be begun. 

It is the desire of Coach Schilling to 
send a track team to the state inter- 
schola.stlc meet. If sufficient funds 
can be raised, this will be done. 



DULUTH CREWS WILL GO 

ON WATER THIS WEEK 



Real Rowing Scheduled to 

Begin at Very Early 

Date. 



^ Taft niMin M% holdlnKN, and It Is ^ 

the wWing P/yen^s-enough^to^statej* ^^^ V^^lL Mr^Hiu?'*'•'•^ "" ""■ % 

^ Chlcaico. March 30. — Herbert P. * 
^ MIIIm admitted today that he Tvaa m 
^ the head of a local Hyndicate * 
^ formed to pure lawe the Chicago ^ 
^ Xatlonni Icbku ' haNcball club ^ 
« from Charles V. Taft of Cincin- ^ 
* uatl. * 

■^ "It Is true ^'•* have begun ne- ^ 
^ gotlationn for tl e purcliaKc of the -i^ 
■^ club, hut I do not care to dUcnsB ^ 
^ the subject until 1 kno^v definitely ^ 
^ ivhethcr the deal >vlll go thruuKh." ^ 
^ said Mr. Mllln. "We are of the )(( 
MH opinion that th > team should be ^ 
¥H owned by Chic i go men and we ^ 
■# have the money to buy It If the -J^ 
^ price la fair. Titnt is all >«e have ^ 
^ to say at pres-nt." ^ 

^ Mr. MIIIm is a wealthy mann- -)K 
^ facturer and for several years has * 
^ taken a keen Interest In base- ^ 
^ ball, yachting and other sports. ^ 



that loyalty in baseball is a joke- 
manager and player alike: because it 
is the price that commands iinmediate 
and eager attention— and if the Fed- 
erals have enough dollars in their 
strong bo.x. they will win. 
• * « 

Large Emil Klank Speaks. 

HROM Omaha Emil Klank sends in 
an epistle, for it is written on the 
best stationery of the best hotel in 
the reformed village. 

"Fred never got started in the 
Americus match," writes Klank. "I 
have no excuses to offer. We didn t 
know he wasn't right until it was too 
late. It was no one's fault. W e will 
sbow^ the public later that Fred is 
still one of the greatest. That s all 
for the time being." 

♦ • • 

It Was Very Rude. 

Bl"ST as the volatile French were 
on the point of believing Georges 
Cariientier was the greatest heavy- 
weight boxer in the world, along 
comes old and somewhat battle 
scarred Joe Jennctte and scores a 
victory over the idol of the gay Pa- 
risians. 

« • • 

Far be it from ns to knock the as- 
pirations of Georges; recall, country- 
men, that only down the scant reach 
of the vears this Carpentier was fight- 
ing the bantams. Vuila! Now he is 
competing with "the heavyweights. The 
only trouble was that France wanted 
Georges to do too much. But when 
one thinks of Bomb Wells— when one 
does— and recalls the pugilistic atroc- 
ities committed by the Briton, why 
then one begins to -think that after 



OUIMET OFF TO 
EUROPE FOR GAMES 



He formerly wa« head of the t'o- * 

Jlumbla Vacht < lub and a well ^ 
known amateur yaehtmaa. He Is ^ 
^ 44 years old. 

^^^P 'o ^n T* T* ^P ^T* ^^ ^' ^^ ^r 




Western Association Formed. 

Tul.sa. Okla., M irch 30.— A schedule 
was adopted anil other details ar- 
ranged, perfecting the organization of 
the Western Ass )ciation of Baseball 
Clubs last night. Six teams comprise 
the league and 140 games are to be 
played during tie season, beginning j 
May 1. Muskogee. Okla.. will open at \ 
Tulsa. McAlester at Oklahoma City 
and Fort Smith. Ark., at Joplin. Mo. 
s » 

Track Tiam Losses. 

New Haven, Conn., March 30 



Tales 

temporarily at 



track team will lose, 
least, three of its most promising 
members through sickness or scholastic 
troubles. Russei- H. Lucas, a long- 
distance runner, was operated ui)on 
vesterdav for app >ndlcitis. W. F. Koss. 
"the shot-putter, in under probation be- 
cause of low schi-lastic standing, as is 
also A. Revel, a fist quarter-miler. 



Orand Forks, N. D., March 30. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — Above Is the 
complete roster of candidates for the 
Grand Forks Northern league team. Di- 
rector A. J. Kavanaugh announced last 
night that twenty-eight men had been 
signed, and, unless several finds are 
made during the season, there will be 
no more contracts offered. The only 
name not given above Is that of "Mug- 
sy" McGraw, the Duluth outfielder, 
who was traded for Edmunds. Mc- 
Craw's contract has not been received, 
but Manager Kavanaugh declares that 
he win wear a Grand Forks uni- 
form. 

Eddie Wheeler, the new playing man- 
ager, will arrive In the city Sunday or 
Monday to confer with Mr. Kavanaugh 
regarding the training season plans. 
Judging from the above list of can- 
dld:ite.s. Grand Forks will have a first 
division team this season. Kavanaugh 
and Wheeler have combed various dis- 
! tricts In search of the best material, 
and. according to the dope, they have 
landed several real stars. 

Outfield Looks Stronff. 
T'^■i :>ulfleld, one of the weak points 
In la.;t year's team, will be exception- 
ally strong this year. Altman will be 
seen in left field again, and there are 
several topnotcher.s to choose from for 
the other potlticns. Harold Bond, the 
teaching player, has b?en signed again, 
but. Ina.smuch as he cannot report un- 
til lune, it is dcubtful wnethir or not 
he will play. . , , 

B It without him, there Is material 
aplentv There is Bunny Kr.ehn, who 
plavJ" with Diluth two years ago, 
and wlio -nade su'ih an excellent im- 
pression while in the outfield. Then, 
th'jve is M. K. Culver, the heavy-hlt- 
tlng cutflelder, who played in the 
Michi-ran league last year. Culver hit 
ovr .300 last season. 

Kavanauarh recertly C9n.«;ummatcd 
another deal. which promi.''es to 
strengthen the outfield materially. Pat 
Flaherty, who played for Davenport 
last ye.ir, has been secured in ex- 
change for Pitcher Wells. Flaherty 
plaved in right field fjr Davenport and 
hlt'.290. ^^ _ _ 

B-'3ides these men, there are R. J. 
Altmxn of Waltham, Minn., and J. B. 
Luttrell of Luverre, Minn., both of 
who Tl are raid to be excellent out- 
fielders. , . , », 

The infield also gives promise of be- 
ing exceptionally strong. There are 
Rube Foster and "Hal" Chase, both of 
whom are known for their fast field- 

^Then, there is "Chick" Edml.'ton, 
who undoubtedly will play short. In 
writing of him, Wheeler said: "P:dmls- 
ton is one of the greatest fielding 



National Champion Will 
Contest in England 
and France. . 

Boston. Mass., March 30.— Francis 
Ouimet, the youthful holder of tho 
national golf championship, sailed yes- 
terday on the steamer Lapland to match 
Jjls nerve and skill with the best of 
the European golfers over the famous 
courses of the British Isles and France. 
On his twenty-first birthday the con- 
queror of the noted British profcs 
sionals, Vardon and Ray, will be get- 
ting in trim for the British amateur 
championship tournament o^er ths* 
Sandwich course, on May 18 and 22. 

The first competition in which 
Ouimet will engage will be for the his- 
toric St. George's challenge cup »t 
Sandwich on May 14 and 15. the player 
making the best scratch aggregate 
score of two rounds winning a sliver 
model of the trophy. 

Ouimet is accompanied by Arthur G. 
Lockwood, a former Massachusetts 
amateur champion, who Is a native of 
England. 

worliTsThampions home. 

Will Begin Series Witti Nationals on 
Wednesday. 

Philadelphia, March 30. — Headed by 
Ira Thomas, captain of the Philadel- 
phia American league baseball team, 
the first squad of the world's cham- 
pions arrived here yesterday from 
Jack.^onvllle, their .spring training 
camp. All the Athletic players appar- 



The Duluth Y. M C. A. handball play 
ers lost the series for the state title at 
the courts of the St. Paul association 
last Saturday afternoon. 

One of the distinct and somewhat 
shocking surprises of the tournament 
was the one-sided defeat of Bill Wend- 
landt, classed as one of the crack play- 
ers of the Northwest. 

John Kay of St. Paul defeated the 
pride of Duluth by the score of 21 to 
17 and 21 to 0. 

While the first contest was close, the 
St. Paul man had a walkaway in the 
second game. 

Sturm of Duluth was beaten by Cook 
of St. Paul by the score of 21 to 7 in 
two straight games. 

Dreves of Duluth lost to Haedge of 
St. Paul, 21 to 14 and 21 to 16. 

Johnson and Olson of Duluth were! 
beaten in the doubles by Samm and 
Nelnhauer of St. Paul by the scores of 
21 to 13 and 21 to 10. 

Pete Petkoff of Duluth lost to 
George Sudheimer of St. Paul, 21 to 9 
and 21 to 12. 

In the doubles Petkoff and Levlne 
of Duluth were beaten by Coffey and 
Cook, after winning the first game 
21 to 13, by the scores of 21 to 19 and 
21 to 13. 

While making no excuses for the 
defeat, the members of the Duluth 
team state that the St. Paul courts 
were twelve feet longer than the local 
one and two feet narrower. In ad(fi- 
tion the handballs used by the St. 
Paul players are about once again as 
large as the ones used here. 

However, this is not given as an ex- 
cuse for the loss of every game. The 
St. Paul team is coming here for a re- 
turn series of gatives, some time the 
coming month, and the members of the 
Duluth Y. M. C. A. team will have the 
opportunity of proving that it was the 
court that really had a great deal to 
do with the loss of the games. 

The St. Paul boys treated the Du- 
luthians fine — except on the handball 
courts. Off the course the Apostles 
were perfect gentlemen, according to 
the statement of Bill Dreves. "And 
when the St. Paul boys come up here," 
said William, "we Intend to treat 
them just as well — off the courts." 
* 

Baseball Scores. 

St. Joseph, Mo., March 30. — The Min- 
neapolis American association team 
was defeated here yesterday, 11 to 10. 
by the local club of the Western 
league in a weird ten-inning struggle. 



Meeting of Oarsmen Is Set 

for Wednesday; Squad 

to Be Cut. 



Candidates for the crews of the Du- 
luth Boat club are expected to take to 
the water the latter part of the week. 

This announcement was made yes- 
terday by Coach James E. Ten Eyck. 

There will be a meeting of the can- 
didates of the squad at the Y. M. C. A. 
Wednesday evening, when a heart-to- 
heart talk will be given. The rules of 
training at d living, hygiene, food val- 
ues, and rowing will be discussed by 
Coach Ten Eyck. It Is vastly impor- 
tant that every member of the squad I 
be on hand. 

The cut in the squad will be made 
this week. Every m.'* going on the 
water will be expected to stick through 
the season. 

After the reduction of the squad 
there will be about eleven seniors, 
thirty-four bantams and fourteen jun- ' 



BIG AERO 
SEASON ON 

Tuesday Begins Largest 

That Europe Has 

Yet Had. 



lors. It Is desired that some large 
Junior candidates come out this week. 
Candidates coming out for the crews 
after this week will prove of little 
value, according to James E., and, in 
addition, will be laboring under a 
handicap. 

It will be a case — and a pathetic one 
— of "Love's Labor Lost." 

As has been stated Innumerable 
times in this paper, more juniors are 
needed. Ten Eyck stated today that 
the men he has are a fine looking 
bunch — but he wt.nts more. 

Choosing eight men out of a bunch 
cf fourteen is cutting the thing rather 
fine. There is little chance to choose. 
It Is important that some more junior 
candidates come out — and it i." also im- 
portant that they come out before it is 
too late. 

Unions* Have Entered. 
Announcement reached Duluth today 
that the Unions of Boston were to en- 
ter the National. Also at a meeting of 
the re.;f.tta committee the di tes of the 
National were set for Aug. 7 and 8 

The Unions are a bunch of college 
men and did not enter last .season. It 
is expected that this club will send 
some very strong crews to the city of 
brotherly love. 

One of the features of the training 
of the Duluth crews, is the news bul- 
letin service. Jimmy keeps the inter- 
est of the boys In the rowing game by 
posting on his bulletin board all of 
the latest information of the rowing- 
world. Every evening every candi- 
date takes a squint at the board and 
becomes acquainted with what the 
other crews of the country are do- 
ing. It makes 'em work harder — if 
that is possible. 



added to those events of 1914 already 
on the international list of sporting 
competitions. Both the Union Boat 
club of Boston and the Winnipeg Row- 
ing club of Winnipeg, Man., have an- 
nounced the intention of entering 
eight-oared races in the challenge 
event of one mile and 550 yard."?. The 
report Is also current that a Phil- 
adelphia club is considering the pos- 
sibility of a similar entry. The ques- 
tion of the acceptance of these entries 
rests entirely with the Henley stew- 
ards, who have in the past demon- 
strated an adherence to a very strict 
code of eligibility. 



f A A A A A lit 



SKIPPER MAY DEFEND 

THE AMERICAN CUP 




Houston, Tex., March 30. — The New 
York Nationals defeated the Houston 
Texas league club yesterday, 11 to 2. 
by free hitting and base-running. 
Merkle stole four bases. 



New Orleans, La., March 30. — The lo- 
cal Southern as.^oolation team out- 
played the Cincinnati Nationals yes- 



Winnipeg May Enter Hen- 
ley Regatta In 
July. 



New York, March 30.— The present 
week will witness the opening of an 
aviation competition season in Eu- 
rope which will surpass all previous 
records in this respect. From April 
to November, there will be an almost 



terday and won, 4 to 2. Niehoff's ! uninterrupted series of races and other 
home run in the second, scoring Hob- ' 
litzel ahead of him, gave the visitors 



their only runs. 




Owensboro, Ky., March 30 
league recruits yesterday defeated the 
Milwaukee team here, 7 to 2, in a six 
inning game. 



for both aeroplanes and hy- 



Montgomery. Ala., March 30. — The 
Montgomery Southern leaguers won 
the last game of the series from a 
team of Detroit Americans, 3 to 2. 



Memphis. Tenn.. March 30. — Ty 



events 
dro-aeroplanes. 

More than thirty competitions cover- 
National Ing from one day to several weeks are 
already scheduled and still others are 
contemplated. .Several of the contests 
will have either naval or military bear- 
ing and sanction, while others will be 
of a purely .^porting nature. 

Of the latter class the race for the 
International speed championship in 
September with entries representing 
France, the United States, Great Bri- 
tain Germany and Italy, will natural 



^ HIXO RITCHIE GI\*ES 

* C. WHITE AX AUDIENCE. 

* Chicago, March 30. — Willie 
^ Ritchie. Ilghtnelgbt boxing cham- 
•^ plnn. han agreed to meet Charley 
^ White, a local asfiirant, for a ten- 
-ik round bout In Milwaukee, May 8. 
^ RltcliJe vi-tll get $10.04M) guarantee 
^- or 40 per cent of the gro.s!i re- 
^ celptM, Tvhtlc White will get 2!S 
^ per cent. Rltchlc'M manager Kald 
^- that the chani|>inn lias promised 

* to nign liiM agrccmeat early this 
^ week. 

fernscomIng 
for kelley bout 



The "Wild Cat" Will Com- 
plete Training in 
Superior. 

The Abrams Brothers announce th« 
signing of Johnny Sokol of Minne- 
apolis and Jack Doyle, the Now York 



Cobb's hltlng, two singles, a double ' ly attract the greatest interest In this ; boy who is under the management of 
and triple, out of five times at bat, ! country. The opening competition will ;^rt Abrams, for the seml-wlnd-up of 
helped a team of Detroit Americans j be the race which starts on^Tuesday ^ ^^le fight cardof April 7. 
win from Memphis 
league, yesterday, B 



Dallas, Tex., March 30. — By outhit- 
ting the Pitt.«burg National leaguers 
here today, Dallas of the Texas league, 
won a slow game, 6 to 2. 



Louisville, Ky.. March 30. — The Chi- 
cago Cubs yesterday defeated the 
Louisville American association team, 
6 to 0, on a soggy field. Both Hum- 
phrels and Lavender pitched good ball. 



CAPT. SELAH B. HOWELL. 

Capt. Selah B. Howell is to be the 
professional skipper of the "Defiance," 
which la one of the three boats build- 
ing to defend the America's cup. He 
will have a crew of thirty-six. all of 
whom have been selected. 



Kansas City. Mo., March 30. — Willis' 
pitching, although almost equaled by 1 
the work of Mit^-hell, oroved a puzzle 
to the batters of the Denver Western 
league team here yesterdfty and the ; 
Kansas City as.'^ociRtion won. 7 to 4. I 
■ . — 

Wins Skat Tournament. { 

Peoria, 111., March 30. — The first Mid- | 
die West skat tournament closed here ; 
last night. H. Laubach of St. Loui4- 
carried off the premier honors with a 
net score of twenty-three games. One 
hundred and thirty-one players from St. 



of the Southern from the capitals of seven European 
to 1. countries, each course terminating at 

Monte Carlo, in connection with the 
i5-day hydro-aeroplane and motor boat 
meet 'which will begin next month. 
Prizes agregating $15,000 will be dis- 
tributed among the winning air pilots. 
Following In rapid order will come 
contests at Monte Carlo and St. Peters- 

"in the month of May. events in- 
clude the Prince Henry circuit race on 
a course the extreme points of which 
Hamburg and Strassburg. The 



prize money is in excess of $17,000. 

A tentative progr^^m for the polo 
tournament in connection with the 
Panama-Pacific exposition at San 
Francisco, has been prepared. Accord 
i 

te^am's "f rom'all parts of the United 
States as well as England, Spam, 
France, India and Argentina. The 
estimated expense Is placed at close 
to $100,000. 

It remains with the board of stew- 
ards of the Royal Henley regatta of 



iniiaiiitt-i «»■>-■»•*- — ■ - , Trie DOUt Will oe jiuiu o«. •-■•^ ^ 

Francisco, has been PreP^red. Accord- ^^^ ,g expected to p 

ing to the present plans, the entry ^'P"*, ^^e best bouts staged in 

list will consist of about twenty-fl\e ""^J;__ paction of Wisconsin u 



Louis. Kansas City. Wolcott. Iowa. o..v.o -^ — -■ . .. ..^ >.-„„,,- 
Davenport. Iowa, Chicago, Pekin and i England to decide whether^t he regatm 

other cities, were presenC 



[to be hfcld on July 2, 3 and 4 shall be 



"Wild Cat" Ferns and Spike Kelley 
will be the star bout of the evening, 
with Sokol and Doyle as another strong 
attraction of the evening. 

Ferns is expected here during the 
week to complete his training for the 
bout. 

His Splkelets Is working hard for 
this contest, as he desires to wipe out 
the defeat he sustained at the handa 
of Ferns on the evening of March 10, 
1913, at Kansas City, when the Feme 
party shaded the Kelly one In a ten- 
round gallop. *!.-— 

In Doyle the Abram.-^ believe they 
have a fine feathered bird and they 
also believe that Johnny Sokol is the 
lad to show just how good Doyle la. 

The bout will be held at the Grand 
" ■ expected to prove 
the 
northern section or ^viscousiu under 
the Heddrng law^ 

AMERICANSWIN 

AT COURT TENNIS. 

Tuxedo Park, N. Y.. March 30. — In an 
exhlbllU-n anatch In court tennis on thm 




V: 



I 



Monday, 



THE DULUTII HERALD 



March 30, 1914. 



17 



c< !;it of the Tuxedo Tennis and 
Raciiuet club yeaterday. Jay Gould, 
ch.iinplon of the world, at'.d W. H. 
Hiihn. the two amateur champions In 
doubles uf America, defeated CJeor^e F. 
Covey, formed champion of the world, 
and Xevillo Lytton, amatt-ur champion 
of England, three sets to one, by the 
Bcoro of 2-6. 8-4. 6-4. 6-8. 

The Americans played a wonderful 
granie and easily outclasaed the Kng- 
lishmen. tioiild's returns were cen- 
tered principally at the English ex- 
< h:itnpi<»n throughout the match. His I 
grill shots were accurate. 

A large and fashionable audience 
■wltnes^sed the match and tennis en- j 
thusi'ists from all over the country 
were present. 



CHILDREN AS 
GARDENERS 

Fully 2,000 Pupils of Public 

Schools Will Turn 

Honiecroftcrs, 



WEST IN RELAY RACES. 

Several Colleges at Pennsy-s Grounds One Dealer AlonC HaS Sold 

Philadelphia. March 30— The West I U,UUU riiCketS Oi oCeClS 

■will be well represented In the annual • Q-4U-.«|Jrt 

carnival of relay races and field games', IM oCnOOIS. 

of the University of Pennsylvania on \ 

Ar-rll 25. OhlcaKO. Michigan, Illinois, , — ■ 

KHnsad. N'otre Dame, Purdue, Missouri,; From present indications from 1.500 

Oliio State and ^^'i-^'i7f''^,,"'l|;;-"'V.r,! 1 to :;.000 school children will this year 
-will be represented either bj rcii> i „, _^ . , ^ j .i, • L 

teams or by men in the special events, raaive home ga dens, and do their share 
Wiscor.-'sin is th-- Litest university of in the work of making Duluth the 
<ntry, Iviving entered Wahl. their :*tar Homecroft Cltf of America. 
hte^h .1unH>er. R'ehards ofl tah tUe , . . , -.rdeninir has been 

w rids champion, is entered in that i interest in garaening nas oeen 
t'vc't. and Harvard, Yal^ and Penn- ! growing steaiiily in Duluth for the 
eylvania will a!i<o have men In the last five years but it is expected that 
lilKh jump. I the total numl er of gardens in Duluth 

The entries for the relay races close' during the con ing summer will greatly 
on Wednesday as far as the group j exct-ed all former Hgures. 
rt fs are concerned. It is expected, Two years aKO the West Knd Commer- 
tij it about uOO teams will be oil the cial club conducted a garden contest 



;iiiry list. 



BOY 14 YEARS OLD 
RICHEST IN WORLD 



New York Court Finally Un- 
tangles the Brown 
Estate. 

'larch 30. — John Xichalas 



for West end school children. This 
Interested a iarge number and last 
summer more than 300 children were 
entered in th« contest. Prizes were 
awarded in the fall for the best gar- 
dens and so hi rh Is the Interest among 
the pupils thai this number will easily 
be passed the coming summer. The 
other city school.'' have also taken up 
the work and a local seed dealer re- 
ported Saturdiy that he has already 
sold 10,000 pa ;ket8 of seeds to school 
children alone. In addition he sold 
them 600 appte trees and 600 currant 
bushes. He t tated that these 10,000 
packets went to about 1.200 children 
who will ha^e gardens this coming 
summer. Tbits number does rot In- 
hildren who will buy 



,. ^ ^ i elude thope 

} r .nr-old boy, great | g^^^g from thi stores. Thl.^ large num- 



af ter i ber is al.'^o exclusive of tho men and 



New V 
Brown, .»r, 

grandson uf ^ ---;"' -;-^- ' ^J^^^^^ o, I^^luth who 

whom lirovvn ura'.e:«!iy was named^ ,^ become homecrofters. 

becomes th- ' ricliest boy in the world t^j, b,jys a Central high have or- 

under a supreme court deciiiJii hand- ganlzed an ai. ricutural cliib and It Is 
, I e ,,,,.,i,^ I expected thai most of the members 

«d down ir>alurday. \ -^rm become gardeners during the va- 

cation niothotis. They have arranged 
for several a Idresscs by prominent 
Duluthians. 9\-ho are Interested in 



A legal tangle had taken up a large 
p-irtion of the 1:3,000.000 estate left bj 
Jchn *-■ : • • Brown, son of Nicholas 
B: ,\vn, !i5 argued that certain j 

trusii iu !.*.-,. valid bequests under 
Khode Island laws, were invalid in 
IS'ew York state, where part of the es- j 
tate was located. 

An action was brought to test this 
point, Frank W. Matteson. the trustee,, 
being unable to gain the administra- j 
tion of property until there had been , 
a. judicial construction in the matter. ' 
Justice Weeks found that the bequests | 
were valid. . , . i 

Mrs. Walts Shermin. mother of uady i 
Camoys, is the only living child of j 
John Carter Brown. Her interest In I 
the estate of her father also had b^en ; 
tied up in a trust she had created • 
iipon her marriaije. It vras decided in 
the present case, however, that the.-?e • 
tru.sts terminate^! with the death of 
her husband in 1?12. and the court dt- i 
reets that she receive her half of the - 
< - ■ .1 

>r part vill go. under the 
c • M L iiuri. to her nephew, John Nich- 
olas Crown. Jr., whose father. John 1 
Kichuias Brown, died in ISOO. nine : 
weeks after the birth of his s;<n. 1 



farming and Hardening. 

It looks lite a big year for home 
gardens. 



GREAT GROWTH OF 
MUTUAL COMPANIES 

state Insurance Commis- 
sioner Shows Healthy 
Condition in Township 
Fire Insurance Organ- 
izations. 



MUST SUPPORT 

THEIR FAMILIES 



Two Brothers Are Released 
By Judge Under Sus- 
pended Sentences. 



Township nutual fire insurance com- 
panies which insure farm property In 
Minnesota al >ne are having a most 
remarkable record in the state. Ac- 
cording to It surance Commissioner J. 
A. O. Preus, last year the amount of 
business in force Increased $L'5. 133,373. 
Since the ye« r 1S80. the insurance tu 
force has pi jgressed as follows: 

18S0 $1,704,210 

1890 ::4,1>31.347 

1900 121.99»,087 

191il ^^'-^-^'^^^ 

1913 ;3H'26«-034 

At the end of the year 1913. there 
were 158,253 policies In force, and 
there were 1 »7 township mutual com- 
panies doing busines.s in the state. The 
cost p-'r hun Ired of insurance was on 
an average 19 cents. The joint re- 
ceipt.^ during 1913 were $696,731.55. 
and during he year the losses paid 
were $501,421 .82. The total assets of 



John and Calvin Danlelson. broth- 
ers, must cultivate a higher sense of 
duty to their respective families or 
they will be obliged to spend the 
next three months at hard labor on 
the joint county and city work farm. ^^.c. „.,...,.-—. --- ,-. ,. ^.^^^ 

This was the ultimatum issued by i the companies at the end of last > ear 
Judse J. l> Ensign in juvenile court , were $446.1H.50. It is estimated that 
Saturd rnoon when the brothers i thf re are, therefore. lo8..83 poUc>- 

ivere 1 - . before him on a charge I holders in Minnesota who ought to 

of contnbuling to the dependency of ' carry this class of insurance for the 
iiiinnr children | foUowii.g rt! sons; 

''"The I.infelsons wer. arretted on the ! ^ Fi"t_Tha, no ^f"'^^^^,^^,"^!;^;!^^^!^ 
complaint of R. D. McKerch.r. humane i failed *i"^« »,*'^«f,.i*:' ";P\"!^the d^^ 
aeent. who r-ported to the court that i subject to superMsion b> the aepari 

ea h hiid a family of a wife and three , ment o' *»?„" "f "'^^• 
children. t%iid that in each case they, Second— in e»e ct 
}iad teen nei?lected. Judge Ensign gave 
-day sentences at the work | 
Impended the sentences , 
d'-rsianding thnt rhey 
work and support tlieir , 
-vvivti's -iriu itiildren. 

SfiturJay wa3 a i>'ir;y day in iiiv.»nile 
CO — ' ■' V.ree boy^; w . re coaiiriittid to '■ 
th Wing reformatory, two girls ! 

fc- I I . ir? .Sauk Center schc>o] >,nd one ; 
cliild ordered taken to the state public 
St. boo I at Owatorma. 

One mother is reported to have ( 
f..u.i^.i\ In the court room after Judge j 
i had ordered her daughli>r j 
ill. .1 to the state school for girls 
at Sauk Cc'.iter. 




WE HOLD OUR 
CUSTOMERS 

with the strot-.g reins of their 
satisfaction with our service. 
Unless we please you we do 
not consider the transaction 
satisfactory. 

When you come here for 
Moving, Packing and Storage 
you can do so with the assur- 
ance that we give every pos- 
sible honest value. 



Second — These companies are able To 
furnish insurance at anywher»\ from 
one-third to one-fourth the price of 
other insuraace companies. 

TWO CAMDiOAfES 

DROP CONTESTS 

Fight Involved Outcome of 

Recent Election in Town 

of Balkan. 

W. C. P^n s.ey and William Cooper, 
who were d -feated for township of- 
! flees by E. 1*. Kowalke and A. J. Sul- 
livan, respectively. In the town of 
Balkan, Satu day afternoon filed stipu- 
lations disu Issing election contest 
proceedings. ^. 

Ramfiev and Cooper were amoni; the 
I defeited"caniidates who appealed to 
' the district court alleging that the 
■ re'-ent township election was a fraud 
and that the result was brought 
about by e political conspiracy on the 
part of th3 Oliver Iron Mining com- 
pany to pain control over the town- 
ship's affnin-. It is alleged that those 
' w'lo were declared elected were not 
bona fid3 residents but h.Td moved in 
' a short time before the election sole- 
: ly for the purpcse of becoming candi- 
dates fcr office. Other contests over 
the same election r.re still pending. 

SAVED FROM FARM 
BY QUICK "TOUCH" 

A. J, Carlson Neglects to 

Pay Al mony Until Past 

Due. 



DULUTH 

VAN & STORAGE 

COMPANY 

18 FOURTH AVE. WEST. 
Both Phones 492. 



By raising 

afternoon, 

himself frot 

the Joint co 
a sentence 
upon him b 
contempt of 

The sente 
thirty mlnui 
when Carls< 
that he had 
sllmcny far 
M. Carlson, 
the courtho 
money. 

The Carl 
Xovember. 
ordered to i 
and ?5 a m 
m'nor child 
mltted to t 
He neglccte 
court in all 
come past <* 

G. A. E. 1 
Carlson, ap 
beach warr 



h 



/ 












MINNESOTA 
STATE SEAL 



WHILE THE SUPPLY LASTS la-nj 

"State Seal" Watch Charm 
Warranted 14-K Gold Plated 
Rose Finish Medallion || 

To Every Purchaser of a Sc Pouch of TUXEDO I 




*■ 



Every patriotic citizen of Minnesota will want one of 
these Watch Charms. It stands for his state pride and loyalty. 

Every detail of this State Seal is brought out by heavy 
embossing* Rich, lustrous, rose finish. Ready to attach 
to watch-fob or chain. A splendid example of the jeweler's 
art — an elegant, dignified, ornate decoration of symbolic 
value, that will appeal to every citizen of this State and 
induce him to try Tuxedo. 

That is the object of this remarkable offer — the reason we have gladly 
gone to considerable trouble and expense to have this State Seal Medallion 
produced for us from specially made dies. We know from experience that 
the majority of men who try Tuxedo become permanent smokers of this 
superbly mild, delightful, healthful tobacco. 



YOU CAN BUY TUXEDO 
EVERYWHERE 




Convenient poach, 
innerlined with 



Thm Perfect Tobcuxo for Pipe and Ggttretie 



moutnre-proof paper 



i 



Tuxedo is the favorite tobacco of 
'critical American smokers— a refined 
tobacco for men of refined taste. No 
other tobacco has ever rec)sived the 
endorsement of so i6any f armous 
Americans — leaders in their different 
spheres of activity, whose judgment 
carries weight and commands con- 
sideration. 

Tuxedo is made from the very 
mildest, ripest Kentucky Burley to- 
bacco—aged until perfectly mellow. 
Then treated by the original "Tuxedo 



Process" that makes Tuxedo absolutely 
non-biting and decidedly throat-sooth- 
ing—and develops the wonderful mild^ 
nesSj fragrance and flavor of the Burley 
leaf in a way no other tobacco has ever 
successfully imitated. 

The handy Sc Cloth Pouch of Tuxedo 
fits snugly in the vest pocket, and 
keeps the tobacco fresh and delicious 
by its inner wrapping of moisture- 
proof paper. EspeciaUy popular with 
smokers who make their own fragrant 
Burley cigarettes from Tuxedo, 



5c 

lOc 



Famous green tin 
with gold lettering, 
curved to fit pocket 

in. Tm Humidors, 40c and 80e 

in Class Humidors 
SOc and 90c 



|-|«f^ |-« W^ This Free "Stale Seal" Watch Charm is offered by the enter- 
ic 1^ t^L^ prising merchants whose names appear below. Their supply 
* * of Watch Charms is limited and they cannot obtain more 

— so call on the nearest of these up-to-date dealers right away. Get a 5c 
pouch of TUXEDO and ask for the "State Seal" Watch Charm, FREE. 



THE AMERICAN TOBACCO COMPANY 




GUS MACKA'OL. 
BOO W««t Superior Street. 

RIPLEY CIGAR CO., 
421 West Superior Street. 

ROWLEY'S CIGAR STORE, 
305 Went Superior Street. 

EDE?r CIGAR STORE, 
310 West Superior Street. 

UXITED CIGAR STORES, 
Lake Avenue and Superior Street* 
423 We«t Superior Street. 

B. BEMJA * CO.. 
307 V^ West Superior Street. 



JOE bo:r !<nr, 

401 West Superior Street. 

EDWARD STONE, 
221 West Superior St. 

A. F. KRrSCHKE, 
113 First Avenue West. 

CRATHWOL CIGAR CO., 
216 WeNt Superior Street. 

EIHIL BAR<IUIST, 
107 East Superior Street. 



J. LADTN, 
417 East Fourth Street. 

O. CHRISTEN SEN, 
703 East Fourth Street. 

PEACOCK BROSn 
432 East Fourth Street. 

SCHILLER CIGAR CO., 
831 West First Street. 

W^. H. DENNING, 

1 East Superior Street. 

TOM GEORGE, 

Sixth and Garfield. 

REX CIGAR STAND, 

20th Are. West and Superior Street. 



B. J. PIERCFJ, 
West Superior Street and Garfield Ave. 

ED M. STONE, 

West Superior Street and Garfield Ave. 

W. BADEAUX, 

1928 West Superior Street. 

CODY HOTEL, 

Ramsey and Central Avenue. 

JULIUS COHEN, 

Fifty-first Avenue West and Roosevelt. 

MRS. LAMBERT, 

S02 Central Avenue. 

GRAND AVENUE PHARMACY, 
Grand and Fifty-seventh Avenue W>st. 



W. 



HARRY HANSON, 

Grand and Fifty-seventh Avenue Wesl 

OLSON & KAUPPI, 

Grand and Sixty-third Avenue Wcat. 

GEO. GALAGUER CO., 

Grand and Flfty-«»eventh Ave. 

C. G. FROST, 

S508 Ramsey Street. 

A. BACK STROM, 

2821 West Third Street. 

C. JACOBSON, 

Twenty-first Ave. West and Snperloi 

CHAS. BOUHISTON, 
Twenty-fifth Ave. West and Third SI 



a charge of contempt of court in fall- 
ing to obey the alimony ordf-r. Carlson 
wa3 brought in Saturday afternoon. 



TWO HRES DO 

SiNAU. DAMAGE 



$35 In a hurry Saturday 
Alfred J. Carlson saved 
a serving thirty days at 
unty and city work farm, 
vliich had been imposed 
y Judge r.crt Feoler foi 
court. 

t\ce was suspended within 

es after it had been passed 

>n announced to the co rt 

n'anaeied to raise overdue 

his Qivorcod wife, Carrie 

Carlson ttlephoned from 

ise to a friend for the 

sons were divorced last 
At that time Carlson was 
>ay his wife's attorney $15 
inth for the support of his 
ren, which had been com- 
ic custody of the mother. 
d to obey the order of the 
>wlng his payments to be- 
ue. 

Inlayson, attorney for Mrs. 
illed to the court for a 
int for Carlson'd arrest on 



Two fires Saturday and Sunday 
caused a total damage of $675. 

The first occurred at 4 o'clock Sat- 
urday afternoon, when some papers in 
the basement vault of the old Kitchi 
tiamml building at Third avenue west 
and First street caught fire and slight- 
ly damaged the walls and floor. The 
loss is estimated at $75. 

At 880 o'clock Saturday evening the 
residence of A. Cohen at 911 East Third 
street caught fire from some shav- 
ings and rubbish in the rear of th» 
first floor, which Is unoccupied, and 
caused a total damage of about $600. 
The flames spread to the upper floor 
and burned the entire rear of the 
structure. The firemen spent two 
hours at the scene of the blaze. 

The fire department was called to 
513 West Superior street yesterday af- 
ternoon, when the janitor of the build- 
ing, fearing a fire, turned in an alarm. 
There was no damage. 



principal of the Industrial high school, 
gave a short talk on general school 
work. He was followed with an ad- 
dress by M. H. Walker, commercial 
instructor of the Industrial high 
school, on "Accuracy." The program 
was in charge of the West Duluth 
instructors. 

Folowing the regular program the 
members held a general discussion on 
the changing of the school curriculm. 



PLEAD FOR DEUY 

OF TRUST UWS 



New 



York Men Frame 
Brief to Send to 
President. 

New York. Maasbh -^^O.— The special 
committee of th* "* chamber of com- 
merce, appointed on-".'Feb. 19 to put 
into the form of f^m-f the expressed 
wish of the chafebey tliat President 
Wilson and congress fp" slow" on the 
president's propoted .jinti-trust legls- 

CnUnni WIACTCCQ MFFT i'^tlon, has mad puwf its report. 
OUnUULIVIMO I Clio IVItL- I . The cofnmltt.-, of which John C. 



Give Dinner and Discuss Various 
Sctiool Problems. 

The Duluth School Masters' club 
held its regular monthly business 
meeting and dinner Saturday evening 
at the Y. M. C. A. 

During: the evening 3. A. Foster, 



prise already established and retard 
its further exten-^iion." 

Pleads For Delay. 

The committee asks the chamber to 
urge upon the president and congress 
"that ample time be given for the 
consideration and discussion of these 
new proposals by all the people of 
the country; that provision should be 
made for taking testimony from busi- 
ness men and business organizations 
throughout the country whose activi- 
ties prevent their appearing at Wash- 
ington to express their views, and that 
whatever legislation may be formu- 
lated, action thereon be deferred to a 
later session of congress "in order 
that there may be sufficient time for 
thorough discussion and a complete 
expression of opinion throughout the 
country." 



weather In Northern and Central states 
east of the Rocky mountains." 



THIS WEEKS WEATHER 



TELLS ABOUT JEWS' 

PAL ESTINE COLONY. 

I Boston, March 30. — The story of the 
; progress made " by the co-operative 
colony of Merchavia, a Jewish agri- 
I cultural settlement in Palestine, was 
j related yesterday by its founder. Prof. 
Franz Oppenheimer, chief instructor 
of economics in the University of Ber- 
lln. Speaking at a banquet given In 
; his honor by the Zion association, he 
j declared that the colony, although 
three years old, had enabled Jews 
j from all parts of the world to return 
I to the soil and had inculcated a feel- 
I isr of freedom and equality. The pres- 
ent need. Dr. Oppenheimer said, was 
for more land and Implements. 



babituai urunkaru and that he hai 
taken their two sons out to saloons and 
given them liquor until tliey becam« 
intoxicated. During the rronth of May 
1911, she says, she caused his arrest 
on a charge of assaulting her. 



Laflin, presid« i t tjrf tl.o chamber, is 
chairman, declares that the tentative 
bills in congress "not only widely de- 
part from the si^rlt of the 'consti- 
tution of peace' outlined In the presi- 
dent's message, but by threatened in- 
vestigations and possible prosecutions, 
would restrain lawful business and 
have a disastrous effect upon enter- 



Washington, March 30. — Unsettled 
weather with frequent rains over near- 
ly all parts of the country is predict- 
ed by the weather bureau for this 
week. 

"Temperatures during the next sev- 
eral days," said the bulletin, "will av- 
erage near the normal along the North- 
ern border states. A disturbance cen- 
tral Sunday morning over the South- 
erns plains states will move slowly 
northeastward and be attended by gen- 
eral rains the first part of the week 
In the Mississippi valley and the dis- 
tricts east thereof. 

"Another disturbance that is ap- 
proaching the North Pacific coast will 
move eastward over the Northern 
states and cross the great Central val- 
leys Tuesday or Wednesday and will 
be attended by rains and be followed 
. by a chang^e to considerably colder 



MARRIED AT 13; 

SE EKS A DIVORCE. 

After eleven years of married life, 
Rose Strolk, 24, Is seeking a legal repa- 
ration from Frank Stroik, 42, and the 
custody of their two minor children, 
boys aged 10 and 6. The divorce is 
asked for on the grounds of cruelty. 

Mrs. Strolk was IS years old when 
she became a wife. They were mar- 
ried at Ashland. Wis., Jan. 19,- 1903. 
Since that time, she claims, he has 
suljected her to a systematic course of 
cruel and inhuman treatment. 

one alleges that he has kicked, beat- 
en and bruised her, used profane lan- 
guage to her and the children, wrong- 
fully accused her of infldelltj' and 
otherwise made himself unbearable. 

Sh« also sets forth that he is an 



NOT WORRYING FOR 
MEN A BOAfiD KARLUK. 

New York, March 30. — Confidence In 
the safety of those on board the Kar- 
luk of the Stefannson expedition, which 
was lost track of months ago in the 
Arctic Ice, is expressed by the ex- 
plorer in a letter to Rear Admiral Rob- 
ert E. Peary. 

In the letter, which was dated Fort 
McPherson, Feb. 14, and postmarked 
Dawson, March 5, and which was made 
public by Admiral Peary. Stefansson, 
referring t j the Karluk. wrote that 
"Bartlett is capable of doing what can 
be done, and I am sure will do all he 
can looking to the safety of those on 
board if they should have to land ok 
Banks land." 

The Bartlett referred to is Capt. 
Robert Bartlett of the Peary expedi- 
tion, who was In command of the Kar* 
Ink when she disappeared. 



CWCHESTER S PILLS 




Ladleai Ask your Itrmg^ai for 
CblHi h in t sr^i IH«siM4Br.in4. 



f 



l>Ui« iu Bed «ad Uold metalllcN 
hoies, traled wldi Blue Ribbon. 
Tak« n« otbcr. 3«y of reap 
DraccLit. A<kforCin.CirRg.T£Bg^ 
BIAMOND RSAND PILLCI. for S5l 
jron knows ta Best, Safett, Always ReU«b!« 

SOLO BY DRiaOlSTS EVER¥WH£££ 




3" 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 




u^ 



Monday, 



THE DUXUTH HERALD 



March 30, 1914. 



^»^i^>^>^^^^^^^»»^»^>^>^«^>^i^»^>^>^>^« 



Scoop Don't Give aWhooJQfor the Boss' College Education 



"HOP" 










^/^ 



^00 



^TO CORRECT (Ae 

0^ VT EV^^ER. 
CA05EX JUST 

CA^AE F^eoM 

-THERE <A(H' 

OOCx-HT ID 

KNOWl 






(g)vq<if-\T>^-n.-5'YHD-.B;fM-n) -(^AP 




CUPIO HAS 
TAKEN HAND 

One of Principals in Grand 
Forks Alleged Jury Brib- 
ing iVIarries. 



RETIRING SECRETARY 

OF CROOKSTON CLUB 



Sam's banking: lawf«, returned here last 
week with Mrs. .Tones for a few da> s' 
visit, and both were warmly received, 
a large number of friends being at the 
depot to greet them. 

Andy etill lias the game old spirit of 
"go" In him, and though he is up- 
wards of 50 years of age he has the 
ambition and energy of many a man 
of 25 and seems determined to make 
good again in spite of the roughness 
of ills path. There were many people 
here who were glad to see him and 
shake hands with him. 



lage to represent Michigan at the 
.second national conference on' market- 
ing and farm credits to be held in Chi- 
cago April 14, 15, 16 and 17. 



Cross-Examination of Al- 
leged Jury Briber Sullivan 
Is Now On. 



Grand Forks. X. D.. March 30.— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — The preliminary 
•xaniinaiion of Harry Cooper of Hills- 
boro. (barged with bribery in connec- 
tion with the acciuittal here of his son 
of murder, will be held as soon as he 
returns from his honeymoon. 

Mr. Cooper was wedded at Lafayette, 
Ind., last Thursday and is expected 
back to the state April «. Miss C.race 
Boone, a sweetheart of thirty years 
•go, is his bride. 

Salllvnn OoKM-Rxnnilned. 

The cross-examination of J. A. Sul- 
livan, the state's star witness against 
Attorney Tracy Bangs and J. C. Ma- 
hcn. accused of .iury bribery in the 
Cooper case, was commenced this morn- 
ing. He related his story on direct 
examination Saturday. 

The hearing, which i.«» being con- 
ducted before Justice Phil Mcl.ough- 
lln. probably will continue through the 
entire week, as it is understood that 
the defense will not conclude its cross- 
examination of Sullivan till tomorrow 
or Wednesday. 

Sullivan's story on direct examina- 
tion involved Tracy Bangs as the di- 
rector of the use of money with the 
jury: brought in J. C. Mahon as hav- 
ing" first broached the subject to him. 
and it included C. M. Cooley. now judge 
of the district court, former law part- 
ner of Bangs; .1. R. Carley, former sec- 
retaiv of the Northwestern Trust com- 
panv,' and A. L. Xechter, present law 
partner of Bangs, in the alleged brl- 

Sullivan ."ftid Bangs directed Carle> 
to pay him rash on several occasions 
for purchasing liquor for the jurymen 
and he says he received such money. 
Sullivan says. too. that he went to 
Bangs' home one time, after midnight, 
when matters relating to the influenc- 
ing of the jury were discussed. Tele- 




This is the largest transat^tlon so far , 
in the state involving >'oal mines and 
Is made to lower cost of production 
and marketing, and to give ample a*;- i 
fvirance of capacity to meet any and | 
all possible competition and contln- , 
gencles. I 

IncorporH«ori« 'W>II Kno^»n. 
The incorporators are all well known 
in this community. Mr. Richards is I 
president of the Merchants' National 
bank, one of the solid financial insti- , 
tutions, and one of the most progres- i 
give and enterprising of the active , 
nun of the Missouri slope country. Mr. | 
Truelsen has been in charge of the 
operation at Zenith, and is well and 1 

most favorably known m this ;i'';Vne^'; ' «fter his clothes had caught fire from 
Mr. DtUers 13 a young active busine^^^ explo.slon of gasoline, by his 12- 

man, who is thoroughly 'f "^'V- LT.il I V^'ar-old playmate! Carl Hanson, who 
ihe coal business. Mr. !!< 'i*^" '« ^*i"al- | [^^^^^. ^, ^^ f,,^^ ^^^^ Calhoun. The 
1^>- well known and has for a long time, ^^j^g^^ occurred on the lake shore 
beta connected with lignite coal min- | „^„^ ,,,^ ^^^y^^ ^^^ ^j^^ Minnekahda golf 



\ Dakota Briefs 



SAVES CADDIE'S LIFE. 

Companion Throws Him Into Lake 
Extinguishing Burning Clothes. 

Minneapolis, Minn., March 80. — 
George Tattersfield, 11 years old, was 
saved from burning to death, Saturday, 



ing. Mr. EvSmith. the vice president, 
for vcars a resident of Duluth, is now 
located at Fargo, has through his 
numerous visits to Inspect his opera- 
lions here became well known to many 
citizens. 



WALTE :^ TAYLOR. 

Crookston, Minn.. March 30. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — At the recent 
annual meeting ot the Crookston Auto- 
mobile club Walter Taylor retired as 
secretary to be succeeded by C. M. 
Lumpkin. Mr. Taylor was unable to 
continue further i i charge of the club s 
activities. His ; dminlstration of af- 
fairs gave entire satisfaction and his 
resignation was generally regretted. 



Sullivan, it ai.pc ars. cashed a $16 ; 
check on the Noithern State Bank of 
i Grand Forks. TUe account, however, i 
I was squared by « Pinkerton detective, 
Sullivan's companion. After that af- 
fair Sullivan is .barged with staying 
I at another hotel, under an alias, and ! 
ji-mping his board bill. 

The proprietor. William Dlgnan, of 
the Oxford saloor in Portland, charges 
that Sullivan nude that saloon his 
headquarters during much of the time, 
and that he thi re met and became 
closely associated with W. H. Mc- 
(irudcr. a Portlard painter, who testi- 
fied in the hearing at Portland s-everal 
days ago that he was the other party 
to the hotel coi versation related by 
Sullivan as having been with Cooper. 
McGruder says his testimony was of- 



NEW SUB-STATION HEAD.; 

Charles Ruzicka in Charge of Willis- 1 
ton. N. D.. Institution. 

Fargo, N. D., March SO.— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — E. C. Schol- 
lander. director of the sub-experiment ; 
station at WlUlston. resigned and 
• harles Uuzlcka has been named as 
his successor. Mr. Ruzicka has been ! 
connected with the head offices of the , 
Petter Farming organization since its , 
est.tblishni«nt. He is a North Dakota ' 
bov and an agricultural college grad- 
uate. His place here will be filled by 
G. A. Abderson of the registration 
board. i 

SCULPT ORTO OHIGH, 

Bismarck Has Not EnoiPgh to Meet 
Charge for Custer Statue. 

Mandan, N. D., March 30.— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — More money 
is necessary If the people of 
Mandan are to erect a heroic statue 
of Cen. Custer or else a sculptor more 
moderate in his demands must be 
sought. The local committee took up 
the matter with Leonard Crunelle, the 
sculptor who deslgn»d the Sacajawea 
Etatue. which stands in the capitol 
grounds In Bismarck. He proposed a 
statue modeled after the famous paint- 
ing. "Custer's Last Stand," but the 
figures he quoted were impossible un- 
der the fund at the command of the 
committee. The matter Is under ad- 
visement. It is probable other eculp- 
tors will be consulted and if they quote 
prices like those of Crunelle the erec- 
tion of the statue will be postponed 
till a larger sum can be raised. 



accident 
near the 

club, where the boys were employed 
as caddies. There being no players on 
the links the boys whlled away the 
time by building a bonfire. Young 
Tattersfield had found a can which he 
supposed to be filled with kerosene and 
threw it on the blaze. The explosion 
followed, engulfing the boy in the 
flames. The Hanson boy found his 
chum lying on the ground near the 
fire. He dragged the unconscious boy 
to a hole in the lake ice and pushed 
him in. The injured boy is at a hos- 
pital, and will probably recover. 

SUCCEEDS KELSEY~CHASE. 

Albert Turrittin of Sauk Rapids New 
; Gopher State Bank Superintendent. 

] St. Paul. Minn., March 30. — Albert H. 
Turrittin of Sauk Rapids has been ap- 
pointed state superintendent of banks 
by Governor A. O. Eberhart to succeed 
I Kelsey S. Chase, who resigned to ac- 
I cept the presidency of a new St 
, bank. j 

Mr. Case had held the office since . 
' Tan 1, 1911. When his term expired' 
Jan. 1. last, he was reappointed by the j 
governor. . , .., . 

Mr Turrittin. who was born in this | 
state forty years ago, has btjen presl- | 
dent of the Benton county state bank 
at Sauk Rapids for several 
a nu 



He expects to assume 
about May 1. 



I Willislon, N. P. — The Williston Cora- 
'[ morclal club has worked out a delinite 
' scheme of co-operation between the 
{ bu.=ineBS men of the city and the farm- 
ers, the first result of which was the 
I joining, by the full membership of the 
I Muddy Valley Farmers' club as asso- 
' elate members. 

I Mott, N. D. — E. H. Elsele, the collec- 
, tor for the International Harvester 
(company, who was arrested several] 
I days ago on the charge of securing I 
I signatures to mortgages under false i 
pretenses, was given a hearing before j 
'Justice Portland of Bentley, at which 
I time he waived examination and was ! 
released on fBOO bonds, which were fur- 
I nished. 

; Ml not. N. D. — Otto Domyer, who was 

, convicted on a charge of forgery sev- 

' eral days ago, was sentenced to one 

year in the state penitentiary by Judge 

K. E. Leighton. Domyer made the 

i check payable to John Anderson and 

forged L. M. Davis' signature. He tried 

to cash the paper at the B. & R. store. 

Dickey, N. D. — R. A. Klnzer announces 
his candidacy for representative on the 
Republican picket. Mr. Klnzer made 
the race for this office two years ago, 
but was defeated by the Democratic 
candidate. He is a successful farmer In 
Litchville township. 

Farpo, N. D. — The guarantee for the 
Minneapolis Symphony orchestra has 
been put up by local music lovers and 
the orchestra will appear In Fargo 
April 17. 

Bottineau, N. D. — A revival of civic 
and public spirit has resulted in the 
reorganization of the Commercial club 
here. A ftw of the leading business 
men got together and conceded the im- 
perative necessity of an organization. 
A mass meeting was called at which 
there was a large attendance and a 
great deal of enthusiasm. E. C. Bowen 
was made president and W. P. Mc- 
Millan, .secretary. 
, Grand Forks, N. D. — Frank Harlan, 
"»"' I who has been assistant passenger 
agent of the Great Northern in this 
city for some tim€>, will leave Tuesday 
next for St. Paul, where he has accept- 
ed an appointment In the union depot. 
Park River, N. D. — At a special meet- 
ing of the city council first reading 
was given proposed ordinances No. 2 
and No. 3. which provide for changing 
years and j the salary of the chief of police from 
of banks in J"6 por month, according to revised or- 
dinance, to $26 
new 



feated the local normal Friday night 
in the annual contest. Oshkosh took 
the affirmative of the subject, "Mini- 
mum Rate of "Wages Should Be Fixed 
by State Authorlti. a." 

Madison — \Vit.consin won fourth 
place in the Class B division of the 
National Intercollegiate association 
this vear, as against seventh in the 
same 'division lost yeur. The members 
of the rifle team were: Capt. C. M. 
Brown, W. Martin, R. E. Purchas, W. 
G. Woodson and W. G. Hansen. 

Wausau — Lloyd Allen, aged 11. at- 
tempted to crawl between cars in the 
St. Paul yards Friday. Two wheels 
ran over his body and he w^as crushed 
to death, 

Mondovl — Victor Hartman, aged 33. 
a laborer, hung himself here. P<»or 
health is thought to have been the 
cause. He leaves a wife and seven 
children. 

Madison — Automobile licenses Ispued 
by Secretary Donald for the past year 
have passed the 25,i/ww mark. Motor- 
cvcle licenses Issued were 2,800 in 
number and 1.000 to dealers. The to- 
tal revenue from this source to date 
is $140,600. 

Fond du Lac — Preliminary arrange- 
ments for the opening of an open air 
school were made at a meeting of the 
board of education. It is proposed to 
conduct this school in a building on 
West Scott street. 

Green Bay — A new freight depot, 
costing $50,000. will be built in this 
city bv the Northwestern road this 
year. 'Work on the new brick struc- 
ture will begin immediately. 

Madison — The state board of health 
is preparing a pamphlet on the care 
and feeding of infants. One part of it 
will explain how to teach a baby to 
iiurse. The pamphlet will be printed 
and ready for distribution within a 
couple of weeks. 

Ashland — County Surveyor Jerod W'. 
Day and Civil Engineer John Fors.q 
are at work on a new county map of 
Ashland county which will be com- 
pleted within the next month or so. 

Hurley — The Rev. James Austin, 
pastor of the M. E. church, has been 
transferred to another part of the dis- 
trict by J. W. Irish, district superin- 
tendent. He preached his farewell 
sermon in the church here Sunday 
evening. 

Mil\iaukce — James Graham, aged 
58, prominent contractor, was stricken 
with apoplexy in the Davidson hotel 
Saturday night and died shortly after 
mldnli?ht at Emergency hospital. He 
did not regain consciousness. 



i^:;!irus^nlLf,"i::^Vo^.Tj;^,^l j^;;.-o,.-, -^ .j| «- -- 



fixed as the monthly pay. 



conversation will Cooper had been put. 

GRANDDAUGHTER OF 
ANDRE CAPTOR DIES 



Allege Framc-Up. , 

Further evidence to show that J. A. 
Sullivan framed up evidence at Fort- 
land Or., on which to connect McLaln 
Cooper with alleged briberies w ill be ] 
placed before Governor Hanna this | 
■week in the form of affidavits by sev- 
eral Hood River residents, where Coop- 
er resides. ^ ^^ 

These affidavits will bear out the 
testimony of Robery Barry, the fore- 
man on the t'ooper ranch, to the effect 
that Cooper was not out of Hood River 
during ail of the month of January, 
when Sullivan claims he brought Mc- 
Lain Toouer into his hotel room, hold- 
ing a conversation with him relative 
to the all^-ged briberies. 

That Sullivan was arrested while at 
Portland. charged with obtaining 
r4oney under false preten.«es, also will 
be shown to "'tovernor Hanna. througli 
records of a Portland municipal court. 



Mrs. Delia Wightman, 

Whose Grardparent Helped 

Take Spy, Summoned. 



to 

of 



Pimples 

Source of 
Trouble 



Often the 

Serious Blood 



Center, X. D., '^arch 30.— (Special 
; The Herald.) — The granddaughter 

David C. Williams, one of the men 
! who participated In the capture of 
Mai. Andre, the ill-fated British .spy 
of Revolutionarj war fame, recently 
died here. She v as Mrs. Delia Wight- 
! man and was 88 years old. For many 
' vears she had made her home with a 
daughter her^. Despite her failing 
health for somt years, she retained 
her mental facul ies and was intensely 
proud of her gr tndsire's participation 
In the famous hlitoric event. 



In thousands of instances blood j 
troubles have been the result of com-, 
Ing in contact with disease germs in 
public places. And the apparently in- 
■ignificant pimple has been the c^^use. | 
It spreads with astonishing rapidity, i 
ofen infecting the entire system in a 
few days. 

It is fortunate, however, that there 
Is a remedy to cope quickly and 
thoroughly with such a condition, in 
the famous S. S. S. 

This preparation stands alone as a 
tlood purifier. It Is somewhat revolu- 
tionary in its composition, since it 
has accomplished all that was ever 
claimed for mercury, iodides, arsenic, 
and other destructive mineral drugs, 
and yet it is absolutely a purely veg- 
etable product. It contains one in- 
gredient whl< h serves the active pur- 
pose of stimulating each tiny cellular 
part of the tissues to the healthy and 
Judicious selection of its own essen- 
tial nutriment. There are more- cases 
of articular rheumatism, locomotor 
ataxia, paresis, neuritis, and similar 
aiseases resultant from the use of 
minerals than most people are aware 
of. These facts are brought out in a 
highly interesting book compiled by 
the medical department of The Swift 
Bpeclflc Co.. 304 Swift Bldg.. Atlanta. 
Ga It 13 mailed free, together with 
special information, to all who write 
aescrlblng their symptoms, 

G«t « bottle of S. S. 9. to-da.v. but be c.refm 
Mt to h«T* sometbtng palmed off on you falsely 
claimed to be "Just as good." 

ne only reason why aay-jne will try to ae.l 
^^Bielilflg to »l*cs ot a. 8. a. U in. exua 
^e&t. 



HENRY TRUELSEN IN 
NEW LIGNITE CONCERN 



KID TRAILER IS 

AGAIN SENTENCED. 

Towner. S. D.. March 30. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — For the third time at 
least possible more. "Kid" Trailer. 
North Dakota's most noted horse thief, 
has been resentenced to the i-tate pris- 
on, this time for three and a half 
years. His right name is Charles ^^ln- 
fleld and former terms have been 
served in this state and Canada on 
similar charges. Some months ago the 
authorities decided to give Trailer a 
chance after he had run horses across 
the line for some years from the north- 
west<rn corner of the state. For 
months he was strictly on his good be- 
havior. He finally found the life too 
tame and stole three horses from T. 
W. Klnsey of this plaee. He admitted 
hi.s guilt without a trial. 

"ANd'tTonesback. 

Former Rugby. N. D.. Banker Visits 
Scenes of Operations. 

R igby. N*. D.. March 30. — A. 

("Andy") Jones, formerly 

banker 
worth 



ISHPEMINGBANK 

WILL BE REBUILT. 

Ishpemlng. Mi«-h., March 30. — 
A for<'e of men is repairing 
tli« Miners' National bank which 
was destroyed by fire last 

Wednesday morning. The walls will 
not need lo be rebuilt and men are at 
work carrying away the debris from 
the Interior of the building. J. S. 
Wahlman has the contract for the work 
and he will employ a large force of 
men and it is expected that the work 
will be completed within three or four 
months. The iron beams supporting 
the second floor can be used again. 

The bank opened for business In 
temporary quarters in the Voelker 
block and is in rto way affected by the 
fire. 

PAPERMAKERS RETURN 
TO MARINETTE JOBS. 

Marinette. Wis., March SO.— The 
strikers in the local paper mills here 
who walked out Thursday have re- 
turned to work. They were given an 
increase of 20 cents a day. They asked 
for 25 cents. 



r 

L 



Wisconsin Briefs 



Minnesota Briefs 



Stevens Point — By a 
Oshkosh normal junior 



2 to 1 vote, 
debaters de- 



East (3rand Forks — The county 
board this week called for bids for the 
graveling of state roads Xos. 2 and 6, 
in the townships of Huntsville and 
Grand Forks. The estimated cost of 



the first contract Is ?2,500 and of th» 
second ?4,200. 

Willow River — Mrs. Waletzko, aged 
78 years, died Thursday morning at tho 
home of her son, Joseph Waletzko. 
She had been in failing healtli for 
some time pat^t and her death was not 
unexpected. She was the mother of » 
large family. The funeral was held 
Saturday. 

Roseau — At the Roseau county 
Democratic meeting held here last 
week the following county committed 
was appointed; Martin Nelson, chair- 
man; A. Waag, secretary; O. Dalby 
of Greenbush; W. B. Oislason of Bad- 
ger; J. F. Holmes of Warroad; F. Hor- 
rocks of Roosevelt. 

Rod Lake Falls — Mrs. Emma Du- 
charme, who brought action for di- 
vorce again&t Romeo Ducharme, al- 
leging cruelty and non-support, was 
granted a decree in district court. Her 
maiden name, Emma Trudea\i, was re- 
stored to her and she was awarded 
the household goods. 

Mahnomen — A. J. Andersen, who 
has been clerk of the school board for 
the past three years, tendered his 
resignation as a member of the board. 
C. C. Cooper was elected to fill the un- 
expired term of Mr. Andersen, and H. 
S. Frazer was elected clerk. 

Moorhead — Bowers Bros, got tho 
contract for building the Benedictino 
Sisters' home here. There were six 
bids as follows: W. H. Merrltt. $5,640; 
A. J. Fridland, ?5,782; Tom Powers. 
$5,482; Bowers. Bros.. $5,333; N. N. 
Malvey, $5,614; E. Anderson. $6,880. 

Wahkon — B. F. Congdon arrived 
from Dubuque, Iowa, last week with 
a carload of household goods and now 
occupies the Clason house. He owns 
160 acres in 16. 41-25. and will imme- 
diately proceed to improve It. • 

Staples — Joseph Page, for many 
years a resident of Staples and wlio 
put up one of the first buildings la 
Staples, on the present site of tho 
Fletcher hotel, recently was adjudged 
insane at Gate. Wash., and sent to tho 
asylum at Steilacoom. 

Walker — County Treasurer McKeowa 
has completed his March apportion- 
ment. It shows a total of $57,026.8S 
from tax collections to be distributed. 
Cass county gets all of this except 
$4,960.04 which goes to the state. Th« 
sum of $15,373.96 of this amount goes 
for county expen.ses, the schools get 
$22,817.75 and the tow^ns and villages 
are given $14,146.13. 

Crookston — David Mazson and family 
have arrived from Franklin county, 
Pennsylvania, to farm near Euclid. Mr. 
Mazson is very much pleased with th« 
valley. 

Roseau — The recent surgical opera- 
tions performed by local doctors, 
emphasizes the need of a hospital. Dr. 
Welmore, who has charge ot securing 
donations and membership fees for & 
hospital at Roseau, reports the fund 
as growing near the $2,000 mark. 

St. Cloud — Work of reconstructing 
the Leisen block, gutted by fire in 
February, will be commenced in tho 
immediate future and It is expected 
that it will again be ready for occu- 
pancy by June 1. 



I Peninsula Briefs 



who served 
for running 



H. 

a local 

time in Leaven- 
afoul of Uncle 



Former Duluth Mayor In- 
terested in North Da- 
kota Industry. j 

Dickinson. X. D., March 30.— (Special I 
to The Herald.)— The organization of 
the North Dako'a Lignite Mines com- 
pany here meais the improved meth- 
ods of securing 'oal in this part of the 
, state and the . stablishment of the 
I largest lignite mining Industry in 
, North Dakota. 

Two present I'ptrated mines are In- 
' eluded and the . apaclty at first w ill be 
1.000 tons dally and that will soon be 
' doubled. Banltt r Richards - of this 
, place is sccretaiy. Hansen Ev.'^miih 
I and ex-Mayor Henry Trueist-n, both 
formerly of Duluth, are vice president 
I and general manager. The headquar- 
: ter.<i of the comj any will be established 
' in Fargo. 

I Take Ovi-r Zenith Mlaes. 

! It Is understood that the new roni- 
' panv la to tak» over and operate the 
I Zenith mines, e'tabli.sh* d twelve years 
ago at Zenith by ex-Mayor Henry 
Truelsen and Hansen EvSmith of Du- 
luth, and the I'lttsburg mines of the 
Dakota Fuel company, established sev- 
eral years ago by Messrs. Richards. 
Delters and Pel ton. 

It is underst »od that the mines of 
the Dakota LU:nite Mines company 
will have a cc mbined dally capacity 
of 1,000 tons, \vhich can be increas»>d 
to 2,000 tonA oil A f«w montlu' notice. 



Restores Natural 
Color to Grey Hair 
If yonr hair is irey or 
faded you can quickly 
and permanently re8tora,.| 
ita natural color by using 



Calumet — Mrs. Emma N. Mackenzie, 
aged 80, widow of the late Fred Mac- 
kenzie died March 27. Tlie funeral 
will be held Tuesday. She had lived 
here forty years and is survived by 
these children: Mrs. James N. Cox, Mrs. 
John B. i'urtls, Clyde S. Mackenzie, 
register of deeds; Robert B. Mackenzie, 
all of the Copper country and Mrs. M. 
B. Calms, who is now in Montreaux. 
Switzerland and Fred H. Mackenzie of 
Hallock, Minn. . . ^ „ . , , 

L'Anse — The trial of George Briski, 
charged with the murder of Deputy 
Sheriff Pollock at Hurontown in Octo- 
ber, will be continued until the next 

Lake Linden — Thomas Orr, a brother 
of Dr. G. W. Orr of this city is dead. 
The decedent was 78 years of age and 
for a greater part of hla life, he re- 
sided in Walled Lake. Mich. 

Marquette — An inquest into the 
death of .Nick Lustilla, who was run 
over by the east bound South .^hore 
train Wednesday afternoon, between 
<*hocolay and tlordon, was conducted 
by Coroner William Prln of Ishpem- 
lng The verdict was that Lustilla 
came to his death by an accident, and 
that his body was found on the D. S. 
S & A. railroad track. The funeral 
Was held Sunday. 

Negaunee — Brapch Board No. 204. 
New Era association elected the follow- 
ing officers: President, James Hawke; 
vice president. William H. Toms; 
treasurer A. O. Sjoholm; directors, for 
three years. Charles T. Wead: delegate. 
\ O Sjoholm: examining physicians, 
[;'. M.' Belhumeur, N. J. Robblns and P. 



MOTHERS 

From the same teapot with the same leaves how many people 
can draw the same tea? 

From the same goods and the same pattern how many of you 
can make the same dress? 

From the same materials with the same recipe how many 
of you can make the same pie? 

There can be but one answer; no two would be alike. 

BUT 

There are many Remedies for Babies on the market 

Chas. H. Fletcher 

has been preparing 

Genuine Castoria 

for many more than 30 years 

Preparing it so carefully, so cautiously that it has saved more 
Suffering than all other remedies added together. 

CASTORIA to be CASTORIA 

The Kind You Have Always Bought, Must Bear the Signature of 



city 



health 
in the 
have been dis- 



This wonderful preparation 
eradicates dandruff, enlivens the 
hair follicles, and gives the hair 
its natural, youthful appearance 
Isn't a dye. Results guaranteed. 
Money refunded if not satisfied. 

Sk it4 tl It tnttMt. »*■»•« k^!e.««' »" '•< 
ul fcitcr'i ■Mt.-PUl* Bn Sxt. U, Rcwirk. Ki. 



S. Wilson. _ ,, , 
Marquette— Dr. Main, 

' officer, is fighting the measles 

I city As yet no cases 

i covered outside of the Third street 

I school district, and the health officer 
is working hard to check the spread 
of the disease, w4ilch is so common 
among the children, especially in the 
spring of the year. „ . ^ , j,. 

Ishpemlng— Frank J. Helndel. dis- 
trict deputy grand exalted ruler of the 
Elks will go to Calumet on March 31 
to attend a meeting of the lodge and 
to exemplify the work. 

Ontonagon — Governor Ferris has ap- 
polnitd Thornton A. Ureen of tiiis vU- 




Sold only In one size bottle, never in bulk, or otherwise; 

to protect the babies. 

The Centaur Company, 




Prcst. 



^ 



'i- 



|J 



j" 



k 



i 



is 






_-_L 



Monday, 



THE DtJLUTH ITEl^ALD 



March 30, 1914. 



19 



ON THE IRON RA NOES 



HAD KIDNAPED 
ANOTHER GIRL 



Virginian, Accused of Carry- 
ing Off Gilbert Girl, 
Had Habit. 



Crow and Miss Ulce Schrleber, teach- 
ers of th»» publf schools. A phono- 
grraph furnisihed music. 

RANGE nUMBERS 
I ENJOY BANQUET 

Members of Calling From 

Duluth Are Among 

Guests. 



He Tried to Lure Away Girl 

of 8 Years on 

March 22. 



Titfiinia. Minn.. March 30.— (Spef-ial 
to- THe Herald.) — Frank Danderdau 
V i V w-as brought here yesterday from 
C Pirt by Deputy Sheriff Whltte to 
prevent infuriated citizens of the 
n< ii;hborJng village from lynching him 
fir kidnaping the 4-year-old daughter 
of Victor Johnson of Sparta, Is about 
3i> and employed as a setter and 
» iS.ed at other jobs about the Bailey 
BiA lill here. He Is of French na- 
iiity and does not speak English 
well. He is believed to be a de- | 
r ate or at least not right mental- , 
iUtnrts to get a statement out of , 



dence. Onoloe Ide. Frances Fllllman, 
Clara and Mary Paffino June and 
Olive Kaiser and Colburn Christopher- I 
son. Mtss Kalaer received mauy pretty | 
gifts. 1 

Ben Edelsteln Is confined to the 
home of his sister. Mrs. M. Garber, 
with a severe attack of grip. 

Hans Wagner, employed as clerk In 
the counting department of the Oliver 
Iron Mining company, returned Satur- 
day evening from a two weeks' vaca- 
tion spent with relatives In Omaha. 
Xeb. 

Miss Julia Bogseth of Sparta. Minn., 
has accepted a po.-^ltion n^ bookkeeper 
for the Mesaba laundry, beginning her 
duties this morning. 

Edward Bubley of Superior came to 
T..WW. xt -KM K •A /cr.-^i-i Hibbing Saturday evening for an over 

HIbbing. Min i.. March 30.— (Special Sunday visit with friends and rela- 
te The Herald. < — "Sanitation and the tlves. 
Work to Be Done by l.ocal Boards of , Ellery Anderson, a '^""f'", "'^^blng 

„ ,,.., ^, , , , ,,„,^ J,. bov but now of Buhl, spent the week 

Health" was tHe principal topic dls- ^^-^ ^^^^ ^^ ^,,p guest of friends. 

cussed at the 4ocond annual banquet l.,ouls Helsteln. the Pine street fur- 
given by the I ange Master Plumbers nlture man. left yesterday noon for a 
association at :he Hibbing hotel Sat- short business visit at the Head or 

urday evening. Thi- banquet was a the Lakes. 

success in ever." way. more than fifty Miss Faye T^oolfan was \" "^er Sun- 
gue.sta being piesent. Only two mem- day guest of her sister. Mrs. Oeorgo i 
bers of the ranre association were not ' Mesberg. of Lveietn. 
able to be pre.ent and the remainder 
of the gue»ts -ame from Duluth and 
the Twin Cities 

Following a > elicious menu that was 
Interspersed wi h musical selections by 
the orche.stra and vaudeville numbers, 
Michael Boylai , mayor-elect of Vir- 
ginia, opened tlie program of toasts as 
toaslnia.ster. In the absence of Mayor 
Power, who is 111. Village Attorney S. 
C. Siott iJeliveied the address of wel- 



hlm rire futile. It is not believed he 
realizes the enormity of his act. He 
will be hold here until tomorrow. 
wii. II he will be taken to tiilbert for a 
hraring before Judge Anderson, the 
h-iuing set for today being postponed 
bv " " ■ 

ii ; 

of, 
t 

&■■ 
Cuircuced. 



u^e of the absence of Assistant ; 
ty Attorney Boyle and to give the 
i!ited Gilbert people time to cool 
s it is feared they might attempt , 
nch him if he were taken back 84 
tfter yesterday's sensational oc- 




AUSTRIA INVITES 

SUBJECTS HOME 



MICHAEL BOYLAN, 
The Toastmaster. 



Tried to Kidnap Before. ! 

'";ilbert. Minn., March 30. — (Special to i 
Tn-- Herald.)— After Frank Danderdau! 
of \ irginia had been arrested here 
}->.-terday charged with kidnaping the 
4-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Vk lor Johnson, living in the Sparta i 
fulJitlon. it developed that March 22 he 
tried a similar act with the 8-year-old' 
diuKhier of Otto Llndholm of this 
pl-ioi-. Then, It is said, he entered the ^ 
Lindholm home just after the girl had 
b'-en entertaining some girl friends, 
gr^iblxd her by the arm and led her] 
owav. but on reaching the street let' 
ter go when she screamed and he saw 
Someone coming. The Lindhohn girl 
y-.si.^rday positively identltled Dander come. W. \V. Hughes of Minneap-^lls, 
d'lu as the man who dragged h-r from president of the state association told 
her home. This Intelligenco added to j of the work that was being done to- 
the fury of the people over the attempt i wards the periection of sanitation by 
t'> carry off the Johnson girl and only | ih.- state boar I of health and of the 

frompt' action by offlcers prevented a work that was- still in prospect. 
^ n> hlng. Cliisholin 3Ian Speaka. 

Mr. Johnson Is a timber contractor William Pau son of Chisholm spok« 
and about 4 o'clock Sunday morning on various phages of the public health 
Mrs. Johnson aroused her husband an* question. Mr. A'erlan. secretary of the 
Btii'i she heard a noise in the adjoin- i state associatiim, gave an Interesting 
Ing room where their 4-year-old talk on the wurk that the members of 
daughter was sleeping. Investigation the organization could do in educat- 
Bhc»wed an op-.n window and an empty jp^ the residttits of their communi- 
t'-d. A short ladder against the win- , ties towards b« iter sanitation. 
dow showed how the kidnaper entered | j. L. Lewis, secretary of the local 
and left. Mr. Johnson dressed and | commercial oh b. was enthusiastically 
luirried to the fire hall, where he notl- , applauded foil )wing his remarks on 
fied Patrolman Alex Karkovan. who, building up i community and the 
rang the fin- bell and In a few minutes, boosting ssplrit. Wm. Mahoney con- 
m. crowd gathered. Searchers at once i tributed to the success of the program 
Bt^rted out to find th^ kidnaper, di- j ^ith several veil selected stories. 



Scarcity of Laborers to 

Work Farms Believed 

Back of Call. 

Hibbing. Minn.. M*rch 30.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— That the abundance 
of officials and the lack of laborers is 
responsible for the notice issued by 
the Austrian government calling all 
Croatians back to their hame and of- 
fering to pay their fare Is the opinion 
I of a local Croatian who translated th« 
notice Into English. 

"I do not think the government be- 
' lleves that labor conditions are not 
good here, as much as they realize that 
I they must find men to work their 
' farms unless they all want to go bank- 
I rupt buying food supplies." said the 
Hibbing Croatian. "There are so many 
officials over there that few laborers 
are left. An official title, however, 
does not carry a large salary and 
many of the secretaries and their un- 
der secretaries receive less than any 
working man. I do not know how 
many of the men here will respond to 
the call, bpt there will undobutedly be 

some." ^,, . . I 

Th-i notlve which was published In 
the Croatian paper last week and sent 
broadcast throughout the mining com- 
munities Is as follows: 

Text of Nottce. 

"Notice to all subjects of Austria- 
Hungary: The Austrian government 
Is In receipt of information to the ef- 
fect that employment is unsteady, 
conditions are undesirable, and wages 
are low In certain portions of the 
United States where its subjects are 
largely congregated. The Croatian 
minister of interior has requested that 
all subjects return to their homes. 

"The Austria-Hungary government 
announces that all its subjects by ap- 
plying to the Austrian consul at St. 
Paul win be given free transporta- 
tion to their home towns. This call 
applies to all subjects living In Min- 
nesota. North and South Dakota. 
Michigan and In Ashland. Bayfield, 
Douglas and Iron counties In Wiscon- 
sin." 

The notice in signed by Edgar 
Prechnik, Austrian-Hungarian consul 
at St. Paul. 




FOR&CA 

TUESDAY 

For Dulutli. Siiiwrior and »lclnitr. 
Iiicludlnc the Mcnaba and VeriuUtuu 
Irtiii rangea: Oeiier.illy cloudy 
weather tonight and Tuesday: low- 
eat temperature tonifht about ::0 deg. 
»t DulutL-Stiserloi and SO dec. to 
25 dFff. on the lion rangM; uiodet- 
at« rionlieaat«rl> wluJii 



WIND SCALE. 

Miles 
Per Hour. 

Calm to 6 

I Jght 5 to 15 

Moderate 15 to 25 

Brisk 25 to 35 

HUh 35 to 50 

Gale 50 to 63 

Hurricane 65 and above < 

H. W. RICHARDSON, 
LocaI ForecMter. 



A WOMAN'S HEALTH 

, Every woman's health is peculiarly 
I dependent upon the condition of her 
blood. How many women suffer with 
headache, pain in the back, poor ap- 
petite, weak digestion, a constant 
feeling of weariness, palpitation of the 
heart, shortness of breath, pallor and 
nervousness? If you have any of these 
symptoms, do not despair of getting 
better but begin now, today, to build 
up your blood with Dr. Williams' Pink 
Pills. See how the nervous energy 
of the blood is restored as the blood 
becomes pure and red and the en- 
tire system is strengthened to meet 
every demand upon it. 

Dr. Williams' Pink Pills are useful 
for all women but they are particular- 
ly valuable to girls of school age who 
show symptoms of going into a de- 
cline, who become pale, nervous and 
languid. These pills aid In securing 
perfect development and health bjr 
strengthening the system and purify- 
ing and building up the blood. Thin 
blood during the growing years of a 
girl's life usually means a flat-chested 
and hollow - cheeked womanhood. 
There can be neither health nor beau- 
ty without red blood which gives 
brightness to the eyes and color t« 
cheeks and lips. 

Write now to the Dr. Wiliami 
Medicine Co., Schenectady. X. Y., for 
two helpful booklcl.s. "Plain Talks to 
Women" and "Building Up the 
Blood." 



R<PtANATORY NOTES. 



lOktOTTaUona 
pta throng 
th* wind " 



Ukca at ■ a. a teTCBtf Mh naridian Mae. Affpm > r«(hie«<1 to tea level. laoBArs (eoDtinoon. liae.) paaa Oiroegh poJnta of eqnal alt premire. IsoTBiaiis (i^^T^ 
^.nt fiKfreslteBpcralHrerieo^J. pi^ciplttloo of tt !■»* w «or. for pot 14 bour., U»rd, »».m»m .toJrdoc^^^ ^ ^ 



CLOUDY 




The thawing 
weather of yes- 
terday bids fair to 
continue if only 
Old Sol could get 
.in his work, but 
the obstreperous 
clouds still con- 
tinue to hang on 
and. according to 
predictions, will 
be on the job 
again tomorrow 
as well as tonight. 
But the temperature will be moderate. 
A year ago today the weather was 
cold. The sun rose this morning at 
6:50, and will set ttald evening at 6:36 
o'clock, giving twelve hours and 
forty-three minutes of sunshine, six 
mioutes more than Saturday. 

Mr. Richardson makes the following 
comment on weather conditions: 

"During the last twenty-four to 
forty-eight hours light to heavy rains 
fell over Eastern, Central. Southern 
and Western states, ana light snow 
over scattered portion,!^ of the North- 
west. Tempeiatures continue moderate 
to warm over Central and Southern 
states and have risen somewhat 
throughout the Northwest. The heav- 
iest rainfalls occurred In Tennessee 
and Southern Wisconsin. 



Tuesday; not much change in temper- 
ature. 

Lower Michigan — Cloudy tonight and 
Tuesday; colder in extreme south por- 
tion tonight. 

Teuaprrature*. 

Following were the highest temper- 
atures for the last twenty-four hours 
and ttie lowest for the last twelve, end- 
ing at 7 a. m.: 



Viiliner into parties and beating the i 
Cu'uUJV In a systematic manner. 
Drov* Child In Cemetery. 

Pressed too closely by his pursuers 
tb^» kidnaper dropped the child in the 
cemeterA-. where the little one was 
f.iiind shivering in her night dress, but 
oth'rwi.<e unharmed. They soon cap- 
tnr*»d Danderdau. Frank Kosier of 
tJilbert and the janitor of the Genoa 
F* hool grabbing the man between 
Cilb.rt and Sparta. They brought him 
l>a- k to t.;ilbert. but he made no re- 
ei-*tance. After he was lodged in the 
Village jail public feeling ran so high 
and a lynching wa.^ feared, bttt Deputy 
Sii'^riff Fred Whitte. who had in the 
lueantimo arrived from Virginia in a 
inafhine. took the man in custody ana 
•with other offlcers spirited him away, 
t-' the Virginia jail. The crowd finally 
dUpersed wltli nuitteringo of threats 
tj^ain.'.t the accust^d. 

Public feeling is considerably al- 
layed here today and when the hear- 
ing of the accused Is hold tomorrow 
1» i*i not expected indignation will get 
t' > better of judgment and efforts at 
a ii nching made. 

-• 

Chlnholm I.uneheon. 

rhi^liolm. Minn.. March 30.— fSpecial 
t. Ihe Herald.)— Mrs. Charles E. 
French of South Central avenue was 
ho.'sless Saturday afternoon to a 1 
o'(-!ock luncheon to twenty-fuur of her 
ladv friends most of whom are mem- 
bers of the Ladies' Bridge club. Bridge 
wa< played the balance of the after- 
j, ti. The decorations and favors were 
ii \ r-llow. Kach lady wore a yellow 
j.«ii.jull and a handsome bouquet of yel- 
low jonquils were given a.«! apprize for 



The vaudeville program was contin- 
ued after the banquet until an early 
hour. A numl er of cartoons prepared 
by a local artiit were among the suc- 
cessful features of the entertainment. 

In the afternoon a short business 
session was hild by the members of 
the association 



CHISHOLM MINER 
CRUSHED TO DEATH 



TOWER MEN TO 

VISIT ST. PAUL 



General Foreea«t«. 

Chicago, March 30. — Forecasts for 
the twenty-four hours ending at 7 
p. m. Tuesday: 

Iowa, "N^rth and South, . Dakota, 
Nebraska and Wyoming — Unsettled to- 
night and Tuesday; probnJ^y showers; 
not much change in temperature. 

Wisconsin, Minnesota — Cloudy and 
unsettled tonight a««l Tuesday; not 
much change In temperature. 

Montana — Showers tonight and prob- 
ably Tuesday; not much change In 
temperature. 

Upper Michigan — Cloudy tonight and Miimedos* 



Abilene .... 

.Ml>eiia 36 

Altiarlllo 

Battleford 36 

R!.^raarck 34 

Bdse 51 

Boaton 30 

BtitTalo 5« 

Cairo 

Calgary 3J 

Chart** City 

Cliarleston 76 



HluhLow 
..S4 Si 



Chicago 

Concordia . . . 
Davenport . . . 

Denver 

Dee Moines . 
Derlls liBke . 

Dodte 

DnUiQue . . . . 
DULUTH ... 
Kdmonion . . 

KRcanaba 

OalTMion . . . 
tliRhd Haveu 
Green Bay .. 
Havre 



..60 



....4< 

56 

...36 

44 

....46 
....$2 

34 

...U 

08 

....■58 

34 

....48 



Helena 54 

Houghton 

HnMn 48 

Iiidlanapolts 

Jacksonville 84 

Karaloopa 58 

KauMs Clti- «8 

KnoxvlUe TO 

hx Croise 

L>an<l«r 

Louisville 72 

MadUon 4« 

Marquette S4 

Medicine Hat. ... 40 

>Ierapl>is 74 

Miles City 42 

Mllwauke* 40 

...33 



34 
88 
28 
32 
40 
S6 
42 
5S 
24 
30 
60 
38 
42 
38 
3C 
40 
26 
42 
.">3 
28 

S2 
64 
38 
84 
32 
38 
20 
34 
54 
64 
36 
48 
58 
38 
26 
60 
34 
82 
28 
58 

r.8 

Si 



High Low 

Modena 48 30 

Montgomery a 64 



31 
Si 
00 
70 
34 
36 
52 
40 
84 
50 
36 



Austin and William Brown have gone 
to Portland. Or., where they will be 
Joined by a party of Eastern capitlal- 
Ists and together will make an ex- 
tensive tour of the California oil fields. 
Local people are interested in Cali- 
fornia oil fields. 

SEVERAL PUNISHED. 



so 

44 
34 
42 
42 



Montreal 38 

Mooriiead 44 

Nasliville 

New Orleans ....78 

New York 42 

North PUtle ....48 

Oklalioma 76 

Omalia 46 

Parry Sound 44 

PUoenli 64 

Pierre 40 

Pittsburg 60 

Port ArtUur 88 

Portland. Or ....58 
Prince AH»ert ...48 

Qu'.^ppelle 32 

Hiilei«li 56 

Kaplil City 48 

Roseburg 56 

Koswell 

St. lionls 66 

St. Paul 38 

Salt Lake City... 58 

San Diego 64 

San Frauclsco. . .54 
Sanlt .Sle. Marie. 86 

Seattle 

Sheridan 58 

Shrereptirt 78 

Sioux City 44 

Kpokane 58 

Springfield. Ill 

Springfield. Mo.... 
Swift Current ...30 

Tamp* 8* 

Toledo 48 

Valentine 

Waslilnglon 44 

Wlchlt* »i 

Willlston 84 82 

Whmemueca ....*« 28 

Wlnntpef 38 20 

Vellowstone 48 8» 



Eveleth Judge Disposes of Cases 
Against Accused. 

Eveleth. Minn., March 30.— (Special 
to The Herald.) — The Eveleth police 
force shows no discrimination in re- 
gard to nationalities in upholding the 
law as shown when a cosmopolitan 
gathering was brought before Munici- 
48 1 pal Juil-ja Moylan. Andrew Navalli. 
6 Finn, charged with being drunk and 
*2 flashing a big hunting knife, was 
'" I fined $25 and costs. Pat Fitzgerald had 
prolonged his celeb ralior. ol St. I'at- 
nck's day. He was adjudged a "vag" 
and sent to the county jail for forty 



56 
84 
46 
54 
48 
84 
42 
82 
66 
36 
36 
4G 
52 
80 
64 
40 
34 
88 



the remainder of the series of services recently staged at the opera house in 



Killed on E:ve of Leaving to 

Bring Family From 

Austria. 

Chisholm. Minn.. March 30. — (Special 
to The Herald. • — Steve Pernar. a minor, 
was smotherei in a cav'eln In the 
Chisholm mini Saturday about noon 
while he and his partner were hurry- 
ing to finish a contract. He is mar- 
ried and his family in Austria has been 
expecting him home within a month, 

leave Chisholm 



Will Interview Game and 

Fish Commission at 

Capital. 

Tower, Minn.. March 30. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Arrangements are per- 
fected to send a delegation to St. Paul 
to appear April 1 before the game and 
fish commission In the matter of fish 
protection for Lake Vermilion. The 
delegation consists of Dr. R L. Burns, 
C. D. Murphy. G. C. Carlson and H. T. 
Olson. 

councIl To su pervise. 

Two Harbors' Mayor Wants City Con- 
trol of Building and Repairs. 

Two Harbor.s, Minn., March 80. — 



which are to be' held during the week 

KEEWAfiriiMr 

IS CONVICTED 



Knife Wielder Is Given 

an Indeterminate 

Sentence. 

Grand Rapids. Minn.. March 30.— 
(Special to The Herald.)— Pasquale 
Papasurdo of Keewatin, tried in dis- 
trict court for stablnng Vito Campag- 
none at Keewatin last November with 
a knife, was found guilty by a district 
1 court Jury of second degree assault 
I and Judge Wright gave him an tnde- 
' terminate sentence in the St. Cloud 
I reformatory. ..,..«., i, 

I The Jury acquitted N. A. Olson, who 
' was tried on the charge 



this city. ^, ^- 

John Tulle has begun the erection of 

a cotta-ge on the property recently 

purchased on Lake Vermilion. The 
, cottage being erected by H. T. Olson 
' Is fast approaching completion. In- 
' Quiries for it are being received. 
i Miss Jessie A. Copp, a teacher at the 

government Indian school, was here 

Saturday. .„ , .. d* 

C. D. Murphy left on Sunday for St. 
Paul. as delegate from St. Louis coun- 
ty to the Democratic state conference. 

EVELETH TO MAKE 
ILLUMINATING GAS 



for the old hone. He has lived in this 
country for s- veral years and was fa- 
miliar with riininK and the accident 
can hardly b» explained. As soon as 
the caveln wms reported every effort 
was made to reach him but It was 2 
a prize for o'clock before the body was recovered, 
high score. Mrs. Charles "r. Woods be- I Th» remains Rill be buried here and 
ing the liiky ladv. A.s.slsting in serv- the sad news has already been com- 
ing, viit- 'vi_!^.> '.^"^ ,.. , »,, _ I municati'd to the wife and family 

across the ocetn. Pernar was 46 years 
of age, and a member of two societies 
under which t te funeral will be held. 



he having phinned to leave v.nisnoim : -e„_,. , ^„ t^w-, H«»r«ld i Mavor Towl i''^'*" int-u "■• '•"° ,'""-;•"% ^.-^■-i,'',::"" 

next Wednesdty for New York to sail ; f^P^'^'f ' '° \''® _;" _i?.^._ T. ' the name of Lloyd^Levie of Deer RUer 



recently made a recommendation to 



of forging 

Deer River 

River bank last 



I to a check on a Deer 

the council that an ordinance be draft-: December and getting It cashed 
ed which will give the city a --»-•" 1 »**«»» lajunotlon 



Ing were Miss A. Bess Clark. Miss Jane 



TGROW AWAY YOUR 
EYEGLASSESI 

A FREE PRESCRIPTION 

You C an Have Filled and I te nt Home. 



Y. 



n you wear glasses? Are you a| 
V )f eyestrain or other eye weak- j 

»i :-::>. if SO. you Will be glad to know] 
that there is real hope for you. Many 
T. ho ;e eyes were failing say they have 
liad their eyes restored through the 
prjjuiole of this wonderful free pre- 
sriplion. One man says after trying 
It ; "I was almost blind; could not see 
to read at all. Now 1 can rend every- 
thing without any glasses and my eyes 
do not water any more. At night they 
would pain dreadfully; now they feel 
fine all the time. It was like a miracle 
to me." A lady who used it says: "The 
Btmo.-*phere seemed hazy with or with- 
out glasses, but after using this pre- 
•criplion for fifteen days, everything 
seems clear. 1 can even read fine print 
without glasses. It is believed that 
thousands who wear glasses can now 
di.'scard them in a reasonable time and 
multitudes more will be able to 
•irungthen their eyes so as to be 
spared the trouble and expense of ever 
getting glasses. Eye troubles of many 
d-s. riptions may be wonderfully bene- 
f 1 by following the simple rules. 
Here is the prescription: Go to any 
active drug store and get a bottle of 
Optoua. fill a two-ounce bottle with 
warm water, drop in one Optona tablet, 
and allow to dissolve. With this liquid 
'bathe the eyes two or four times daily, 
"You should notice your eyes clear up 
perceptibly right from the start and 
Inflammation will quickly disappear. If 
your eyes are bothering you even a 
Utile take steps to save them now be- 
fore it is too late. Many hopelessly 
blind might have been saved If they 
had cared for their eyes In time. 



DULUT H GIRL S WIN. 

W. C. A. Five Outplay Girls' 
Team of Two Harbors. 

Two Harbor ), 'Minn., March 30. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.)— The Y. W. C. A. 
team of Duluth defeated the girls' team 
of this city rn Saturday, 10 to 4. The 
game was pi lyed in the Y. M. C. A. 
gymnasium and nearly 400 people were 
present. Although the Two Harbors 
girl.s have played exhibition games be- 
fore, this wa 1 the first regular game 
with an out- )f-town team. 

The vlsitois played a fast, clean 
game and their combination work was 
superior to that of the local.^. Miss 
Forester was the star for Duluth and 
her fast floor work was a feature of 
the contest. Mi.xs Brown also played 
Well. Miss E ither Felto made the only 
scores for T vo Harbors. 

The Two Hi. rbors players were some- 
what handicapped on ai count of play- 
ing under a new set of rules in re- 
gard to dribbling and snatching the 
ball: It was deemed advisable by the 
Duluth refer, e to eliminate these two 
rules to pre /ent unnecessary rough- 
ness. 

The lineup was as follows: 

Duluth — Two Harbors — 

Miss Foreste • ....f Mis.** Pelto 

Miss Anderson ....f Miss Pelto 

Miss Brown c Miss Mather 

Miss Walt . g.Misa Irwin and 

Miss Kernan 

Miss FJellman . . . .g Miss Sullivan 

and Miss Hunter 

Summary: Baskets — Miss Forester, 
1: Miss Brown, l; Miss Anderson. 1; 

Miss Walt. 1: Miss Pelto. 2. Foul.s 

Miss Brown, 2. Referee — Conliff. Time- 
keeper — Urar t. 

BIRTHDAY PARTY. 

Is Given By Brooklyn Miss of 3 to 
Young Friends. 

Hibbing. ^linn.. March 80.— (Special 
to The Hera d.) — Miss Isla Kaiser en- 
tertained Saturday afternoon from 2 to 
6 at her h< me in Brooklyn, on her 
eighth birthday. Music and games 
formed the afternoon's entertainment 
after which a dainty luncheon was 
served. The guests were Mabel Clevt- 



certaln 

amount of control over all buildings | 
which are under construction or re- 
pairs. He furthermore recommended , 
that all persons wishing to build or 
make repairs inside the city limits be 
required to get a permit and that a 
sk»'tch of the proposed works be sub- , 
mitted to the city council for inspec- 1 
tion and approval. He believes that 
such an ordinance would be a splendid 
thing for the city and would prevent 
undesirable repairs from being made. 
The city has had considerable trouble 
in the past in regard to matters of 
this nature and It Is hoped that such 
an ordinance would entirely eliminate 
all disputes In the future. 

• 

Eveleth Hears Dr. Hovln. 

Eveleth. Minn.. March 30. — (Special 
to The Herald.)— Rev. William F. Ho- 
vls of Endlon church. Duluth. spoke at 
Lenton services held at the auditorium 
last night bv the Methodist church. 
Rev. Hovl? will speak again tonight 
and other speakers will be secured for 



Judge Wright set «,he time for the 
hearing of the Injunrtlon suit against 
the construction of judicial Ditch No. 
2 for Wednesday, April 1. before .Judge 
Stanton, either at Bemldjl or at Grand 
Rapids. 



If Power Plant Is Acquired 

Will Add Gas Making 

to It. 

Eveleth, Minn.. March 30. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Mayor J. J. Gleason 
states that it is the intention of the 
city council to add gas-making ma- 
chiner>' to the equipment at the power 
plant if it is acquired by the city. 

Mayor Gleason is satisfied that the 
council win have no difficulty in pur- 
chasing the plant of the Home Electric 
& Heating company after an appraisal 
has beep made. 

As soon as the plant becomes mu 



days. 

Vincent Bicclannlo, a young Ital- 
ian, it Is said had prepared for 
a call on a lady friend by purchasing 
a revolver and ammunition. He pleaded 
guilty to carrying a concealed vreution 
but denied any evil intent. Judge 
Moylan sentenced him to pay $50 and 
' cCiSts or serve forty days. The fino has 
not yet been paid. 

\. rusty revolver had been found in 
the possession of Pete Peterson, a 
Swede, when arrested for* drunken- 
ness. Peterson, who is a lumberman, 
said that ho had been under the in- 
fluence of liquor and knew nothing of 
the revolver until it was shown him 
by the police. Ho paid a fine of %b 
and costs. 

John Manning being unable to pay a 
fine of |5 and costs for drunkenness, 
he was sentenced to serve twenty days 
in the county jail. 

The unusual number of concealed 
weapons found on prisoners recently 
has aroused the judge and hereafter 
he says that heavier sentences will be 
imposed. 

EVELETH FIREMAN 

HURT BY JUMPING. 

Eveleth, Minn.. March 30. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Matt Kumsey, a 
member of the Eveleth fire depart- 
ment, had an ankle badly injured in 
attempting to Jump onto the fire 
wagon when it passed him. 

Kumsey and another member of the 
department were off duty when an 
alarm sounded. As the hook and ladder 
wagon dashed down Pierce street the 
two attempted to leap onto tho rig. 
Kumsey slipped and fell, tho kind 
wheel of the wagon passing over his 
ankle. It was badly sprained and 
some of the smaller bones may have 
been broken. His companion made 
the leap to the wagon in safety. 

The call proved to be for a chimney 
fire and the department was not 
needed. 



Why Suffer? 

Here's Wliat Natural 
Methods Do for You 

You waste so many days thinking it 
over, when the facts are so easily un- 
derstood that Electro Medicine heal* 
quicker than anything else you ever 
heard of. Here's what Mrs. Chas. 
Peterson of your own city has to say 
about these treatments: 

Duluth, Minn. 

Electro Medical Doctors. 

26 West Superior Street. 
I suffered from Chronic Bronchitia 
for live years. I had a continuous dry 
cough. My chest pained me. I was . 
weak and run down. I saw some of the 
best doctors in the city, but they did 
me no good. Electro Medical Treat- 
ment helped me right from the start. 
My cough Is gone. I gained in weight 
and I am perfectly well. Three months 
cured me completely. I would *cheer- 
fully recommend your pleasant treat- 
ments to sufferers from chronic dis- 
eases. Yours respectfully, 

MRS. CHAS. PETERSON'. 
717 North 58th Ave. West. 

Electro Medial 
Doctors 

2« WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 

Consultation Free. 



The injunction P';«';^«^'"«f^,\V'« J^t.'J nl^pa? prop^ftv It will be enlarged and 
instituted by Senator D*"'fL*"a "a,nst addltTonal machinery Installed to In- 
T.„.„o ^^..^tv «nrl Rre directed againsi ^^^^^^ ^^^^ capacity. The street light 



broke his hip. He was en route fron^ 
Edinburg, N. D., to Laurel Mont., with 
a supply of immigrant moveables;. 
When the train stopped hero bo 
thought he would take a little exercise 
and made the misstep that caused hi« 
severe injuries. 




Itasca county and are directed agal 
A. J. Anderson of St. Paul. George A. 
Ralph and others, mostly of St. Pa.\ih 
who were the petitioners for the altc"- 

The ditch as contemplated would 
start from a place west of Bear lake, 
in Itasca county, and run south and 
empty Into the La Prairie river, a short 
distance from Grand Rapids. 

The principal ground on which Sen- 
ator Gunn bases his injunction claim 
Is that It would drain Bear lako to 
the south and thus stop the flo^^^f 
water from that lake through Bear 
river into Little Fork creek to the 
north. _ 

BEMIDJI FIREMEN 

GETTjNGPOINTERS. 

Hibbing, ^^nn.. March 30— (Special 
to The Herald.)— Chief Herbert Doran. 
Jack Hlllaby and John Goodman, 
members of the Bemldjl Are depart- 
ment, were Hibbing visitors Saturday 
inspecting the automobile trucks that 
have been r^cenily installed by the 
local departnXnt. A new fire fighting 
apparatus Is to be purchased by the 
enterprising council of Bemldjl. and 
the committee was appointed to as- 
certain what machines were used by 
other towns. The Bemldjl men were 
much pleased with the department 
here and were shown through all or 
the sUtlons by Chief Mclllhargey. 



LANPHER 

HAT 




EVELETH OFFICER 

PICKS UP MONEY. 

Evel'^th. Minn., March 30.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— Sergeant John Zlder 
of the local p' lice force, has a fat roll 
of bills which he will deliver to any 
one who can identify them. The money 
was in plain siuht on a sidewalk In 
the business part of town but a piece 
of paper was wrapped around the 
outside so that he kicked It several 
times before recojrnlsinfir It as a roll of 
bills. Others had passed the money 
without not icing It. 

TOWER NOTES. 

Tower. Minn.. March 80— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The members of tho 
Warrior club presented to J. R. Oberg 
a watch charm handsomely engraved 
for his services in rehearsing the 
actors In the play, «"The Country Kid," 



mg system would then be extended. 
Improvements at the plant and the 
adding of gas-making machinery 
would necessitate the enlarging of 
the building. 

Regarding the granting of a fran- 
chise to some private corporation to 
put in a gas plant here the mayor 
stated that he did not think such a 
proposition would meet with the ap- 
proval of the council as the policy of 
the admintstratlon is to obtain and re- 
tain control of the public utilities. 

EVELETH HOP^ATE. 

Eveleth. Minn., March 30.— (Special 
to The Herald.) — The Junior class of 
the Eveleth high school has fixed 
April 24 as the date for the annual 
Junior-senior hop. an affair given by 
the third year class to the graduates. 
Plans are already being made and the 
Juniors Intend to make it a memorable 

event. 

• 

To F.xaMine Oil FleldM. 

Chisholm. Minn.. March 30. — Harry 



Grand Raylds Debatorn Win. 

Grand Rapids, Minn., March 30. — 
(Special to The Herald.) — Speaking for 
the affirmative on the question of the 
recall of judges in the debate here 
with the Alexandria high school de- 
bating team the local high school de- 
bating team champions of the Eighth 
district won. This contest was the 
semi-final for the championship of the 
state. The field has narrowed down to 
four teams through elimination, those 
besides Alexandria and Grand Rapids 
still remaining, being Caledonia and 
Montevideo. These last mentioned con- 
tenders will also meet, and the winner 
at that contest will meet the victor of 
the Grand Rapids-Alexandria contest 
here at the University of Minnesota 
next month, when the championship of 
the state will be decided. 



TWO NEW COMPANIES 
ARE I NCOR PORATED. 

Two new corporations filed articles 
today with Charles Calllgan, register 
of deeds. 

Lachlan Macdonald, Grace Macdonald 
and Alexander Macdonald are incor- 
porators of the Gardner-Macdonald 
Agency, (incorporated), a real estate 
and insurance agency which has or- 
ganized to engage in business at Vir- 
ginia. The capital stock of the com- 
pany Is $25,000 divided into 250 shares 
at* $100 each. 

The C. D. Steele company, which will 
engage in a general mercantile busi- 
ness in Duluth has a capital stock of 
$25,000 divided into 1,000 shares at $25 
each. The incorporators are Carroll 
D. Steele, S. T. Brown and J. E. Gard- 
ner, Jr. 

Only One "BROMO QUININE" 

Whenever you feol it ''old comiiic on. think of ilis 
full n»ai«. LAX.\Tn'K BROMO QIIM.m:. Look for 
glpiature of E. W. Grove on Uix. 2jC. 

« 

Charged With Perfury. 

Glen Ullin, X. D.. March 30. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Internal dissensions 
with the German Verein has resulted 
in the arrest of Gustav Falk and two 
other members on the charge of per- 
jury. Early in February the hall of 
the Verein was enjoined and closed for 
a year. The evidence was furnished 
by the three under arrest and it was 
asserted whisky was kept in the placs 
for sale. The other faction caused the 
arrest of the trio. 



The Army et 
G>n8tipation 

U Growing Smeller E' 

CARTER'S LITTI£ 
UVBft PILLS M* 

fwpoBs^Ie — UMjr i 
only glTS relisf— 
they psnoMteadr 
cure C««|tir*r 
tie*. Mil. 
(iott* we 

Sibbaii«iti«, Sick 

SMALL rni, SMALL DOSE. SMAU PUCI 

r Genoine muttbeu Signature 




Second Set of Twins. 

Grand Rapids, Minn., March 30. — 
(Special to The Herald.) — The second 
set of twins have been born to Mr. and 
Mrs. M. A. Sprang, a boy and girl hav- 
ing arrived at their home Saturday. 
The first set was born about three 
years ago. Mr. Strang is county 
auditor and very popular. 

jurorsjohTplea 
of becker gunmen 




Ten Sign Petition for Re- 
prieve in Murder 
Case. 

New York. March 30. — H. Lionel 
Krlngle, of counsel for the four gun- 
men who were found guilty of the 
murder of Herman Rosenthal, the 
gambler, left New York for Albany to- 
day with a petition asking Governor 
Glynn to stay the execution of the 
death sentence, set for April 13, until 
after the second trial of Charles 
Becker, the former police lieutenant, 
whose conviction was set aside by the 
court of appeals. 

The petition Is signed by ten of the 
twelve jurors who convicted the gun- 
men, and contains in addition docu- 
mentary matter and a prayer signed 
by the gunmen, "Dago Frank" Ciroflcl, 
"Leftv Louie" Rosenberg, "Gyp the 
Blood" Horowitz and "Whitey Lewis" 
Seidenshner, in which they request, 
first, that the death sentence may be 
changed to a term of impHsonment, 
and second, that reprieves be granted 
"until after the final determination of 
the indictment" against Becker. 



Neuralgia 

if not attended to, may be- 
come acute and weaken the 
system. Stop it promptly with 
the one remedy sure to soothe 
the nerves and kill the pain — 

SIQAKS 

LINIMENT 

— deadly foe to tootheche, 

sciatica, and rlieHmatism. 

Mr. E. W. Gillespie, of Denmark, 
Tenn.. R.F. D. No. 8. writes: "I had • 
l>een suffering with neuraljria for some 
time. Sloan's Liniment was recom- 
mended to me. and I used some of it, 
and it stopped the painentircly." 

At >li dealers. Price 25c., SOc. & SIJX) 

Dr. Eari S. Sioao, inc, BosloH,lllass. 



rASTHMA C AT AERH 

WHOOPING COUGH SPASMODIC CROUP 
BROMCHmS COUC^ COLDS 



Immigrant Hart. 

Leeds. N. D.. March 30. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Stepping off a freight 
train in the dark on to what he sup- 
posed was solid ground. L. G. Gemmill 
fell eighteen feet from a bridge and 




CSTAILISHCO 1B7» 

A simple, safe a::d effective treatment 
for bronchial troubles, without dosing th» 
stomach wiih drugs. Used with success 
for tiiirty-f our years. 

Theaircarryingtheantiseptlc vapor, in- 
spired with every breath, make; breath- 
ing easy, soothes the sore throat, and 
stops the cough, assuring restful niglua, 
Cresoleae is invaluabi« to mothers ^^■ith 
voung children and a boon to sufferer* 
irom Asthma. 

Send vi foital for 
deicriptivt bookUf. 
'AI.I.DRt*GOIBTS. 
Try Crodolene Anti.septto 
Throat Tablet* for the ir- 
ritated throat. Thpjr are 
simple, effective and anti- 
Bf pUc. Of your dnigclst 
or from us, 10c in ptunps. 

VAPO CRESOLENE CO. 
C2CartludtSt,. N.T. 





> 



^1 




ao 



Monday, 



THE D^LUTH HERALD 



March 30, 1914. 



.%«•«•« SOS rkilltps, Wls»., !IIayor. 

Ifadison, Wis., March 30. — The mayor 
of the city of rhillips, according to 
Attorney General Owen, is guilty of 
official malfeasance for remaining as 
a stocltholder In the water and light 
plant which furnished about $4,000 



worth of water ai d light to the city 
annually. 

That the contrat t between the city 
and public utilitiet company was exe- 
cuted prior to the time the stoclthol- 
der became mayor can make no dif- 
ference. 



Spring Millinery Opening! 

Our Spring Millinery Opening today overcrowded « ur department, 
for the women of Duluth readily aclvnowledged our n fllinery depart- 
ment as accepted authority for all that is new and clever in hats and 
hat trimmings — and the wonderful assortments and lo v prices are the 
reasons why it is so popular from day to day. 





WEST EiSJD 

HERAI^D BRA NCR I f | ' 

Henaan Olaoa, Maaaser, 183S Waat Sap^dr Btrr^i. 



CURLERS BUY 

CLUBHOUSE SITE 



The illustrations here shown are three of the man; 
are displaying at this Spring Opening. There are Tui 
fects in ^ix styles, Bandeaux, Bonnet Bandeaux, b. 
Gainsborough Hats. Thf^se hats a/^ .H^"*^«<* .^y'^jj^ \^ 
mind one of a garden. Our Id, J..0O and $10.00 1 
reproductions of the foreign hats, in which we emph 
materials. Don't fail to see these. Every one core 
visit the department whether you purchase or not. 

For further announcement look for our ad in Thirsday evening* 
Herald. 



/ styles that we 
bans. Sailor ef- 
illor Bandeaux, 
ossoms that re- 
ats are perfect 
y only the best 
ially invited to 





E^>CCL>USIVE SH 



Make this shop your dovn town stop. 

105 and 107 West Superior Stniet 



PIANOS ! 



HIGH-CLASS INSTRUMENTS AT RIDICU- 
LOUSLY LOW PRICES HERE TOMORROW. 

Be sure to see these splendid bargains Easy pay- 
ments, special discount allowed for cash. Included 
in this sale are such well-known makes as Baldwin, 
Ellington, Hamilton, Howard, Monarch, H. P. Nel- 
son and other well-known makes. 

It costs nothing to come in and look — come early. 

Special bargains in L'sed Pianos, such as Kimball, 
Adam Schoff, Waldeman, etc. 

STORE OPEN EVENINGS. 



R. O. FALK PIANO CO. 

26 LAKE AVENUE NORTH. 

P^Look for the Red Awning. 



BEST RUBBER PLATE t 



WORTH $25 




We guarantee this plate to be the best rubber plate that can 
be made. It is constructed of the very best materials by dentists 
who have specialized in this class of work. It carri-*s our personal 
guarantee as to fit and wear for a period of 10 years. 

A WORD TO THE PUBLIC 

Most of you know very little about dentistry outside of your 
own limited experiences and must depend upon the ability and 
honesty of the dentist. It is to your interest theiefore to select 
dentists who have a reputation for ability and honesty, and who 
are financially able to make good their guarantee. 



THESE PRICES PREVAIL EVERY DAY. 

BEST $1.50 
SILVER FILLING 



50 



Heavy $8.00 Gold 

Crown 

Finest $10 Porce- 
lain Crown 



$3.00 
$5.00 



$3.00 
$5.00 



Teeth 

Without Plates 
a Specialty. 



Heavy reinforced $10 
bridge work, per tooth. 

Wonder plate, 
(worth $15) now 

Our Oxygenated Gas is wonder- 
ful in extractions, absolutely pain- 
less and harmless as sleep. 

If you ne<!d Crowns or 
Bridges you will find our 
work unexcelied for beauty, 
finish and wear. 

Every Gold Crown is made 
of heavy 221 gold, heavily 
reinforced t< resist strain 
and wear. Our work is not 
to be surpassi d regardless of 
price, and carries our per- 
sonal guarantee for 10 years. 

Examination and Exact Estimate Fret. 
Instruction as to Proper Care of Teeth Ij Free. 

UNION PAINLESS DEKTISTS 

Franklin Greer A Co., Owners. ^^^^^^^ 

317 WEST SUPERIOR STREET, DULUTH. ' 

Open dally from 8:30 a. m. to 7 p. m.; Sundays from lO a. m. to 1 p. m. 



,— ■^ ■■■■lat 



Members of Western Club 
Now Assured of Per- 
manent Home: 

Througrh action taken by members of 
the Western Curling club last week 
the club is now guaranteed a home for 
the future. Twenty members of the 
club contributed towards purchasing 
the eight lots now being used and the 
deal WHS closed Saturday through W. 
B. Getchell. 

The club has been considering the 
purchase of this property for several 
years. Its lease expires this May, mak- 
ing it necessary to either purchase the 
property or else move. The considera- 
tion paid is said to have been $3,U00. 

The property has a frontage of 200 
feet on Fifty-seventh avenue and 140 
feet on Bristol street. The twenty 
members each put up J150 and the club 
as an organization will be given plenty 
of time to purchase the Interests of 
the various individual members. 

Frank H. Wade, president of the club, 
said that this action would enable the 
club to plan extensive improvements 
to the building within the next year. 
These improvements would include the 
removal of the posts from the skating 
rink so that it can be. used for league 
hockey playing. A clubroom exclus- 
ively for members will also be erected 
in the future on the lot at the back 
end of the rink, which is now not 
■used. 

The members putting up the money 
were: F. H. Wade, T. F. Wieland. W. 
B. Getchell, E. G. Krledler, M. J. Fll- 
iatrault. Dr. E. W. Boerner. A. H. Don- 
ald, E. J. Zauft. Capt. D. E. Sullivan, 
William Sullivan. Dr. W. E. Judson, 
Dr. R. S. Forbes. Dr. C. R. Keyes, L. A. 
Barnes, Charles litis, Melvin Olson, J. 
A. Scott, W. M. Evered, D. C. Wake- 
man and W. H. Kiltin. 



Indorsed by the church body It Is pro- 
posed to hav« tMe merger complete 
before the state conference this fall. 

It la Intlmatfd t^at there are mem- 
bers of both Chiirches who are op- 
posed to the scheme and will fight the 
proposed merger. . The opposition is 
said to be prln«ip»lly among members 
of the Merrltt church. 




FOUR SPEAKERS 



ARE SECURED 



CONFERENCE IS IN 
FAVOR OF MERGER 



The quarterly conference of the 
Merrltt Memorial M. E. church. Forty- 
sixth avenue west and Halifax street, 
at its meeting Saturday night. Indorsed 
the proposed merging of the Merrltt 
and Asbury M. E. church. Following 
a discussion which lasted nearly all 
evening the conference voted unani- 
mously for the union of the churches. 

Before the union can be effected a 
vote of the two congregations will be 
necessary. It Is probable that it will 
be a month before the vote of the en- 
tire membership of both congregationp 
can be taken. 

The proposition advanced is to have 
the Merrltt church moved to a central 
location about half way between the 
two churches and to use it for the 
united congregations. If the action is 



Congressman Clarence B. Miller, Gov- 
ernor Adolph O. Eberhart. State Audi- , 
! tor Samuel G. Iverson and Mayor W. , 

I. Prince will be among the principal 
I speakers who will address members of 
the West Duluth Commercial club at 
the club's annual banquet to be given 
on April 30 at the Dormedy hall, Cen- 
, tral avenue and Ramsey street. An- 
I nouncement of the acceptances of the 
' invitations to speak was made Satur- 
; day evening at the meeting of the gen- 
eral committee. 

I The subjects on which the speakers i 
I will talk have not as yet been an- i 
; nounced. At least three other speak- j 
' era, in addition to these men. have been I 
I invited to speak and it Is expected ' 
to have word of their acceptance with- 
in another week or two. The program 
committee also announced that vocal 
selections would be given by Philip 
i Gordon Brown and J. F. Fesler, 
1 Plans for the big banquet are rapid- 
ly being completed. The supper will 
I be served by the Ladies' Aid Society 
I of the West Duluth Baptist church. 
' The guests are to be seated at 7 
o'clock and It Is expected that the 
speaking program will commence be- 
fore 9 o'clock. Another meeting of 
the committee will be held on April 11. 
^ 

Soloist at Church. 

A special mu- 
sical program was 
given last night 
at the Westmin- 
ster Presbyterian 
church, Fifty - 
eighth avenue 
west and Ramsey 
street. Miss Ger- 
trude Kerr's 
plea.««ing contralto 
voice was heard 
in "Calvary." 
I'hilip Thorsiad 
accompanied her 
on the violin and 
Miss Clara Good- 
hand on the 
piano. 
1H1«M Oertmdc Kerr. 




PETER KINNUNEN 

TAILOR 

118 South Fifty-eighth Ave. West. 

Men's and Toadies' Tailoring, also 
Repairing. Satisfaction guaranteed. 



WILL H OLD D EBATE. 

The literacy test will be the sub- 
ject of a debate by the newly organized 
debating club of the Irving social cen- 
ter tomorrow evening. The debate Is 
one of a eerics of features planned for 
entertainment at the social center 
meetings. Several of these debates 
have been planned for the near future. 

Another feature will be the demon- 
stration of tango dancing. Fred Clark 
and Clifford Little, the West Duluth 
boys who won Empress tango prizes, 
will demonstrate the dance. 





SHOPPING DAYS 
'TIL EASTER 



( IT I^STER SUNDAY is 
[ iL^ ] "just around the cor- 
LH|| "er." It's the day 
^ ^^ B ^ men and young men 
step out in "new 
togs." Many are making 
their selections now — and 
it's a wise plan. You not 
only get the advantage of 
first choice of the new spring 
goods, but jou avoid the 
big Easter week rush. Come 
in tomorrow, pick out your 
suit, allow us time for any 
little needed alterations, and 
we guarantee everything to 
be ready when you want it. 
See especially the three 
great special feature lines 
arranged particularly for 
Easter dressers at — 



$ 



10'20'30 




FOUR PARTIES 

FOR MISS SCHULTE 

, Four parties have been arranged this 
i week in honor of Miss Cecelia Schulte, 
516 South Sixty-fourth avenue west, 
whose wedding to Andrew C. Dunn wlil 
take place shortly after Easter. The 
first will be tomorrow evening when a 
bundle shower will be given in her 
! honor at the home of Mrs. Sigurd Ber- 
gum, 609 South Sixty-fourth avenue 

, On Wednesday evening Miss Edna 
I Ross, 714 North Fifty-sixth avenue, 
' will entertain at .a handkerchief show- 
er. On Thursday evening Miss Etta 
Bujold will entertain at a shower and 
on Saturday evening a party will be 
given by Mrs. E. J. Ketchuw, 7 North 
Fifty-sixth avenue. 

RAILROAD wiLL 

M AINTAI N LIGHTS. 

The Northern Pacific railroad In- 
formed Commissioner Leonidas Mer- 
rltt, head of the utility division, this 
morning that it will maintain eight 
arc lights over its crossings. This 
will mean a reduction of J4^0 in the 
city's annual lighting bill. The lamps 
I are located on the right-of-way at 
; First avenue east. Forty-second ave- 
I nue west. Fifty-fifth avenue west, 
1 Fifty-sixth avenue west, Fifty-sev- 
I enth avenue west. Fifty-eighth avenue 
! west, Fifty-ninth avenue west and 
! Sixty-third avenue west. 

I Mrs. Laughton Dies. 

l! MrF. Margaret Laughtcn, 64 years 
old. died at her home near the power 
station west of Fond du Lac f<illrwlng 
an Illness of several months. She 
leaves a daughter and two sons. The 
sons are John, who made his home 
with his mother, and Willlnm, living 
In the West end. No amnKCiuenls 
have been made for the funeral. 

More Socialist Candidates. 

The Socialist party is to be fully 
represented with candidates for the 
I state legislature and senate on the 
' primary ticket. P. G. Phillips said he 
intends to become a candidate for the 
senate and that James B. Foubister 
and Leo Loukka would run for the leg- 
islature. These men were given the 
Indorsement of the Socialists at a re- 
cent meeting of the West Duluth So- 
cialist club held at Victor's hall. 

West~Duiuth'Briefs. 

Mrs. W. E. Kern. 4809 West Sixth 
street, has returned from a three 
weeks' visit to Rochester, Minn. 

A daughter was born last night to 
Mr. and Mrs. John M. Gram, 6609 Grand 
avenue. 

Miss Inez Anderson, who has been 
.studying in a school at Wahpeton, N. 
D., returned home this morning to 
spend Easter visiting her parents. Mr. 
and Mrs. J. B- Anderson, 328 South 
Fifty-ninth avenue west. 

Mrs. S. J. P. Lackie of Tower Is a 
guest i\t the home of her mother, Mrs 
Willlpftn Paradise. 616 North Fifty- 
sixth avenue west. 

Thomas Eddy of Calumet, Mich., Is a 
guest at the home of his sister, Mrs. 
L C La Mont, 5218 Wadena street. 

Mrs. S. Johnson, 107 North Fifty- 
fourth avenue west, will entertain 
Wednesday afternoon for the Ladles' 
' Aid Society of the Asbury M. E. church. 

The West Duluth Book club will en- 
tertain at a literary program tomor- 
row afternoon at the West Duluth 
public library. Miss Mary Shesgren 
will give a reading. 

Delightful was the word after dinner 
yesterday at the reopening of the Hotel 

Grand. . i j * 

A daughter was born yesterday tc 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Miles, 210 North 

Fiftv-fourth avenue west. 

Watch repairing. Hurst. West Duluth. 

'LefrNo*^Hei7sr 

So far as can be learned, Kallc 
Hemming Schanen, whose death oc- 
curred in this city »n Feb. 25, 1914. 
leaving an estate of $800, is survived 
by no heirs. 

W. W. Crawford, a creditor of the 
estate, today filed a petition for ad- 
ministration. If no heirs can be found, 
all money left after the payment o\. 



Special, "^59.10 

This Grafonola, equipped with the new No. 6 Reproducer and 
tone arm, the VERY LATEST improvement, and the best; includ- 
ing 14 Double Records, 28 Selections — enough of the world's best 
music for an entire evening's entertainment — all 
on easy payments. 

You cannot weigh a Grafonola in terms of dol- 
lars — it must be placed upon the same terms as 
patriotism, love of home, love of kindred; for its 
not the instrument itself that gives it worth, it's the 
atmosphere it creates in the home. 

The songless home is apt to be the weak home; 
it's the home usually where people discuss whether 
life is worth living; it's the home where the boy and 
girl, finding no fund of happiness and amusement, 
seek their pleasures elsewhere — it's too often the 
average home where life is unrelieved by anv ready- 
at-hand enjoyment. The songless home does not 
mould strong characters. 

The coming of the Grafonola into such a home is 
more than the chance acquaintance who can enter- 
tain at times by a song or instrumental selection. 
It is the friend of all the family and can be drawn 
on for many a happy hour. 

Do not fail to come in and let us show you the 
new improved Grafonola — it brings the actual life- 
hkeness of th<e artists to your home. 








18 Third 
Ave. West 



EDMONT 



18 Third 
Ave. West 



I 

1 





I 




"^%^ 



I 



ORIGINAL 
PRODUCERS 

of our 



% 



Pure Milk and Cream 



PASTEURIZED 




Delivered to You in Sealed Bottles. 
Protect the Health of the Family. 

BRIDGEMAN- 
RUSSELL CO. 







'If 

itt' 



debts and claims will eventually revert 
to the state. 

AHENDANGE IS 

CONTEST OBJECT 

A very interesting attendance con- 
test Is taking place between three of 
the largest Presbyterian Sunday 
schools of the city and six of the lesser 
Bi7e and up to date the latter class 
fl T;, the lead The contest has been 
going Sn for'^-flve weeks. The three- 
combine consists of the Sunday schools 
of the First Presbyterian, Second Pres- 
bvterlan and the Endlon and the six- 
Jomblne consists of the Westminster 
Presbyterian, Hazelwood Presbyterian, 
mlhlind Presbyterian, House of Hope, 
?len Avon Presbyterian and the Lake- 
Vide Presbvterian. The banner for 
welkly increase is awarded this week 
t^ the Endion Sunday school for it 
showed an increase of 68 per cent The 
s?ore stands as follows up to and In- 
cluding yesterday: ^^'^'^q, in^^ 
March 19. Total, crease. 
First Presbyterian. 61 5 2,572 .08 
Second Pres 205 9»5 -^^ 

Enriion <* - \\l 40 

Westminster Pres. 242 1.180 .40 

Hazelwood '3 295 .3J 

Highland \\ 365 .*^ 

House of Hope 68 302 .-l 

Olen Avon 243 1.16- •/ 

Lakeside -^^^ ^^^ 

AUTO S TRIKE S CURB. 

An automobile, driven by Sievert 
narum esTsast First street, became 

i^"^?%er^lari:^fe,^^"an^ 

Women May Be Strong 

and enjoy life whether in the home 
or business world if they can keep at 
bay those ailments peculiar to their 
sex. If every woman realized how 
Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Com- 
pound, that simple remedy made from 
roots and herbs, goes to the root of 
the trouble and overcomes such symp- 
toms as backache, headache, nerv- 
ousness and irritability, they would 
be healthier, happier and stronger. If 
vou suffer from any form of female 
Ills why don't you uy it? It will pay 
you to do so. 



just as the machine reached Lake ave- 
nue, It skidded and crashed into the 
curb. No one was injured. 

There were four persons in the car, 
besides Harum, but tTiey all escaped 
uninjured. Several pedestrians, how. 
ever, were spattered with mud. 

The front wheels of the automobile 
were smashed, but otherwise the car 
was not damaged. 



SCANL ON WE DDING. 

Scanlon, Minn., March 30. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Miss Florence Stein of 
Brookston was married here Saturday 
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Anton 
Smith to th^ir son, Edward Smith, at a 



pretty home wedding. Rev. Mr. Watt 
of Carlton officiating. The bride wore 
shadow lace over crepe de chene with 

a veil, and carried bride's roses. The 
couple were attended by Mr. and Mrs. 
Emil Smith, sister-in-law and brother 
of the groom. 

Miss Stein Is a very popular young 
lady here, also In Brookston, where 
her parents reside. 

Mr. Smith is a junior partner of the 
firm of Smith Bros, at Scanlon and also 
is secretary of the Duluth Casualty 
company. 

The only out-of-town guests were 
Mrs. A. D. Heritage of Virginia, Minn., 
a.nd Miss Clara Stein and Henry Stein 
of Brookston. 

The couple left for a short weddinff 
tour and will return here soon. 



I 

« 





Of Course You Will 
Want a New Easter Hat 

and this season's styles are really new novelties in 
shape, color, finish and trimming. 

The JOHN B. STETSON. . .$3.50 to $6.00 
The DRYER $2.00 to $3.00 

Our line of Spring Caps are complete in all the new 
shades and models, from 50c to $2.00. 

KENNEY & ANKER CO. 

409 and 411 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 





■*<■ 



Monday, 



THE DUL^TH HERALD 



March 30, 1914. 



SI 



MARKET HAS 
WEAK TURN 



Wheat Sells Off Under Bear- 
ish Influences— Crop 
Reports Good. 



Flaxseed Declines With 
Heavy Selling and No Sup- 
port From Crushers. 



Dninth Board of Trade, March 30.— 
The market Rrevr weaker at the elwse. 
Maj vtheat eloaed '«e oil, July TsC off, 
iiad •M'pteinber a rent olf. May duruai 
closed "Hte olf and Jaly =>i»e •*• 

off at 3«e, and rye 
at &S#97c for the 



at 



Oati elowed ^tv 
elo w g iy anchanaed 
best jp-nites. 

At Wiaalpec Mmy ••(• eloaed 
b«' 40 bid and July at 37 '-ae bid. 

I'utH on Minneapolis Hay wheat 
eloaed at S»«S»»ri»e, and calls at 8»>s 
. ■ •».'»• I e. 



AMERICAN WHEAT MARKETS, MARCH 30, 1914. 

May— Open. Hlah. Low. Cloae. Mar. 28. T'r ajfo. 

DuUith 91Tia .91% .«1-Ha .•lb .91Ti-»2 .U\'Tk 

Minneapolis ... .90V«-^ .90^ .99% .89%a .90Hb .85T« 

Chicago 93-92% .»8 .92*4 .92^b .9J\i-'«4b .9()V4-«4 

Winnipeg 92Vb .924 .91H .fllHb .92V4-*»b .88%-Vfc 

July— 

Duluth 92'ia .92\-\b .SS-V,* ,»2a .92T4-95 .l8Vi-% 

Minneapolis . . .■ .917* .917, .91 .9\b .92 .87 

Chicago . .88 4-Vi-?>.88Vi .87^ .874-%a .88'Sib .90^-% 

Winnipeg 93T* .93^4 .9S«i .98Vsb .94-V,b .89T4 

DULUTH DURUM MARKET. 

Open. High. Low. Clost". Mar. 28. T'r ago. 

May 90a J9\ .89^ .8!»^a .90 .91^ 

July tlH .91H .91 .90%u .91H 

DULUTH LINSEED MARKET. 

Open. High. Low. Close. Mar. 28. T'r ago. 

May 1.6la l.«0\ 1.59^ 1.69\a l.Sl 1.24Sk 

.Tuly \.62\ 1.62% 1.61H l.«l*i,a l.S2^b 1.164^ 

September .... 1.63»/ia l.eSVia 1.61% 1.61*sn 1.63";«n 

Duluth close: Wheat— On track: Ko. 1 hard. 92c: No 1 northern. 91c; No. 
2 northern, 89c; No. 1 northern to arrive. 91c; Montana No. 3 hard. 90c; Montana 
No. 2 on tra- k. 90c; May, »lc bid; July. 92o asked: September, 87Hc bid. Durum 
—On track: So. 1, 885»c; No. 2, 86Sic; to arrive. No. 1. 88So; No. t. 86%c; May, 
8»»»c asked Julv, 90^c. Linseed — On track, $1.58*i; to arrive. $1.68*i; May, 
81.59\ asked; July, $l.«l*i asked; September. $1.6ia« nominal. Oats — On track, 
S6c; to arrlv*. S6c. Rye — On track. h5<8Slc: to arrive. 55W5Tc. 

Elevator receipts of domestic grain — Wheat. 42.084 bu; last year. 81.468 bu; 
oats. 2.164 b j; last year. 18.394 bu; barley. 15,283 bu; last year, 20.760 bu; flax. 
2,907 bu; las', year, 18,168 bu. 

Shipments of domestic grain — Wheat, 4,000 bu: last year, none: oats, 1.500 
bu: last yea-. 8.187 bu; barley, 487 bu; last year, 17,916 bu; rye. 1,571 bu; laat 
year. 1.632 bu. .... ,, ,«« ^ 

Elevator receipts of bonded grain — Wheat. 3.. 31 bu; last year. 66,639 bu; 
oats. 10 bu; ast vear. 26.T40 bu; flHX. 3.327 bu;; last year. 41.689 bu. 

Shipments of bonded grain— Barley, 92 bu; last year. 2,4 48 bu. 



The whi 
under an 
f luences. 
ttier rains 

territory, 
condition 



at market was weak today 
accumulation of bearish in- 
There were advices of fur- 
from over the wint*^r wheat 
Snow's report placed Its 
at 91.7 ptr cent, indicating a 



as compared 
crop of 528,- 



yieJd of 600.000,000 bu. 
with last year's record 
ULMI, 1)110 bu. 

btjaboard exporters at New York re- 
ported thai resellers abroad were of- 
fering wh<-at at a cent cheaper than 
U could ba bought for in this country. 
Liverpool closed substantially lower on 
tn» cheriper offers of American winter 
wheal, ai.d favorable reports from Kits- 
i^la. Declines in corn at Chicago, Kan- 
-sa.^ Citv and St. Louis were also fac- 
tor* in breaking wheat. The Argentine 
corn crop is ei«tinmied at 348,000.000 
bu, au'l heavy offerings from there are 
now pressing on all the world's mar- 
kets. 

Weakness wa^ also promoted by llb- 
♦ral sfllins of the Alay wh«:ra.t option 
by Armour. Patten and other large op- 
eritor.s at Chicago. Thai unloading 
was regarded as significant. 

The .American visible supply showed 
a moderate decrease of 1.172,000 bu in 
tli<» week, making stocks now stand at 
63.535.ot»0 bu again.st 68,996,000 bu last 
. ear. Corn .stocks increased 526,000 bu, 
and oats increased 873,000 bu iu the 
W eek. 

Primary receipts showed a .small in- 
i rease being reported al 1.02::, 000 bu. 
Marketings at Duluth were, however, 
light, inspections coming to 25 cars 
against 23 last year, while there were 
just 5tJ lar.s of all grains on the tracks 
for tlu> day. There was a good run at 
Minneapolis, receipts there coming to 
54S cars against 542 last year. It is 
expect'd however that the movement 
there will be over wiihin the ne.xt few 
days. 

May wheat opened unchanged at 
917jc and It weaken»<d 'ic during the 
first thre«' hours' trading. July opened 
unchanK»-i at 92t«c. and it also sold 
down "nc. Interest In durum was 
an»all. ih- May option In It selling off 
•4c to 8i>^ic. July open»»d unchanged 
at 31 'hI' and it declined ijc. 

I.lcjuldatlon in Flaxseed. 

Flaxseed broke sharply during the 
ses.sii>n under pressure of liberal sell- i 
ing aiul sniHll interest on the part of 
crusher* The niarket was of? from 
the opening and it.e weakness in- 
creased during the first three hour.s' i 
tradlne. with liquidation more in evi- 
dence. Final prices showed declines of' 
1 ^ic and 2»4C In the day. 

Receipts were in larger proportions 
nt Minneapolis and Winnipeg and 
holders derived no comfort froni cables. 
London closed ^»c off and Buenos 
Aires and Antwerp unchanged. ' 

May flax opened unchanged at $1.61 ' 
and it closed 1'+ off at $1.59»t. July, 
opened unchanged at $1.62'^< and it ^ 
closed l»,c off at 11.61 S- The Sep- 
tember option opened ^-<c down at 
11.63'j. and the close came at $1.61 '|. 
At Wi»tnip»>p. Mav flax closed at $1.40 '* 
bid and July at $1.43>4. 



Soft Minne! >ta is hard to sell. No. i 
1 northern Mue stem sold at from Ic \ 
Ic 3c over I. 'ay, and velvet chaff at 
IHc premiui K Flour reports still dis- 
closed a limited demand. Cash No. 1 
northern wJieat sold there at from 
91»iC to 92 ^,c and No. 2 northern at ] 
from 88»«c tr> 90»gc. 
: • • s I 

Broomhall cabled from Liverpool: ; 

I "Li^ht Ameii<an shipments this week i 
and particu arly to Liverpool, offset ; 
the easier .ables on Saturday, and L 

.opening values were unchanged to '•sd 
lower. Foil >wlng the opening, there 

I was a dispotition for profits and val- ! 
ues declined hi'& htd with pressure In i 

[the distant nonths. American winter, 
crop prospec -s, cheaper offers of Amer- ' 

' lean wlnlerst. together with favorable 
weather reiiorts from Ru3sia, and : 
pressure In com helped the decline. 
It Is expect ;d here that the govern- 
ment report will be bearish. At 1:30 
p. m. the undertone was easy, H®^*d 
lower. 

, "Corn opeied '•id lower and later fur- 
thpr decline.I Hd with the undertone 
easy. Fine vveather in Argentina and 
small inquir ■ for now Plato steamers, 
with freer i)anubian offers helped to 

1 stimulate pr >flt-taking. At 1:30 p. ra. 

' prices were ?»d lower for July." | 

I • • • 

Liverpool weekly stocks of wheat; 
were 2.816.0(t0 bu. Increase 201.000 bu;, 
corn. 1,981.010 bu, decrease ::87.000 bu. ' 

• * • 
I Fort Willi? m and Port Arthur stocks 
at the end o" last week as reported to 
Parker Pain.- were: Wheat, 11,906.604 i 
bu against 11.418.382 bu last week and 
11.512,121 bii last year; oats, 4,934,593 
bu against !, 318, 710 bti last week and 
5.455.552 bu last year; tlax, 2,842.190 bu 
agains>t 2.811 .442 bu last week and 
3.367.495 bii last year; and barley. 
1.513.226 bu against 1.399.037 bu last' 
week and 2.182.263 bu last year. i 

In vessels not included In the abovP: 
Wheat. 4.08:,630 bu against 7,498.290 
bu last year oats. 2.514,311 bu against 
438,511 bu I tst year; tlax. 461.017 bu 
against 1.12(.375 bu last year; and 
barley, 33J.732 bu against 412.581 bu 

1 last year. , 

I * * • I 

1 Clearances reported: Wh^at. 527.000 
bu; Hour. 51,000 bbls; together they 



1,497,908 bu.; Increase, 15.988 bu.; 
bonded 281,848 bu., increase, 35,808 bu.; 
total flax, 1,779,756 bu., Increase. 51.- 
789 bu.; barley, domestic, 496,674 bu.; 
afloat, 274,678 bu.; Increase, 20,703 bu.; 
bonded. 110.367 bu.; decrease, 938 bu.; 
oats, domestic, 1,673,167 bu., Increase, 
824 bu.; total oats, 4,145,869 bu.; In- 
crease. 15.032 bu.; corn,. 388. 186 bu., in- 
crease. 3,112 bu. 



CHICAGO MARKET. 



equal 757, OOt bu; corn. 16,090 bu; oats, 

15,000 bu. 

* • * 

Primary niarkets report the follow- 
ing receipts and shipments today: 

Whertt — R.-ceipts, 1,022,000 bu. last 
year, 9S9.00<> bu; shipments, 402,000. 
last year, 24 7,000 bu. 

Corn — Rec 'ipts, 1,222,000 bu. last 
year, 488,000 bu: sliipments, 556,000 bu, 
iabt year. 391,000 bu. 

Oats — Rec» ipts, 832,000 bu, last year, 
549,000 bu: .hipments. ?20,000 bu. last 
year, 619,000 bu. 

• • • 

grain receipts: Whf^at, 
1 car; flax, 4 cars; 



Wheat Prices Drop on News of 
Abundance of Rain. 

Chicago, March 30. — Plentiful rain 
carried the wheat market today de- 
cidedly lower. Favorable weather re- 
ports from Russia also counted against 
the bulls. Opening prices which were 
he to ^^^'&"9t|C down, were followed by 
additional drop. 

Estimates that the winter crop in 
the United States would exceed 600.- 
000,000 bu and be the largest ever 
raised tended to prevent a rally. The 
close was weak, l^l^c to lVi@l^c 
net lower. 

Corn fell In sympathy with wheat. 
Besides harvest reports from Argentina 
favored the bears. The market opened 
unchanged to >»\'mC lower, and con- 
tinued to dei.line. 

The close was weak at ?»c to ^ic@ 
'»»c net decline. 

Weakness spread to 
outset. Pit speculators 
buyers. 

Provisions suffered from lack of de- 
mand. After opening 'Vkc off to 2 lie up 
the market receded all around. 

^Vheat— No. 2 red. 93>>5'@94c; No. 3 
red, 92'.» (^92».»c; No. 2 hard, 92I3C; No. 
8 hard. 9n2^91*^c; No. 2 northern, 
93^!^ 94>-<jc; No. 8 northern, 92>^4r 
93»^-c; No. 2 spring. 934 4i94ViC; No. 3 
spring. 92'*!(?i 93 4c. 

Corn— No. 2, 68c; No. 2 yellow, 68>-.'C; 
No. 8, 65'»67 4c; No. 8 white, 66^ & 
68c: No. 3 yellow. 65 41^67 4c. 

Oats — No. 2 while. 404c; No. 3 white, 
38»4©39»ic; standard, S94!&«9?i«. 

K«iia« of prices: 

HUh. 



oats from tlie 
were the only 



Whest- 
MW .. 
JlllV . 

torn- 
May . , 

Jaly . 

Osta ■ 
Ma.v .. 
July .. 



ttpru. 

.srt »•»'-» 
.M's '4 



lx»w. 
.B7H 



Clos». 



.«; 



•.o,h 



.68SV 

.8y-fi8Ti 

.40 



.MS 
.«» 

.89H 



.3»S 



.6S4-Sb 

.SP'is 



MINNEAPOLIS MARKET. 



Duluth bonded 
29 <ara; or ts, 
total. 34 car i. 

• 

Cars of wheat 





Caah Sale* Manday. 




No. 


1 l.a'-'l Mheat. 2 car* 


.$ .92»4 


N,. 


1 i>..rtlTTn wliett. 3 raw 


. .n\ 


No 


1 iiiMTlieru wheaf. :< cam 


. .*\\ 


Xj. 


I n<>rili«ai wlteut. ! rart 


. .»i'. 


N«> 


1 iii>rtli»"-ii wliMt. I.'WU bu. to arr)r« 


. .91ti 


No 


1 uiinliffi wheat. 2.'HV) bu. to arrtifo 


. .trj 


Sty 


1 1. >nh«frii wheat. IHO.M bu 


. .»l»i 


>■■>. 


2 K'lnlieni wlteM. 2 cars 


. .«JS 


S4. 


2 ni>r>li«»ii wbe«t. 1 far 


. .•95» 


No. 


• u'.rtlirrii nbeat. 1 lar 


. .V»\ 


.No. 


3 iiortlierii nrliFat. 1 rar 


. .W^ 


N. 


1 .jijriin\. •-• caw . 


. .•I'V* 


No. 


2 n'li'ini. - caw 


. .«r 


N >. 


1 niiW'i .liiruni. 2 can 


. .»7\ 


X,». 


I riax. 1 can 


. 1 M 


Ko 


1 n.i\. 1 car 

MARKET GOSSIP. 


. l.*>»^ 



Receipts of all grains at Duluth la.st 
week fell off sharply to 368.009 bu. 
Shipinent.s, inrludiii;; amounts taken 
out by the mills, at: ^jrepited 161.000 bu. 

• * • 

r. W. .'Nnow's crop report says: 
"I;i.,adly .speaking the crop starts 
with stronij growth, well rotted and a 
moisture supply suffiicenl to carry it 
to maturity with less than normal 
rainfall between now .".nd the harvest. 
T'lere appears reason to anticipate 
cf>ns>l<IerHble compl?»int of Insect lifo 
during th"' sea.aon this year, on ac- 
count of the mild character of the 
winter, but danage from this cause is 
always a minor factor." 

• * • 

World's ehipment.e; Wheat — Ameri- 
can 2,556,000 bu; Russinn. 2,628.000 bu; 
Danubian. 1,288.000 bu; Indian. 96.0"'> 
bu; Areentine, 1,84 1.000 bu; Austral- 
Ian. 2.440,000 bu: Chili and .North 
Afriea. 80,000 bu; total. 10.832,000 bu: 
ag.^inst 11.968,000 bu last w»ek : "nd 
13.520,<iO0 bu Last y^ar. < *orn shipments 
were I,fi24,o00 bu against 4,308.000 tu 

last yoar. 

• a « 

i)n p'>.»sage — Wheat. 48,32P,000 b.i; 
last w.ek. 50,072,000 bu; and la.^^t 
year. r^7. 488.000 bu; decrease, 1. 744. 000 
"bu. < 'orn. 5,508,000 bu; last wee't, 
5.7S8.0.MJ bu; .ind last year, 11,926,000 
bu; decrease, 230,000 bu. 

• • • 

The Minneapolis ca.ih market was a 
little groRKy with the deman 1 cetit- 
ered luostly on the choicest offerings. 



• * 

received: Tear 
Saturday. Ago. 

Duluth 2S 23 

Minneapolis 515 643 

Winnipeg 129 268 

Chicago 17 45 

Kansas City bu ."i- 7«.000 91.000 

St. Louis, bi 118.000 62.000 

• • • 

Cars of liiuteed received: Tear 

Saturday. Ago. 

[Duluth I 10 

Minneapolis 48 42 

'Winnipeg 24 19 

• • * 

Foreign closing cables: Liverpool — 
j Mheat, '4 f» ' jd lower; corn, unchanged. 
I F'aris — Wheit, '^'S'itc lower; flour, 
[ *>t '9 4c lower. Berlin — Wheat, un- 
changed. Budapest — Wheat, 24c 
; higher. Antwerp — Wheat, Sc lower. 

• • • 

The Canndl.an visible supply of 

wheat as oit last Thtirsday, was 20,- 

j 299.000 bu. compared with 24,937,000 bu 

, last vear. TVie oats supply was reported 

1 at 14.080, OWO bu. as against 9.607,00 bu 

a year ago. Wheat stocks decreased 

819,000 bu 1m the week while supplies 

: of oats gained 310.000 bu. 
I « • • 

I Representftivefl of the grain trade at 
1 the North Atlantic seaboard ports are 
I appointing committees to appear at 
Washington to request delay and to 
j work for a'nendments on the grain 
grading measures introduced by Rep- 
resentative I. ever In the hou«<» and by 
Senator McCiimber In the senate. These 
I measures piovide for Inspection and 
I grading at the Initial stages of mar- 
' ketlng In o-der to give growers the 
! advantage of an official grading. The 
Baltimore Cliamber of Commerce. Bos- 
ton Chambe • of Commerce, Philadel- 
phia Commt rcial ejrchange and New 
York Produ( e exchange, all of whose 
i representatives convened here on 
I Thursdajr, v 111 each appoint a com- 
mittee of ftiur. 
! • * • 

Duluth cat inspection: Wheat — No. 1 
j northern, 3; Xo. 2 northern, 3; sample 
grade. 1; no «rade. 1; durum, 10: mixed, 
j 7: total wheit. 25; last year. 23; flax, 
'l: last year. 10; oats, 3, la-^t year, 2: 
I barley, 1, Ijist year, 5; total of all 

I grains, 30, last year. 42; on track, 55. 

I • « • 

j Supplies of grain in Duluth elevators 
at the week ended March 28. 1914, giv- 
ing changes In the week — Wheat. No. 
1 hard. 1.19 i. 328 bu.: ?^o. 1 northern. 
6.135,870 bu. No. 2 northern. 1.849.978 
bu : No. 3 northern. 126.530 bu.; No. 4. 
3.125 bu.: rejected, 13.958 bu.: no grade. 
6.501 bu.: w< stern red, 123 hu.; special 



Wheat Weakens on Heavy Receipts 
and Lower Cables. 

Minneapolis, Minn.. March 30. — 

Heavy receipts from North Dakota and 

Western Minnesota points weakened 

the local wheat market today. Othel 
softening causes inchided lower cables 
and reports which tended to insure a 
hoavj- 1914 crop throughout llie North- 
west and Southwest. 

Wheat— May, 904c to 904c; high, 
90 4c; low, 89»'»c; closed. 80*>,c asked. 
July opened 914c; high, 914c; low, 
91c; dosed, 91c bid. 

Cash— .No. 1 hard. 93 4 6 91 He; choice 
to arrive, 924c: No. 2 northern. 88'^»«j 
90 4c: to arrive. 89=Sfe90»»c; No. 3 
wheat, 864 '^ 874c. 

Flax, $1.55*4 'ffl.58V4. 

Flour was reported In good detpand 
all mills runn'ng at capacity. Prices 
unchanged. Shipments, 54,430 bbl. 
Barley, 43® 67 4c. Kye. 5546564c. 
Bran, unchanged. 



Xew York 

New York, March 
$1.004c; July, 964c. 



c;ralM. 

30._Wheat, 



May, 



I.l«er|M>ol Ciraln. 

Liverpool. March 30. — Wheat— ^not 
quiet; No. 2 red we.«tern winter. 7s> 
3*.d; No. 1 Manitoba. 7s 44d; No. 2, 
7s 3 4d; No. 3. 7s 2\d. Futures easy; 
March. 7s 24d; May, 7s 2'4d: July. 7*. 
2 4d. Corn — Spot stend.v; Atnerlcan 
mixed. 6s Fd: LaPlata. futures eas.v; 
July, 4s 7*:»d. Flour — Winter patents, 
28« 3d. Hop? — In London, (Pacific 
coast), £4 lO.s'ofB 15s. 



Mld««ay HarMe Market. 

MItir.esma 'han^ffr. St. P«iil. .Minn . Marrli S« - 
llantKt Jc /UmuMnnan rrpt>rt : Marltet !.'« ei-en tti 
imic. all better rU«««M nt hitraoa mretinc with fair 
drasaiid. Shlpmeini bHiix n ade to a riunili*r of 
Iiolnts in MliinaRota am) VVUh-.misIh. RerelptH liiclttd- 
pil a good aaa'trtnieul of draft aud gaiieral pun^^Mf 
horsM. 

Itr.ifters, eitrm U'OtSi'V-, 

Iimftem. clicilce 11i>(k 14'. 

I>r»rt*M. rnmmon to good TSf^UO 

Kanu nmres anil honia. rrtrm 1 £.'><■ I lij 

Kami niarm anil liorsc». clioice P.'ifS 12,- 

Karm liorMa. com mm (a guod S^ta 9: 

rielitar}' tiones 80<i I4i.'> 

Itrlvera and aaiMIeni CtiwITO 

Mulr> aixordint tu rilz* TS^IT.' 



Xe»v York 

York. March 



Money. 

80.— Call 



money 



ruling rate, 1%; closing. 



A GOOD HRM TO SHIP 
YOUR GRAIN TO 

ATWOOD-LARSON 
COMPANY, Inc. 

Special attention given to caab 
grains. We give all shlpmenta our 
personal attention. 



Dll.lTH. 



MINNBAPOLia. 



bin. 635.436 bu.; durum, 2.086.463 bu 
winter. 634.099 bu.: bonded, 1,145,977 
bu.: afloat, lurum. 199.000 bu.: spring 
wheat. 785.0it0 bu.: winter whent 487.- 
828 bu.; grand total wheat, 15.305.216 
bu.; domesdc Increase. 13,926 bu.; 
bonded lncr< ase 3,060 bu.; total, year 
ago. 20,550.1:5 bu. 

Coarse srn ins — Rye, 318.687 bu.: fn- 
crea.se, 16.022 bu.; flax, domestic. 



«KN^I^>^l^>^>^l*» ^ »»^>^X»^X»<»#»^^»^>^>^^»^>^H»»# 



— SHIP TO — 



H POEHIER CO. 

(EUablishe.) 1855.) 

. GRAI V COIV1K4ISSIOM 

I MINM<LVP< LIS. DCI.UTH. 



ANDALL, OEE & 
[LIABLE URAIN 

MINNEAPOUS - - DULUTH 





ITCHELL CO. 
ERCHANTS 

- - WINNIPEG 



New 
steady. 1 *i < 
14 « 2. 

Time loans easy; 60 days, S4@2»i; 
90 days. 2*4; six months, 3<58'I. 

Mercantile paper. S41J4. Sterling 
exchange steady: 60 days. $4.84.60: de- 
mand, $4.86.20. Commercial bills, 
$4.83*4. 

Bar sliver, 58c; Mexican dollars, 
454c. 

^;overnment bonds steady; railroad 

bonds easy. 

» 

Shattuck Arizona Copper Company, 
Duluth, Minn. 

Dividend >'o. 8. 

A quarterly dividend of $175.000 00 
being fifty (50c) cents per share on the 
outstanding capital stock of thla com- 
pany, has been declared payable April 
20th, 1914, to stock holders of record 
at the close of business March Slet 
1914. Transfer books will be closeci 
from April 1st to 6lh, 1914. both days 
inclusive. 

NORMAN E. LAMOND, 
Assistant Secretary 
D. H., March 17 to 81. 1914. 

OFFICE OF SUPERIOR & PITTs" 

I BURG COPPER COMPANY— * ^ i a. 

' To the Shareholders: 

i You are hereby notified that the An 
nual Meeting of the stockholders of 
Superior and Pittsburg Copper com- 
panv will be held al the office of the 

I company. Calumet. Mich., Mondav 
April 13, 1914, at 12 o'clock, noon, for 
the purpose of electing directors for 
the ensuing year and for such other 
buslnesa as may come before the meet- 

i Ing. . L . . 

! The transfer books of the company 

I win be closed March «, 1914, and will' 

reopen March 16, 1914. , 

By order of the Board of Directors ' 

GORDON R. CAMPBELL, i 

i Secretary. 

Dated «t Calumet. Mich., March L 
1914. 




Trend Is D(jfwnward in the 

Morning^ But Prices 

RiseLater. 



Western SKdfes Have Ad- 
vance Above Last Week's 
Final Figures. 



New York, March 30. — The uneven 
course of speculation for a time re- 
suited in contrasting movemetits, but 
ultimately the trend of the Important 
issues becHUie detlnitely dtwnward. 
Stocks came chiefly from professional 
traders who favored the short side on 
account of the lack of invc&t:neat de- 
mand, and the steady diminution of 
speculative interest. 

Bears neverihelesa remembered the 
stubborn resistance of tie m irkct on 
last week's declne and moved cHUtious- 
ly. The general market was largely 
influenced by steel, which worked 
lower slowly on comparatively light 
seUiiig. Lionlj were easy. 

today held 
tlnal range, 
undertone, 
light, and 



First prices 
last week's 
was a good 
demand was 



the favorite shares moved 



market 
midday, 
to pro- 
in val- 



close to 

There 

but the 

none of 

more than 

A few 

of the specialties were less stable. 
American Tobacco fell 2 points. Ameri- 
can Car and Studebaker gained about 
a point each. 

Standard shares fluctuated feebly, 
and the diverse course of various spe- 
cialties exercised no Inliuence on the 
general movement. Canadian Pacitle 
and Studebaker '%ere strong. Texas 
Company, St. Loula Southwestern and 
I'nion Bag preferred lost considerable 
ground. 

Covering of shorts gave the 
a steadier appearance after 
but the demand was loo light 
duce any lasting Improvement 
ues. Weakuesb rdf the oil group and 
sluggishness of ttlVeBtiiient shares con- 
tributed In rediic&ig the general buy- 
ing power to rmaiinal proportions. 

Efforts to acfteaerute tlie afternoon 
rally brought oit sto<^k. but these of- 
ferings were absorbed readily and 
prices advanced^; furtHtr as ouiside or- 
ders began t<| come in. H.-iilroad 
shares and actlyo specialties recovered 
fully under the: leadership of Lehigh 
and New Haven, which rose a point. 

The market closed firm. The good 
February showiffJJ tnade by St. Paul 
cauKed an Increased demand for the 
Western shares, which rose beyond 
last week's final fig^ires. Amalgamat- 
ed was conspicifburtly strong despite 
the pause in the domestic demand for 
co>>pers. 

NEW YORK STOCK QUOTATIONS. 

By private wire to Cay & .Sturgis, 
326 West Superior atreet. Members 
of New York Stock Exchange. 



Old Colony Mining Co. 
Cld Dominion ....... 

Osceola 

Pond Creek Coal Co 
Qulncy Mining Co... 
Kay Conaildatod ... 

Santa Fe 

St. Mary's M. Land. 

Shannon 

Shattuck , 

Shoe Machinery 

Shoe Machinery pfd... . 

Superior & Boston 

Superior Copper 

Swift & Co 

Tamarack 

Trinitv 

Tuolumne 

U. S. Smelting common. 

U. 8. Smelting, pfd 

United Fruit 

Utah Apex 

Utah Consolidated 

Utah Copper 

Victoria 

Winona 

Wolverine 

Wyandot 

L'niiated fettoekii — 
Arizona & Michigan... 

Bay Slate Gas 

Begole 

Bohemia 

Boston Ely 

Butte Central 

Butte & London 

Calaveras 

*'hief Consolidated .... 

Cons. Copper Mines Co. 

Corbin Copper 

Cortez . . . .* 

Crown Reserve (ex.-dv) 

Davis Daly 

Dobie 

Dome Extension . . 

Ely Consolidated .. 

First National 

Goldfleld Con. (ex-div.) 

Hollinger 

Houghton 

La Hose (ex-div.) 

Mines Co. of America.. 

Montana 

New Baltic 

North Star 

Ohio Copper 

j Oneco 

) Pearl Lake 

Porcupine Gold 

Preston 

Raven 

Smokey Dev 

South Lake 

Southwestern Miami .. 

Temiskaming 

Tonopah 

Tonopah Belmont 

Tonopah Extension .... 

United Verde Extension 

West End 

Wettlaufer 

Yukon (Ex-div.) 



2% 


49Vk 


77 


17 


69 


2m 


17* 


86^ 


6 





64 


28 >4 


2% 


29*4 


S6 


i% 


«5c 


S9 


47-% 


169 


1% 


10 



1 1-16 
3 1-16 

45c 

60c 



.SToC^^i- 



I Ulg)t. I, Luw. I Ohm. 






Amal. <^opper . . 
Am. Can ..:... 
Am. Smelting \ 
Am. Smelt, pfd. 
Am. Sugar 
Am. Tel. & Tel. 
Anaconda CopJ»<j#'., 

Atcliison \fl . , 

Bait. & Ohio........ 

Bethlehem Sttf«l .... 

B. R. T 

Canadian I'acJCic . . 
Cal. Petroleum ...".. 

do pfd . . 1 

Central Leather .... 
Chcs. & Ohio 

C, M. & St. P 

Chino Copper 

<'orn Prod 

Del. &. Hudson...... 

Erie 

General Electric ... 

Gen. Motors 

<;ranby Con. 

< ;t. North, pfd 

do Ore certificates. 

Harvester 

Illinois Central 

Inter.-Met 

Lehigh Valley 

Mexican Petrol. 'H,.. 
Miami Copper ....... 

Missouri Pacific .... 

Nevada Con 

.New Haven Ry ..... 
New York Central ..^ 
Northern Pacific ... 
Pennsylvania ..:..... 
Pressed Steel Car . . . 

Reading 

liep. Iron & Steel . .. 

Ray Consolidated 

Rock Island pfd 

Southern Pacific .... 

Southern Ry 

Studebaker 

Tenn. Copper 

The Texas Co 

I'nion Pacific 
r. S. Rubber 

IT. S. Steel 

I'. S. Steel pfd. 
I.'tah Copper . . 
Va-Car Chem. . 

Wabash 

Western irnlon 
Westinghouse 



22*)it 

29V« 
69 

!l02--5« 
160 V* 
122 "i 

36', 

96 >4 

90 

41 

92 



' • .^ 1 * ' 



26^ 
65 
85 '4 
53 'i 
99% 
41% 
»V. 
.I149H 
.1 29>4 
.11444 
.; 93 », 

• ! 88 U 
.1126', 
.1 S5»4 
.11041^ 
.|110>4 

• i 14% 
.|144\i 

• 1 66% 
.1 24 

24^4 
16^ 
70 »4 
9014 

114 

11«% 
43Vi 

165^4 
23 7, 

21 \ 
7% 
94% 
26% 
83% 
34 -« 

146% 

169 

61>.4 

109 Ti 
66 
31% 
1% 
68 
T6% 



I 22% 
' 75% 
{ 29 
j 68% 
!102\ 
1100% 
122 
\ 35% 

96% 

89% 

40% 

92 
206% 

26 

65 

34% 
'. 5314 

98% 

<1 

I 8 
1149% 
I 28% 
1144% 
I 93% 

i «:% 

1125% 
I 85% 

1104% 
1110% 
I 14% 
1143 >^4 
I 64% 
I 23% 
I 24% 
I 16% 
I 69% 
I 89% 
ill8 I 
109% 
43% 
1164% 
I 23% 
j 21 '-i 

1 93% 

! 25% 
I 32% 
I 34% 
1145% 
1167% 
I 61% 
t 62% 
1109% 
I 65% 
I 81% 
I 1% 
I «2% 
I 76 



I 22% 
I 76 

1 29% 
1 «8% 

:io2% 
:ioo% 

1122% 
! 35% 
1 96% 
I 90 
i 41 
I 92 
1 206% 
I 26 
I 65 
i 35% 
63% 
99% 
41% 
8 
•149% 
I 29 
1144% 
! 93^ 
87% 
il26',» 
I 85% 
1 104% 
!110% 
1 14% 
1114% 
1 66% 
I 24 
I 24% 
! 16% 
I 70 
I 90% 
{114 
1110% 
! 48% 
1165% 
I 23% 
j 21% 
I 7% 
I 94% 
I 24% 
I 33% 
I 31% 
1146% 
1159 
I 61% 
I 63% 
il09% 
: 65% 
I 31 >i 

I 1% 
I €8 

I 76% 



New York 
11 a. m. ... 
Noon 

1 p. m 

2 p. m 

Total 



sales 



. 42.566 
. 99,492 
.131,285 
.165.000 
.185,600 



BOSTON COPPER STOCKS. 



Furnished by Gay & 
West Superior street: 



Sturgis, 326 



Uated Storka 



Bid. I Asked. 



• ••••• 



Adventure 

Agr. Chem 

do pfd 

Alaska , 

Ahmeek 

Algomah 

Allouez 

Amalgamated 

American Zinc ..... 

Arcadian 

Arizona Commercial 
Butte & Ballaklava . 
Butte & Superior ... 
Calumet & Arizona . 
Calumet A Hecla ... 

Chino C'jpier 

Cliff 

Centennial 

Copper Range 

Daly West 

I'iast Butte 

Franklin 

ij ra nby Cons 

(jreene-Cananea 

Hancock Cons 

HeUley Gold Mining C( 

Helvetia 

Indiana 

Inspiration <Jong ...... 

Island Creek Coal, .... 

Island Creek Coal, pM. 

Isle Royale 

Kerr Lake ,. . 

Lake Copper 

La Salle 

Mass Copper ...i.ii. . 
Mass. Electric Cfr<.4.. 

do pfd .... 
Mass Gas 
Mason Valley 
Mayflower .. 

Miami 

Michigan ... 

Mohawk Mining Co.,. 
Nevada Consolidated 

Xiplssing 

North Butte 
North Lake 



. . »■* i V I 

.iS. J. 

■ . •_» ^. I 

••■■•//•■ 



•i 



1% 

65 
93% 
22% 
286 
1% 

76 

18 
4% 
4% 
3% 

351^ 

68Tr 

412 
43 % 

1 
17 
37% 

2% 
11% 

S% 
S8 



1% 
66% 

94 

22% 
296 

1% 
42 

76% 

18% 

4% 

- **^ 
3 7-16 

36 

6:<% 

416 

•11 li 

2% 
17% 
3I> 

2% 
11^ 

< 



OJibway 



f 



•«••• *^4< 



lie 
1 

1% 
38c 

Ic 
87c 

Ic 

1% 

90c 

2 9-16 

90c 

26c 

1 13-16 

1 3-16 

6c 

6c 

3c 

2% 

1% 
16c 

3 

1% 

2c 
99c 

1% 
36c 
33c 

1 

7c 
10c 

2c 
10c 
26c 

4 

1 
14c 

6% 

7% 

1% 
66c 
88c 

3c 

2% 



IS 

49% 
78 

17% 
69% 
21% 

:: 

37 

6% 
27% 
64% 

28% 
2 6-16 

30 
106% 
36% 

3% 
70c 
89% 
48 
160 

2 
10% 
56% 

1% 

3% 
47c 
80c 

15c 
12c 

1% 

1% 
40c 

6c 
39c 

3c 

1% 

92c 
2 13-16 
1% 
35c 
1% 
1% 
25c 
12c 
10c 
2 7-16 
1 13-16 
17c 
3% 
1% 
3c 
1 1-16 
2 
38o 
36c 

1% 
lie 
15c 

6c 
15c 
75c 

4% 

1% 
17c 

7% 

7% 

2 
60e 
91c 
10c 

2% 



Remarks: C. & C. 30g32. 



CMeajso I.iveMtoek. 

Chicajri. Mai-rli 30 — Hogs-Uei-eiiJU. 34.000; flrra. 
So nbore .^murit&jr's areritxe: iMtik. S8.ti0(a8.7.>: Usht. 
$8.5.".<»8.:.^: mJinl. $8.«.^)',i?:.75; lm»Tj-, $8.30fe7.T3; 
rouRli. )(!.:«)(<> 8. to: pi«i. (7.:<r.<M8.<j3. 

Cattle— Uecflpu. :il,iH>0: mcwtly 10c Iowpf; beeves, 
$6.pje" i'.OO; TeitM *taere. JT.SftwS.Jj; western steers. 
J7.fr9(«8.1"; ; storkers and feftlers, $5..')0(<» 8.W; rowa 
ami heifers. $;;.<ij<<:8 40; calTot, SG.ftOe H.OO. 

Shefp^ -Jtercll»m. 2l!.00«; strftiig; nnllre. $").3."i<* 
6.8j: weilerii. $."..:'{.i(»«.9«; .vearllurs, $C.*-»t<»7.6«; na- 
tive, iMibs, $7.u:i(<i8.40; westenu $7.H5«sg.M. 



London Stoekn. 

London. March 30. — American aecurl- 
ties were quiet and steady throughout 
the day. Canadian Pacific improved a 
fraction, but the rest of the list barely 
moved. The closing was dull. Money 
and discount were easy. 



Sontli St. Paul I.lventoek. 

St. Paul, Minn., March 30. — Cattle 
— Receipts, 2.550; killfcrs. . It'c to 15c 
lower; steer;., ?.5.75(5 R.25; co.vs and 
heifers, $4. 75 '0 7.00, calves, 25c higher, 
H-50r/<8.25; blockers and feed< r^., 
.steady to I'^c lower, $J.75@7.25 Hogs — 
Receipt.-*, 7,4 40; 5c hl.arher; range, 8* 25 
C78.4O; bulk, $3.85 T? 8.10. Sheep — P.e- 
cepts, 3,650; 35c to 40c higher; lambs, 
$5.75ti7.75; wethers, 85.00^6.25; ewes, 
H-OOfe 6.00. 

^ 

Cotton. 

New York. March 30. — Cotton: Fu- 
tures closed .'Steady; March, 13.27; May, 
12.46; .luly, 12.11; August, 11.90; Octo- 
ber. 11.47; December, 11.61. 

Spot steady; middling uplands, 13.75; 
gulf, 14.00. _ 

UPWARD SWING 

IN THE COPPERS 



strength developed in mining stocks 
at Boston today as ttie result of good 
buying attributed to further improve- 
ment in copper metal, and in sympathy 
with an upward swing on Wall street. 
Closing prices were the best of the 
day, showing moderate gains ttirough 
the list. 

Butte & Superior was a feature, 
closing 80 cents up at $35.25. Calumet 
& Arizona closed 75 cents up at 868.50; 
Franklin 60 cents up at 86; Granby 
unchanged at $3, and Amalgamated 
Copper 76 cents up at $76.12. 

In the Duluth curb list, Calumet tt 
Corbin was strong, with sales running 
from 29 to 31 cents. It closed at 31 
cents bid. The buying today was 
largcily from the Twin Cities and the' 
East. Calumet & Sonora sold at 72@73 
cents; Chief at $1.06, and Keating at 
$1.50. 

The American Smelting & Refining 
company reduced its price on lead to- 
day 10 cents from $3.90 to $3.80. 

• • • 

Tonopah Belmont Development com- 
pany has declared an extra dividend 
of one per cent payable May 1. Books 
close April 15 and re-oi>en April 30. 

• • • 

At St. Louis, spelter closed dull at 
$5.16 bid and lead at $3.70^3.75. 

w • * 

Gay & Sturgis received the follow- 
ing morning letter from Xew York on 
the stock market situation: "The news 
of last week was bad enough to break 
any market that was not pretty thor- 
oughly liquidated. In other words, the 
market seems to be in a sold-out con- 
dition, and this brings to mind the old 
saying that there is no bear like a 
sold-out bull, which may perhaps ac- 
count for the pessimistic talk. 

In only a few cases did prices de- 
cline 1 per cent except inactive stock. 
We cannot view the retrenchment as 
practiced by the leading railroads In 
the wholesale laying off of men, and 
be bullish for the near future, but 
when such ne-ws falls to dislodge stock 
or fails to cause liquidation, isn't it a 
pretty good indication that we have 
discounted most of the bad features? 

"Give us a good crop this year and 
the bears will lo.oe what little money 
they have made. On any further de- 
cline from this level, I would cover 
shorU.** 



STOCKS— 



Bid. Asked. 



36% 


1 37% 


1;% 


18 


30 


• • • • • . 


40c 


46c 


3% 


4 


17% 


17% 




4r% 


'86 




18 


i«% 


8% 


3% 


6% 


7 


4% 


4% 


2% 


3 


11 


11% 


61% 


62 


89% 


90 


3% 


3% 


6 


6% 


23% 


24% 


76c 


90c 


43% 


44% 


16% 


16% 


6% 
27^ 


27% 


1% 


1% 


IVtt 


t 



Butte-Alex Scott | 

Calumet & Mont. Cons. 

Calumet & Corbin 

Calumet & Sonora 

Carman 

Cuyuna-Mllle Lacs.... 
Chief Consolidated .... 

Cliff Mining 

Denn-Arizona 

Florence 

Keating 

Rainbow Dev 

Red Warrior 

San Antonio 

Savanna 

Sierra 

Warren 

Warrior Dev 



4.75 
.20 
.31 

V26 

2.26 
.92 
.46 

7.76 
.10 

1.60 



.60 

1.00 

.76 



6.00 
.30 
.33 
.75 
.28 

2.76 
.95 
.60 

'.'16 
1.76 
9.00 I 

.75 
2.00 
1.50 

.70 
6.50 

.90 



THE PRODUCE MARKETS. 



ChlesKO. 

rhlraan. Mareh 3«. — Butier — Kteadr: Twelpu. 8.1'>2 
tiibc ereameric-^. eitrax. 21H<': extra flriils. 23*^(i 
Ur: Brsls. •IXltiic; aecundx. lU^t-Oc- 

I'^SK*— L4>wor : rareir*.'. S!0.770 riueg; at mark. eacM 
liir-luded. 17aI8c; ordinaf]' flniu, irVi<al7^; fli^s. 

t3>Mse— .'^leadT : dtUles, I80: twins, 16*i@lTc: 
Amrrir*a KWiS'l'Wc; iuiig honn, 17<«@17Vbc. 

I>Mat'>fl>i— Steady; reroipts, 72 carg; Uidiisaa, Wn- 
netota and WUcuu^n red, 60(3 65c; do, whlt«. 63 

Psultrr — AllvB, hixlier; sciringa. 18c; fuwis. 18c. 



24Hc: crMncrr held extras, KftSSt^c: flnta. tl» 
r.!i-: pmoeia extraa, tOlgii'/tc^ la<liet, curraiu make 
•rtu. 19c. 

Ctae«Ke— Irrecular; rvcedpta. 284 bozea; at ate. whale 
milk held white eiMclal. 19r: do, colored. ItMe; do, 
white, arerage fancy. 18ii(«'l8%c; do, cfflored. 18',i 
<a.l9c; Wisconsin, whole milk dai>lea. fa^irr, 184@ 
l!)c; do, ivriiu and flaU, fane}'. ISVi^lSc; akiina. 
lH«15o. 

£^0 — Steady; receliHii, 2».2eB canes; freab gatbered 
•ztraa, 22c; fresh eatiiered flrsU. 6t4ira«e packed. 21c; 
freah gathered tints, lO^tsSOi^c; aecuiid«, 1«® 
l»tkc 



not gettincr the 1914 license. The chlsT 
says that some of the Superior auto 
owners are purchasing Minnesota taga 
because they are cheaper, and he in- 
tends to cause a full investigation of 
the matter and prosecute offenders. 



a 



FORBIDS REFUSAL 
OF CREAM SHIPMENTS 



Lid" on Superior. 



U. S. Court Issues Injunc- 
tion in Duluth Firm's 
Case. 

St. Paul, Minn., March 80.— (.Special 
to The Herald.) — An Interlocutory In- 
junction was issued this afternoon in 
United States district court restraining 

the Northern Pacific railway and 
Northern Express companies from re- 
fusing shipments of cream for Duluth, 
Minn., from points more than sixty- 
five miles from Duluth, in accordance 
with the Johnston cream law, and re- 
straining the attorney general of Min- 
nesota from bringing action to compel 
the two companies to refuse such ahip- 
mentp. 

The cream shipped by the above com- 
panies into Duluth is properly Inter- 
state business, passing through Supe- 
rior, Wis., but the Northern Pacific has 
a contract with the state that ship- 
ments between such points shall be 
considered interstate ao far as state 
regulation is concerned. 

The application for an injunction was 
brought by the Bridgeman-Rus«ell 
company of Duluth. The firm was rep- 
resented in court today by Attorney 
Frank Crassweller of Duluth. No op- 
position to the issuance of the Injunc- 
tion was made by Attorney General 
Lyndon A. Smith, the form of the order 
being agreed upon by the attorneys 
before it was presented to the court. 

The constitutionality of the Johnston 
bill as it concerns interstate shipments 
of cream was not attacked by the pro- 
ceedings. 

Circuit Judge Walter I. Smith and 
District Judges Page Morris and C. F. 
Amidon joined In the order. 

defensTrests 

in gran case 



The "lid" on Superior fitted tight 
yesterday. One lift was attempted br 
Charles Allen of the "Black Duck" i>ar 
on Tower avenue, but the leak waa 
Quickly cemented by the appearance of 
Patrolman Greeley, who arrested the 

Sroprietor. He put up $100 bail for 
Is appearance In police court this 
afternoon. The city was said to be the 
"dryest" In many years yesterday. 



Daniel Collins Dies. 

Daniel Collins, former reporter for 
the Superior branch of the News Trib- 
une, died this morning at his home at 
Seventeenth street following an illness 
of two weeks of typhoid fever. He had 
a large acquaintance in the city. Th« 
funeral will be held from the resi- 
dence tomorrow afternoon. 



JURY ACQUITS 

CONF ESSED SLAYER. 

Houghton, Mich.. March 30. — The jurj- 
found Luka Plese not guilty of the 
murder of Deputy Sheriff Pollack late 
Saturday. Plese was charged with 
complicity in the killing and made a 
confession when arrested. This con- 
fession was admitted in evidence with 
the jury instructed to decide whether 
or not It was made under a promise 
of immunity. The jury was out four 
hours. 



SEVERTS ON BOU ND OVE/. 

Baudette, Mlni>., March 30. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Judge Hosehied Sat- 
urday heard the charges preferred 
against Gust Severtson, a bartender 
in Bob McMahon's saloon at Spooner, 
I who was brought back from Thief 
! River Falls on the charge of forging 
i the name of Ole Stenerson to a $66 
check and stealing |20 belonging to 
Stenerson. left In his custody, and held 
the accused to the grand jury. 

Mr. Middleton represented the county 
attorney and George Ericson of Spoon- 
er the defense. 



The defense rested its case this 
morning at the trial of the Gran di- 
vorce action in Judge Cant's division 
of the district court this morning. 
This afternoon John Linklater. a pri- 
vate detective, took the stand for the 
plaintiff in rebuttal. Linklater testi- 
fied that he was one of the five men 
who broke into Jffohn R. Heino's office 
on the day of the raid in which Heino 
and Mrs. Gran were arrested for adul- 
tery. 

At the morning session, the lasf^ wit- 
nesses called on behalf of the defense 
were Miss J. S. Moody, deputy clerk of 
the district court, who testified that 
Gran had filed an alienation of affec- 
tion suit against Heino at 5 o'clock on 
the afternoon of the day that the raid 
\\-as made on Heino's office, and Wal- 
ter Johnson, who testified that- a g.ar- 
nishee summons in the same matter 
had been served on him the same day. 

The ca.se will probably go to the 
Jury Wednesday. 



MERCHANTS DISCUSS 

FRAUDULENT ADVERTISINd 



Fictitious advertising was dlscus.sed 
at a meeting of the directors of the 
Retail Merchants' association at the 
Commercial club this noon, and Secre- 
tary George M. Peterson was requested 
to prepare a paper on the subject and 
submit It to The Herald for publica- 
tion. 

The attack of the retail merchants 
is upon merchants who put fictitious 
values upon goods and advertise "bar- 
gains" by such means. The associa- 
tion has found that in many cases 
where goods are advertised at half or 
less than half cost that the advertised 
price Is a fraud and that the goods 
do not possess the values advertised. 

HUNT WrNSPLACE 

ON S T. PAU L BALLOT 

St. Paul, Minn.. March 30. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — C. J. Hunt today won 
his fight for a place on the St. Paul 
city election ticliet as a councilraanic 
candidate, when the state supreme 
court granted his petition for an order 
directing the common council, as the 
city canvassing board, to correct its 
report on the recent primary election 
so as to show that he. and not J. D. 
Hyland, was nominated. 

The court sustains the petitioner on 
every contention. It orders the can- 
vassing board to reconvene and cor- 
rect its returns so that it shall bo 
shown that Hunt received 15# votes tn 
the second precim^t of the Tenth ward 
and a total of 4,107 votes for the office 
of councilman. 



BURY IR ONWO OD MAN. 

Funeral of George Young Who Died 
Following Operation Held. 

Ironwood, Mich., March 30. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — The funeral of George 
C. Young was held from the home, the 
services being conducted by W. A. 
Cole, reader of the Christian Science 
church. 

Mr. Young was sanitary inspector 
and a resident of Ironwood for nearly 
a quarter of a centi»ry. He sustained 
a severe injury of his left foot several 
years ago, tuberculosis infection de- 
veloped and it became necessary to 
amputate the leg just below the kn'.e. 
This failed to arrest the infection and , 
the progress of the disease was rapid, 
causing his death. He was born in 
Ogden.sburg. N. Y., Dec. 20. 1867. He 
was married to Miss Clare E. Larviey 
at Green Bay, Wis., June 9, 1889, the 
family moving to Ironwood the fol- 
lowing year. He is survived by the 
widow and four children. Earl, Ivy, 
Gladys and Dean, who will have the 
sympathy of the community. When 
Ironwood's new garbage ordinance was 
enacted In 1911. Mayor D. E. Suther- 
land appointed Mr. Young as sanitary 
inspector. Through his untiring efftorts 
he placed the system on a successful 
basis. 

Interment was made in Riverside 
cemetery. 



IRONWOOD CLUB 

EL ECTS O FFICERS. 

Ironwood, Mich., March SO. — (.Special 
to The Herald.) — The Ironwood Com- 
mercial club held a very interesting 
and profitable meeting at the club- 
! rooms on Friday evening. The club 
j Is in a flourishing condition and great 
Interest is shown by the members. The 
following officers were elected: Pres- 
ident. Samuel A. Reid; vice president, 
Robert A. Heideman; secretary. H. E. 
Erickson; treasurer, F. H. Kearney; 
directors. J. C. Thomas, R. A. Douglass, 
Javes Devoy, Oscar E. Olson, Peter 
Lofberg, Oscar J. Nordling. G. N. Ol- 
son, C. E. Erickson, F. J. Sullivan. W. 
H. Nancarrow. 




NORMAL SCHOOL 



WORK RESUMED 



Students of the normal school which 
was totally destroyed by fire Friday 
night will b« taken care of in other 
buildings. The regular courses were 
again begun this afternoon at 2 
o'clock in the auditorium of the Su- 
perior high school. The sessions will 
be held between 2 and 7 o'clock. 

The training department which in- 
cluded the grade pupils will be taken 
care of at the Blaine school. The pupils 
will not be regularly entered in this 
school but courses will be held under 
the direction of the normal training 
department. The continuation depart- 
ment of the Blaine school will be 
moved to the Carpenter school. 

It is expected that a meeting of the 
regents will be held tomorrow when 
action will be taken to haye the school 
rebuilt. The building is a total loss, 
and many doubts are expressed as to 
whether the salvage of brick and stone 
will pay for the removal of the debris. 

Charles E. Bennett, state Insurance 
inspector and fleorge Halbert. engineer 
of the state railroad commission, ar- 
rived in the city today to determine 
the loss to the buildings. 



TOO LATE 
TO CLASSIFY 

One C^vt a Word EUrh lattcrtfea. 
No Adverttseaaent L.^«s Than 15 Cents. 



FOR Ri;,NT — SEVL -ROOM HOUSE. 
f20. Inquire 737 West Second 
street. 

WANTED — BOV ABOUT 16 — P\^RM 
work. Fine chance to learn business. 
New plan, modern methods. Ad- 
dross C 400, Herald. 

FOR KENT — FIVE-ROOM FLAT, 
modvn except heat, $15 per month. 
Inquire Bridgeman &. Russell com- 
pany. 

WANTED TO BUY— l^ARGE ICE BOX. 
Call Douglas 116-L. 

Farm lands at wholesale prices. L. A. 
Larsen Co., 214 Providence building. 




AUTO OWNERS MUST 

BUY 1914 TAGS 



Automobile owners will have to 
"come across" with their license fee for 
this year or pay a fine, according to 
an edict just Issued by Chief of Po- 
lice McKinnon this morning. In the 
future any owners using 1913 tags will 
^be brought Into court and fined for 



MARRIAGE LICENSES. 



Otto H. Krause and I>orothy Berram. 

Frank Oskar Merlsno and Tynne 
Aaltanen of Marquette, Mich. 

Fred Theander and Helen Edstrom. 

John Victor La Vine of St. Paul and 
Marguerite Elizabeth Brown. 

WEDDING PICTURES are a specialty 
with Chrlstensen. 25 W. Superior St. 

SOLID GOLD WEDDING AND EN- 
GAGEMENT RINGS made and mount- 
ed to order at Henrlcksen's. 



MAGNU.SON— Miss Signe Magnuson, 21 
years old, of Floodwood, died Sat- 
urday afternoon at the tuberculosis 
hospital, following an illness of sev- 
eral weeks. The body is being held 
at the Crawford undertaking rooms, 
pending the arrival of relatives. It 
will be taken to Floodwood Wednes- 
day for Interment. 

\W)OD — Charles Wood, «1 years old, 
died Saturday at the county hospital, 

• after an illness of two months. The 
body is being held at the Crawford 
undertaking rooms, awaiting the ar- 
rival of relatives from Keewatin. 
Minn. 



MONUMENTS. 



LARGE.ST STOCK OF HIGH-GRADE 
monuments In the Northwest; call 
and inspect before buying elsewhere. 
P. N. Peterson Granite Co.. 320 E. Sup. 

FUNERAL FLOWERS A SPECIALTY^ 
Duluth Floral Co.. 121 W. Superior St. 



Elgla. 

Htfin, m., Mirrti S«. — Buuer— W*e«k. 24V,ieS5t4c, 



New Yevk. 

New Toi*. M»irK o»— Butter -Steady; rerednis, 
t.816 tub*; crfamea ezuw, 2j(j20Vic; flisU, iZhkig 



Bankers GAY & SXURGIS Brokers 

Bnuieli Ofllect SM West Superior Street. 

MEMBERS OF THB NEW TORK AND BOSTON STOCK KXCHANCiES. 

Direct Private Wlrta t» Boatea, New York. Detroit, PfttsburK, iCfalcas*^ 

HougktoB aad CalaaMt. 

Usted SecHrttlea BMidit aad 80M on Both ExehaMsetk 

SPECIAL ATTENTION TO LOCAL SECURlTIEa 

Botli Plioaos 2S10. 

B. T. eOODBIil., R^aident MiUKagror. 1%'. J. NORTH, Aa«*t. Rea. Maaairer. 



i^riftUb 



V >- 



r^w 



"■W P««»W^*^^P" 





iP 



Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERAin 



March 30, 1914. 



f ' 



1^ 



<s 



1I<^ 



I 



Nominations for Supervisor. Alder- 
men and Mayor Are Made. 

Tronwood, Mich.. March SO.— (Special 
to The Herald.) — The caucus to nom- 
inate candidates for supervisor and al- 
dermen made the following- nomina- 
tions In the eight wards, the nominee 
for supervisor being first and the al- 
dermanic nomination second: „,,,,, 

First ward — William Moore; William 

Jennings. . .^ , «. 

Second ward — Robert A. Douglas; F. 
H. Lesselyoung. ^ , 

Third ward — John DrazKowski; 
Adolph Mut"ller, 

Fourth ward— W. A. Cole; Magnua 
Olson. 

Fifth ward— L. C. Brewer; John H. 
Speare. , ^ , 

Sixth ward — D. E. Sutherland; Jerry 
Harrington. , « o, ^ 

Seventh ward — Samuel R. Slade; 
Thomas J. Stevens. 

Eighth ward— John nrlgg:, William 
Bond, lonif term; WilliRiu Moon, short 
term. 

Mayor dominated. 

The delegates appointed at the sev- 
eral caucuses met at the city hall on 
6aturd:iy afternoon and nominated the 
following: Mayor, Henry Rowe: clerk. 
Jacob Nelson; city treasurer. W. D. 
Snyder; Justice of the peace. J. O. Ous- 
tafson. 



XaHonal Bm^rra' In«)irance Companjr. 

rilncJi«l cfni-©: 332 S. >H. lilgan iiftiue. Clilcago. 
111. (Ortiiilznl 111 15M.) \v |li«m H. ReUm. pr«l- 
iVnt; E. Craham IlhodM. ncretary. Attorney to 
«rtfp< MTvlcc In MinotBota. Toouulsiloner cf tcsur- 
•lice. 

CASH TAWTAL. 1200,000 00. 
INCOME Ih I9I3. 

rremlums ether than perpetual* $ 84.S9T.15 

Reiita aii.l Interest-" 13,115.10 

l^oai all other source* 1,1(3.86 



Mlaaes*«an'« Fatal Fall. 

HanUinson. N. D.. March 30— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.)— Frank Mather of 
PaynesvUle. Minn., veteran of the Civil 
war, died here from the effects 
fall on an icy walk. He was 
Tisiting his daughter when he 
Injured. 



Trtal Inoome % «|.iT5.11 

Uilger »?sti» Dec. :U of prevl u* year. S4S,834.93 
DISBURSEMENTS IN 1113. 

Net amount iiaUl for lo»sos | 12,810.74 

i:xp«OM« of adjustment uf !<>«■»..,..., 1S8.01 

Cnminic^lPns and brolreracf 8,649.29 

Salaiica. f«« and allnwanfes o offlt-era, 

agrnta and eniployea 2.800. OO 

T»j(e». feea, renia. real estate expenM, - 

Are pat ml. m.- 1.821.84 

Dltldends iwd interest 10,000.00 

Grom lo9« nn sale, maturity »r adjust- 

meiit of Ie<lger aMietg 66.00 

All other dlsUirjemeiita 9.841.65 



Total dlsbtirsemcnta t 4.%, 818.53 

E«Utioe 349,081.53 

LEDGER ASSETS DEC. 31. 1913. 

Bfcok talue of bt-ids and siorkj 8 S22.180.:o 

faah In offlce, trun compa lica and 

banlw 22,853.16 

.Ageiit...' hiiln!;rt«. unpaid preni iims and 

bUU r«i-¥hable. taken for pr *niliimi). . 4.0.'7.<'.T 

Total le<!ger a-sseis (as per ) lUii.-eK.J 349.001.53 
NON-LEDGER ASSETS. 

IrUci««t aad tcota due aud attrued $ 4,379.53 



Gi ojs a.sKets 

DEDUCT ASSETS N(>T 
All other aaiets not aOmitled. .. 



8 .^53.371. in 

ADMITTED. 

8 13.570.70 



of a i 
here i 
was 



Tr.f*l aanei* not a<!inlttrd % 13.570.70 

Ti>lal adiuitte<l assets 339.800. 4U 

LIABILITIES DEC. 31, 1913. 

l'rearne<I pr«>nt!luin» 8 18,334. 9'( 

Salaries, eipmses. tase«. UitldMids and 

lntfn»t due 750.0<i 

All other liabilities 82 01 

\ Cspltal Htofk paid iq> 200,000.00 



Aaaerlran FldrMtjr Company. 

Principal i^frtce. .\Ionti<*ller. Vwnions. lOrganlaed 

Id i*<i«. Jxnied W. Jirticli. prwldeiu; HarUr. W. 
K«mp. SHcrttar}. Atscuey tu aaevt i-enicc la Moi- 
Bcet^a: Coumlsaloner of Insurance. 

tA.vH r.APIT.\L, 8:^(12.750.00. 
INCOME IN 1913. 

I*remiuma r«eelw«l lAeii^ 

A«-l<<«it I 97,755 -'i 

llMltU it.hTi.fi 

Llal'illty 54i,r»4.88 

WoiluDen'a ooiuvciiaaiton 2t-6.t)46.:*4 

Fldelitj- 60.32l'iJ 

Surety 122.8-,:2.»5 

BurglaiT and theft JIP.680.1'J 

Auio. etc.. I'rop. damage 41,813.76 

Workmeos toll 4!»3.2e 

Tmud* propenj damaoe 4,946.0< 

Total i.el premium iccome S 1.243,448.85 

Fnim iii;erei>i vntl iei>t» 72,lu7.50 

t'tvm all ultwt (.bucvc* 737.23 



l^tal :.ncome . . 
Ledger aaMis l>cv'. 



Si of pretloua year. 



J. 316,263.57 
3.;:81,i25.5« 



Suiu 

OISBURSEME'«TS 

rialiDs paid i-\«ij — 

Accident 

Health 

JJabilliy 
Workmtc 
ridelit; 
Sureiy . . 
liurglaiy 
Auro. eti 



IN 



...» 
1913. 



a nuipcHMltloD. . 



aiiU theft 

. Prop, damage... 

Workmen* Coll 

Xeaiun proi>eny damige 



Net paid I'oLk-.vhiailors I 

2r.Te»t!gatU'ii aiid mljustmeiit of claim!). 

frmmlsiit !is 

Salaries vi ofttceri. agents emplores, 

exaiiiii;ei>i' aud ltisp«otioa fees 

Dividend^ :o storkliolderi 

Less I n »aJe or maikirliy ut ledger aa- 

a«t« 

All otlicr disbursemcDta 



3,597. 4rj.i3 



43,105.33 

18. 7 69. M 

}'5l. 111.21 

71,242.41 

9,280.16 

80.195.58 

17,675.11 

21.. 107. 43 

498.33 

2.986.00 

1.225.075.72 
257.260.40 
322,66U.70 

108.0.'>3.63 
SO.tOO.OO 

30,467.43 
83.066.15 



Total liabilities, including atltal...! 330.800.40 

•Net furplus 120,650.44 

RISKS AND PREMIUMS. 1913 BUSINESS. 
(a> F'Ire ri»ks wriiieii during he year. 8 4.988. 456. »"« 

Premlunw ivcelTed therenn 42.561. '3 

.Vet aiuoiitit In force at erd of the rear 

IF!.'* and Maiinel 4.126.4.'>6.'>0 

a. — Including business other than Marine and In- 
land. 

BUSINESS IN MINNISOTA IN 1913. 

(Including reiusuraiice rece teil ajiU deducting re- 
li.«iirance plaeed. ) Fire Risks. 

Bisks written $ 70,500.00 

Premiums nyeived fSS.S.') 

Amoitiit at risk 70,500.00 

State of Minnesota. r»epartmr ^f of Insurance. 

I Hereb) t'ertlfy. That tie aruiual statement of 
the N'aUonal Brewers' Insu> i nee company for the 
year ending Def'embcT 31. linS. of whi.li the al.ore 
U an abstract, ha.1 been re< ^Ired and Died In this 
de.rartmeiit aad duly approved by me. 

J. A. O. PREl'S, 
romtuLssioner of Insurance. 



or ntranty fund t IPO. 1. '14 00 

Net surplus 535.124.66 

RISKS AND PREMIUMS. ISIS BUSINESS. 

Fire risks written during th« year t 59,617,640'OO 

Prfmluma received thereon ;<38.3;U>.i3 

Net amount In force at end of the vear.) .Vi. 917, 407. 00 
BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN 1913. 
(Including relnsur^uM reoalieU and deducting re- 
insurance planed.) Fire RUk*. 

ttisks written t 2,362,800 00 

Premliima rrcelTed 11,805.97 

Lrsses paid 8,125.80 

I.«ases ln<rurre»l 8,125. .SO 

Amount at risk 1.894,900,00 

State r,f Minnesota. Pe,-«rtfneiit of Tnaiiran<«. 

I Hereby Certlftr. That the annual statement of 
the tTivderwrltere at American Uoytts for the year 
ending Drrember 31. 191.1. of which the abote 1* an 
abstract. Iia« been recelTcd and (Ued In this de- 
partment and duly approved by me. 

J A. O PRFl'S. 
Commbwloner of Insurance. 



P. E. McCORMACK, 

DISTRICT AGENT 

905 and 906 Alworth Bldg^ 
Duluth, Minn. 

The Fidelity and Ca^aaltT Company. 

Prliicjp;il ofllcc: .New Yorlc. N. Y. KirgHiiJ^eii In 
!»;«. I hctx^rt J. UUI»». prejldnit; Tl.roUoro E. 
t;at.v. secretary. Attornej to accopi <.erTice in Uin- 
ntMjta: <'uniuiis»io;ier of lusiiraiice. 

CA.SH t .xriTAL. Jl.dOO.OCO.oO. 
INCOME IN 1913. 

Preoilum.s received (Net; — 

.Vci UUut I 

Health 

UabiUty 

Wurkmen'a comptnsatJun 

Kldelily 

Surely 

Plate glasa 

Strani bolUr 

Uurlary »iid theft 

Kly wlicel 

Auto, etc.. Pro-.', damage 

xWorWnieirs Coli 

I— l^cess of return premium*, etc. 
oter premiums received. 



ADDITIONAL WANTS 

FROIVI 



AUTOS & M 



FOR RENT— HOUSES. 



FOR RE.VT. 




98 PER CENT OP AUTO BTTTERS 
READ THE DULUTH HERALD. 

The names In which automobile 
licenses were Issued have been checked 
with The l>uluth Herald's subscrlptiun 
lists .and it was found that 98 out of 
eviry 100 people who buy cars read 
The Duluth Herald. 

If you have a car for sale or trade, 
offer it In this automobile column and > ^ 
you will reach practically every one , %, 
who will buy. iS 



rooms, 
rooms, 
rooms, 
rooms, 
rooms, 
rooms, 
rooms. 



1713 Jefferson St 120.00 

2009 W. 7th St 16.00 

1924 Minnesota av 20.00 

3 W. 6th St 26.00 



1419 W. Michigan St. 
1821 W. Michigan St. 
1721 W. 2nd St 



20.00 
16.00 
16.00 



J. D. 

210 



HOWARD 
Providence 



& CO.. 
Bids- 



***^1f****-.^*^¥^!tiY ;.t*iti* ?s**>i^i¥-;»*** 



* 



FOR RENT. 



i^Mf *#5WM«**T^ mc-:iii-i^iiri^ier6fii^i6?(-^6^ 



1,884.094 93 
1.243 786.88 
2.457.744.15 

948.3:>5.&S 

24.3.1120.61 

206.5.(6.37 

453.153.00 

407.-J44.S8 

,'54,Cil.i.09 

101,282.70 ' ^ 

u.Ht«.oe I ^ 

107.38 ^ 






REBUILT AUTOMOBILES. 



Lnzier 16,000 Six, 7-passenger, 
fully equipped; Klaxon horn, top, 
top boot, speedometer, wind shield, 
etc. This would make a good car 
for auto livery purposes. We have 
renewed all the engine bearings 
and the car U in ftrst-class shape. 
For Quick sale, |1.400. 



Total net premium Income 8 8. '•80.460. 87 

kloney burroued IIM.OOO.OO 

Ir'icm toterrst and rents 5U6.:i6v.49 

Pioflt ou sale or malutitjr cf ledger ••- 

•eU 1,236.50 

From all other auutccs ()0,60!:*,0T 



Oldsmoblle "40," 7-passenger. 

# fully equipped, new top. etc. This 

car has fore doors. Is In first-class 

shape and a remarkably good buy 

at 11,000. 



I7atte«i States Casaalty Company. 

Priuclval offlct: New York. N. Y. (OrgauUed In 
ISJ'S. > IrM^on ». UtX, rreldeiit; D. G. Luckett. 



Total income I 

L,eilger as6eis Dec. il of pmious year. 



9.287.666.03 
11,211,156.24 



Total dl»biir«emeijt» , 

Bulai.ce 

LEDGER ASSETS DEC. 

Bot'k TaJue o( Ivndi and stocks . . 
Ca«h In offli-e. trust companies 

baiilis 

Pieoilums in ccurse of collection. 



31. 



.$ 2.056. .''n^'.oa 

1.540,826.10 
1913. 
.8 1,227.077.63 



acd 



56,f':8.04 



aecivtary. Attorney to accep 
Comuiissluoer nf Insurance. 

CASU CAPITAL. 
INCOME IK 
rremluma received *Xet! — 

Accidvi.t . 

Health 

Uability . 

Worluiicu's comiKnsation 

Plate glass 

Steam boiler . 

Burglary ar.d theft 

Sprinkler , 

Flj wheel «f 

.\uto, etc.. Prop, damage.... 
Workmen'* Coll 



Total net premium Incrme 

From Interest aud rents 

PioOi cii sale or maturity of ledger 

sets 

Piom all other sources 



■ervtce In Miuuesota: 



8500,000.00. 
1913. 



400.029 4.1 

22D.4I4.00 

795,l>a6.04 

183.6tf2.78 

16.64 :• 93 

81,71)7.66 

70,031.64 

85.691.25 

722.42 

42,153.58 

8.B52.0* 



1,898.870.75 
118.538.88 



2,404.04 
140.78 



Total Income % 

Ledger assets Dec. 31 of pre\ ous year. 



2.019.760.(13 
2,897. 8l>2.9« 



Total ledger ^isseis 'a.s per balance). | 
NON-LEDGER ASSETS. 
Interest and rent^ due and ai-vTUtd. . . .$ 



Growi asset.s 8 1 . 5.13.0611 83 

DEDUCT ASSETS NOT ADMITTED, 
rrcmluiui 111 course of collection ipa&t 

due) S 30.622.98 

B«(.k ta.je of ledger a^ets over market 

value 76,077.65 

All other aaseu not admitted 84.48 



Sum 

DISBURSEMENTS 
Claims raid i.NetJ — 

Aocideiil . . 

Health 

Liabiliiy 

«riia.>.. ji ; Wnrlimeii's comprik>atlon 

'"*•*-' ■".! Plate KlHSs 

Steam Ixiller 

Burglary and theft 

Sprinkler 

Auto, etc., PiT>p. damage .. 

W(j ikmeii's CoU 



IN 



1913. 



1.540,826.18 j 
12 243.73 



4,817,563,01 



239,638.47 

108.!»fl7.:;3 

445.530.85 

60,0l'6.48 

4,492. 'JO 

a,732.S2 

43.983.40 

10,529.33 

12,956.1-7 

1,420.(<3 



Total assets net silmitted 

Xtotal admitted asst ls 

LIABILITIES. 

Claims- 
Adjusted 

1 1 ptocebs of iiiljastment and re;,ortcd. . 
KrsisteU 



Total 

L'ed'.ic' rvlnsitrance 

Net urpaid clulnis except 

claims . 

special reserve for unpaid 

lo.ses 

I^p«:n.se<< uf inrestlgstlon 

mer.t 

T ::eanM.l preniiimis 

O inmls^loiia a:jd brvkerace. . 

.Ml otiier liabilities 

Capital ilock paid up 



and 



liability 
liability 
adjust- 



106.785.11 
1,446,284.72 

l..";j.r02 
77.66<'.yO 
93.337.63 

172.551. 53 
8,666.04 

163, 885. 91 

222.249.36 

6.365 00 

440.768.34 

67.363.36 

8 1.208. ill 

382.750.00 



Total liaMlitie$. incliuUng capital 1 

Buri'Iu* <'\tr aU liabilities 

BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN 
Premiums Ite.f ivcd. 
Accident $ 6'.>2.01 



Health 

Msl.llity 

Workmen's compensation 

ri.ieilty 

Surety 

Burglari sr.d tiieft 

Automf bilo property damage. 

Workmefi's collective 

Teanii property daicage 

Totals 



288.90 

2S. 818.41 

6.384.69 

4.147. 9<l 

4..>55.22 

191.79 

1.332.03 

1T9.1S 

42.6$ 



1.304.680 4^ 
141.61-4. 2t 
I9f3. 

Ixsses Paid. 

$ 103.04 

114.63 

33.075.70 

U3.00 

83.64 

188.00 
466.55 
45.91 , 
4.50 ' 



Net paid rolicyholders 

Inrestlgation aud adjustment 

C'omniissiuns 

Salaries of offlcers. agents. 
esamliiers' aiul ln:»pectlou 
Phidends to slocktiolders. . 
All tiher disbursements. . . . 



if claims. 

employes, 
lite 



937.258 f.8 
13{'.121.i6 
468.647.26 

S18.227.rv8 

50.012..'.0 

134.78S..'>8 



Total disbursements % 1.948,0'5.46 

Balance 2,969,507. 55 

LEDGER ASSETS OEC. SI. 1913. 



aud 



Pock ralue of real esti'.c 

Mortgage loans 

BiKik value of bonds and sticks. 
Cask In office, uust comp. nies 

bank'4 

Premiums In course of collections.. 
All clber ledger assets 



Total ledger asset.s las per balance).! 
NON-LEDGER ASSETS. 
Interest and reuis due aud u iiunl. .. .} 



4.500.00 
300,000.(0 
2,269.587.37 

131,846-6 

253.15.V.-.6 

10.417.86 

2.969.507.35 

15.215 25 



Sum I 20,198.823.17 

DISBURSEMENTS IN 1913. 

Claims paid (>'et; — 

Accident I 1,001.182.75 

Health 603,792.98 

Uabillty 1.414,137.52 

Wornweu's compeusatlon 875.189.28 

Fidelity 57.657.44 

Surety 78.2.'«7.81 

Plate glass 172.488.20 

Klearo bollor 46.450.18 

Huiglary aud tlieft 182.597.81 

Fly Hheel 90.355.28 

Auto, etc.. Prop, damage 21.327.60 

Workmen's Coll 2,469.74 



I* 

I* 

I* 
I* 

I* 

I* 



Mitchell Model R, 36-H. P„ 
regular equipment, A snap at (660. 



Mitchell Model T. 36-H. P., 
regular equipment except top; an 
excellent car for business pur- 
poses; can be equipped with a 
carrying body for light trucking; 
1360 takes it. 



Come in and look them over. 



* 
* 

\ir 
* 

it 
Vf 

* 



466 Meshba avenue 7 rooms, 

modern i2b . 00 

46:i Mesaba avenue, 8 rooms, 

modern 30 . 00 

R. B. K.NOX & CO., 
No. 1 Exchange Building. 



F. E. MURPHV AUTO CO., 
309-311 East Superior St. 



Net lald policyholder* I 

IiiTebtlgatioii and adjustment of claims. 

Bororwed money repaid 

Conmitelons 

.Salaries of officers, agents, employee, 
eiamlnen' and ln*pe<tlon feee 

Dividends to stockholdeis 

Loss on sale or maturity of ledger as- 
sets 

.\1' other disbursementa 



Total dUbursementa 

Halance r 

LEDGER ASSETS OEC. 31 

Bork value of real estate % 

Book value of bonds and stocks 

Cssh In offlce, trust comr«:ile8 and 

banks 

Premiums In course of collection 

All other ledger aa&eta 

Total ledger aa.sets las per balance)..! 11.639.217.56 
NON-LEDGER ASSETS. 
Interest and rents due and accrued ! 62,834.22 



3.884.885.43 
593,884.38 i 
100,01)0.00 I 

2,245,»26.:4 I 
i 

1 271.207.82 ; 
200,000.00 I 

10.204.46 
5S&.496.&2 

I S. 863.605. 61 
11.635,217,56 
1913. 

I 1,393,803.45 
8,101,590,19 

240.!(64.25 

l,7e0„"ifll.98 

138,617.69 



_ _ -I 



* 

FOR RENT— M.\E- ROOM HOUSE NO. 
431 East Superior street; good loca- 
tion for rooming house or would rent 
to two families. See N. J. Upham 
company, 714 Providence BIdg. 

FOR RENT— FURNISHED HOUSE, SIX 
rooms, from April to October; all con- 
veniences; o Tuple without children 
desired. Call at house, 632 West Third 
street; phones. Grand i'63; Melrose 
318. 

FOR REiNT— AT 311 SEVENTEENTH 
avenue east, six-room modern bouse; 
hot water heat, bath, gas, electric 
light and hardwood floors; rent only 
$J3. Phone Melrose 6428. O. Lafor- 
lune, 316 West Fourth street. 

FOR RENT— A THOROUGHLY MOD- 
ernlzed eight-room house at 1426 
East First street. This place is all 
newly decorated inside and out. Rent 
only $40. May be occupitud May 1. 
John A. Stephenson & Co., 232 West 
First street. 

*iFOR RENT— NI.\E-ROOM HOUSE 
* with hot water heat. No. 1416 East 
'^l^ Third street; $36 per month. N. J. 
•» Upham company, 714 Providence 
■» Bldg. 



PERSONAL 



flirts need answer this ad. 
L. B., Fifth avenue hotel, 



PERSONAL— A MIDDLE-AGED MAN 
of good character and temperate 
from liquor and tobacco, wLshes to 
get a good hotisekeoper for out-of- 
town; Scandinavian preferred; *Dout 
25 to 40. of good character; no Cath- 
olics or 
Address 
Du luth. 

"Our Newlvwed Outfit* consists of fine 
dignified" furniture that any bride 
will be proud of; all the necessaries 
for four rooms at a reasonaole small 
figure. You should not worry about 
the payments; we make the terms i 
easy. Anderson Furniture Co., 
Twenty-first avenue west. The 
Big House with the Little Rent." 



HORSES, VEHICLES, ETC. 



DON'T FORGET 

THE BIG HORSE AUCTION 

AT 

OUR DULUTH STABLES, 

FRIDAY. APRIL 3, AT 10 A. M. 

The olTerings will include draft pair*, 

brood mares and farm horses. 

BE ON HAND. 



the price 
Big rediic- 



PERSONAL — SHOULD THERE BE 
any doubt in your mind as to the 
genuineness of the R. R. Forward 
tompanv's removal sale, it will quick- 
ly be dispelled by seeing 
marks on the furniture, 
tions on ev erything. 

Personal— Ladies! Ask your druggist 
for Chichester Pills, the Dlainond 
Brand, for 25 years known as best, 
safest, always reliable. Take no 
other. Chichester Diamond Brand Pius 
ar e sold by druggists everywhere. 

PERSONAL — THE \V ATERBU RY 
sanitary chemical indoor closet for 
hoiris without sewer connection; 
instilled anywhere; ab.^olutely odor- 
less; cheaper to buy one than to 
build an outhouse. Write and I will 
call W. F. Markus. We.-t Duluth. 



BARRETT & ZIMMERMAN, 

DULUTH, MINN. 

Barn opposite Postoftice. 






HORSES AT AUCTION. 

IB' YOU NEED HORSES, 

WAIT FOR THIS SALE, 

ON FRIDAY, APRIL 3, AT 10 A.M. 

We will hold another big sale at 

our Duluth stables. The ofterings 

will include over 200 head of 

horses. 

BARRETT & ZIMMERMAN, 

DULUTH, MIN.V. 
Stables opposite Postoltice. 



* 
* 

vs- 






FOR SALE. 



SEVERAL CARLOADS OF LOGGING 
HORSES HAVE BEEN CONSIGNED TO 
OUR BIG AUCTION SALE FRIDAY. 
APRIL 3, BY LOC^GERS AND LUMHER 
COMPANIES. OTHER CONSIGNMENTS 
ARE EXPECTED. DONT MISS THIS 
SALE. 



PERSONAL — THE ENTIRE STOCK 
of Cameron-Johnson-Horgan, the 
factory distributers, must be sold 
before opening greater salesrooms, 
(^ome at once, make your selection, 
t'ash or credit. Present salesrooms, 
2110-2112 West Superior street. 



PERSON AI.— HAVE YOUR BANKER 
report on this offer: $160 for three 
shares preferred stock in National 
company, 8 per cent guaranteed. This 
offer is for par.- Costs ordinarily 15 
per share above par. Call Melrose 
2977. 



i SMALL PAYMENT down and 



a 

to 



* 



FOR SALE. 



CHALMERS fi-passenger ... 

HUDSO.V 5-pas6enger 

OLDSMOBILE 6-passenger. 
STEARNS 6-passenger 



Gross assets $ 11.698.051.78 

DEDUCT ASSETS NOT ADMITTED. 

Premiums in course of collection (past 

rtue) I 356,331.5* 

Book value of ledger asMls o»er market 

lalue 248,820.66 

Spe.lal det>o?lt, less tl50,186.e4 la- 
bility tliereon 27,773.69 

All other assets not admitted 49,542.85 



* 
* 



KLEYN AUTO COMPANY, 
627 East Superior St. 



* 



.$300 
. 376 
. 660 
. 660 



TV tal a-sseta not admitted ! 6fi2.4f.S 77 

Total admitted aasef 11,035,683.01 

LIABILITIES. 
Claims — 

In process of adjti^tment and reported. ! 641,2S7 89 

lucurreil but not reported .^4. 072.05 

Re»Uted 133,690.00 

Total » 828.090.94 

neduct reinsurance 7.143.75 

Net tiiipald claim* e«cei.t llabllttj 

claims 821.S56.19 

special reserve for unpaid llabllitT 

tese. 1.506.410.14 

ICkiienses of Invest Igatlon and adjiist- 



Gross s^SPtf 8 2. 084, 72:1.80 

DEDUCT ASSETS NOT ADMITTED. 
Book value of ledger a:isei8 o er market 

value 8 310.427.57 

.'Special ikpoeit. less 818,.t35.t3 liabUlty 



tlierwn 
All other 



assets not admitted 



6,074. r..7 
6,206.82 



ment 

rneanied premiums 

Commissions and brokerage 

Reserve for oontlngen>i«« 

All other liabilities 

Capital stock paid up 

TnUl llaMlttle^ In-ludlng capital ! 

Surplus over all UsliiUtlrs 

BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN 
Premlunw Received. 



37,000 00 

4 632,7.18.60 

381. 758. ."i? 

400.000.00 

275.3,% 15 

1.000,000.00 



Total a»)e(s not admitted ! 

TotHi admitted as.set.s 

LIABILI1IES. 

Claims— 
In process of atUuiitment ana reported.! 
Keelated 



.! 43.662.33 8 34.194.97 



State of Mlnnevta. Department of Insurance. 

I Hereby Certlf.T, Tliat the annual statement of the 
American Kidelity cimpariy for tlie year ending Pe- 
fember 31. 1913. of alilch tlie slwve is an abstract. 
ba.s been received and Sled in this det'srtment and 
duly ar prove.! by me. J. .\. O. PRKCS. 

Ccmmisfiloi.er of Iniiurance. 



ladeasBlty Matual Murine Aitsaranee 
Compuny. 

Principal office I'l tiie luited states; 3 South Wll- 
lUm street, Xew York. .N. Y. HitBlna & Ctx. at- 
tercey;, getier.'"! man.igers !n tlie I'iiiteJ Stales. At- 
toniey to accept bervlce In .MlimeM/ia: CVimmlssloner 
of In^arance 

l>EPOsrr CAPITAL. !200,0t4.00. 
INCOME IN I»I3, 

Premiums it her thai; perpttuals } S20. 395.32 

Bents and intere!>tH 15,050.10 

From all other eourcee 25,960.93 



for unpalo Uabillty 
Investigation ai d adjust- 



TDtal 

Special reierra 

losses 

Expenses of 

ment 

I'neanied premiums 

Cominlifili n» and brokerage 

Sp(«ial reserve funds 

All oilier liabilities 

Capital stock paid up , 



322.708.76 
2,662,014.04 



72.841.00 

22.275.00 

95.116.00 
155.069,00 

10.566.00 
863,896. 25 

6:<.288 89 
226.928 20 

52.324.07 
500,000. uO 



Total llabnitlee, including raplUI. 

Surplus ovei all liabilities 

BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA 



Ac tdent 

Health 

Uabillty 

Workmen's compensation.... 

Plate glass 

Steajn boiUt 

Burglary and theft 

Sl>nnkler 

Automobile property damage 
Workmen's Collective 



.! 1.968.088.41 
.! 693,925. 6o 
IN 1913. 
Premluiis Keceivcd. Losses Paid. 

I 2,124.75 ! 1. 178.98 

1.007.07 210.65 

17,471.18 22,91074 

6.C01.82 2,1(1.77 

327.04 68.56 

1,002.04 5.48 

6J6.79 T7 

725 70 

1,729.28 1., 109.48 
528.62 91.59 



Total lirome ! 361.406.35 

Lfdger as.seis l>ec. 31 of prettuus year. 524,648.80 
DISBURSEMENTS IN 1913. 

Net amoiUit paiil for !■ s;c8 ! 199,578.38 

}'.^per.^es tt ailjustment of losses 3.556.59 

C(mmlsai(ii3 and brokerage 33,44y.l5 

Salaries, fees atid allowances of of- 
ficers, agents ai,d employes 10,204.0i) 

Ta.xM. feee. rents, reai estate experse. 

Are lalMl, He 13.491. S2 

Rfturi.fd to htrce offii-e 84.391.79 

Ail other disbursements 3,327.42 



TotaJa $31,574.07 $26,027.(2 

Slate of Minnesota. I>epartD;ent of Insurance. 

I Hereby Certify That the annual statement of the 
I'nited States Casauliy comj any for the year eiulliifc 
Decemler 31. 1913. of wlUch tlie above Is an ahstia^t, 
lias been received and filed In tlils dei artinent and 
duly approved by me. J A. O. PRKI'R. 

Com nls»lon«r of Insurance. 



Accident 

Health 

Liability 

Woikmen's compensation 

Fidelity 

.«urety 

PLste glass 

Steam boiler 
Burglary and 

Fly wheel 

Autuinoblle pro-erty damage. . 

J— Excess of reinsurance, etc.. 

received over losses paid. 



theft. 



28.7.13.92 

12.592.81 
118.200.60 

13.195.20 

437.85 

1. 000.08 

8.137.29 

13.164.10 
5.211.89 
2.178. ,M 
2.010.80 



9.0,-,3.1fi.'?.65 
1.980.4l!).36 
1913. 

IxMses Fald. 

$ 15. 37". 90 

6.034.8.5 

46. '.04. 92 

1.343. 77 

Si 53. 02 

5.900.78 

2.593.53 

2.327.01 

23.00 




Second-hand motor- 
cycles; 2 good used 
machines at big bar- ! 
gains. We carry ac- i 
cessories and sup- 
plies and repair all 
makes of motorcycles. Motorcycle Re- 
pair Shop, rear 312 West First street. 

FOR SALE — 1913 YALE. SINGLE-BELT 
drive; run about 600 miles; equipped 
with head and tall lights, generator,] 
tandem and full set of tools r guar- i 
anteed In perfect condition. Outfit ; 
cost |2J6 last August. Must sell be- j 
fore April 10. First reasonable otter! 
gets It. Victor Sandwlck, Sandstone, 
Minn. 

Duluth Auto Tire Repair company. We 
carry a complete stock of tires and | 
sundries. Our vulcanizing guaran- 
teed. 313 E. Sup. St. Both phones. 

FOR SALE — BRAND NEW SINGLE 
cylinder motorcycle. $160 cash. Lake 
Hardware company. 



FOR RENT OR FOR SALE— 8-ROt>M 
all modern brick house on Sixth 
avenue east tar line. William C. 
Sargent. I'rovidence building. 

FOR RE.NT— SEVEN-ROOM HOUSE, 
newly decorated in A No. 1 condition. 
Inquire 128*2 West Fourth street, or 
613 West Superior street. 

FOR RE.VT-— EIGHT- ROOM HOUSE 
at 2026 East First street; hot water 
heat. Apply Mrs. Robert P. Dowse, 
2027 East First street. 

FOR RENT— 1609" EAST SUPERIOR 
street; 11 rooms modern; $66 per 
month. Little & Nolte Co., Exchange 
building. 

FOR R ENT— MODERN SIX-ROOM 
house. 1829 London road; will re- 
model to suit tenant; rent $36. In- 
quire 1831 London road. 

FOR RENT— SIX -ROOM, NEW MOD- 
ern house on fifty-foot lot at Hunt- 
er's Park. A. H. Burg & Co., 23 
Fourth avenue west. 

FOR RENT— MAY I, FURNISHED 
hou.se, complete with piano; water 
and light paid. Melrose 1S72. 

When ready to move call McDonald 
Transfer Co., 17 6th ave west. Mel- 
rose 3913, Graid 1963. 



each month sends a piano 

^'ifoWARD-FARWELL & CO., 
Rex Theater Building. 



lUtle 
your 



PERSO.NAL — IF THE S.WING OF 
dollars means anj thing to you. at- 
tend the big removal sale at R. R. 
Forward & Co.'s furniture store. Sec- 
ond avenue east and Superior street. 

PERSONAL — REDUCED FREIGHT 
rates to Seattle, Los Angeles, San 
Francisco and other Western points. 
Duluth Van & Storage company, 1« 
Fourth av enue west. 

Cancer (tumors and lupus) successfully 
treated and removed without knife or 
pain. Dr. Williams, cancer specialist, 
2900 University av. S. E., Minneapolis. 



BARRETT & ZIMMERMAN, 

DULUTH, MIXN. 

STABLES OPPOSITE POSTOP^FICB. 



FOR SALE— TEAM OF NICE MARES, 
weight about 3,000 pounds, 6 years 
old, well matched, guaranteed sound; 
also several other young mart-s, some 
with foal, weigh between 1.300 and. 
,1,400 pounds; part time given if de- 
sired. 608 North Flfty-."!xth avenue 
west. Cole 301; Calumet 280-Lu 

FOR SALE — A LARGE Si::LECTION 
of draft and general purpose horses; 
good farm mares; guamnteed as 
represented; part time given, If de- 
sired. Mike Wlllette, t08 North 
Fifty-sixth avenue west. West Du- 
luth. Cole 301; t:'alumnei 280-L. 



PERSONAL — Get away from washday 
troubles by sending your family 
wash to us; 6^ic per pound. Lutes' 
laundry, 808 E. 2nd St. Both phones. 

PERSONAL — - FRENCH LESSONS 
given by competent Parisian woman; 
60 cents per hour. Address D 344, 
Herald. 



FOR RENT — HOUSE AT 307 
Eleventh avenue west, five rooms; 
$12.60 per month. 

HAVE US MOVE YOU WITH OUR 
large van and experienced men. Du- 
luth Van Co., 13 Fourth avenue west. 

FOR RENT — MODERN FURNISHED 
house; central. E 367, Herald. 

PADDED VANS for moving furniture. 
West Duluth Ac Duluth Transfer Co. 



Personal — The Comfort Beauty Parlors, 
20 W. Sup. St., give treatment for 
falling hair. Beautiful switches made 
from combings. Dr. Bahr, chiropodist. 



TIMBER AND CUT-OVER LANDS 
bought; mortgage loans made; .lohn 
Q. 4.. Crosby, 305 Palladio building. 

I buy standing timber: also cut-over 
lands. Geo. Rupley, 612 Lyceum BIdg. 



374.18 



Totals 



,..$'.;0I. 862.85 $80,324.92 



State of Mlimesota. nepartment of Insurance. 

I Hereby Certify. TItat the annual statement of 
tiie Fidelity and Casualty company for the year er.d- 
Ingv December 31 1913. ef nblch the above la an 
at«tract, has been re<xlved »rA filed In this depart- 
ment and duly approved by me ^ pnr.rs 

Cimnilsslfner of Itisuraiice. 



Bring your watch to Garon Bros, to 
have It repaired right. 217 W. 1st st. j 



STOCKSANDJONDS^ 

WE BUY AND SELL CUYUNA STOCKS 
and lands. 106 Providence building. 



PERSONAL— THE J. O. SHOE REPAIR 
shops. West end; men's shoes half 
soled 60c. Phone Lincoln 633-Y. We 
call .ind deliver; work guaranteed. 

PERSO.N-AL — MARRY RICH. ANY 
age, dime for sealed list. Marriage 
club, sta tion H, Cleveland. Ohio. 

New York Feather Dyer, 13 W. 2nd St. 
Dying, cleaning, repairing; stickups 
made of old feathers. Grand 343-A. 

MASSAGE— MARGARET NELSON, 218 
W. Superior St., room 8. third floor. 
Also appointments at your home. 

FOR RENT — ELEtrTRIC VACUUM 
cleaners. $1 per day. C. Moore, 319 
W. Tst St. Mel. S248. Grand 2Q64-Y. 

Wanted — Reliable n^an or woman to in- 
vest $500; legitimate business. H 3f4, 
Herald. 

Hair, moles, warts removed; corns, bun- 
ions treated. Miss Kelly. 131 W. Sup. 

Personal — Combings and cut hair made 
into beautiful switches. Knauf Sisters. 

BARKER'S REMEDY for cough.s, colds 
& rheumatism guaranteed at Boyce's. 



.M.1X 
service 



Federal Insurance Company. 

IMnclpiU offlce: i^rscy City. .V. J. lOrgaiiljed in 

UOl.) Perv-y Chubb, president 

rrtary. Attorney to accept 

Commissioner of insurance. „„„„„,, 

CASH CArlT.4L. $1.000.0vO 00. 
INCOME IN 1913. 

Premiimis other than i*ipetuals ! 1. "65.246. 2. 

Rents and interests • 

tlrosa profit on sale, maturity cr adjust- 
ment of ledccr assets 

from all other toua«s 



Crund'ier. »ec- 
lu Minnesota: 



1:6.554 28 



1,563.57 
252. 1» 



Total Income » ian-'f.if-l 

Ledger asseU Dec. 31 of prevloas year. 3.30. ,ti>5.il 



Total dlshtirsemtnls $ 368,9S5.25 | 

Balance 519,058.8(> 1 

LEDGER ASSETS DEC. 31. 1813. 



B( ok value of bo:ids and stock" 
Cish tn office, trust c(>mpanle3 

banks 

Agenli' bilttiire!^. 

biila rei-elvable. 
All otlier k-tiger 



and 



unpuld premiums ai>d 
taken for premiums., 
a.iset's 



360.300.00 

70,119.23 

87.064.41 
1,576.26 



Total ledger a.'^^ets (as per balanced .! 519,059 00 
NON-LEDGER ASSETS. 
Interest and rents dtie aiid accrued....! 2,979.17 

Giosa assets ! 822,038 07 

DEDUCT ASSETS NOT ADMITTED. 

Agents' lialaiiics ai]<: tjlUs re<-ei>aMe $ 4.034.84 

Book value of le<lget assets oter market 



Vndcrwrltera at Anserlran Lloyda. 

Principal offlce: Xew York, N. T. (Urgaulwd in 
1S:><). ) Charles J. Xbllmer chairman; Edward K. 
Hiil. secretary. Attoinej t ■ accept service in ilin 
ncsota: Commlf5ioi:er of In, urance. 
INCOME IM 1913. 

Premiums and aiiscssments ! 

Itews ajid iuttresl 

From all otlier sources— suhs'rlbera' de- 

tosits 



243.9C9.07 
95.839.96 

6,000 00 



Total Income . . . 
Ledger a*sels Dte. 



31 of prtiiou* year. 



285.540 03 
940.158.88 



valtie 



J7.200.00 



Total assets not admitted ! 

Tbtal admitted if-scis 

LIABILITIES DEC. 31. 1913. 

I'rraiil los.se^ anil claim!' % 

Unean.ed premi urns 

Salaries, exrienscs. taxes, dividends and 

lutermt due 

DepusU capital 



31.234.84 
400,804.23 

54.069.65 
95,570.88 

12. COO. 00 
200,000.00 




Total liablUtlcs, Including deposit 

"P"»l S 490.804 23 

Net »un-l\is li8 26''ru 

RISKS AND PREMIUMS. 1913 BUSINESS. 

Marine and inlaiid risks written liurini; 

t'ie yt»^ ■ Ji;«,162.u77 0<) 

Preniii.ins received thereon 610,277 93 

Net aiijotuit In force at end of tlie year 

(tin- and Marine! I0n99'>-,,«n 

BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN 1913. 

ilnciudiJig rtlnsaraine receivtd suii de<lucilr,g re- 
insurance plact4l. I klarliie and Inland 

BIska vnltten »74l.4,-,8.o6 

premiiiai'* received 11. 511. 01 

Net bssfs paid 3.«9.13 

Net lo«-,ei incurred l,45r:.4g 

Amount at risk 346,583.00 

State i»f Minnesota. Department of Insurance. 

I Hixeby Certifv, That the annual statement of the 
Indeimilty Mutual .Marine .Assurance Insurance c<.m- 
pauy f <r the yvar ending December »1, liu.t. of wliich 
the above U ari ubetract, haa been received and filed 
ta tills deiMkrUnciit and duly ai proved by me. 

J. A. O Pr.KlS. 
Commi^saiciier of Inaurauce. 



Bum 

DISBURSEMEKTS IN 

Net amoiuit paid for losnes 

CommL<i<ilbii4, brokerage, s.iiarles 

alluna:.ces to agents, b fleers 

emt-loyee 

Taxes, fees', rents and reni estate 

Knses a!i.l ftre patri'l. etc 

T>ivldendg to subecrlbers 

ItHurned to retlrnl subscrititrs 

All other dl-ibiirsunuents 



,...! 
1913. 
....! 
and 
and 

ex- 



1,225,707.91 
113,563.96 



Tot.al disbursements 

Balam-e 

LEDGER ASSETS OEC. 31. 

Book value 1 f b; nds 

Cash lii office and bsnks 

t'opaid piemlums aitd bills receivable. . 

Total ledger a«<*t'< (a.s pe balance" 
NON-LEDGEtl ASSETS. 
Interest and retits, due aj:d icorued . . . . 



92,804.05 

.■i. 657. 31 
.53 762.82 
31,517. 96 

5,557.46 

! 302.863.36 
922,844.55 

1913. 

! 863..520.69 
32.727. 04 
26.587.22 



...I 
1913. 
. ! 



urn oisBUWSEMENTS IN 

Vet amount pai.l for loi=es 

I'ixrcn*"' of adjustment of losses 

roiuniLssions and brokerage ■■■ '• 

Salaries, fee* and alb »ai»ces of of- 
flcers agents and employes 

Taxes, fees, rents, real estate expense. 
Are reirol, etc 

Mividends and Interwt 

Gross loss on sale, maturity or adjust- 
ment of ledger a'sets 

All other disbutsementf 



65IS Lenden read. 8-roem medem house, 
het water heat. bath. gM. ilectria 
lifht. hardwoed floor* $30.00 

4323 Glliiat street. 7-roo« house, bath, 
water, teilet. hardweod floor In kitehen 18.00 

Bostwiek flats. 423 West Third street, 
modem 6-reoin flat, balh, gas, electric 
liftil, hardwood floors, strani heat, hot 
and cold water, janitor service 4000 

221 Seventh avenue east (May I) S-room 
Hat, modern exee,.t heat, hardwood 
floors. fM> electric llfht, gorcelaln 
bath 20.00 

Ashtabula terrace, (-resm modern flat, 
•II convenience* 35.00 

1427'] Wett Superior street, feur reems, 

water, toilet 8.00 

STORES. 

107 Second av»nue ««*' 33.00 

318 Lake avenue south 50.W 

224 Lake avenue south 

HOOPES-KOHAGCN COMPANY 



we'st quarter, the northwest quarter of j petition be heard, and said final ac- 




4.792.611.82 

548.'>44.44 i 

24.218.81 1 
577. 372.91 I 
I 
S. 994. 64 

45.537.76 
lOO.COO 00 

5.986 18 ! 
18,040.10 I 



T..tal dlsbursemenls » Hr»o?c ?! 

Halance 3.4t»2,91b.48 

LEDGER ASSETS DEC. SI, 19" 

Mortg;ige loans * 

Hook value of liomls fc'ul slocks 

Cash In offlce, truat comptmies and 

bsidts ; ; 

\jifiits' balances, unpaid premiums and 

bills receivable, taken for premiums.. 



^0.000.00 I 
2,701,250 50 I 

417.515.09 I 

I 

3!4,150.S« : 



S.4C2 916.48 

33.465 83 
62,813.0.1 



922.844 55 
7.946.34 



Gross ».';.-ets $ P.';O.790.89 

DEDUCfc ASSETS tOl ADMITTED, 

fr.psid prc-raium."! and bllli receivable 

t past due) ! 332.15 

Book value of letlger aasett over mar- 
ket vaiue 34.71 4. «9 

Special deposits 70.405.00 



Tbtal ledger assets us per balance V$ 

NON-LEDGER ASSETS. 
Interest and rents due and accrued..! 
AU other non ledger assets 

^,«« .<u«M % :1.5.-.9.225..U 

^■"^dIoUCT ASSETS NOT ADMITTED. 

AgenU" balaixws and l-iUs it.-.ivable. . . .! 33.269.30 

B.ok value of ledger assets over markd 



value 



168.435.59 



TVtsl 
Total 



31. 



ISIS. 

...! 



201. 701. H9 
3.357.520.13 



dlvid<nds ai-.d 



450.428 06 
Oll.lW.CIt 

109.000.00 
KS 892.81 I 



Total assets not admitted ! 

Total admitted ast^et.* 

LIABILITIES. 

Ii< ves adjusted and uitad u.-ted ! 

Usscs ret>isied and dbpuieil 

Total 

lieducf reinsurance 

Net unpaiil !'»isc- and claiii s 

Cr^eanifd premliiir<t 

^^aUrlee. eipenses, taxes. d1 'Ideuda and 

liitereix due 

Ir<ierwr1tei4' deposit* 

XotAl liabillllea. Inriudtit» pcrmaiic&t 



105.512.14 I 

825.278.75 I 

5.457.00 
2,500.00 



as=et« not admitted . . . 

admittcii assets 

LIABILITIES DEC 

l"n;ald lo<wcs and clalnie 

rneani«l premi 1 una 

Salaries, expenses, taxes 
Interest due ......... 

Conlfigeiit commissions 1 oon Ooo flo 

Capital stock paid up 1.000,000. 00 

Total liabilities. Ineludlnc capital 

Net sup.vius .J^J^.-.M- 

RISKS AND PREMIUMS. 
Marine and inland rt ks 

Ing the year 

rrciniums r.-. elve.1 thereon . .^ . . , . ■■■■ 

Net amount In f-rce at .nd of the^ vear 

BUSINESS IN ' 



..! 2.222.4I.6 10 
1 1.(5 054.33 
1913 BUSINESS. 

writte'i dur- 

!1.4.-.2. 248.715 00 

3.7.-.7..''.21 :>4 

114. 103.316. 00 
MINNESOTA IN 1913. 



T. 957. 00 

2.4UO.OU 

5,557.00 

171.597.09 I 

8.000.00 ! 
108,b00.00 I 



and (lidiictlng re- 
Marine and Inland. 

.8 3.3.".0.02fi.oo 

29.329.00 

14.621.00 

14.713.60 

724,308.00 



tln<nidlng rcliisuranoe rv^eived 
lusursnce placed.) 

Ki-ks written 

Premiums received 

Net losses paid 

Net los-ses Incurred 

Amount at riak • • 

state of MinnCR'ta. Pe artmetit of Insurance. 
" I HereJiy Certify, r^a-t li.e auiiual statenwv.t of the 
Federal Insurance 'oiniMtny for tite year eiKung De- 
cember 31 1913 f' *•''<■'• "" *^'" *■ ■" »'*"••- 
h»» been re<-el«e«1 and filed in this d«5>srlment ai.d 
duly approved by me. 



MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE— 

Default having been made In the 
oflvment of four hundred and ninety- 
seven dollars, which is claimed to be 
due and Is due. at the date of this 
notice and the further sum of four 
hundred and forty-three and 76-100 
dollars declared to be due upon a cer- 
tain mortgage duly executed and de- 
livered by Elmon D. Harding and 
Minnie Harding, his wife, and Henry 
W Schultz and Bertha Schultz, his 
wife Mortgagors, bearing date the tat 
day of January. l^U, and with a 
oower of sale therein contained, duly 
Recorded in the office of the Register 
of Deeds In and for the County of St. 
Louis and State of Minnesota, on the 
ifth day of June, li»12, at 11:15-60 
o'clock A M., In Book 266 of Mortgages, 
on oage 604; and whert-as said mort- 
eaire contains a clause whereby It is 
orovided that If default be made by 

I the said mortgagors In any of the 
provisions In said mortgage. It shall 
be lawful for said mortgagee to de- 
clare the whole sum secured by said 

I mortgage to be due, and the sum of 
1440 00 and Interest has been due and 

I not paid for some time, and there is 
another note for $440.00 and Interest 
mattering on Jan. 2nd, 1916. and the 

C^d mortgagee has elected a.,d hereby 

'■ doe.s elect to declare the whole sum 

' secured by said mortgage due, and no 
action or proceeding having been In- 

I iitltuted at law or otherwise, to recover 
the debt secured by said mortgage or 
anv part thereof; ...... 

Now. therefore, notice Is hereby 
Klven That by virtue of the power of 
sale contalnfd in said mortgage, and 
pursuant to the statute in such case 
made and provided, the said mortgage 
will be foreclosed by a sale of the 
premises described In and conveyed by 
said mortgage, viz.: 

The southwest quarter of the north- 



the southwest quarter, and lots two 
and seven, in Section seventeen (IT),, 
in Township sixty-four (64) of Range i 
twelve (12), in St. Louis County and; 
I State of Minnesota, with the heredita- j 
I ments anU appurtenances, which sale 
i will be made by the Sheriff of said St. 
I Louis County, at the front door of the 
i Court House, in the City of Duluth, tn 
! said County and State, on the 27th d.'\y 
I of April, 1914. at 10 o'clock A. M. of 
t that day, at public vendue, to the high- 
i est bidder for cash, to pay the said 
I debt of nine hundred and forty and 
1 76-100 dollars, and Interest, and the 
] taxes. If any, on said premises, and 
twenty-five dollars, Attorneys fees, as 
stipulated in and by said mortgage in 
t case of foreclosure, and the disburse- 
ments allowed by law: subject to re- 
demption at any time within one year 
from the day of sale, as provided oy 

Dated Feb. 2Srd, 1914. 

LOUIS J. UERMAN.^ON, 

Mortgagee. 
J. O. HAUGLAXD. 

Attorney for Mortgagee, 
Montevideo, Minn. 
D. H, Mar. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, April 6, 1914. 

ORDER IJMITING TIME TO FILE 

CLAIMS AND FOR HEARLN'G 

THEREON— 

State of Minnesota, 

County of St. Louis — ss. 
In Probate Court. In the Matter of the 

Estate of Charlotte Hector, Decedent. 

Letters of administration thi.s day 
having been granted to Pearl L. Hec- 
tor, it Is ordered, that the time within 
which all creditors of the above named 
decedent may present claims against 
her estate in this court be, and the 
same hereby is, limited to three months 
from and after the date hereof; and 
that the 16th day of June, 1914, at ten 
o'clock A. M., in the Probate Court 
Rooms at the Court House at Duluth, 
In said County, be, and the same hereby 
iff. fixed and appointed as the time and 
place for hearing upt>n the examina- 
tion, adjustment and allowance of such 
claims as shall be presented within 
the time aforesaid. Let notice hereof 
be given by the publication of this or- 
der In The Duluth Herald, as provided 
by law. 

Dated Duluth, Minn., March 12th, 1914. 
S. VV. <;iLriN. Judge of I'robate. 
Seal, Probate Court. St. Louis Co., Minn. 
D. H., March 16, 23, 30, 1914. 

ORDER TO E.XAMINE FLNAL AC- 
COUNT— 

State of Mlnne.eota, 

County of St. Louis — ss. 
In Probate Court. In the Matter of the 
Estate of John B. Dunphy. Decedent. 
The petition of Harry Brown and 



count examined, adjusted and. If cor 
rect, allowed by the Court, at the 
Probate Court Rooms In the Court 
House, in the City of Duluth, In said 
County, on Monday, the 20th day of 
April, 1914, at ten o'clock A. M., and 
all persons interested In said hearing 
and in said matter are hereby cited and 
required, at said time and place, to 
show cause, if any there be, why said 
petition should not be granted. Ord»?red 
further, that this order be served by 
publication in The Duluth Herald, ac- 
cording to law, and by mailing a copy 
of this order to each heir and lntere.«:ted 
party at least fourteen days before the 
said date of hearing. 

Dated at Duluth, Minn., March 30th. 
1914. 
By the Court, 

S. W. GILPIN, Judge of Probate. 
Attest: A. R. MORTON, 

Clerk of Probate. 
Seal. Probate Court, St. Louis Co., Minn. 
D. H., March SO, April 6, 13, 1914. 



FOR S.\LE— DRAFr, GENERAL PUR- 
pose and driving horses. W c have a 
select bunch to choose from and 
guarantee them to be just as repre- 
sented in every respect. AVt-stern 
Sales Stables, 26 -28 East First street. 

HORSES — GOOD— HOR.SES. 
Large selection to choose fiom; buy 
from a reliable firm; fair treatment. 
Zenith Sale & Boarding Stable, J24 
West First street. 

FOR SALE — ONE PAIR OF YOUNti^ 
horses weighing 2.600: also wagon 
and harness; one middle-aged mare 
weighing 1.300; will sell her for $135. 
S. M. Kaner, 1217 East Seventh street. 

FOR SALE — CHEAP, HEAVY HORSE 
and young colt: light and heavy wa- 
gon and rubber-tired buggy, and 
harness. Grand 1778-D, 327 East Su- 
perior street. 

FUR SALE — 6-Y!:AR-0LD BAY 
horse, weight 1,700 pounds; also one 
pair well-matched horses, weight 
2,600 pounds; one more. 1.300 pounds. 
S. M. Kaner, 1217 East Seventh street. 

FOR .SALE— DRAFT AND EXPRESS- 
chunks, farm m.ires, at our new barn, 
near depot. Carlton Horse Market, 
Carlton, Minn. 

FOR SALE — YOUNG HORSE; A-1 
condition; weight 900 poundf; iiar- 
ness, sleigh, !75. Address B 375, Her- 
ald. 

FOR SALE— SMALL HORSE AND 
r.ibber tired buggy; good driver; will 
sell at very reasonable price. Ad- 
dress H 331, Herald. 

~HOR.SE:S—t;UARA.VTEED— HORSES. 

All classes of fresh country horses, 
free from exposure to the diseases 
of city markets. Twin Ports Horse 
Market, 18 First avenue west. 

FOR SALE— MARE 8 YEARS OLD, 
weighs 1,160. with buggy, cutter two 
harnesses; saddle; an excellent fam- 
ily horse. 22 Sixth avenue {a.^t. 

FOR SALE — HEAVY DRAFT AND 
gen.'ral purpose horses; also second- 
hand harness. See Dulutli Ice com- 
pany. No. 4 East First street. 

FOR SALE— 7-YEAR-OLD BAY MARE, 
weight 1,300 pounds. A. O. Giese, 
103 West First street 

FOR SALE— GOofTHORSE, 8 YEARS 
old; weight. 1,100; good worker, 
double or single. Lincoln 118-Y. 

FOR RENT — bXrN. TWO STALLS. 
$5 per month. Call 427 East Fourth 
street. Grand n83-D. 

FOR SALE — !160 WILL BUY «;RAY 
horse: weight 1,650 pounds. Pabst 
Brewing company. 



Sale of School and 
Otlier State Lands 



FOR SALE— TEAM FARM MARES; 
one team gelding, at Gibbons Livery, 
302 .North Fifty-fou rth avenue m'est, 

FOR SALE CHEAP— NICE SI N'! I.E. 
phHeton and harness. Inquire Board 
of Trade livery. 



RENT— STORES, OFFICES. 



FOR RENT. 



319 West First street, 12 by 45.. $45.00 
1320 West Superior street, with 

rooms 140.00 



J. D. HOWARD & CO.. 
210 Providence building. 



State of 
Office. 



Minnesota, State Auditor's 



.1 A. 



Co 



o PKrif!. 
of laaurauoe. 



TME IHIEOALO IS 



, Patrick J. O'Connor, as representatives i ,v,-^'L mineral rights are 

i of the above named decedent, together 

I with their final account of the admin- 
istration of said estate, having been 

I filed In this court, representing, 

I among other things, that they have 

' fully administered said estate, and 

I praying that .said final account of .said 
administration be examined, adjusted 
and allowed by the Court, and that the 

I Court make and enter Its final decree 

I of distribution of the residue of the 

j estate of said decedent to the persons 

■ entitled thereto, and for the discharge 
of the representative and the sureties 

ion th«ir bond. It la ordered, that said 



St. Paul, March 2, 1914. 
Notice Is hereby given that on 
April 15, 1914. at 10 o'clock A. M,. in 
i th? office of the County Auditor at Du- 
i luth. St. Louis County, In the state of 
I Minnesota, I will offer for sale cer- 
j tain unsold state lands and also those 
I state '.ands whion have reverted to the 
: state by reason of the non-payment 
i of Interest. 

j Terms: Fifteen jer cent of the pur- 
: ch ise price and interest on the unpaid 
j balance from date of sale to June 1st, 
] 1915, must be paid tt the time of sale. 
i The balance of purchase money Is pay- 
i able in whole or In part on or before 
I forty years from date of .«ale; the rate 
of Interest on the unpaid balance is 
four per cent per annum, payable in 
advince on Ji ne Itt of each year; pro- 
vided, the piiT.cipal ren-alns unpaid 
for ten years; but If the principal is 
paid within ten years from date of 
sale, the rate of interest will be com- 
puted at five per cent per annum. 

Apprised value of timber, if any, 
must also be paid at the time of sale. 
Lands on which the Interest Is de- 
liniient may be redeemed at any time 
up to the hcur of rale, or before resale 
to an actual purchaser. 

reserved by 
s cf the ttate. 
Not more tl.ai^ 320 acres can be sold 
or contracted to be sold to any one 
ptircha,<cr. 

Agents acting for purchasers must 
furnish affidaxlt of authority. Apprais- 
ers' reports, showing quality and kind 
of soil, are on file in this office. 

Lists of lands to be offered may be 
obtained of the State Auditor or the 
State Commi.s.Moner of Immigrrttion at 
St. Paul, and of the County Auditor at 
abovo address. 

SAMUEL a IVERSON, 

Stite Auditor, 
D. U,. March 8. 1«. 23. 30, 1»14. 



FOR RENT— FLNE CORNER STOREJ. 
on Central avenue, ?teel ceiling, full 
basement; also latge warehouse in 
rear; If taken soon will rent for $40 
per month. W. C. Sherwood 6t Co., 
118 Manhattan building. 

FOR RENT — LARGE Sl'ACE UN SEO- 
ond floor ot 24 atid 26 West Superior' 
street, ovtr Lciser's; very desimbl^ 
business location; rent mod<:raCe. N. 
J. Upham company, 714 iTovmenct* 
building. 

FOR RENT — SECOND AND TH1R1> 
floors, building 25 by 90, 114 West- 
Michigan street. Will rent cheap to 
good parties on long lease; key at 
premises. P. Beneteau, South Vic- 
toria street, St. Paul, Minn. 



FOR RENT — WE HAVE LARGS, 
basement room, just right for repair 
chop for electrician, locksmith or 
manufacturer. Mass. Real Estate 
Co., 18 Phoenix block, city. 

FOR RENT— THE FINEST OFFICS 
on Superior street, for real estate, 
insurance, or general business pur- 
poses. Mass. Real Estate Co, l* 
Phoenix block, city. 

FOR RENT— SEVERAL STORES CBN- 
trally located on Superior and First 
streets. Possession now or May 1. 
See N. J. Upham Co., 714 Providence 
building. 

FOR RENT — NO. 26 WEST FIRST 
street, suitable for feed store or 
blacksmith shop. Call Bloom & Co., 
102 West First street. 



FOR RENT — FROM MAY 1, STORES 
at 103*4 atid 105 East Superior 
street. Call J. Oreckoveky, 630 i» 
We st Superior street- 

FOR RENT— WE HAVE ABOUT 260 
feet of ground floor tpace oa Supe- 
rior street. Little & Nolte company. 

For Rent — From May 1, stores, 103 1^ & 
106 E. Sup., J. Oreckovsky, 530 V4 
W. Sup. St. 

FOR RENT— ROOM, 25x75 - i::ET FOR 
light manufacturing; can be divided. 
Apply Christie building. Fireproof, 

FOR RENT — OFFICE SPACE OR 
desk room. S3 Fourtli avenu* wmU 




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II. 



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Monday, 



1 
THE DUX-UTH HERALD 



March 30, 1914. 



28 



FOR SALE-HOUSES. 



» 

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1150 CASH 

And your rent monejr will buy a 
good »-rooin house, with water, 
sower. bTlh and electric light, half 
hlo.k from ear line; good West 
Iniliith location; price |2,::00. it's 
a snap. 



WHY DO TOU PAY RENT? * 

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FOR SALE— HOUSES. FARM AND FRUIT LANDS. 



(Continued.) 



FOR SALE — NINK-ROOM HUUriK 
with all modern conveniences, on 
Twenty-third avt-nue east; easy 
terma. Ai >ply 2tl8 JefCerson street. 

FOR SALK Imodku.n kk:ht-room 

house on -Vest Third street; hot wa- 
ter heat; large lot. Inquire 2C09 
West Second street. Melrose 70T5. 



J 2 00 CASH. ^ 

Balance on rental basis, will buy 
a two-family house, with water. 
s.v or. electric light, toilets up 
srid <lc>wn: stone foundation; large 
barn; one block from Fifty-sev- 
enth avenue car line. Live In one 
flat and rent out the other, and 
you will soon pay for the hou.se. 
IMice ^l.iiOO. 



FOR SALK -NFNK-R«H>M HOl'SE AR- 
ranged for two families, also nice 
furniture; ver>- cheap, party leaving 
city. Coll 909 East Third street. 



FOR SALK — CHEAP. FOUR -ROOM 
house; big corner lot; big barn; also 
66 chickens. S7S2 Traverse street. 



FOR SALE - EI'IMT-RtMJM HOl'SE. 
newly fixe i up: all improvements In. 
Call 16 Vernon street. 



EST DULUTH REALTY CO., 
^'lO'l Ramj»ey Street. 



Farm lands at Meadowlands on easy 
terms. I no LIn.strom, owner, 31 
East Mich igan street, Duluth. 

FOR SALE- HOUSeTcENTRaL WEST 

end; must be moved from lot. Call 
2515 West Second street. 






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U HllXKY WALL COMPANY. 



Great big ban?:aln In fine West 
end lui-ation. One of the finest 
fi.-inje residences In Duluth. as 
good as brand new; oak and birch 
rtf'ish. hot vi-ater heat; IS beautiful 
large rooms, suitable for two fam- 
ilies; .-orner lot, 100 by 140 feet. 
Could not duplicate this for Jll'.- 
000; price only $6,500. 



Fine new house. East end; six 
large, light, airy rooms, facing 
lake; oak flni.sh. hot water heat, 
full laundry; blue stone founda- 
tion; built-in buffet. Best new 
home ever offered at such a price. 
Must sell quick. Only |3,600. 

(656) 

Nli'e five-room cottage, Ea.<»t 
N'inth .street; hardwood floors, 
srvvMr. water, gas and electricitv. 
I'ri. e $1.S>00. (707) 



WHIT.VEY WALL COMPANY, 

Torrey P.ulldlng. 

Phones: tJrand 810; Melrose 1.368. 

Xighls or Sundays call Mel. 3430. 



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FOR SALi:- NEW SIX-ROOM HOUSE. 
3816 West Fifth street. 



BUSI^!ESS CHANCES. 



* BUS! 

j -^ For rer 

! ;¥• on Lake a 

I ^ chandi^im 

i(- of people 

■^.i summer n 

if nianent t 

I ^ manent tr 

■i^ us If you 



■fi- i: ^:V •;i«;\^^?.-*-;^^MJ**^';->-^-Ar.*^,i-;.^^-« 



« 



V n- '»- • J- rv r;- fc rv * f cTr Srtv'nr^pVJir^i- Vc- 
HOME BARGAINS. 



I 



A S">d 6-room house. Sixtieth 
.-i\-Tui'< west, one block from car 
line; very reasonable, on easy 
terms. 






ie- sfiiaij 



a 

a- 



NESS LOCATIONS, 
t, best business corner 
Venue; suitable for mer- 
; purposes. Thousands 
pa.aslng dally during the 
lonths and a heavy por- 
raftlc all year round, 
aftlc all year round. See 
want a good location. 



L. 
213-14 

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« 40 ACRES. ■::■■ 

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it- 20 acres cleared, balance In pa.s- # , 

^ ture; 8-room house, large barn. ie\ 

* - good hor.sos. 2 ce»w.>« and all farm "A? , 
#• machinery, for sale cheap on easy ^ \ 
-Af terms. #i 

* # 

^- 80 ACRES OF GOOD LAND. ■»] 

* # 
Ai Five miles from Wascott, Wis., *• 
:v- has 15 acres cleared; new 6-room ig- 1 
;¥^ house and barn; 65 acres of good :¥• 
iip timber, pine and taniarack. Price ^ 
« $1,200; $100 ca.<h will haitdle. bal- # 
ie- auce in live years. ^ 

* « 

* « 

* 40 .\CRES, PARTLY IMPROVED. * 

* * 

■!¥. .Toining Jean Duluth farm. Price i^ 

* |!»y0, on easy terms. if 

* « 

* « 

>p See us for prices on smalt farms if- 

* near Duluth. We have a big list- # 
i^ i«ig and can surely suit you. <- 
« « 

■•*'- * 

iS» # 

a- ZENITH REAL p:STATE & LOA.\ *- 

ii- COMPANY, * 

^ Corner 'Jrand Avenue and Ramsey t^ 

* Street, West Duluth. * 

* Cole 116. * 

« •» 

* THE BEAUTIFUL SWA.X RIVER * 
*• VALLEY, L\ SOUTHERN ITASCA i^ 




A. LARSEN CO., 
■15 I'rovidence Bldg. 



nUSF.VESS CHANCE — HUNDRED 
miles an hour with safety Is the 
Speed of Taylor's Water-Mobile, a 
new type motor boat. The story of 
this invention Is Interesting. Write 
today; bo< k free. Water-Mobile Un- 
derwriters Carter-Cotton Bldg., Van- 
couver. B. C. 

BUSINESS CHANCE.S— FOR SALE— 
The newsj>aper known as the Mur- 
dock Volc! and Job office comblnod. 
The Voice has a circulation of nearly 
500. I'lenty of news and advertising 
type; also good assortment of job 
type. For further particulars ad- 
dress The Voice. Murdock, Minn. 



BUSI.VESS CHANCES— FOR SALE— 
Grocery ai d confectionery store with 
living roo us in connection; central 
location III light housekeeping dla> 
trlct; doing good business. A bar- 
gain at $4t.O. Address O 841, Herald. 






COUNTY. MINN. 



THE LAND OF F.\RMS FOR 
ACTUAL. FARMERS. 



* 



* The best agricultural land left to- * 
if day In Northeastern Minnesota Is j^ 
^ in the Swan River Valley. # 

* * 

•*. Geographically situated between 4 
H' the two great iron Ranges. # 

* ^ * 

if- Good roads, good markets, good i(- 

0- schools and good climate. r^ 

i^ ^ 

* A great opportunity for actual * 
a settlers to get lands suitable for if 
if diversitted farming at first coat if 



if 
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7-room house. Seventy-first ave- 
r.ue west, on Grand avenue car 
<ar line; water, gas, sewer, toilet; 
cash payment, balance 
monthly. 



We furnish 
houses oa the 
plan. 



money and build 
monthly payment 



GPwVND AVE.VUE AGENCY. 

Corner Grand and Fifty-sixth 

Avenues West. 



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BUSI.VESS C 
Milllnerv; 
the city; t 
sonable; a 
stock owii 
Z 30. Hera 



KANCES — FOR SALE — 
high-class trade; best In 

plendid location; rent rea- 
great sacrifice In value of 

>g to 111 health. Address 

Id. 

H.VNCES — PROSPEROUS 

business, annual sales for 

?200,000; a fine opportu- 

le or more to buy a prof- 

ness that is well known In 

Minnesota; annual profits 

0. 000. Y 368, Herald. 

BUSINESS CHANCES— FOR SALE— 
Part of tlie ground floor of a big 
money-mal.ing enterprise dlvded Into 
1120 share.-. Safe, with big dividends 
for years to come. Will bear closest 
Investigatl )n. K S77. Herald. 



BUSI.NKSS ( 
mercantile 
five years 
nlty for o 
Itable busi 
Northern 
$8.00U to $ 



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and on easy payments. '^ 

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For particulars call on or writd 

JONES & BLACKWOOD, 

414 Manhattan Building, 

Duluth, Minn., or 

A. A. HALL, Resident Agent, 
Warba. Minn. 



NOW 



IS THE TIME OF THE 

YEAR TO MME BiOINiEY 

THROUGH THE HERALD 

WANT ADS. 

Now is the time that people want to 
buy Real Estate, Horses, Cows, Wagons, 
Implements, Poultry, Household Goods, 
etc,; Make Trades, Secure Help and Po- 
sitions, Rent Houses and Rooms. 

. Now is the time to get best results and 
make money through The Herald Want 
Ad Columns. People want things and they 
read The Herald Want Ads to find them, 
because The Herald gi\'«3 them a larger 
number of everything to choose from. 
That's why 

HERALD WANT ADS SET RESULTS 



^ 





ADDITIONAL WANTS I poultry and EGGS. 



ON PAOES 22 AND 24 

FARM AND fRUIT LANDS. 

(Continued.) 
ii^'ii^ifiyX'if-^ifii'^-ififit-ifif^i'ii^-if^.ifiC^ 



LANDS. * 1^ LANDS. 
Get Really for Spring. 



^ , $500 CASH 

balance on terms, buys 7-room house 
r«'Mng Lincoln park; stone founda- 
tion. 35 by 100 foot lot. Price J3.l'00. 



BUSINESS t HANCES — FOR QUICK 
sale, leavi ig city, my confectionery 
and restaurant on (Jlary street. .Sales 
averaging $250 per month. L. E. 
Davis, owi er. New Duluth, Minn. 



ISOO CASH 
payments buys nice 6-room 
corner lot at Twenty- 
eighth avenue west; modern except 
CO $2,000. 



and eisy 
home on 



h.ai. r 



$300 CASH 
and balance |20 per month buvs good 
4-room house at Twentieth avenue 
west. Price $1,200. 



$300 CASH 
mi balance of |»00 payable at $20 per 
nionth buys nice S-room cottage- 
lot 40 by 92 feet on Twentieth ave- 
nue west and Eighth street. 



NATIONAL-CO-OPERATIVE REALTY 

AOE.VCY, 

Ro.m 1. 2022 West Superior Street. 



A BARGAIN FOR THE MAN 
Wmi .«^()ME CASH. 



f»'>f^ff^i:'iy::-iiii-::'i^i:-ii^^ii^if-»ifiyif 

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A fine, newly-painted, 6-room 
home on two lots; fine garden, 
shrub trees and small fruit; elec- 
tric lights, hardwood floors and 
good well; located on car line. Im- 
proved street, Duluth Heights. 
Prlre only 5900; easily worth 
SI. 500. 

Party anxious to sell now. In- 
tend:* to move to farm this spring. 



For terms see 

L. H. WHIPPLE, 
701 Torrey Bldg. 



BLSIXESS CHANCES— DRUG STORES 
(snaptt) fc r sale and trade In 48 
states. Address F. V. Knlest, Omaha, 
Noo. 



FOR SALE -FINE CORNER FOR 
store, opposite school; seven-room 
house; central, cheap. J. D. How- 
ard & Co.. Providence Bldg. 

FOR SALI — PICTURE THEATER: 
win stand Investigation; $3,000 will 
take it. For particulars address 
W 39>, Hei aid. 



BUSINESS CHANCES— FOR SALE— 

First-class confectionery and gro- 
cery; good location in East end. Ad- 
dress E 32), Herald. 



BUSINESS CHA.XCES — FOR SALE— 
Furniture of rooming flat, full of 
roomers. Call afternoons, 10 West 
First street. Flat B. 



notice:— D< 'N"T FAIL TO SEE US IP 
you want to buy or sell a place of 
business. Duluth Business Exchange. 
609 Torrey building. 

FOR SALE CHEAP — FRUIT AND 
light groc. ry on main street: cheap 
rent; doing good bustnesa. X C. 
Herald. 



r.USl.VE.SS CHANCES — FOR S.\LE — 
Small steain laundry cheap. If taken 
before Apr 1 1. Write M 28S. Herald. 



■y^^-^'k-^i^ififii-ifififififififif-^-::-;:.?:^ 



**«-A^-A-*^7V--#:^*«.l^?.«^l*^|f^.^>.-v^l^j^i^ 



if 

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if 

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FINE SOLON SPRINGS COTTAGE * 

if 
For sale cheap; lot 150 by 95. with if 
tlise trees; cottage has stone foun- if 
dation, excellent well, with good 
pump; four rooms, porch all 
screened In. For sale at a snap- 
$1,000. 5500 cash. If you want ji 
tirsl-class new cottage, see us 
about this quick. 



^• 



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Wanted — Reliable man or woman to In- 
vest $600; legitimate business. V 396, 
Herald. 

WANTEDjTixMpF 

FOR SALE OR TRADE— CITY PROP^ 
erty for 320-acre farm In Saskatche- 
wan valley, near Velfeazo, one mile 
from school, one mile from river; 160 
acres ready for seed; good build- 
ings. Inquire T. Shoveln, Proctor. 
Minn. tUd phone 61 J-3. 

WANTED— \\ HAT HAVE YOU TO 
exchuigj for North Dakota wheat 
Ian 1. Call or address 236 Lenox 
hotel or boK 12. Stanley, N. D. 

RAILROAD TIME TABLES. 



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?'r-;;iS-?j-vfjtj&^;^v.i-^^v."A^«<^T^;.i?;-v;iiM':Tii:-vj 



FOR S.\LE. 



A FEW CHOICE 40 AND 80- 
ACRE TRACTS AT MEADOW- 
LANDS, NEAR ST.\TIO\ AND 
SCHOOL AND ON A GOOD ROAD. 
EASY '^ERMjj. 



L. B. ARNOLD. 
LAND COMMISSI! ).\'P:R, 
110 WOLVIX BUILDING. 
DULUTH, MIN.N. 






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FOR SALE. 



160 



ACRES FINE F.\RM LAND 
NEAR BARNUM. 



Has $2,500 worth of standing 
timber on it. Will trade for good 
city property. Inquire 



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I 

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if Several forties in Aitkin county 

if with part mineral rights from $15 

'» to $20 per acre. 

*■ 

160 acres In Douglas county; 
good land and offered under the 
market. See US for description 
and price. 

r 



40 acres nice< land near Arnold: 
easily cleared; no stones. Ideal 
for truck a*a dairy farm. Price 
$22 per acre. Terms. 

6 acres adjoi«tns: Colman's addl- .. 
tion at Woodland; beautifully 4 
timbered; ail good land. Price it 
$760. Part terms. # 

if 



C. W. ELSTON. if 

if Both phones. Duluth. Minn, if 

ii'if-^fifif-^fi:-ifififiy::-^-if-::-ififif-!fifififif'ii.i^. 



^f:ififi:ififif::<-i:^ii'i:-ifi:-ifi£'ififi£ifii.ifiy» 



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FOR SALE. 



TWO CHOICE 80-ACRETR.\CTS 
PARTLY IMPROVED, AT MEA- 
DOWLANDS. SEVERAL AT- 

TRACTIVE PROPOSITIONS FOR 
DAIRYMEN. CREAMERY PRAC- 
TICALLY ASSURED. 



L. B. ARNOLD. 

LAND COMMISSIONER. 

110 WOLVIN BUILDING. 

DULUTH. MINN. 



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^^.^•\^\^:\^^'-»^i^.V^>\t>'^^.je.^?^.jfry.^.^^tJi'.j^.Atjg 



WHITNEV WALL CO. 

20-arre farm, near Superior, Wis., all 
cultivated; fair building.i. best soil 
and water supply; five miles from 
street car line; price $1,250. (H 19) 



160-acre farm on Lester river; 60 acres 
have been cultivated and the balance 
easily cleared. Will trade for city 
property. Price of farm. $2,500. easy 
terms. ^q g^ 

WHITNEY WALL CO. 
301 Torrey Building. 



FOR SALE. 



80 acre.i. Carlton county. 2^ miles 
from Barnum; fine black loam; 10 acres 
cleared. 5 acres fenced; on good road 
rural school route; enough timber for 
buildings and 800 cords of hardwood' 
frame house 16 by 24; $22 p«r acre, oii 
terms. 



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EBERT-WA^ER CO. 

315-16 Tofrey Bldg.. 

Duluih, Minn. 




FOR SALE— HERE IS A (JENUINE 
snap; will sell. one or six forty-acre 
tracts, twenty-tive miles from Su- 
perior, Wis. I.and located near two 
stations, sandy loani soil; has good 
road and telephone on land; also has 
beautiful lake; land can be cleared for 
$10 per acre; wll! sac rlflce this at 
$16 per acre, one-third cash. Don't 
know of any bigger snap at Head of 
Lakes. Address 4601 Oneida street. 

FOR SALE— IF YOU ARE LOOKING 
for a cheap farm or cheap lands for 
Investment we have several thou- 
sand acres in St. Louis, Lake. Aitkin. 
Itasca and Pine counties, that we 
can offer you from $3.60 per acre 
and up. See us before you buy. 
Bartlett-Pear.«on company, 604 First 
National Bank building, Duluth. 
Minn. 



ACRE TRACTS WITHIN CITY LIM- 
its. near Woodland; level land, good 
soil, good road?; take an auto ride 
with us and look them over; only 
$10 cash, $10 monthly. P'ay-Schau 
Co.. 106-7-8 Providence Bldg. Both 
phones 24. 

I 

FOR SALE — 200, 00« acres good Doug- 
las Co. lands. 16 to 30 miles from 
Duluth; $7 to $15 per acre, terms, ten 
years' time; priijre.s advancing. United 
States Land Co.. Hammond 61k.. Su- 
perior. Wis. Phone Broad 292. 

FOR SALE — $1Q DOWN, $5 M<5nTHLY 
buys farms near Duluth. Minn. Prices 
$10 per acre; some timber; some 
open; 20.000-acre selection; free 
maps. L. T. Felland, 523 Palace 
building, Minneapolis, Minn. 



THE DULUTH HEH.\LD IS RECOG- 
NIZED POULTRV MEDIUM. 
The I'uluth Herald is the recognized 
poultry medium. It is the official pa- 
per of the poultry i-aisers of Duluth 
and Nortliern Minnesota. 
; CIRCULATION LARGEST 

( RATES LOWE.ST 

1 The Duluth Herald has the largest 
i circulation of any newspaper in Mlnne- 
I sola (outside the Twin Cities). Its 
' charges for classified advertising are 
j less per thousand circulation than 
those of any other paper in the state. 

Closing out — AVt. C^rpington, R. I. Red. 
S. C. Buff Leghorn cockerels. $1.50; 
Hamburg, Wt. Wyandotte. Wt. Mi- 
norca females, $1; one Black Orp- 
ington hen, three pullets, one cock- 
erel. $7; seven R. C. Buff Leghorn 
pullets, one cockerel, $10; ttfteen S. C. 
Buff Leghorn pullets, one cockerel, 
$18; 25 S. C. Wu Leghorns, one fine 
cock. $30; 120-egg Jewell incubator, 
$8; 420-egg Essex model, $25; R. I. 
Red, White Orpington eggs, $1.50 
and $2 per 16; $8 and $10 per 100; 
Red and Orpington baby chickens in 
May, 25c. Call Lakeside 119. Write 
302 East Superior St.. W. W. Seekins. 

i! C. RHODE ISLAND RED EGGS 
from first pen Duluth 1914 show. 
This i>en also won challerlge cup for 
best pen in American class. 16 pens 
competing. T. H. Cornell, 4218 Lom- 
bard street. Old phone Lakeside 96-L. 



W.\NTED — MAN AND WIFE TO 
rent improved ■ and stocked farm 
near Duluth. with furnished home. 
Snap for right party. Address Y 347, 
Herald. 



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C. L. RAKOWSKY & CO., 
Exchange Building. 



Duluth & Iron Range Rail 

"VermllloB Route. 



Road. 






DULtnt— 



Jm-Z-Jf-Hf^ifififif^ii^^fiy^fifififi^^ i^^;.^..;;^ 

Ft>U SALI-:— $500 CASH AND BAL- 
ance monthly buys duplex house. 
S. venth avenue oast and Fourth 
street, five rooms each; water sewer 
bath, monthly rental $35.50- price 
«-nly $3,000. Little & iXolte com- 
paiiy. Excha nge Bldg. 

FOR S.\LL — BY OWNER. IN WEST 
end. two houses with water, gas and 
electric light, rental at $45 per 
month; price. $3,100; $1,000 cash 
down, balance to suit Address. A 
»'~. care Herald. 

^^11^ i{^}fi--^^mT CHEAP." NO. 207 
^\e.st bixth street, two flats of five 
rooms .ach; water, electric light gas 
and sewer; line proposition for party 
Of moderate means. See A. O. Ander- 
son at Anderson Furniture company. 
Twen ty-flrst avenue west. *"*"'• 



'Knir» l{l»«r. T" I Harbors. 
Tower. Ely. \\ Intcn. Aii- 
ror«. Biwtblk. JlcKlnley. 
Spartk. Kieleu , GUbtrt. 
Virginia. 



Le«TC. 

* 7:30a.m. 
t 3:lS».m. 
|ll:3«9.«. 



10 acre.9 close to Jean Duhith stock 
farm (east side), unimproved; price 
only $100. ^ 



ArrlT* 

• 5:3S*.ai. I 

SIO:lfip.«. 

xtOM$.m. 



OR.\ND AVENUE AGENCY, 
Fifty-sixth and Grand .\venuea West. 



•— D»lbr t- Dally m ept Sunday 
train leases rtally rnm Fiftoeiiih Avenue 
J-MlxeU train » rrlves ilally exoept Sui 
isenth .\Tenua East Station, z- -Arrives 
Sunday only. 



t-MUed 

Ran Station. 
iJuy at ttf- 
taioc Uepat 



DULUTH, MISSABE .^ NORTHERN 
RAILWAY. 

OCfteet 4t» Went Soperlor St„ 
Phoaes, »«». 



licavs. 



ArtlTt. 



FOR SALE— CJOOD slzE COTrXrv' 
With large lot right on lake fronf 
at Sol..n springs. Wis. Write for 
particulars to J. W. Sheridan 18 
lourtJi avenue west, Duluth. 



I Hlljblng CbUholm. Vlrciula. £»•- 1 ~" 

*7-Mttm{ leth. O leralne. .sbaron, tMoau- f *3:2lwi 
tain iron. .Sparta. BlwabU. j 
Ulbbti I, (blaiioim. Shafoo. 
•3:30|»a' Mrxliiia. ET«IKh. '*l«:3laa 

, Cul?raln9. 

r VlJS nla. CblihottD. Uik- 

I "7 :58pm' blin, Kfsletli. • 'Jl 

UinaLlk. 



FOR S.\LE — 160 ACRES OF LAND, 
one mile from depot on Soo line, 
Carlton county, Minn. Beautiful trout 
stream runs lluough this quarter 
section. Nice open land. easily 
cleared. Can be divided Into 80-acre 
tracts if desired. Will sell ch-^ap 
now and on easy terms. Address 
A 881, care of Herald. 



FOR RENT— TWO WELL IMPROVED 
farms near Floodwood. St. Louis 
county. Minn. Good buildings, ex- 
cellent water, large clearing, suit- 
able for dair>-ing and grazing. Will 
rent very reasonably to right party. 
Write A 891, care of Duluth Herald 



FOR SALE— OR T^ADE, 160 ACRES 
of gcM)d land in North Dakota; will 
take any kind of good property in 
exchange. Address Y 389, Herald. 

HOMESTEADS LOCATED BY A 
homesteader; also best soil In states 
$5 to $20 an acre. Wm. RuUen, Bau- 
dette. Minn. Best of references. 

FOR SALE OR RENT — 160-ACRE 
farm, with new big house, barn, etc., ] 
25 miles from Duluth, 10 minutes | 
from station. R. R. Forward. Duluth. ] 

FOR SALE— FORTY ACRES OF GOOD 
fami land, six miles from West Du- ' 
luth; Thomson road. For further ' 
particulars call Melrose 5275. i 

FOR SALE— AN 80-ACRE~IiIPROVED 1 
farm near Proctor; will sell chenp ; 
for cash. Inquire 2718 West Michi- 
gan street. 

WILL TRADE MY DULUTH PROPER- 
ty for an Improved farm; must be 
well located. A 875, Herald. 



MONEY TO LOAN. 



iyifffificicif^^iciiififififififififiC-'tficiyarc^ 
if if 

if WHEN YOU WANT * 

* TO BORROW $10 OR MORS * 
if ON FURNiTURE. PLANOS, ETC.. * 

* * 
if you naturally want It quickly, con- * 
if fidentlally and at the most reason- if 
if able cost. You want to feel that * 
if you are dealing with a company if 
if who win consider your interests, * 
*■ give you every advantage and ex- * 
if tend the utmost courtesy and cou- # 
if slderatlon at all times. ^ 
^ it 
if DULUTH LOAN COMPANY, * 

* 307 Columbia Bldg., 303 W. Sup. St. •* 
if Open all day and Wednesday and if 
if Saturday evenings. ijt 
« if 
ii^fififif^ifififififififif^iiifSifififififififif 



SALAR Y— LOANS — CHATTEL. 

Take your own time to pay us — 1 
month, '4 months, 6 months or 1 year. 
Cheap rates and reasonable terms. 
LOOK OVER THESE RATEd. 

Borrow $10; you pay back $11.00. 

Borrow $20; you pay back $:il.76. 

Burrow $30; you pay back $32.50- 

Borrow $40; you pay back $4;i.25. 

Borrow $50; you pay back $64.00. 

Rebate allowed it paid before due. 

Write, call or telepnone us. 

DULUTH FINANCE CO.. 

301 Palladio Bldg. Both 'phones. 
Open Wednesday and Saturday even'gs. 



DULUTH REMEDIAL LOAN ASSN. 
401 First National Bank Bldg. 
Organized by business men of this city 
for the purpose of loaning money In 
amounts of $10 or more on chattel se- 
curity. The only Chattel Loan Associa- 
tion in Duluth licensed by the city, and 
whose rates strictly comply with the 
charges allowed by Minnesota laws. 



V\ t. LOAN ON ALL iClNDS OF PER- 
soual security at lowest rates. Call 
on us, 430 Manhattan Bldg., and get 
rates. Duluth Mortgage Loan Co., W. 
Horkan. New 1698-D; Melrose 3733. 



REALJSmEJLOANS. 

W. H. PRINDLE & CO., 
8 LONSDALE LL-G. 



MEL. 2400— PHONES — GR ND 23f. 

WE ALWAYS HAVE 

MONEY ON HAND TO 

LOAN AT 6V4 AND 6 PER CENT. 

ON REAL ESTATE ..ECURITY. 



W. M. PRINDLE & Co. 



MORTGAGE LOAi' ^ 

We are in a position to ulace yonr' 
loan on most advantageous terms, at 
lowest cost. 

RICHARDSON, DAY & CTtE.VDLBt 
Exc hange Building. 

MORTGAGE AND kEaL ESTATE 
loans; money on hand to loan at % 
pep>cent in amount of $l,tOO and tip- 
wards, no delay. N. J. L'pbam C©.. 
714 Pr ovidence building. 

MONEY TO LOAN ON REAL ESTATlJS' 
mortgaged; 6^ and 6 pi-r tent, any 
amount; no delay. Careful, reliabto 
service. William C. Sargent, lf:i 
Providen ce building. 

WE DEAL IN REAL ESTATE SB- 
curities. First mortgages bought and 
sold. Real Estate Securities com- 
pany, 808 Alworth building. 

CASH ON HAND TO LOAN ON CITY 
and farm property, any apiount. low- 
est rates, no delay. Northern Title 
Co., 613 First Nat ional Bank Bldg. 

Cty and village loans in Minnesota. 
Repay loan monthly; easy terms. 
Knlppenberg, Commercial building. 
Phone 597. 



MONEY TO LOAN — ON r i^r-ST MORT- 
gage; immediate answer given. Se« 
us. J. D. Howard & Co.. Providence 
building. 



MONEY TO LOAN — HUNTERS — WE 
loan money on rlHes. shotguns, re- 
volvers; will hold until next season 
before sold. Keystone Loan Co., 22 
West Superior street. 



MONEY TO LOAN — SAFE AND 
profitable Investment for $500. $1,000 
or more. Your money will double. 
Ask for particulars. Address T 202, 
Herald. 



MONEY TO LOAN— LOANS MADE ON 
diamonds, furs, watches, all goods of 
value; $1 to $1,000; lowest rates In 
city. Keystone Loan Co., 22 W. Sup. St 



MONEY FOR SALARIED PEOPLE 
and others upon their own name; 
cheap rates, easy payments; confi- 
dential. H. R. Carr, 609 Lyceum Bldg. 



WE CARRY IN STOCK REPAIRS FOR 
10,000 different stoves and ranges. C. 
F. Wiggerts & Sons. 410 E. Sup. Si. 



UMBREU-A^^ 

IT PAYS TO HAVE YOUR UMBREL- 
la repaired. Gingold, 126 E. Sup. St. 



WANTED TO BORROW^^^$L000 FOR 
three years at 6 per cent on Jirst 
mortgage; good security. Address 
E 346, Herald. 



$£§,000 TO LOA.N — LARGE AND 
small amounts. Low rates on mort- 
gages. Cooley & Underbill Co., Ex- 
change building. 

Money at lowest rp.ti s. 

Any amount, no delay. 

Little & Nolte Co., Exchiaf c Bldg. 

FOR SALE— LAKESIDE LOT, CROS- 
ley park, or will exchange for .<?ee- 
ond-hand car. Write M 268, Herald. 

MONEY TO LOAN— LOANS MADE ON 
timber and farm lands. John Q. A. 
Crosby. 396 Palladio bnlldlng. 



— FOR CHEAP MONEY QUICK — 
— See L. A. .-.cuion company— 
— 214 Providence building — 

MONEY TO LOAN ON FIRST MORT- 
gages. any amount, no delay. C. L. 
Rakowsky & Co., 201 Exchange Bldg. 

Money to loan; any amount; low rates. 
Cooley & Underbill, 209 Exchange. 



PLANTS AND TREES. 

THJB^'jEW^Lr'NURSERY^'coi^^ 
Lake City, Minn., oldest and largest 
In Northwest — Now is the time to 
order your plants, trees and shrubs 
for spring planting. Phone our local 
representative and let him advise 
you. Melrose 6763. 



PLANTS! PLANTS! I HAVE THEMl 
King raspberry (require no protec- 
tion), $1.50 per 100; Dunlap straw- 
berries, 60 cents per 100; currant and 
Carrie gooseberry plants 60 cents 
dozen prepaid. Mrs. Culle, Herrick, 
Minn. 



Subscribe for The Herald 




PRIZE-WINNING S. C. WHITE OR- 
plngtons. Won 3 firsts, 2 seconds 
and 1 third, with 18 birds competing, 
at Fargo, N. D., 1914. Write for my 
1913 winnings. Eggs and cockerels 
for sale. Claude Gant. Bottineau, N. D. 

ROSE COMB RHODE ISLAND REDS; 
eggs for hatching; price winners; 
$1.60 for 15; $3.50 for 60; also cock- 
erels for sale. I. W. (Jilleland, 607 
South 71st avenue west. West Du- 
luth, Minn. Zen ith phone. Cole 145-A. 

SINGLE COMB RHODE ISLAND RED.S, 
S. & B. strain, from winners at New 
York, Boston, Philadelphia, Yonkers, 
Minneola, and Louisville. Hatching 
eggs and stock for sale. Order now. 
Melrose 3909 or 572. 

FOR SALE— S. C. RHODE ISLAND 
Red eggs for hatching, pure bred, 
well marked, free rangers; eggs are 
fertile. G. E. Owen, Melrose 2679, ring 
1, Riverside park. 



miE 




iOE FO^ 



YOyB MDLY iEEi! 

This directory is intended for the convenience of anyone 
desiring something a little out of the ordinary in their 
daily needs and requiring it in a hurry. The firms repre- 
sented below make a specialty of immediate service and 
will gladly furnish any information that is necessary. 
Remember, satisfaction is guaranteed by every advertiser. 

JUST USE YOUR TELEPHONE! 

SEE IT IN THE HERALD EVERY DAY. 



AWNINGS, TENTS, PACKSACKS. 

POIRIER TENT & AWNING CO., 413 
East Superior street. Both phones. 



DULUTH TENT & AWNING COMPANY- 
Get prices. 1608 W^est Superior street. 



ACCOUNTANTS. 



MATTESON & MACGREGOR, 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS AND 

AUDITORS. 

Business Counselors and Systemizers, 

700-701 Alworth Bldg. 

Phones: Melrose, 4700, Grand 71. 



F. D. HARLOW, 3 4 EXCHANGE 
building. Telephone, Melrose 3664. 



ARCHITECTS. 

W. B. Roe, architect and builder. 412 
Providence building. Gibud 8b2. 



ASHES REMOVED. 

Ashes, cinders and manure hauled 
away; teaming dune. H. B. Keedy, 
both phones. 



ASHES REMOVED. CALL GRAND 
570-D, 71'J East Eighth street. 



DANCING ACADEMY. 

Lynn dancing academy, lauy instructor. 
13A L-ivea v. n. Hall for rent. Mel. 1145 

TANGO— "LEA RN CORRECTLY." COF- 
fin's academy. 



FURNITURE. 



100 DAVENPORTS, 
Leather or Imported tapestries, selling 
at our GREATER SALESROOM- 
Sale price 40 per cent less than re- 
tall prices. Cash or credit. 




CAMERON-JOHNSON-HORGAN, 

The Factory Distributers. 

Salesroom — 2110-2112 West Superior St. 



FOR SALE— ROSE COMBED WHITE 
Orpingtons, good strain; one Cypher 
incubator and brooder; also Jewell 
Incubator. Park 67-D. 

FOR PALE— S. C. R. L REDS' EGGS 
from prize winners, and breed for 
heavy winter layers; $1 per setting 
5;<07 Idlewild street. L. Besser. Lake- 
side 173-K. 



t— !>ally except Suxiclaj. t— Excapl 



Ff>R SALE— BY OWNER. SEVEN- 
room house at 4224 Gladstone street- 
easy terms; will consider trade for 
vacant property. Call Melrose and 
Lincoln 112 or eve nings Melrose 3783. 

Bungalows, cottages, houses at Lake- 
side, ready for occupancy; terms to 
suit- Lots on easy payments any ;/art 
of Lakeside. Headquarters for Laivc- 
side property. Greenfield Realty Co. 

P<»R S.\LE— HOU.SE~FOR TWO FAM^ 
Hies, hardwood floor, gas, bath, elec- 
tric light; owner leaving <;Ity. Plotr 
Wolowich. 2769 Wellington. Fifth 
street. 

FOR SALE — HOUSE AND LOT. 27 

South Fifty-seventh avenue east; 
strictly iiiodt^rn, nine rooms; small 
payment down. John C. Klas, 
Beaver Dam, Wis. 



•—Dally. 

B lvrablli. 

Cafe Observation Car. Missabe Range 
Potnts. .«<>lid Vestlbuled Train. 

DUIUTH 4 NOttTHERN MINNESOTA RAILWaV 
Offlcoa, i Lenadalc Bldg.. Ouluth * 

Train* connect u Knife Rlrer dally (except Sun- 
day) wtUi l>. * . It. train* learlnc Duluth at 7 3« 
a m.. arriving at Duluth at 5:35 p. m. Connact •» 
Cramar witU Uratil Maraia ataa« «b«n ruimln«. 

Duluth, S->uth Shore AAtlantrc! 



Laave. 
$7.45anr 

t8.l2am 

t8.20aia 

Arrlf*. 
t7.55pm 
x8.S5pm 
k6*9»nt 
t7.IOpm 



8tATI0.\S. 



For .SALE ON EASY TERMS — OH i 
will rent to responsible people, 
modern 7-room house: best location in 
W«»t end. Write A 883, Herald. 1 



Laafe^ 



S8. 1 3»m 

(Soo 
S6.4Spni. 

(Sou 
t7.00«iB 

S.40ani 
6.3vlaiii. 
i4.20affl 
Si.OOaai 
JIO.IOari 
|7.58am. 
|8.2Spi«. 

IS.SSpm. 
i8.40aai . 



.... Duluth ilO. 

Una Union Station.) 
. .. Superlur ... {10. 

Llna I'l.loii Slatluu.) 
Superlut IS. 

(Union Depot.) 
. . Houghton ....}ll. 

. .. C'alujuet tlO. 

. . bliprming ...{(2 
. . .Marquetta ...glj 
Sault til: Marie.. $6. 

. . Montraal {10. 

Boitoa 19. 



An1«a. 

30ani ts.5()pia 

OAam ts.2lt,>ai 

SSan |S.iO»« 

I Spot 
2Spai 
SSam 
4S|;ni 
25pm 
JOpm 
«aai 



t7.29an 
Ki.lSaai 



FOR SALE— CHOICE DAIRY LANDS 
near Alborn and Payne, on the m&ln 
line of the Duluth. Missabe & North- 
ern railway; special prices and terms 
for the next tixty days. Dairymen 
Investigate. L. B. Arnold, land com- 
mlsLlnner, 100 Wolvin building, Du- 
luth. Minn. 

FOR S.\LE— FORTY ACRES OB' GOOD 
farm land close to Five Corners, ten 
miles from Duluth; $20 per acre; $200 
cash: also forty acres one mile from 
Munger, Minn.; close to school and 
road; $600; one-half cash. E. E. Hel- 
land, 103 Thirty-ninth avenue west 
Duluth. 

FOR SALE — FORTY ACRES, $50 
cash and $50 per year buys It; north 
of Woodland; excellent soil; adjoin- 
ing improved farms; prices $12.60 

and up. 

C. FRANCIS COLMAN, 
Both phones. 421 Ma nhattan Bldg. 

Five farms, large and small; prices 
right and terms f-asy; all more or 
less Improved. For information see 
W. L. Seaton. Res. 9 Mesaba place. 
6th Ave. and Mesaba; phone (rran(i 
791; or 206 Manhattan Building: 
either phone 1998. 



f!!, FOR SALE— COWS. 



CYPHERS AND BUCKEYE INCUBA- 
tors, brooder.-*, poultry supplies and 
remedies. Send for price lists. J. w. 
Nelson , 6 East Superior street. • 

FOR SALE — BARRED PLYMOUTH 
Rocks; cock and cockerels; eggs for 
hatching. C. E. Mace, 1631 East Third 
street, Duluth. 



CARPtNihK RbPAlK WORK. 



Work done neatly. O. Pearson, 207 W. 
First St. Zenith i:;74-X or Park 97. 



CARPET CLEANING WORKS. 



INTERSTATE CARPET CLEANING CO. 
L. Sinotte, Prop.; compres&ed air and 
vacuum cleaners and rug weavers. 
1908 West Michigan St. Both phones. 



Carpet and rug cleaning; naptha proc- 
ess. Zenith uye house. Phones 1888. 



FOR SALE— CARLOAD OF FRESH 
milch cows will arrive March 29; 
will buy or exchange for beef cows. 
Call S. Wlddes, 3218 West Ninth 
street; both phones. Grand 2294-A, 
Melrose 4325. 

FOR S.^JLE— M. LEVINE WILL AR- 
rlve with a carload of fresh milch i 
cows Monday, March 30. 821 Fourth i 
avenue east. Grand 1708 D. Melrose 
4702. 

FOR SALE — M. J. WIDDES HAS A 
number of good milch cow-s — soma 
fre.sh, some will be fresh soon. Call 
at 914 East Fifth street. 



TESSMAN BROS. CO., 102 E. MICH. 
street, sell poultry fee d of all kinds. 

FOP. SALE— JEAN DULUTH COTTON 
Ball Orpingtons, at Jean Duluth farm. 



CHIROPODIST. 

YOUR FEET! 
Safe, sanitary and scientific methods 
for ail foot ailments. I make a spe- 
ciality of treating flat-fool and broiven- 
down crches. 

DR. GEORGE S. SMYTH, 
306 Columbia ^Idg. Phone Mel. 194. 



FOR SALE— S. M. KANER WILL RE- 
celve a carload of fresh milch cows 
Tuesday, March 81. 1217 East Sev- 
enth street. 

FOR SALE— SIX GOOD COWS. ALL. 
fresh. .t02 North Fifty-fourth ave- 
nue west. 



__SEED^OTATOES. 

THE McKI.XLEY POTATO IS UN^ 
doubtedly the best yielder and keeper 
that can be grown in this section. I 
Yielded 665 bushels per acre at Jean' 
Du Luth Farm. Sorted seeds for sale 
at $1 per bushel, including sacks,! 
Cloverdale Farm. Wrenshall. Minn. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING. 



Dul ith Engineering Co., W. B. Patton, 
Mgr., 6ia Palladio bldg. Specifications 
prepared and construction superin- 
teuUed tor waterworks, sewerage, etc 



CLAIRVOYANT. 



MRS. ANNA, in Bryant & Co.'s hair par- 
lors, 18-A Lake ave. north. MeL 1146. 



AGENTS WANTED. 



CHIMNEY SWEEP. 



ED McCAKTY, chimney sweep, furnace 
cleaner, smokesl'ack & flagpole paint- 
er. Lakeside 46-L: Zen. Park 133-A. 



Knudsen, chinmey sweep and furnace ! 
cleaner. Fire headquarters. Phones 46 



^— OsUi ttxasi 



. . Montrpal 
. . New York 



IIO.SSpM 
1 8.40pm 

»-i»aa#. 



— 1 



FOR SALE— WISCONSIN. THE BEST < 
dairy and general crop state In the 
Union; ^-ettlers wanted; will sacrifice , 
land prices to get them: ask for i 
booklet about Wisconsin Central I 
land grant. Address Land Dept, Soo 
Line. Minneapolis. Mian. | 



WANTEp-JO RENT. 

W^AN-TED^ T0'^^^lrBr?F-.rBY''"'Y0lJNa 
lady, two modern unfurnished rooms 
for light houjjfclt^eplng in private 
family. Call ^her pho ne 390. 

WANTED TO RENT— SL\ OR SEVE.V- 
room modern hn^e. East end or : 
Lakeside, preferaQ^iy Lakeside; per- i 
maaeuL Addrc^o U owS, UeraiO. 1 



AGENTS — WANTED FOR CITY AND ', 
country territories; ambitious, loyal, | 
hard-working salesmen; would give 
men preference that are employed at 
the present time; gilt-edge refer- i 
ence of past and present record de- ' 

bond: all communications absolutely CARD ENGRAVING AND STAMPS. 

confidential. S 361. Herald. 

AGENTS WANTED— BEST SELLING 
household specialties on earth; big 
profits. Write today. The Model 
Specialty company, Ladysniith. Wis 



FLORIST AND NURSERYMAN. 

Duluth Floral Co.. wholesale, retail cut 
flowers; funeral designs. 121 W. Sup. 



FURNITURE RE-COVERED. 

Let Forsell do your UPHOLSTERINQ. 
334 E. Superior street. Both phones. 



MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS. 




A. Haakonsen, dealer 
and expert repairing 
at J. W. Nelson's. & 
East Superior street. 



BOSTON MUSIC CO., MUSICAL MER- 
ch.iadise, 18 Lake avenue north. 



OLD MAGAZINES AND PAPERS. 

old magazines and papers bought. Call 
Duluih Paper Stock company, 389-91 
South First avenue eaat; Doth phones. 



PATENTS. 

PATENTS — ALL ABOUT PATENTa!' 
See Stevens. 16 Fidelity building. 



PLUMBING. 



^^ f^^'^'^o^RY PLUMBING CO, 34 
W. First St.. plumbing and healing. 



PAINTING dt PAPERHANGING. 

fa]5<iincPand paj^erha^^Jing^ 

Call Grand 1217-D. C. Gill. 



Painting. Paperhanging, Interior Dec- 
orating. Call J. A. Selln, Mel. 7u78. 




Duluth Floral Co.. whole.<;ale, retail cut 
flowers, funeral designs. 121 W. Sup. I 



Consolidated Stamp & Printing Co.. 
Barker & Orr, Props. 14 4th Ave. W. 

CivnTENGINEER^AND SURVEYORS 

BERT FARRELL. 414 MANHATTAN 
building. Anything in engineering. 

R^ s! NICHOLS, 418 MANHATTAN 

building. Anything in englneerlug. 



REAL ESTATE. 

L. A. LARSEN Co.. 213 Providence BldjT 
City property, lands, loans, fire Ins. 



SAFETY RAZORS SHARPENED. 



Safety rp.zor bhides all kinds sharpened 
and put In first-class condition. 30o 
per dozen. Lake Hardware Co. 



SOBSSRIBE FOB THE HERALH 



l^fc^S 




i^j^^^"^'-'^-- 



*r*» -•--■*•.■ ^"^ ' ' «^ -^ . 






Monday, 



THE DUUOTHHERAIiD 



March 30, 1911 



NEWS 



you in touch 
ever} day in 



Did vou ever stop to consider that the letters in the 
word NEWS stand for the initials of the four points of 
the compass. 

AVhat the news does is literally to put 
with the four quarters of the whole world 
the year and almost every hour of the day. 

The advertising has come to be an essential part of ihe 
news. It covers the entire compass of the business world. 

It tells of the currents of trade. 

are made, w 



It tells 
what the 



where things 
cost. 



hat thcv are for, and 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No Advertisement Less Than 15 Cents. 

heTp^anted^femall 

WANTED — COOKS; WAGES FROM 
$S0 to |100 per month, in and out of 
the city; head waltreBses, wagoa 
ftom ISO to 140 per month; boarding 
house cooks, dining room girla; want 
entire force for large hotel, out; 

feneral housework girls, salary from 
16 to $40 per month. Central Em- 
ployment oflfice, 126 West Superior 
street. 

WA.VTED— COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework; small family; no 
children. 316 Fourteenth avenue 
east, near Fourth street. 



facts— facts that concern the w<ll being 



It deals with 
of the people. 

Take it from the standpoint of actual helpfulness — 
and there is. on the whole, little news in the newspaper 
that is as important as the advertising. 



W ANTED— EXPERIENCED GARMENT 
saleslady; steady po.sition to cora- 
pf'tent ptTson. When applying give 
name of last employer, state Tenglb 
of experience and salary expected. 
Itasca Bazaar company, Mlbbing. 
Mtnn. 

WA.NTED— A LARGE PUBLISHING 
house desires to employ a local rep- 
resentative to handle Installment 
collections. Women preftirred. Mr. 
H. H. Holm, collection manager, 103 
Watkins building, MUwaukee, Wis. 



One Cent a WordtEaeh Insertion. 
No Advertisement LftBB Than IS Cents. 

nwmfHHiSrwMin^ 

AND 23 



^> 



FOR RENT-BROOMS. 



49 outskda rooms, 
with hot ard cola 
ranuing water; cen- 
ter of business dis- 
trict, within tour 
blocKs of all de- 
pots. Hat'se: Pel" 
Oay, 60c and up; per 
w«ek, I 2.U0 ana up. 

FtUNlSH TliUl.K UuOMS tKiTCHEN. 
dining room and Oodroom) with a 
Keily outnt for $«». I'ay for it on 
the uignincd easy payment plan, Jl.60 
a w^ck; tne cost (s less than the rent 
ask*«d icr a a-room light hoi.sekeep- 
Ing suite. i>on"t pay lurniture rem 
t\ S. Kelly I'urniiure company, 1 



ALVARADO 
HOTEL- 
MODERN tURO- 

I'EAN PLAN. 
210-.'i2 W. bup. St. 
J. A. IJUACKL.! f. 

Proprietor. 
Mel. itfbv; G'd 1173. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No Advertisement Less Than 15 Cents. 

sale^^misc|lQneou^ 



BARGAINS IN USED PIANOS 
& Bach, mahogany 



Kranlch 

case . 

Wiilard 



mahogany case. 



1236 
118 



HOWARD, FARWELL & CO., 
Rex Theater iiuilding. 



lit 



W eht ^uperior street. 




One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No Advertisement Less Than 15 Cents. 

N T^ephonTdTrectory 

OF 

BUSINESS 

HOUSES. 

Below you will And a ; 
condensed list of reliable , 
business firms. This is de- i 
signed for the convenience | 
of busy people. A telephone 
order to any one of them | 
will receive the same care- j 
ful attention as would be i 
given nn order placed In 
person. You can safely de- 
pend upon the reliability 
of any one of these ttrms. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No Advertisement Le « Than 15 Cents. 



* 






* 



wanti:d. 
salesman fok rugs and 

DRAPEl.lKS. 

Appl / 
L FREIWL'TH. 






s 



Wanted — Girls to attend dressmaking 
school; make garments for yourself 
or others while learning. Quick and 
easy patterns drafted, any stylo. 
Miss Gray, 3rd floor. Geo. A.^ Gray Co. 

WANTED — FOUR LADIES AND 
gentlemen for chorus; splendid op- 
Rortunlty to right parties. Apply 
manager. Grand theater, 6606 Grand 
avenue, between 7 and U p. m. 

WANTED— COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework, no washing; al- 
so good nurse for two small chil- 
dren. 2616 East Third street. Melrose 
1663. 

WA.NTED — LADY OF GOOD AP- 
pearance and salesmanship can earn 
big pay at pleasant work. Address 
C 379. Herald. 

WANTED— GOVERNMENT .TOBS FOR 
women; big pay; list positions avail- 
able free. Franklin Institute. Dept 
644 L. Rochester, N. Y. 

WANTED--GIRL FOR GENERAL 

housework in family of two. Call at 
Berkshire apartments No. 1, Eighth 
avenue cast and First street. 



FOR RENT — WHY NOT FURNISH 
your rooms anew now, during For- 
ward's L*ig removal sale, i'rices on 
best hKtn-graue furniture are ex- 
ceeaiugiy iow. iou wiU get ine 
money oack on increaseu rents from 
tnc room in no iim«. 



*#;^#;.i*i^i^-*#i^****-;**X'****^- 



FOR SALE — CAMBRON-JOHNSON- 
Horg:an, the furniture factory dls- 
trlbut^r.*!, are dosing out their en- 
tire stock at their present sales- 
roams and warerooms before open- 
ing the much greater salesrooms 
right in the retail district. Cash or 
credit. Everything must go Imme- 
diately; practically your own prices, 
at 2110-2112 West Superior street. 



ELGIN HOTEL. 
S"*! Wviit First Street. 
Have iitteen outsiue muaern rooms, 
.><teaji he»i, electric lights, free 
baths, telephone, etc., |2.6o per week 
and up Melroee 1/336; Gruna 26t>. 

FOR RENT— YUUK OPPORTUNITY TO 
furnish your rooms witn some hign- 
grade furniture AT LOW COST. K. 
R. Forwara «c Co. are going to move. 
Select your furniture wnue the big 
removal saiw is on. it means a oig 
saving to you. 



WANTED— WOMAN TWO DATS A 
week for washing and ironing; must 
be good ironer. Mrs. M- I. Stew'art, 
4202 Robinson street. Phone, Park 3. 



WANTED — MIDDLE-AGED WOMAN 
with two furnished rooms wants a 
woman or girl as room-mate: cheap 
rent; all conveniences. Lincoln 260-D. 



THE .NEW ALEXANDRIA. 
Furnished apartments and single rooms 
with bath or witoout; private tele- 
phone In all room«; dining room in 
conn.icticn. 322 W«*t Second street. 



For Sale — Typewriters — We sell the 
most visible typewriter made. Old 
machines accepted at a good price. 
Machines rented at |1.60 to J3 a n-.o . 
with stand; rent applies on purchase. 
Send for list of rebuilt lypewriteis, 
fully guaranteed. We repair all ma- 
chines; Quick service; right price. 
Call Mel. 71»; Grand 686. L. C. Smith 
& Bros.' Typewriter Co.. 21 4 th a v. w. 

FOR SALE— IF IT'S A PIANO, NOW 
is your chance. We have marked 
their prices down along with every 
piece of furniture in the store. It 
would be hard to ttnd an opportunity 
equal to this. Come in and look them 
over. R. R. Forward & Co., Second 
avenue east and Supe rior street. 

FOR SALE— PENINSULAR RANGE, 
large heater, dining table and chairs, 
st« el davenport, gas plate, bookcase, 
desk, bed.-s, dishes, clock, etc., all for 
160. Quitting housekeeping. Up- 
stairs, 126 North 'i wcuiy-second ave- 
nue west. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No Advertisement Less Than 15 Cents. 

^forJInQ^^ 

# FOR RENT. i; 

* 

it 
» 
« 
* 

* 



One 3-room flat, modern 
heat. Twenty-eighth 
west and Third street. 



except 
avenue 



Also some fine, comfortable, 
steam-heated rooms In the 
Weiland block (unfurnished). 
1"3 West Superior street. 



ZENITH REALTY CO., 

104 East Superior St., 

Phone, Grand 2166. 



FOR RENT— AT 117 WEST FlRS'r 
street, four- room front flat and 
bath; facing south; three closets and 
store room Including water, only 
JiO. W. C. Sherwood & Co.. 118 Man- 
hattan building. 

FOR RENT— A SIX-ROOM, MODERN 
flat, in residence district, at 321 Ea.si 
!■ irst street; handy to business sec 
tion; heat, water and janitor service 
supplied; rent ?o».50. .lohn A. 
Stephenson & Co., 232 West First 
street. 



SECRET SOCIETIES. 



PALESTINE LODGE, NO. 7«, 
A. F. & A. M. — Regular meet- 
ings first and third Monday 
evenings of each month at 
8 o'clock. Next meetiii«j 
April 6. 1914. Work— Second 
Henry E. Grieser, W. M.; H, 
secretary. 




degree. 
Nesbitt. 



IONIC LODGE, NO. 18«, A. F. 
&. A. M. — Regular meetings 
second and fourth Monday 
evenings of each month at 
7:30 o'clock. Next meeting, 
special, March 30, 1914. Work 
degree. Edward Armstrong, 
Burr Porter, secretary. 




—Third 
W. M.; 



KEYSTONE CHAPTER, NO. 
20, R. A. M.— Stated convo- 
cations, second and fourth 
Wednesday evenings of each 
month at 7:30 o'clock. Next 
meeting, March 26, 1314. Work — Royal 
arch degree. Charles G. Mead, H. P.; 
Alfred Le Richeux, secretary. 




A 



FOR RENT— FIVE-RUUM CENTKAL- 
ly located Hat, hardwood Iloors. gas, 

. plumbing, stove heat, ^14. Massa- 
chusetts Real Estate company, lH 
Phoenix block, city. 



March 
select 
Hough, 
secretary. 



DLXUTH COUNCIL, NO. 9, 
R. & S. M. — Stated convoca- 
tions, third Friday of each 
month at 7:30 p. m. Next 
meeling, special, Tuesday, 
31, 1914. Work— Royal and 
master degrees. Frederick ffl. 
T. I. M.; Alfred Le Richeux, 



rit^ THE HOTEL METROPOLE. 
Roomj |2 and up per week; free bath; 
hot and cold running water In each 
roo n; room and board |6 per week 
and up; elegant accommodations. 



;1^f ^lYi?-!^** J?*fW« J¥ A? ¥ '^Ji-Af ***i^^Jf ** 



WANT iD. 



Old 

©BICtilSTS— '.^,'}.°"^ 

Eddie Jeron!mu9. rh.G.1234 

DE % T 1 H'F 3 ■ 

Dr f' H. Burnett.D.D.S.4608 

lAlXDRIES— 

Peerless Laundry .... 4.J8 

Yale Laundry 4.9 

Lutes Laundry 447 

Home Laundry Co 4<8 

Model Laundry 2i4» 

Troy Laundry *-67 



New 

'Phone. 

1072 



209-X 

428 
479 
447 

478 

13U2 

257 



i 

it 



EXPERIENCED FURNITURE 
I'ACKt RS. 



Apply 

DULUTH VAN & STORAGE 
18 Fourth Avenue West. 



CO.. 



REAL ESTATE, FIRE 

IXSURANXE AND 
RENTAL AGENCIES^ 

U ^7 LarseiTcoTTl 4 Providence Bldg. 
Field-Frey Co.. 203 Exchange Bl«lg. 
William C. Sargent. 102 Prov. BUjg. 
Getfv -Smith Co., 306 Palladio Bldg. 
A a' Fider Co.. 300 1st N. Bunk Bldg. 
Katicnal Co-operative. 2022 W. Sup. St. 



# 

* 

it 

it 

-»rc::'^}yt7i-^t^^i^i}it:t? i^ .?^^***s^*«<i^- 

WANTED^— MIDDLE-AGED COUPLE 
to take charge of tmall herd of pure 
bred Guernseys, orchard and truck 
garden; buildings comfortable and 
convenient, about twenty miles from 
Duluih. Write stating experience 
and giving referei ces. M 381, He-r- 
nld. 

WANTED— SALE.s^M.iN CALLING ON 
liQuor trade in Minnesota, Upper 
Michigan and Wi.<^ponsin, can make 
good mone.v selling Imported and 
domestic wines fo • a.s. Fine propo- 
sition for man ol ability. Address 
F. 390. Herald. 



WANTED-— NEAT GIRL FOR GEN- 
eral housework; small family: good 
wages. 407 East Fourth street. Call 
between 10 and 11 a. m. 

WANTED AT ONCE — GOOD GIRL 
for general housework. 17 North 
Ei ghteenth avenue east. 

WANTED— GIRL TO ASSIST WITH 
housework; call mornings. 909 East 
Fourt h street. 

WANTED— GIRL TO DO GENERAL 
housework In family of three. 718 
East Third street. 



WANTED— GOOD GIRL 
al housework; good 
East Second street. 



FOR GENER- 
wages. 2626 



WANTED— GIRL 
housework; no 
Second street. 



FOR 
cooking. 



GE.NERAL 
1026 East 



THE NEW MlDi*AND HOTEL, 

Newly furnished, modern, light and 

cozy stcum-heated rooms; ruiej $<:.60 

and up; meals If desired, twenty for 

15. 210 West Second street. 

THE DE ANGELTKRR HOTEL. 

310 East Superior street; nicely fur- 

nlshel. «team heated rooms, running 

water, etc.. |2 per week and up. 

Special winter r atea In effect. 

THE KAISERHOF HOTEL. 
10 Lake ave. N. Nicely furnished, 
steam heated outside rooms; use of 
phones, bath. Rates 60c and up. Spe- 
cial weekly rate s. C. A. Nordqulst. 

COM- 

heated 

room. 

Eabt 



FOR SALE— PENINSULAR RANGE, 
large heater, dining table and chairs, 
steel davenport, gas plate, bookcase, 
desk, beds, dishe.s, clock, etc., all 
for |50. Quitting housekeeping. Up- 
stairs, 126 North Twenty-second ave- 
nue west. 



FOR SALE — TYPEWRITERS. ALL 
makes, used typewriters, at bargain 
prices; some used only few months; 
machines rented and three mouths' 
rental applied as payment. Send tor 
list. Duluih Typewroter Co., 319 
West First street. 



FOR RENT- -REASONABLE, 
fortable furnished, steam 
suite of rooms; also single 
Meals if desired. Call 224 
Fourth street. 



FOR RENT— LARGE, NEATLY FUR- 
nlshed, warm and homelike front 
room, with running water; also other 
smaller rooms suitable for one or 
two. The Verona, 310 W. Third St 



FOR RENT— NICELY FURNISHED 
rooms, suitable for two; beautiful 
lake view; also rooms for light 
housekeeping. Melrose 6996. UOl 
East Second street. 



FOR SALE— $90 THREE-PIECE MA- 
hogany parlor euite, upholstered In 
genuine line black leather; easy 
payments, $68 60. Anderson Furni- 
ture company. Twenty -first avenue 
west. 



FOR RENT— A VERY PLEASANT, 
modern, seven-room flat, in excellent 
residence district, at 721 East First 
street; heat, water and janitor serv- 
ice supplied. John A. Stephenson & 
Co., 232 West First street. 

FOR RENT— FIV'E-ROOM MODERN 
flat In West end, will be ready April 
1; heat, water and Janitor service In- 
cluded; rent ?22.60 per month. AVhlt- 
ney Wall company, Torrey Bldg. 
Grand 810; Melrose 13 68^ 

FOR RENT— A.N EXCELLENT SIX- 
room heated flat at 416-B East First 
street. This flat is in first-class 
condition. Water and janitor service 
supplied; rents for only »39. John 
A. Stephenson & Co., 232 West First 
street. ^ 

FOR RENT— FOUR-ROOM FLAT NO. 
322 East Seventh street; hardwood 
floors, water, sewer and gas; only 
flO. N. J. Upham company, il4 Provi- 
dence Bldg^ 

FOR RENT— WAHLDORF, 220 FIRST 
avenue west, five rooms, front; hot 
water heat. Janitor;- wall beds; very 
central. Wahl & Meeser, Lon sdale b ldg 

FOR RENT — MODERN SIX-ROOM 
flat; central location; heat and water 
furnished, $50 per month. M. M. Pat- 
tlson Co., 428 New Jersey building. 



DULUTH COMMANDERT, NO. 
18, K. T. — Stated conclave, 
first Tuesday of each month 
at 7:30 o'clock. Next meet- 
ing, April 7, 1914. Work- 
Regular business. John Cox, E. C; 
Alfred Le Richeux, recorder. 





FOR SALE— USED FURNITURE Ac- 
cepted in part payment on new 
gpods. What have you to trade? 
Anderson Furniture company, Twen- 
ty-flrst avenufc west. Lincoln 14; Mel- 
rose 1867. 

FOR BALE— ONE 7 BY 10 UPRIGHT 
engine and one 20-hor6e .power 
holier; one 6»i by 8VSf upright engine; 
one elide Height ao-horse power. 
Melrose 5332. 



FOR RENT— 232 MESABA AVENUE— 
Five-room flats; modern except heat; 
good condition; janitor service, etc. 
Chas. P. Craig & Co., Sellwood build- 
ing. Phones 408. 



SCOTTISH RITE — REGULAR 
meetings every Thursday eve- 
ning at 8 o'clock. Next 
meeting. April 2, 1914. Work — 
Regular business and ballot- 
ing. Henry Nesbitt. s ecretary. 

ZENITH CHAPTER, NO. 25, 
Order of Eastern Star — Reg- 
ular meetings second and 
fourth Friday evenings of 
each month at 7:30 o clock. 
Next meeting, March 27, iyi4. WorK-— 
Regular business. Alice Magie, \\ . M.J 
Ella F. Gearhart, secretary. __ 

EUCLID LODGE. NO. 198, A. 
F. & A. M. — Meets at West 
Duluth second and fourth 
Wednesdays of each month 
at 7:30 p. m. Next meeting, 
April 8, 1914. Work— Second 
J. O. Wlnton. W. 11.; A. Dun- 
secretary. 





degree, 
leavy. 




DULUTH 
R. A. M.- 

luth first 
month at 



CHAPTER. NO. 69. 
Meets at West Du- 
Wedne.'^dav of each 
7:30 p. "m. Next 



SITUATION WANTED 

MALE. 



SITUATION WANTED- BY STUDENT, 
of advertising: 25 years of age: able 
to furnish best references; would 
like employment with view of ad- 
vancement; salary to begin, a sec- 
ond consideration; would like per- 
sonal interview. T 391, Herald. 



WANTED — OUR H I O H-G R A D E 
household specialty sells at sight, 
and every order brings from one to 
twelve repeat orders. Don't delay. 
Write at once. I . E. Montgomery, 
123 So. Fourth St. Muskogee, Okla. 



W ANT ED — EXPERIENCED MA- 
chine operators. Apply Mitt & Glove 
compan y, 226 East First street. 

WANTED— GIRL TO WORK ON 
mangle. Apply Linen Exchange, 
209 -11 East First street. 

WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework: small family. Apply 
609 East First street. 



WANTED— GIRL 
second work, 
street. 



TO ASSIST 
1306 East 



WITH 
Second 



WANTED— 500 MEN TO BUT OUR 
unredeemed pledges: 200 mens' suits. 
60 spring ovcrc( ats, 160 railroad 
watches, 200 solid gold rings. Key- 
stone Loan Co., Yi W: Sup. street. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework, at once; no cooking. 326 
Tenth avenue east. 



THE FREDERIC HOTEL. CORNER 
First avenue west and First street, 
has all been newly decorated. Hot 
and cold running .water In every 
room. Rates 60c to >1.60 per day . 

FOR RENT— TWO MODER.N FUR- 
nished rooms for light housekeeping; 
reasonable rent. 11 West Second 
street. 

GAS. 

water 

iphone 



FOR RENT— F<X:R ROOMS, 
electric light, hardwood floors, 
paid. 12 Wist Fifth street; tel 
free. 



WANTED— EVERYBODY TO KNOW 
that they can get good meals, cooked 
the way they wish, at the Bismarck 
cafe. Business mens lunch, 11 to 2, 
86 cents. Private rooms for ladies. 
Emtl Hollander, 208 West Superior »t 



FOR SALE — PEN.NANT COMBINA- 
tlon gas and coal ranges; two 
stoves In one at the price of one. 
Anderson Furniture company. Twen- 
ty-first avenue west. 

FOR SALE— ONE HEAVY NEW LUM- 
ber wagon, one second-hand spring 
wagon, one second-hand one-horse 
farm vsagon; bargain 
1922 West First 



B. J. 
street. 



FOR RENT — TWO UP-TO-DATE 
flats; new, all modern, six large 
rooms and bath; corner Fourteenth 
avenue east and Sixth street. In- 
quire next door. 

FOR RENT— FIVE-ROOM FLAT, 
modern except heat; water paid. 
1107 West Michigan street. Inquire 
next door. 



mceung, April 1. li'U. ^^ orJc 
— Regular business. W. H. 
Borgen, H. P.; A. D unleavy. secretary. 

■ EUCLID CHAPTER, NO. 66, 

Order of the Eastern Star- 
Meets at West Duluth Ma- 
•onlc temple the first and 
third Tuesdays of each month 
at 8 o'clock. Next meeting, 
1914. Regular business. Grace 
W. M.; Ptarl E. Boerner, 



F. Murray, 
secretary. 



FOR RENT — FIVE FURNISHED 
rooms with bath, water paid, electric 
light, $26 per month for summer. 
Call 'after 6. Melrose 6 588. 



FOR RENT— MODERN EAST END 
flats, one furnished, large rooms;, 
grate, hardwood floors, furnace heat. 
1809 Jefferson street. Melrose 4362. 




LAKESIDE LODGE, NO. 281, 
A. F. and A. M., meets first 
and third Mondays of each 
month at 7:30 o'clock, in town 
hall. Lakeside. Next meeting, 
special, March 28, 1914. W orlc 
degree. James A. Robinson, 
C. S. Palmer, secretary. 



Lewis 



FOR RENT— TWO NICE FURNISHED 
rooms for light hoosckeeping; water, 
bath, gas. electric light. 628 West 
Fourth street. 



shop, ___^__ 

FOR SALE— DON'T BUY ANYONE'S 
old furniture when you get new, 
strictly high-grade goods at R. R. 
Forward & Co.'s big removal sale, at 
unheard of low prices. 



FOR RENT— APRIL 1, SIX-ROOM 
flat, 116 East First street; steam 
heat, hot atid cold water. Janitor 
service; sunshiny and very desirable: 
rent %t9. ^ 

FOR RENT— No. 11 BALDWIN FLATS, 
seven room.s; heat and water fur- 
nished. William C. Sargent, Provi- 
dence building. 



TRINITY LODGE, U. D., A. F. 
and A. M., meets second and 
fourth Mondays at 8 o'clock, 
in Woodmen's hall. Twenty- 
first avenue west. Next meet- 
ing, special, Thursday. April 2, 
1914. Work — Second degree. Carl E. 
Lonegren, W. M.; R. E. W heeler, sec- 
retary. 




WA.NTED — COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
een^ral housework; two In family. 
1603 East Supcn-lor street. 



EITUATION WANTED BY TOU.NG 
man machinist as chauffeur; have 
had five yt-ars'' experience; am strict- 
Iv temperate and reliable and can 
furnish A-1 references. Address J 392, 
He rald. 

SITUATION WANTED — BY YOUNG 
man with engineer's license; wishes 
employment; will accept firing or 
night watching; long experience. 
Addresi. r 370, Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED— A.NY KIND OF 
work, not too heavy, by bright man 
of 60; good penman; neat and clean; 
good habits. Address D 365. Herald. 

SITUATION WA.NTED — BY^ YOUNG 
married man, X-1 accountant and 
collection correspondent; six years* 
experience. Address. L 363, Herald. 

SITUATION WANTEL>— BY A Y'OUNG 
married man as houseman; is also a 
good gardener; best of references. 
Address E 388, He rald. 

AS TEAM- 

with city. 



WANTED — BRASS MOULDERS FOR 
general run of ca Uings; steady em- 
ployment and gocid wages for first- 
class men. Duluth Brass Works 
company. 

Learn barber trade; always in demand, 
big wages, easy work; few weeks 
completes; tools given; diplomas 
granted. Meier Borber college, 27 E. 
Nic. Ave.. MInneaiolin. Estab. 1893. 

WANTED — GO\ ERNMENT JOBS 
open to men and ^/omen. Thousands 
of appointments c )mlng. List of po- j 
sitions free. !• ranklin Institute. 
Dept. 186 L. Rochester, N. Y. | 

WANTED — BRU JHT, ENERGETIC ' 
young man to colect and solicit city | 
trade; good opportunity; experience] 
not necessary. .Vddress. Herald, Z | 
208. j 

WANTED— WAREHOUSE IXECTRIC- ' 
Ian; steady job; married man pre- 
ferred. D. Anderson, superintendent. 
Kelley-How-Thon son Co. 



WANTED — GIRL 
housework; good 
party. 821 Fourth 



FOR GENERAL 
place for right 
avenue east. 



WANTED— COMPETENT MAID FOR 
general housework, three In family. 
1906 East Second street. 



FOR RENT— FURNISHED ROOM AT 
614 Vi East Fourth street. Melrose 
2713, 



FOR RENT — MiJDERN, COMFORT- 
ably furnished, steam-heated suite of 
front rooms; central. Melrose 17 



9. 



FOR RENT — NEWLY FURNISHED 
rooms, hot water heat. 206 West 
Third street. 



AVANTED — GIRL 
housework; three 
Jefferson street. 



FOR GENERAL 
In family. 1632 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. 14 North Nineteenth 
avenue east. 



FOR RENT — LARGE PLEASANT 
room, heated. Inquire 1520 East Third 
street, or phone Melrose 2601^ 

5^5^ RENT — NEWLY FURNISHED 
rooms reasonable. 213 Lake avenue 
north. Call Melrose, 6847. 



FOR SALE— FURNITURE AND LEASE 
of nine-room flat, five rooms rented. 
706^ West Second street. Melro.se 
8977. 

FOR SALE — FOR BETWEEN SEA- 
eon heat an adjustable coal maga- 
zine In your wood heater; burns 
buckwheat or cargo pea coal; see it 
In use. 1723 Ea.<?t Fifth street. 



WANTEI>— COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
genf-ral housework. 12 .North Nln- 
teenth avenue east. 



WANTED - APPRENTICE SEWING 
girl. Miss Ostensen, 2612 West Sec- 
ond street. 



FOR RE.VT- FURNISHED FRONT 
room and two smaller rooms; steam 
heat. 320 West Third street. 



WANTED— EXPERIENCED GIRL FOR 
general housework. 1431 East Sec- 
ond street. 



J'OR RENF- FURNISHED ROOM FOR 
gentleman; board if desired. 18 
West Third st reet. 

FOR RENT— NEWLY Fl^RNISHED 
rooms: all conveniences. 21 Mesaba 
avenue. 



FOR SALE— ONE-HALF I'RICE FUR- 
nlture. Beds, springs, mattresses, 
china closets, rocking chairs, etc. 
Boston Music Co., 18-20 Lake avenue 
north. 

FOR SALE— O.NE LARGE CANVAS 
canoe made In Maine; excellent con- 
dition. Apply S. J. Colter. Phone 
Melrose 2988. 



FOR SALE}— Secona-hand woodworking 
machinery, portable sawmills, trans- 
mission appliances, pipes for steam, 
water and furnaces. Duluth Mach. Co. 



FOR RENT — OUTSIDE, MODERN 
flat; seven rooms; water and heat 
furnished. 716 West Second street $35. 
William C. Sargent, Providence Bldg . 

FOR RENT — VERT DESIRABLE 
five-room flat; modern except heat, 
rent $20. Call Gra nd 1871-Y. 

FOR RENT— FLAT; HOT WATER 
heat; all conveniences. Apply 28J1 
West Second street. 



ZENITH COUNCIL, NO. lei. 
Royal league, meets the sec- 
ond and fourth Thursdays of 
the month at 8 p. m., K. of P. 
hall, 118 West Superior street. 
Shandoss Hoad, Kelley-How- 
Thomson, archon; collector, H. A. Hall, 
18 East First street. ^ 

DULUTH LODGE^ NO. 28, I. O. O. F.— 
Meets rvtry i riday evfuiug at 8 o lioofc 
at Odd KciloWi ball. Is iMkt timu* 
uonli. -Next nieetiLB, Kilda.v, March 2T, 

1B14. Work— Tliiia degiee. U. K. Liinlbcm. N. Q-l 

A. i. O'UonncU, Ufcc. Sec.; A. 



H. I'aul. Kill. bee. 



FOR RENT 
brick flat. 
Call Grand 



_ FIVE- ROOM MODERN 
819 East First street. 
2207-D. 




FOR RENT— FIVE-ROOM FLAT AND 
alcove; modern except heat; rent $26. 
226 ^ East Third street. 



FOR RENT — CLEAN, 
basement flat, central. 
Third street. 



FOUR- ROOM 
$10. 608 West 



WANTED— RELIABLE 
general house work. 
6863. 



(;1RL FOR 
Phone Melrose 



SlTl.ATION AVANTED- 
Bt^r; well acquainted 
Write Z 372, Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED — BY YOU.VG 
man to drive delivery wagon. Ref- 
erences. Write K 398. Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED BY EXPER- 
ienced man and wife, on farm or 
summer resort. Addr^-ss V 374, Her- 
ald. 



SITUATION WA.N'TK 
wife to take charge 
P 366, Herald. 



BY MAN AND 

of farm. Address 



SlTUATIO.N WANTED — BY YOUNG 
Tiian In garage or driving auto; A-1 
references. Call Calumet 200-L. 



WANTED — LOCOMOTIVE FIREMEN, 
brakemen; wages abotit $100; expe- 
rience unnecessaty; send age, post- 
age. Railway, care Herald. 



WANTED— GIRL TO ASSIST WITH 
housework, 413 First avenue west. 



FOR RENT — TWO FURNISHED 
rooms for light housekeeping. 413 
West Fifth street. 

THE VELVIDEBE HOTEL, 
1029 West Michigan etreet. nicely fur- 
nished rooms from $2 and up per week. 



WANTED— A NURSE GIRL. 
First street. 



2626 East 



WA.NTED— BOY 16 YEARS OLD TO 
work around sto "e in country; pay 
$3 per week and board. Write to S. 
N. Peterson, TwU , 24>nn- 



WANTED — A 
experience. 



COOK; 
Esmond 



Ml'ST 
hotel. 



HAVE 



FOR RENT— TWO 
light housekeeping, 
avenue. 



ROOMS FOR 
134 Mesaba 



WANTED — GOVERNMENT Posi- 
tions are easy to get. My free book- 
let Y 302 tells h >w. Write today — 
now. Earl Hopkini, Washington. D. C. 

— — — 

Z 393, 



wante: 

East First 



OMPETE.NT 
street. 



COOK. 



in 



Wanted — Iteliable man or woman 

vest $600; legitim.ite business. 
Herald. 



WANTED AT 
enced second 



ONCE — 
cook. Rex 



EXPERI- 
hotel. 



WANTED — COOK. BLANCHETT 
sA. 522 Lake avenue south. 



HO- 



W ANTED— NURSE 
First street. 



GIRL. 2626 EAST 



SITUATION WANTED 

FEMALE. 



SITI.ATIO.N' WANTED— Yt^UNG LADY 
Stenographer and assistant book- 
ketper, three and one-half years' ex- 
perience, wants position out of the 
city. Address B 396. Herald. 

SITUATION wTnT ED — COM PETENT 
voung lady wishes position as book- 
keeper and stenographer; will be 
willing to work for small salary. 
Call Ogden 587-X. 

SITUATION WANTED — WILL DO 
wa.<*hlng and ironing at my home. 
Mrs. Nis.sinen. 4305 Dodge street; 
i'.eniih phone Park 165-D. 

SlTUATIO.N WANTED BY EXPER- 
lenced colored woman, cooking or 
hoiisekeeping; will go out of city. 
Melrose 6675. 



WANTED— GIRL FOR GENER.\L 
hou»*"work. 314 iiecond avenue west. 
Mrs. Sullivan. 

WAM'ED- BOY F' >R OFFICE WORK. 
Answer In own handwriting to X 
Sf»7. Herald. 



WANTRIV- Yt^U.Nl MAN TO WORK 
on dnlrv farm, good milker. Apply 
1030 West Ninth street. 



wantf:d— 'tr.«;t cla.ss 

Call Lincoln 310 A. 



BAKERS, 



Fq^SAL£-^AL ESTATE 



FOR RENT- 
Nlneteenth 



-FURNISHED 
avenue west. 



ROOM, 124 



WANTED^COAT !«AKER. 
man, Ontonagon, Mich. 



J. S. WILL- 



Wanted — Cash pfild for diamonds, 
watches repaired. $1. 6 S. 5th A v. W. 



BITUATIO.N WA.NTED BY STENOG- 
rapher who Is willing to work for 
low wages to gain experience. Ad- 
dress C 337, Herald. 

irri'ATION WANTED— BY YOUNG 
lady stenographer with a little ex- 
perience. Address J 371, Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED — DRESSM.\K- 
Ing and tailoring by the day. Phone 
Melrose 6028. 

SlTiATION WA.NTED BY STENOg"- 
rapher with five years' law exper- 
ience; references. B 354, Herald. | 

BITUATIO-N WANTED BY DAY' WASH- 
Ing, cleaning; will take wa«ihipg 
home. Melrose 2267. 



_^RiyATEJIOSm^L^ 

PRIVATE HOME BEFORE AND DUR- 
ing confinement, best of care by pro- 
fessional nurse; babies also cared 
for. Margaret 1- inkle. Call Melrose 
2464, 16 West Fifth street. 

PRIVA-TE HOME ¥oR LADIES BE^ 
fore and dfrlng confinement: expert 
care; Infants carfd for. Ida Pearson, 
M. D., 284 Harrl ion avenue. St. Paul. 

MRS. B. ESCH. DOCTOR, PRIVATE 
home for women before and during 
confinement; prices reasonable. 136 
South Western « ve., St. Paul, Minn. 



# 

# 

* 
* 

t 

* 



FOR SALE CHE.\P, 

ON 

EASY TERMS, 

LOT 373. BLOCK 173, DULUTH 
PROPER, SECOND DIVISION. 

Inquire 

ST. LOUIS COUNTY 

STATE BANK. 



s 

« 
# 

« 

it 
it 
* 
it 

t 



l^OSTWJD^Oim^ 

founS^^^w^^^ariT'a^mig^^ 

tor In reducing the high cost ot 
living in the furniture world. Be- 
fore we entered the field retail furni- 
ture shops waxed fat on the profits 
extracted from the people; anywhere 
from 100 per cent up was the game. 
Our method has turned the tide your 
way; Its up to you Mr. Man to 
patronize the chaps who started 
things here In Duluth. Come right 
now to our greater salesroom sale 
and save 36. 40 and 50 per cent. Cer- 
tainly we give credit. c'ameron-John- 
son-Horgan Co., the progressive fac^ 
tory distributers. Present salesroom 
2110-2112 West Superior street. 



FOR BALE — $26, FUMED OAK Li- 
brary table, slightly damaged, at 
half price. Anderson Furniture com- 
pany. Twenty-first avenue west. 

For Sale — Northrup King's Northern- 
grown seeds; also garden tools and 
Implements; seed catalogue free. 213- 
216 East First street. T. A. Scarlett. 



FOR SALE— YOUNG SCOTCH COLLIE 
puppy, cheap If taken at once ^p- 
ply to H. Harris, 928 Vi East Second 
street. 



FOR SALE— UPRIGHT MAHOGANY 
piano; Kimball make; good condition. 
Price $125. on easy terms to respon- 
sible party. Address A 884, Herald. 

FOR SALE— .SODA FOl^TALN AND 
store fixtures; also some furniture; 
will sell cheap. 702 East Second 
street. 



FOR RENT — FIVE-ROOM BRICK 
flat, strictly modern, $33. 126 West 
Fourth street. Call Linco ln 165-D. 

LET US MOVE YOU TO YOUR NEW 
home. Duluth Van & Storage Co., 18 
Fourth avenue west. Just phone 492. 



MAJESTIC HEBEKAH LODGE 
No. 60. Regular meetings first 
and third Thursdays ot each 
month, at 1. O. O. F. hail. II 
Lake avenue north Next 
iieetlng. Thursday evening, 
April 2, 1914. l;e5ular bu.si- 
nefcS. Matilda Julin, N. G.; 
.ott.^ford. secretary. 



w 



DULUTH LODGE, .NO. 508, 
Loyal Order of Moose, meets 
every Tuesday evening at 8 
o'clock, Moose hall, 224 West 
First street. Carl Schau, sec- 
retary, 14 Third avenue east. 



/^S/is. 



w 



\VA>rTED"To3uY^-HORSE, MUST BE 
sound and fairly good roadster, that 
can be used for both road work and 
farm purposes, weight 1,250 to 1.300 
pounds: or will take horse above de- 
scribed as part payment on Ford 
automobile. E. J. Filiatrault, Mutual 
Auto company. Both phones 694. 



i(i^ii'it^Ma^it-^-»?tii-^itit'}i''7i^il-i(^fi^itit 



FOR S.\LE— PIKE LAKE LOTS; HIGH, 
well wooded, sandy beach and next 
summer homes already 
price and very easy 
Burg & Co., 23 Fourth 



to the 
built, 
terms, 
avenue 



large 
Low 
A. H. 

west. 



Mrs. H. Olson, graduate midwife; pri- 
vate hospital and home; 329 N. 68th 
ave. W. Phones: Cole 173; Cal. 270. 



FOR SALE — TWO LOTS IN COLMANS 
addition at Woodland, one block from 
car line; sewer and gas In street; 
will sell cheap for cash. Address 
T 412. He rald. 

FOR .SALE — LOT 60x100 ON SIXTH 
street, near Lake avenue; all assess- 
ments for sewer, paving and grading 
paid; easy terms. Address, Owner, 
M 1004, Herald. 



FOUND— THE WATERRURY SA vo- 
tary chenrlcal Indoor closet for homes 
without sewer connection; in:italled 
anywhere; absolutely odorless; 
cheaper to buy one than to build an 
outhouse. Write and I will call. W. 
F. Mar kus. West Duluth. 

LOST — CERTIFICATE NO. 2876 FOR 
twenty-five shares of Butte-Alex 
Scott Copper company stock in name 
of Joseph L. Ruby. Return to Jo- 
seph Ia Ruby, 619 Free Press build- 
ing.^ ^^^ 

LOST— SMALL BLACK PURSE CON- 
talnlng sum of money, either on 
Lakeside car or In Rex theater, Sat- 
urday afternoon. Reward if returned 
to Herald office. 



FOR SALE— ONE TEN-FOOT WALL 
case, one counter case and one small 
showcase; reasonable for cash. Call 
Gra nd 1699-X 

FOR SALE— $660 PLAYER PIANO, 
good as new. $376; $10 per month 
Pay this and you can take It. Ad- 
dress L 788, Herald. 



FOR SALE — PORTABLE SAWMILL: 
all complete: will sell reasonable or 
exchange for land. Inquire 26 East 
First street, L. B. Goldberg. 

FOR S-\LE — LEATHER ROCKING 
chair; cost $29, will sell for $8. Call 
1019 East Second street. 



WANTED TO BUY — A BUILDING 
lot, on or near Grand avenue, be- 
tween Fifty-fourth and Sixtieth ave- 
nue. West Duluth; give price and 
location in first letter; ca.'ih deal. 
W. D. R., 6202 Ramsey street. 

WANTED TO BUY— WILL PAY OWN- 
er up to $3,600 all cash for modern 
six-room house. Twentieth to Twen- 
ty-sixth avenue west, not above 
Sixth street. A 880, Herald. 

Wanted to Buy — Second-hand furniture 
and stoves. Hagstrom & Lundquist, 
2110-12 West Superior street. Lin- 
coln 447-A; Melrose 6258. 



K. o. T. M. 
nn.rTH tent. no. i. knights of 

the Ma/fabe«6 of ilie World. ineet<i first 
and tliii'd Mu:id8yg <{ fnoh ipouUi at 
Macrabee liall, '.il Lake areiiue nortli. 
Cliailcs O. Kutter. cniumaiiOfr. 623 
Nonli Fifty si'\ei:ih aitn'.ie «e«t: J. B. t;cliii«au, rec- 
ord kcoprr, office lu liaJl. Hours. 10 a. m. to 1 pi 
m. dally. Zcnltli 'piiune. Ciratid tiiy-X. 

DVI.l'TH HOM^2«TK.^D. NO. 31S1 

Brothrihaad tt America Teciorn meets 

Qr:>t and third Monday e^enli.su cf earh 

oioiith. tt Wi;wlniaii hall. Twentj-flwl 

avenue nest and First street. J. C 

Wcsenbcrg. fureniaii. Mrs. J. A. Bell- 

mrreeroDdcnt. Ofttce aiid reeideiioe No. 1 

klreet. Fh'.ne Zenith 229-D Lincoln. 

Jl. W. A. ' 

IMrKRl.\L CAMP, 2206 — iIKI':TS AT 
Forester hall, Fourth avenue west and 
First sii-eet. second and fcLirlh Tuesdays 
of each mouth. U. C. Eac^es, rousul; 
Uobert lUnklo. clerk. care KaoUa 
compauy. ^^^ 

CLAN STEWAHT, NO. 30, O. S. C— 
Meets first and llilrd Wedneeday each 
iiiiinth. 8 p. ID., at U. O. F. liali. comer 
Fourth arenue west and First street. 
Next rtfiular meeting Apiil I. Ad(US 
G. Maiauley. chief; John Cow. fetreury; 
Jolu) Burnett, fluandiil wcietary, S13 Torrey buUdliis. 




Wanted — Boliable man 
vest $600; legitimate 
Herald. 



or woman to In- 
buslness. A S86, 



MRS. HANSON. GRADUATE MID 
wife; female complaints. 413 Sev- 
enth avenue east. Zenith 1226. 



LY'DIA LEHTONEV. MIDWIFE. 2406 W. 
Second street. I'hone. Lincoln 476-A. 



'*lA.\'TKD-Wf)HK 
l^B'jbln 2$0-D. 



BY THE DAY. 



i 



WANTED — BOARD AND ROOM IN 
private family, li West fitbt «treeL 



FOR SALE— SNAP— t'ORNER LOT, 60x 
140 feet, one block from car line, at 
Lakeside; only $525. Little & .Nolte 
company. Exchange building. 

FOR SALE — LOT 204 MORNINGSIDE 
addition. Woodland, including one- 
half acre. Address F. W. McHugh, 
M. D.. Ontonagon, Mich. 



FOR sale:— HOUSES, FLATS, LOTS 
and land by L. A. Larsen company. 
213-214-216 Provideuco buildioif. 



LOST— 18 K.\RAT WEDDING RING 
down town, March 26. Return to 
Mrs. Plcotte, 216 Seventh avenue 
west. _ 

LOST — LOCKET CCWTAINING PIC- 
ture. Reward if returned to Alex- 
ander Hamilton, courthouse. 



FOR SALE CHEAP — MAHOGANY 
bookcase and buffet. Call mornings. 
1014 East Fourth street. 

FOR SALE — HALL SAFE, EXCEL- 
lent condition; $50; bought three 
months ago for $76. Phones 114. 

FOR S.A.LE — BABY CARRI.^GE, CK)OD 
as new. Call Lincoln 307-A. 

For Sale — Edison Indestructible records 
by mall, 60c. Boston Music Co., Duluth. 



Good Furniture 
Furniture Co., 



at 

332 



bargain. 
Sup. St. 



Zenith 
Phones. 



LOST— GERMAN SHAVER VANITY 
bag, between Seventh and Eighteenth 
avenues west; monogiam O. M. Re- 
turn to Herald offi^. Reward. 

LOST— SUNDAY NOON. SMALL BE A D- 
ed purse In vlclftity of First Presby- 
trrlan church. Call Melrose 2139. 



DRESSMAKING. 



BOATS^NpjWOTORBOATS 

FOR SALE — tiLASS CABIN LAU.NCH 
Idler; 28 feet long, 7-foot beam; fully 
equipped; has 16-horse power, heavy- 
duty Scrtpps engine; in fine condi- 
tion. This is a bargain. E. A. Viv- 
ian, 1301 East Third stree t. 

i^^^R SALE— LAUNCH, REAL BAR- 
galn. Full Information at Motor- 
cycle Repair shop, or phone same. 
312 West First street, rear. 



WANTED TO BUY — LARGE OR 
small tract of land for Investment. 
Address I 69, Herald. 

Furniture and stoves. .Toe Popkln, 231 
E. Sup. St. Grand 2287-X; Mel. 6955. 



H POPKIN BUYS STOVES AND FUR- 
"nlture. Grand 2337-A; Melrose 1482. 




WANTED TO BUY — IMPROVED OR 
unimproved fa rm Iinds. A 364, Herald. 

Zenith Furniture 
St. Both phones. 



Furniture and stoves, 
store. 332 E. Sup. 



foK^^nKST—SlCKi?f FURNISHED 
front room suitable for man and 
wife or two young ladles; good table 
board. 228 First avenue west. 



BOARD, $3. 
W^est First 



'6 PER 
street. 



WEEK. 



613 



FOR RENT— ROOM AND BOARD FOR 
lady: $6 per week. Call evenings. 
lOSVi West Fourth street. 



UPHOLSTERING^ 

Furniture, Automobiles, Carriages; rea- 
sonable prices. E. Ott, 112 1st Av. W. 



DIAMOND LODOK, NO. 45. li. OV P. 

—Meets evc;y .MoiidMy evening In Sloao's 
hall, comer TM-entleth avenue west and 
Superior street Boyd Yergtn, C. C, 
2226 Weal First ttreet. S. L. Pierca, K. 
.f U. a ud S. 

K. OF P. 
.vonni STAR LODGE, NO. 35. K. 0» 
r. — Meets e\tty Tuesday. T:30 p. in., at 
Castle hall. 118 West Superior atreet. 
.Veil meeting Mzivh 31. Dancing party. 
O. S. rainier. C. C, city hall; S. 
A. Ueani. K. of R. and S.. 28 North Taeuty eighiU 
aveiiue nent: Bmt A. Howe, U. of F., 20S First N'a* 
tionai Baok hulkliug. 

A. O. V. W. 
FIDKLITY LODOB. NO. 105 — MEETS 

at Mao-abee ball, 21 Lake avenue nonli, 
etety Thursday at 8 p. m. Visliing mem- 
bers iveli-ome. J. A. Luhausky, M. W.; 
A. E. Pierhig. recorder; U. J. Uurroitt 
21T l^Iast Fifth street. 

.MODEKN SA.MA1UTAN3. 
ALPHA COUNCIL. NO. 1 — TAKE No- 
tice: That Beocttceul deg.'ee nieeta tac- 
ond and fourtb Tliursda>s and the So- 
maritan degree the tlr>t aud third Thura- 
davs at U. O. F. UaU. corner Fourtfc 

avenue west and First street. W. B. Henderson. Q. 

8 • Wallace P. Wallbanks, aorlbe. F. A. Noble, F. 

s!'; FIrat National bauM buUding. Uia. W. N. Doa- 

aidson. Lady G. 3. ^__^___^^___ 

DULUTH TEMPLE. NO. 186, 
Camels of the World, meet* 
every Friday evening at K. 
of P. hall, 118 West Superior 
street. Martin Johnson, sec- 
retary. Initiation every Fri- 
evenlng. 





DR ESSM AKINQ 
Park 126- Y. 



WANTED. CALL 



BRAZING. 



CA.ST IRON, STEEL, COPPER, BRASS. 
C. F. Wlggeru & bona, 41tt i:^. iduy. idt. 




recorder . 



ORDEB OF OWLS, DULDTB 
Neat. No. 1200— Meetings are beld 
every Wednesday evening at OwJa 
hall. 118 Wect Superior street, 
second floor. Joseph K. FeaJu. 
secretary, 22 East Superior street. 



A. O. U. W.— Duluth Lodge, No. ]0— 
Meeits every accood aud fourth Tuesday 
nigbis at 1. O. O. F. hall. 18 Lake are- 
nue nortb. Nut meetlnf March 24, g 
p. m. sharp. Initiation and banquet. 
Oeorge E. Llndberg. U. W.; R. G. Fooie 
T. J. Hi. Germala. flnandg. U Wtu ruai 




day 




or 



UOOEK-N BBOTHERHOOU 

AMERICA. 
Duluth Central Lotice. No. 450, meA« 
at 418 W. Superlur saeet. second 

loor, second Tuesday of each month. 
Next meeting April 14. Initiation'— 
Large class. Dr. William li. Kook- 
ler, pitsUlent; Jacob Johiiaon, d«9> 
uty: Charlca V. Uanscn. aetretaxy; 
treasurer. 



BOTAL ARCAN1JM. DCLUTH COUIf< 

oU, No. 1482— Meets second and fouitk 
Tuesday evenings at Maccabcc ball. St 
Lake avenue uurtb. CUuton Brooki. §••• 
retaa. Ml OoltMtbU UiUdli^ 



I 

K 




:7 



^ -^ 



i 



I 



II- 

\ ■ 

I 



I 



I* 



I. 








THE DULUTH HERAL 




VOLUME XXXI— NO. 306. 

TENSE EXCITEMENT 
MARKS THE CLIMAX 
OF DEBATE ON TOLLS 



TUESDAY EVENTING, MARCH 31, 1914. 



TWO CENTS. 



!^ 



Crowded Galleries Hear 

Mann and Clark Attack 

President's Plan. 



ST. PAUL MILLIONAIRE 
IN CUTICAL CONDITION 



HUERTA CONFIDENT 
VILLA WILL FAIL IN 



Humphrey of Washington, 

Republican, Says Clark 

Was Wronged. 



Republican Leader Predicts 

Canal Trouble in Case 

of War. 



*^f^|HMi***MH(Nf ****** 



NI1.I.KR DECIOES TO 

■ VOTK FOR REPEAL, 



From The Herald WMhInffton Bureau. 

\Va>bliiKtun, March 31. — Rf'P- 
r«-«<ntati\r CI«r«'nrt B. Miliar of 
Uiiluth annonnoFil tutlny that he 
had rraolvfd the doubt In bin 
■nliifl UB (hr I'anuma ranal tolln 
qarntion In fa\or of a repeal of 
tlie free tollH provision of the 
e^latlnK la». 

"I ntudled the qneHtlon from 
the eeonomic Ktaadpoint and 
from the «lev\point of the termn 
of the treaty, and found that on 
botli potiitx there nbould be no 
fmoiuption for the ooaKt-vTlwe 
MhipH of the Vnlted Stateii,*' nald 
>lr. Miller. 

Other membern of the Minne- 
sota delesatlun nho v\lll vote for 
repeal are .\nderMon. Ilaniaiond, 
Ua\l.s. S<e%eni». VoUtead, i.lnd- 
bersh ai>d Steenerwon. Thos»e 
^\ho wUl xote aKalntt repeal are 
Smith of MinnenpoIlK and Mana- 
han. eonirrei».<iman-at-Iar|te, 




DES MOINES 
KILLS^BONDS 

Votes Against Issue* for 

Municipal Waterworks 

Project. 



ON TORREON 

Only Word From the Front 

Is That Fighting 

Continues. 



Avenues of Federal 
Blocked — Witnesses 
Describe Battle. 



Aid 



DEMOCRATIC CONF^/tNCE AT 
ST. PAUL STRONi^f IN FAVOR 
OF HAMMONE t OR GOVERNOR 

SENTIMENT 
PRACTICALLY 
UNANIMOUS 



CHOICE OF DEMOCRATIC CONFERENCE FOR GOVERNOR 



Hanna Elected Mayor for 

Third Time — Other 

Iowa Elections. 



FREDERICK WEYERHAEUSER. 



WEYERHAEUSER 
MAY NOT LIVE 



an 

cf tense excitement the j^jnjonaire LumberiTian's 

the house over President 



*************************** 

AVashington. March 31.— In an at- 
■n'risjihere 
isfrug.^lf in 
Wiison's proposal to repeal the Pan- 
ama tolls exemption today was pressed 
to Its last stage. 

A full atlendanf-e on the floor and 
a thri.tiK of an'tious spectators such 
as lli^ iiiiuse seldom has seen In the 
gnllt lies waited for the concluding de- 
batfs and the deciding vote, which 
was expected late this afternoon. 

On the program for speeches were 
Speaker Champ Clark. Republican 
Leader Mann, both opposed to the pres- 
ident, and Tierre^ejitaitve.? Sl.erley ai d 
Covington, for the administration. 
Claim Sa«e Majority. 

Administration supporters confldent- 
Iv . iHimed the repeal bill would pass 
b\ a majority of from 60 to .5. 

"Cheers and applause greeted the 
opening of the days debate. ^>^ "t'n 
Representative Humphrey. Republican, 
of Wnshinpton. declared that "but for 
an injustice the great, patriotic speak- 
er of this house today wo\ild be oc- 
cupvlng the White Hou-«e.' the gal- 
I. rles joined the floor in a round of 
apt'lause. , . , 

Representative Humphrey denounced 
the Democratic position as "more con- 
temptible than the Knglish language 
can express." and d»-clared that the 
condition had been brought about by 
tl\e 'fgoti.«tical blundering' 
administration in the 

'*He lauded Majority Leader Under- 
wood and Speaker Clark, who. he said, 
"by every rule of fairness and honor 
should be president today." 



r>es Moines. Iowa. March 31. — Con- 
fusion of voters over the ballot used 
in the municipal waterworks election 
yesterday was given, by its friends to- 
day, as a reason for the defeat of the 
measure. It seemed almost certain 
that the bond Issue had lost, even 
though the people had voted "yes" 
on the question of municipal owner- 
ship by a substantial majority. The 
ballot contained two questions, after 
it had been announced that only one 
proposition would have to be voted 
upon. 

Hanna Re-eieetrd. 

Verification of the returns on the 
candidates for mayor and city coun- 
cil early today showed that Mayor 
James R. Hanna had been elected 
to his third term by an almost 2 to 1 
vote over Zell G. Roe. former police 
commissioner. Jacob M. Leonard, the 
labor candidate for council, who ap- 
peared to have been beaten in early 
returns last night, was successful, ac- 
(ording to verified count, by nearly 
160 votes. The other commissioners 



* 

* 

WW 



FKiHVIXG COXnXUES. * 

Jaai^s, ItUirrh 21. « 1 o'Hork * 
toAmy a alnirle line Matins that 4i 



flKhtlnic conllnnrti at T*rrron v«-a« ^ 



A rumor that an arastotfep 
been ac*cd to vvwa denied. 



had * 

* 



Washington, Mareh 31. — The Mexican 
embassy here today received the fol- 
lowing message from the foreign office 
in Mexico City: 

"Torreon has not fallen, and the gov- 
ernment la quite confident that it will 
not fall, according to the latest re- 
ports received by the government from 
the front." 



Life Is Sustained By. 
Oxygen. 



Sons From St. Paul Reach 

His Bedside at Los 

Angeles. 



of the 
Mexican sltua- 



for refus- 



( Continued on page 8. fourth column.) 

LIFE SENTENCE FOR 
^^HANDSOME JACK" 



Jury Finds Koetters Guilty 

of Murdering Mrs. 

Kraft. 

Clilcago. 7.larch 31.— John B. (Hand- 
some Jack) Koetters was found gailty 
of murdering Mrs. Kmma Kraft of Cin- 
cinnati, and his punishment was fixed 
at life imprisonment, in a verdict ren- 
dered by a jury here today. The jury 
took the case yesterday afternoon. 

The crime was committed N'ov. 14. 
1S12. Mrs. Kraft was 60 years old and 
bad been a widow four years. She had 
been Infatuated with Kfntters and had 
Jiiat sold her little property In Cincin- 
nati for |:!.000. It wa.q the Recusa- 
tion of the state that Koetters. failing 
to get the money from her by cajolery, 
niurdered her and fled with It. 

■Evidence was Introduced that Koet- 
ters previously had obtained $800 from 
Mrs. Kraft. This the defendant ad- 
nilttf-d. 

Woman'* tl^ad Crunhrd. 

Mrs. Kraft was fovjnd in a ht»tel room 
here at the pttlnt of death, her head 
crushed from a blow with a machin- 
ist's hammer. Su5pici<in pointed to 
Koetters. but a nation-wide search for 
the man was fruitless until he was ac- 
cidentally recognized in San Francisco. 
When arrestfd he had $60 In a pocket 
r>f his coat und $800 concealed in his 
shoe. 

A feature of the defense was an at- 
tempt to set up an alibi for the slain 
woman. inst«rad of for the murderer. 
Evidence was offered to prove that 
Mrs. Kraft could n«.t have bten in the 
«'hicago hotel at the time she was said 
by the state's witnesses to have ar- 
rived there. 

Accounts from the juryroom were 
that the jurors agreed at once on Koft- 
ter's guilt, and debated only on the 
punishment to be inflicted. Koetters 
Is about 35 years old. 



Los Angelef. Cal.. March 31— Fred- 
erick Weyerhaeuser, the millionaire 
Minnesota lui iber man. who has been 
ill at his wti ter home near Pasadena 
for a week, oday was reported in a 
critical condition. His condition grew 
worse last ni jht and It was feared he 
could not Tf" over. Oxygen was used 
to prolong life. _,j*v 

Weverhaeujer was prostrated with 
a severe cold last Wednesday. Signs 
of pneumonia were noted. At that time 
physicians sad there was no cause for 

*'Th"eaged 1 amberman talked yester- 
wlth his sons. Charles and 



(Continued on page 8. sixth column.) 

TWO MINNESOTANS 
OPPOSE REPEAL BILL 



Rebel* Arc ,0|>tlmiiitle. 

Chihuahua. Mex..* March 31. — While 
officials here are djpttmistlc as to the 
outcome of the batfle of Torreon, they 
said today that the absence of official 
reports Indicate.s that <ien. Villa is 
meeting with stubborn resistance. 

The telegraph office Is accepting 
telegrams addressed to Gomez Palaclo. 
care of Gen. Villa, but thus far none 
addressed to newspaper men has been 
replied to. 

Flghtlns Conllaiirs. 

Juarez. Mex.. March 31. — l"he only 
information available here early toua> 
was thnt fighting continues at Torreon. 
There were no details, but rebel offi- 
cials decjared that the main battle for 

' the town was fought at Gomez f'alacio 

! last week. Losses there wei« heavy on 
both side*i, and they assert that neither 

i aide is now able to repeat so bloody 

! and determined « confest. 

In Torreon the fighting is said to 
be from house to houFC, whereas Gonua 
Palacio had to be takcfj by storm after 
three assaults. In the <{ourse of ■which 
men went down by hundreds. 



day 



Fred- 
erick, who arrived from St Raul. Mrs. 
<J S Davies, and Mrs*. K. J. Hiil. 
daue'htera of the stricken man. are i 
humlng to tie bedsid e from the East. 

In the hiot. rv of the development of 

the logging a id lu^^^er business of the 

Northwest th* name of \\ e> erhaeuser 

has been pron Inent for many years, and 

vJ^hile this industry Is now In the de- ; 

^Uie in this section of the country 

that name will continue to be one of 

h^ foremost in the business for some 

it^e in the North Pacific coast states. 

where tl'eincustry is still flourishing. 

Cam* From iicrmany. 

Born In Nl. der Saulhelm. Gernriany. 

N'ov 21 1834. son of John and Kather- 

ine (Gabel) Weyerhaeuser, he received 



Smith and Manahan Talk in 

House Against the Sims 

Measure 

From TO* Herald Wathlnfton Bureau. 

"Washington. March 31. — Two Minne- 
sota Republican members. Smith and 
Manahan, have declared themselves 
opposed to the .Sims bill to repeal the 
free tolls pro\ Islon of the Panama 
canal law. Representative Smith. In 
his opening statement yesterday, .said 
he was opposed to the pending bill "be- 
cause he believed It Involved the sur- 
render and betrayal of the most Im- 
portant rights of ownership of the 
United St.ites In the Panama canal." 

Mr. Smith said the provision ctf 
equality of treatment In the Hay- 
Pauncefote treaty was "simply a guar- 
anty by the I'nited States as the 
owiier. constructor and operator of the 
canal, to show no favoritism or par- 
tiality to one foreign nation over any 
other, as to conditions or charges of 
traffic or otherwise." 

Mr. Manahan's speech consisted of a 
series of questions on the points dis- 
cussed by the proponents of the meas- 
ure, one of them being a query as to 
why he wasn't given more time to 
discuss the question. 



Federal Treaxwi^ ••laed. 

Douglas. Ariz.. M.irch SI. — The Span- 
ish steniwer Bonall. carrying 900.000 
pesos with which to pay the Federal 
garrison at Guaymas. was captured 
Saturday by ConstitijtionallBts off 
Topolobampo. acc»rd'i'i< to official dis- 
patches received ifttt by Constitu- 
tionalist Agent LeleKvywr. 

The money was <.---«Sscated and the 
vessel suiik and nW* ilptain and crew 




Second District Congress- 
man Is Ready to Obey 
the Call. 



Only Few Delegates Desire 

Lawler as the 

Candidate. 



Senator Sullivan of St. 
Cloud Chosen Tempo- 
rary Chairman. 



WINFIELD SCOTT HAMMOND, 
Congressman From the Second Minnesota District. 



(Continued on page 9. third column.) 

SAYS HEITaS MID 
TO HAUL 'REPEATERS' 



NO 



RAILROAD 
STEEL AND 



FAVOBS FOR 
IRON CONCERNS 



FIND 57 WAYS TO 
SPELL "ISOSCELES ' 



Terre Haute. Ind., March 81. — "When 
the trial of Msiyor l>oDn M. Roberts, 
charged with election frauds, was re- 
sumed In the circuit court today. Wal- 
ter A. Myers, a chauffeur, was re- 
called for cross-examination. Myers 
yesterday testified that for three days 
last October he had hauled repeaters 
to registration boothn In this city, and 
later had driven repeaters to different 
voting precincts at the election In No- 
vember. 

Myers in his testimony declared that 
he had been paid |2 an hour for his 
work, and that he had collected the 

money from Mayor Roberts. The wit-. - o • ,i j .^ 

ness was cross-examined yesterday, but i etry a few days ago misspelled the 
the defense had not finished with him word "isosceles A^yr^V .> different 
, when court adjourned for the day. i ways, it was announced today. 



New York Students Use 

Fifty-six Varieties 

of Errors. 

Albanv. V. Y.. March 81.— High 
school students in New York state who 
tried the state examination in geom- 



New Tariffs Are Suspended 
for All Other In- 
dustries. 



Four Thousand Schedules 

Held Up By Commerce 

Commission. 



(By a Staff Correapondcnt.) 

St. Paul. Minn.. March 31. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — That Congressman 
'■ W. S. Hammond of St. James will be 
the choice of governorship honors 
I of the Democratic conference which Is 
1 being held in the Auditorium here to- 
i day, seems to be a foregone conclu- 
sion. Congressman Hammond has no- 
1 tifled his friends, after repeated urg- 
■ lags that he will "abide by the decl- 
j slon of the conference." This is more 
! than he has heretofore admitted, as 
I he was of two minds — one being to 
: run again for congress from the Sec- 
ond district of Minnesota, and the oth- 
er to take a try at the governorship. 
Even the Lawler adherents, at this 
writing, have quit trying to make be- 
lieve that they have any show In the 
conference. It is all Lynchwise. and 
! Lynch la Hammondwise — so there you 
j have it. However, it is not hoped to 
I put matters through without a fight, 
1 although that fight will be in the 
I nature of filibustering more than any- 
; thing else, for there will not be enough 
Lawler raeu in the conference to msk^ 
the tlght'fla'ngercms at anr sitCe of th© 
game. 

The gatherlnr at the Auditorium 1b» 
it Is generally conceded, one of th» 
most representative the state has ever 
I known. Men with personal business 
; Interests have forsaken them for the 
nonce, paying their own expenses and 
; devoting their time to the benefit of 
j the state rather than party. Earnest- 
ness J» the apparent keynote, wltb 
few exceptional cases, of the confer- 
( ence and It Is believed will produce 
pregnant results. It is the general 
! setitiment here that because of the . 
strong Hammond sentiment It is not 
all unlikely that Dan Lawler will 
w-ithdraw when the desire of the dele- 
gates takes concrete form. Mr. Law- 
ler is a delegate and is therefore sub- 
.iecting himself to being bound by 
the decision of the conference. 
*!>nlllvan In Chalrmaa. 
The conference met at 11 o'clock thl» 



his education In Cermany and worked 
In a vineyard until 18 years oUi He 
came to Ameilca In 1852 and located in 
the northeast rn part of Pennsvlvan a. 
In 1856 he moved to Coal \ alley. 111., 
and engaged In the lumber and grain 
Susine.ss. Ind It was while in business 
at that place that he was marrie d Oct . 

(Continued oi page 8, second column.) 

"FAMILY EHTRAHCE" 
BARBED IN CHICAGO 

Ordinance Is Passed By the 

City Council— Crowd 

Cheers Aldermen. 

Chicago, March SI.— An ordinance 
prohibiting "'amlly entrance" signs on 
saloons, or a ly other inscription Indi- 
cating that »n entrance was Intended 
for the adiilssion of women, was 
passed last night by the council. 

The ordinance which would prohibit 
booths in wlie rooms was referred to 
the Judiciary committee »»y a vote of 
30 to 25. Tl e gallery was ftH^tl .^'tlJ 
spectators who hissed or cheered the 
aldermen debating the measure. 

I THE DAY IN CONGRESS | 

« 

s 

bills If 



STUBBED HIS TOE. 



DETROIT AND OLIEN 
POSTMASTERS NAMEJ. 

From Tht H^rtld WashittftAS Burtau. 
Wii.shiijgton. March 31. — The presi- 
d*nt has r...mlnated the following Min- 
nesot.i p .•<tnr?fSft»s: Kvtrelt W. Davis 
at D-^trolt; Ole A. Fuglen at Olien. 



\*»v CoHK-t In Seen. 

Cambridge. Mass.. March 31. — A ca- 
blegram reoeixed nt the Harvard col- 
lege observatory from Kiel announced 
the discovery of a conu-i by Dr. 
Kritzingf-r of Holhamp. The comet 
wa.s ob.>=ervtd on March 29, 6171. 
Greenwich mean time. In right ascen- 
sion 16 hours. 11 nan., 30.2 sec; dec- 
lination minus 9 deg,, 30 mia., 45 sec. 



SENATE. 

Met at «••!». 

Convidrrrd aiisrrllanrou<i 
upoii the 4 ulendar. 

<'oaHt aid Innular survey eoaa- 
mlttor lieurd arKumenta on thr 
proponal tor the Kovcriimrnt to 
take over the Clic<»apeaUe A Uela- 
vvnre caiml. 

Commeri-e commit <er vta» urged 
to appropilate for deepeniiiK and 
wtrHlKhtrit nn the narrovvH u( Lake 
Chuiuplain. 



1 
J 



* 

* 

upon 4 
Pan- Jd 



HOrSE. 

Met at i 1 :.tO a. ni. 

Final d 'bate wan begun 
the propo led repeal of the 
ama (olln exemption. « 

Itrprer^eiitatlve lllnebangh, « 
rbulrman of the Progrewnilve ron- * 
irreH.'«lonal romailttre. trntifird be- ^ 
fore the •leetiona rooimlltee of A 
c>ontrlliutl>)nN made by eongrcsa- ji 
■irn to th • laat eaaipalgn. -^ft 




(Continued on 



page 



8. sixth column. > 



Washington. March 31.— All new 
tariffs filed by railroads eliminating 
allowances to Industrial railroads were 
suspended today by the interstate ^m- 
merce commission untiL July 30, with 
the exception of those affecting the 
United States Steel corporation and 
other iron and steel companies, which 
were permitted to stand. 

Approximately 4,000 tariffs were sus- 
pended. They would have become ef- 
fective at midnight, and were submit- 
ted In compliance with the commis- 
sion's findings ill the industrial rail- | 
ways case, in which it was held that 
allowances and divisions of rates made ■ 
by trunk lines with certain industrial 1 
railways operated by iron and steel 
companies in Eastern territorv were, > 
In effect, rebates and should be dls- ' 
continued. 

No tariffs affecting the Industrial 
railways covered by the decision in the ' 
industrial railways case were sus- i 
pended. Only those Industrial rail- i 
ways that have not had "iheir day In 



SIEGEL'S WIFE WIU 
SUE HIM FOR DIVORCE 



Will Name Two Co-Respon- 
dents-Was Once News- 
paper Writer. 

New York, March 31. — Henry SiegeU 
the bankrupt banker and • merchant 
under indictment for grand larceny and 
violation of the state banking laws, 
is named as defendant in a suit for 
absolute divorce which counsel for 
Mrs. Vaughn Slegel said would be filed 
today. It is understood that two co- 
respondents are named. 

Mrs. Slegel was the widow of George 
M. Wilde, brother of Rear Admiral 
Wilde, U. S. N.. when she came to New 
York from her home in Virginia in 
search of work. 

She was employed as a nevrspaper 



court" are granted a suspension of' the ' ^r't^r, and was assigned to write a 
tariffs affecting them. I story about the Slegel stores when 



MeanM Trriuendonii Losx. 

Eliminations of allowances and divi- 
sions with the Industrial roads oper- 
ated by the United States Steel cor- 
poration and other iron and steel com- 
panies in the East were permitted to 
stand. That will mean th.it. unless 
the courts enjoin the trunk lines from 
discontinuing the allowances, or the 
commission should give a rehearing 
of the industrial railwavs case the 
tariffs will be effective' against the 
Steel corporation's roads and against 
those of other iron and steel com- 
panies. It is estimated by experts of 
the commission that elimination of 
such payments would mean an annual 
loss to the Steel corporation alone of 
about 59.000,000. 

The order provides for hearings. Xo 
date has been fixed, but it is scarcely 
likely they will be held before nex't 
autumn. In which event it will be nec- 
essary for the commission, before July 
30, further to suspend the tariffs. 



they opened. There she met Siegel. 
She resigned from the staff of th* 
newspaper and went to work for Siegel. 
In 1898 they were married. 

Separated Four Yeara Ago, 

Until four years ago .'^legel and his 
wife maintained luxurious establish- 
ments In New York, Mamaroneck and 
London. 

Four years ago Mrs. Slegel went 
abroad. Then the fact that the couple 
had separated became known. Siegel, 
it was said, was paying his wife $25,000 
a year. These payments, howe%-^r, are 
declared to have been discontinued 
some time ago. after Siegei's affairs 
became involved. 

Mrs.. Slegel arrived In New York 
from Paris about five weeks ago. She 
consulted her attorneys and they be- 
gan preparation of the complaint 
against the merchant-banker. 

Siegel and his wife both refused to 
discuss the suit today. 



NEGRESS LYNCHED ARMS DISAPPEAR; 



BY OKLAHOMANS 

is Accused of Murdering 
White Youth Near j 
Muskogee. i 

Muskogee, Okla., March 31. — Marie ] 
, Scott, a negresB, who " Sunday night 
I killed Lemuel Peace, a young white 
! man. by driving a knife into his heart, '. 
^was taken out of tlie Wagoner county! 
1 jail early today and hanged to a tele" j 
I phone pole. The mob. w hlch was '■ 
' masked, overpowered the jailer, a one- ' 
': armed man. threw a rope over the 
, woman's head and dragged b«r out of 
1 the Jail. 



MAY BE FOR IRISH 



Copenhagen, Denmark, March 31.— 
A mysterious cargo of 300 tons oT 
rifles, supposed to be intended for Ire- 
land, disappeared from the vicinity of 
the Danish Island of Langeland dur- 
ing last night after an embargo had 
been placed on it by the authorities. 

The rifles were brought to Lange- 
land from Hamburg on board a light- 
er, which anchored off the Island. A 
short time afterward the Norwegian 
steamer Fanny drew up alongside and 
proceeded to take the arms on board. 

The Danish authorities then came on. 
to the scene and seized the papers of 
the lighter and the steamer, whose 
commanders were ordered to await 
further instructions. 

Today tho two vessels bad vanished^ 




DEFECTIVE PAGE 






r 



il 



—> 




r 



^# 



Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



March 31, 1«14. 




"WEATHER — Oenerally cloudy weather tonight 
and Wednesday with probably rain or anew; 
moderate northeasterly winds. 




MafUy 
Clothes for 
Lively ,' 
Boys..,^ 



BOYS' EASTER SUITS 
AND TOP COATS 

In preparation for Easter we have outdone ourselves! 
Headquarters for values truly remarkable! 
Styles of distinctive juvenile charm! 

The children's store will delight mothers of little folks with 
the ample, almost unlimited, preparation it has made for Easter out- 
fits for the little, ones. Stocks are splendidly complete and aglow 
with interesting values that should make this store your place to 
do your buying. 

A FEW SPEOI^LS 11^ iOYS' WEIIR 

BOYS' EASTER SUITS, ages 7 to 18 years, fancy mixtures 
and blue serges, latest models, fancy plaited patch pock- 
ets and sewed belts— $3.45 tO $15.00; also complete 

showing in above sizes, suits with two pairs of 
icy mixtures and blue serges — $3.95 



WILL COLLECT 



GARBAGE FREE 



City Prefers Ttiis Plan lo 
the Exclusive Con- 
tract System. 




''Correct Brett for Womtn 




and GirUr 



Lack of Funds Will Delay 

Action Until Next 

Year. 







1 suit,unmatchable value 
Norfolk, with 2 pair lin- 
d pants — $4.95. - 

venile Suits, P.alkan and Russian 
les, ages 2i/> to G years; fancy mix- 
tures and blue serges, $3.45 to 
$7.50. 

Complete showing of Rah 
Rah Mats. 50c to $1.50. 

Spring Caps. 

Ih-iUiant showing of Shirts 
and Blouses, all. new colors 
for spring. 

A complete linf of BoVs' 
Shoe«^, sizes from B to (i]'2 — ' 
prices, $1.75 to $at>0. 



OAK HALL BUILDING 




STATE PLANTING TREES. 44 



Reforestation Is Going on in Itasca 
and Crow Wing Counties. 

Mipiu'apolis, Minn., March 31. — The 
p!.T ,Mn^ of 1,000,000 pine trees, the 
tiT.-t [• iMresiation work by the state 
<.:• Minnesota on a large scale, was be- 
Kim yesterday In Itasca and Crow i 
^X\l\S counties. The tree planting is 
belns done under the supervision of 
r». R Tierney, assistant stale forester.' 
Most of the trees planted are whice 
pin 



MOVIES" TO 
SHOW MINES 



have al8o been loaned by the commit- 
tee for the exhibit. 

It is expected that nearly 1.000 >or- 
wesrian re.nidents of Northern Minne- 
I sola will visit Norway during the rejv- 
I tennial celebration. From Pu'"*!^ 
I it is probable that more than 200 peo- 
ple will make the trip. Several steam- 
ship agencies of the city have rei>orted 
reservations for the spring. «"«">' ^^ 
the people intending to leave the latter 
part of April in order that they may 
I be there on the opening day. May i.. 




W T. Cox. st»te forester, paid that 
5r)<i; ■ fxp'rimental reforesting had 
l... n d'»ne in the northern part of the 
.xlMir-. which has proven that the work 
i\-ill i)e a' success 
tivt^r lands will be . ^ 

The work is beinp: doTie with a Sl'i. 
««*» fund appropriated by the legisla 
turc. 



Mver Mining Company Will 
Prepare Exhibits for 
" Norway. 



NOTICE ! 



cTuovl^'and'birnud Norweqians of Duluth Are 

replanted. ^ 

Active in Securing 
Exhibits. 



The S<-andla C<tiii>t«M\v Association 

of I-ondoii Koad will lioM its aiuiiial 

nuHHiiig WVdnr'iilay cvfiiliiij Ainil 1 

at 8 «.'rlork. 10« First avt>iui«' west. 

\!I int'nilK-rs arc* ura:<>«J t 

A. O. S\VF..NDB\ 



Witt TRY TO 
PROVE ALIRI 

Defense in Gran Case WiA 

Subpoena Prominent 

Duluthians. 



The city will not award aii exclusive 
contract for the collection and disposal 
of garbage and ashes, but will endeavor 
to establi.sh free municipal collection 
as soon as the ttnances will permit. 

This decision was reached at an in- 
■"formal conference held in the mayor's 
office this morning. 

.Since the opening of the bid submit- 
ted by the Sanitary (larbage company 
and its terms published, a storm of 
protest against acting favorably upon 
the proposal has arisen. The city 
cauncil has been bombarded with ob- 
jections coming from all parts of the 

city. 

CouiiHI Hreds ProteMiM. 

The cons«>nsus of opinion has been 
that the city should establish a free 
municipal collection and it is in w- 
sponse to this widespread expression 
of the public's sentiment that the 
commissioners concluded today to 
grant no exclusive privileges but to 
work to the end that free collection 
may be instituted as soon as the funds 
are available. • 

"The citVs action in advertising for 
bids and considering the proposition 
submitted served a most useful pur- 
pose in that attention was centered on 
the garbage collection problem," said 
Commissioner William A. Hicken, head 
of the safety division, this morning. 
"We desired the figures in order that 
Wf might have a definite basis on 
\\hich to discuss the matter. We 
learned that the people of Duluth are 
stronglv opposed to the exclusive con- 
tract and are as heartily in favor of 
citv collection. All the members of ; 
th^ council have felt that municipal ! 
collection is the only satisfactory so- j 
lution of the problem but it wa." 
thought that that might be ha.'^tened | 
and the best interests of the city | 
served bv private collection for a j 
time. We shall now proceed to enlarg** I 
the system which we have Instituted 
and we hope that within the next year 
or two it may be extended to all parts 
of the city." 

l\o FundK TbiH Tear. 
The cltv has no funds available this 
vear for "installing the free collection. 
But when the budget is made next fall 
it la probable that a levy of $10,000 
to $15,000 will be Included. 

The health department now has four 
or five sanitary garbage wagons, part 
of which are in use. One is kept busy 
in the downtown district. Another 
collects part of the time in the West 
end and the balance of the time as- 
sists in the downtown collection. Oth- 
er wagons may be started at an early 

MUCH DEVELOPMENT 
OF MINES EXPECTED 

Great Northern and Other 

Concerns Plan Large 

Amount of Work. 

Hibbing. Minn., March 31. — (Special 
to The Herald.)— Though preparations 
for taking over the Great Northern 
properties now being operated by the 
Oliver Iron Mining company under 
leasees which expire on Jan. 1, 1915, 
will occupy the greater part of the at- 
tention of the management of the ore 
properties, the development work on 
the lands now in their control will 
not be overlooked. „ ... 

It is probable that the Smith mine, 
located north of the North lino prop- 
erty which has been cleaned by Butler 
Brothers during the past season, will 
be mined during the coming summer. 
SlrlppiiiK <••«• n«iiwo»dle. 

The Winston-Dear company has tour 
.shovels at work on the Dunwoodie 
mine at Chisholm and the tTieat 
Northern Ore company will be read> . 
in ca'se it is necessary, to ship from 
that property before the close of the 
present season. At the Dean, two 
shovels are at work completing the 
stripping, under the direction of Ktit- 
ier Brothers, and will reach the ore 
this season. , 

The property, which Is perhaps of 
most interest to the residents of the 
range is the Hill Annex at Calumet 
where a shaft has been sunk. The land 
is owned bv tlie state and is being op- 
erated bv "the company under a state 
lease This Is one of the largest prop- 
erties in the district and definite in- 



Spring Fashions 

Are now at their best, as the choicest 
models and most exclusive fabrics are nov/ 
being shown in our extensive ensemble of 
Fashionable Apparel for the Discriminat- 
ing Woman. Also 

Outer-Dress for the Small 
Woman and Young Miss 

Styles possessing the charming individuality of Gid- 
ding apparel for adult women — with an added touch 
here and there which makes these delightful modes 
even more becoming to petite figures — form an inter- 
esting feature of the authoritative New York fashions 
now on display in this establishment. 

The small woman, debutante and college girl can fill 
their dress requirements here with genuine satisfac- 
tion. 

Tailleur Suits, Stunning Coats, Silk or Serge Dresses, 
Net, Lace and Wash Frocks, Waists and Millinery. 



'i 






This Is the Most Wondertul Stove 

Shown 
in Duluth! 



raSlfTWO-FUEllEMi 

Cooks tr Bakes ,£^Gas c£od\ 






.\ Perfect Gas Raiiffe 
A Peile<t Cua\ Raiise 

Combined — two in one! 

An ideal stove for our vari- 
able Duluth climate: Costs 
about a.s much as a first-class 
coal range. Has all the ad- 
vantages of both fuel sys- 
tems. We are selling a great 
many Pennant Two - I'uel 
Uanites. Those sold are giv- 
ing the very best .satisfaction. 
If interested call for hook. 
"Storv of the Pennant." It 
tells all about this wonderful 
stove. 

We handle the Peoria-Tjex- 
inffton 0>al rUina«'s. Quiek 

Vction Malleable itanjies. Ins- 
tate lias Kanges — i^a<li tin- 
l>e«^t In its partkular liekl of 

usefulness. 

Easy Terms of Payment. 





21st Avenue West 
and Superior St. 



••The Big 
> House With 
the Little Rent" 



f 



SAYS KIDNEY REMEDY 
ACTS LIKE MAGIC 



1 have been a terrible sufferer for a 
number of years with kidney and 
livtT trinilile. also nervous prostration 
rind health generally poor, constitution ■ 
♦miiri'lv run down until life became a 
burtU'ii. 1 tried physicians and every 
.ivailable remedy but found no relief. ■ 
Was Induced to give Dr. Kilmer's 
Swamp-Koot a trial, which acted like, 
maeic. and am happy to siiy that I be- 
lieve I am entirely cured and now 
as Rood a man as ever. 

I belifve it my duty to make this 
l>u!.li. statement that I may help 
otli.x will) may be sufferinst from 
tlv Sim.- trouble. Swamp-Root is. 
wiihoiii .lut-stion the greatest remedy 
in the world. Anyone in doubt of this 
stat.-in«ut or the authenticity can ad- 
dress Hie as below. 

Yours very truly. 

M. H. MiCt:)Y. 
Van Wert, Ohio. 
f?tate ('f * >hi() ) 

Van W. -n founty \ ^^• 

Till- ri)i<'t;oinK statement s',v.-rr. to 
bel'-re me and subscribed in my j>i-e:«- 
♦>iire this 18th day of July. VjO^. by 
tlie SHid M. H. McCoy. 

A. C. GILVIN, Notary Public. 



lietter to 

Dr Kilmer & Co., 

Binghamton. X. Y. 



Norwegians of Minnesota Intend that | 
this state and its products shall be i 
well advertised at the centennial eel- , 
ebration in Norway this summer. 
Handsome exhil-its of the state's in- 
dustries. iiioludiiiK extensive photo- 1 
graphic reprodu -tions of the activities 
of the Iron ndustries. lumbering, i 
farming and de; criptive matter of the 
more populated Norwegian settlements j 
of the state wil be featured. 

Odin Halden. county auditor; State | 
Insurance Comn issioner J. A. O. Preua, ' 
l>r. H. Hovde i nd John J. Moe have 
been Instrumental in Inducing the Oli- 
ver Iron Mining company and the Min- 
n-'sota Steel co npany to make exten- 
sive photograp IS of the various ac- 
tivities of the ange and in this city. 
L. P. Oallagher took the photographiS. 
Among the p lotographs will be the 
large panels sliowlng some of the 
larger mine.s, trains hauling ore, the 
washing plant at t'oleraine and min- 
irig locations a.^ well as club houses in 
the various r:i ige cities. There will 
I be fifteen of t le larger picture-*, as 
well as about twenty smaller pictures 
; showing the :.afety appliances in- 
stalled bv the company and sanitary 
methods "used < n the locations. 

A feature of ihe mining exhibits will 
be motion pictx res of the mine opera- 
tions. There «vill be eight of these 
reels showing miners at work under- 
ground, the h( isting of ore. work In 
the open pit m nes. scenes In an about 
the various mining locations and other 
numerous plact s of tnt>'rest. in addi- 
tion to these several large maps, sliow- 
ing the format on of the ore through- 
out the northern part of the county 
stntistb's regarding ship- 



KILLED DEER 
TO GET FOOD 

Judge Lenient With Settler 

Who Violated Game 
I Laws. 



"Hihi^"'- ! ^^^^''^ to Show Telephone 
Conversations Were 



Not Held. 



CIERK BECOMES 

MEMBER OF FIRM 



In suppoM <rf,ttie denial of Mrs. Olga 
Gran that < |ff»irthe last week in Jan- 
uary she 1 r«< fliBaged daily in tele- 
phonic con''«rs»,fSon with her husband's 
former bujilness associate, John R. 
Heine, an<&tMt messages of love and 
affection pfcsed between them on those 
occasions, the defense at the Gran di- 
vorce trial thia afternoon will attempt 
to establi.-^ an alibi for Ileino for each 
conversation alleged to have been 
overheard by («ran and other eaves- 
droppers on the line. 

According to B. M. Coldberg. attor- 
ney for Mrs. Gran, when the defense 
has Its inning «t rebuttal a number of 
prominent DulutWans will be called to 
the witness staind for the purpose of 
testifving that at the various time* 
he has ^een credited with having beev 
In conversation with Mrs. (Iran he was 
In renlilv otherwise occupied. In all 
of the alleged conversations Mrs. (Iran 
Is alleged to have done the calling. 
Several witnesses testified that they 

„ _ - - listened on taps which had been in- 

children and because i stalled by (Iran on his own telephone 



Shot Deer to Provide Meat 
for His Seven Chil- 
dren. 



Prove What Swamp Root wm Do For Yoa 

Send ten cents to Dr. Kilmer ai Co., 
Binghamton. X. Y.. for a .sample size 
Txitile. It will convin<re anyone. You 
will also receive a booklet of valuable 
information, telling about the kidneys 
and bladder. When writing, be sure 
and mention the Duluth Dally Herald, 
n.-gular fifty-cent and one-dollar size 
blillles for sale at all drug store* 



Pecause R. E. Daker. 38 years old. 
settler In the town of Duluth, has 
family of seven 
there was little to eat In the home last 
week. Judge Cutting this morning sus- 
pended sentence on the prisoner, who 
was taken Into custody on a charge of 
killing deer out of season. 

r.aker pleaded guilty when arraigned 
this morning, but the prisoner stated 
that the members of his family had 
been compelled to get along on ver> 
little food for the last two months. 
Sausage was \he only meat in the house 
Ion the day he killed the deer, l>akei 
' told the court. He knew he had broken 
the law. he said, but his family of 
seven children had to be fed. 

Deputy liame Warden Storey, ^^ho 

I arrested Baker, recommended clemency 

Ind ludge CutUng suspended sentence 

against Raker and permitted h.m to 

to his home. 



line and "that they h.nd heard the con 
versations which had passed between 
Mrs. <;ran and Heino, co-respondent in 
the divorce case. 

Among the witnesses who testified 
this morning in rebuttal as to the al- 
leged conversations were .lohn Saari. 
attorney and publisher of a Finni.sh 
n*wsDa"oer. Thelraa Harta and William 
"iKiier John Hill testified that he 
had seen Heino in front of JL^ran^s 
hou.se on a date which Heino had de- 
nied that he had e ver been there. 

HOME RUIeIiLL 

DEBATE RESUMED. 




formation regarding-" the method of 
mining that will be used has not been 
made public. It is believed that be- 
fore active shipping is started from 
this mine either stripping or milling ; 
methods will be employed. | 

Sliipprd 1-owt Year. j 

Cnder the lease held by the Oliver ; 
Mining company 5.236.000 tons were ; 
shipped from Great Northern proper- 
tie.s last season, though the minimum 
was 5,1:50,000. This year the mini- 
mum is 6.000,000 tons, so that it is 
niacticallv certain that at least 6.014,- 
000 tons will be shipped. The prop- 
erties in which the leases expire next 
Januarv are: Fay. Leonard North 
ino. South Uno, Dale, Herald, Mace 
Mississippi. Hill. Walker and North 

^^n' is not likely that all of these 
properties will be worked. The Her- 
ald closed down on Saturday, due. It is 
claimed, to the uncertain price of ore 
early in the season. Tr*,„„ ,„j 

The Mahoning. Stevenson, Ltlca and 
Leetonia mines ar^ HiU properties that 
are being operated on leases which 
I do not terminate for some time. 

The plans for opening any or the 
j other properties held by the Great 
I Northern are uncertain at this time, 
i though it is anticipated that opera- 
I tions may be started on some of the 
others. ^ 

farmhand'defies 

illinois posse. 



enow near here, obtained a shotgun 
todav and drove everyone off the place. 
He barricaded himself in the house 
and said he would kill anyone who 
tried to remove him. A posse of dep- 
uties was sent from here to arrest 
Clyne. 



BACK TO FARM 

FOR POLICEMAN 



r 

Joliet, 



.,.,..^v. 111., March 31.— John Clyne, 
discharged from the farm of Dr. Janieg 
Whitnev Hall of Chicago, at Good- 



j Protecting life and property In a 
j city like Duluth does not appeal to 
I Patrolman Edward E. Clendenning as 
j much as does the life of a farmer. 
'This morning he presented his resig- 
nation to Chief Troyer ar.d he will 
i leave the department tomorrrow. 
! Patrolman Clendenning came to Du« 
luth.ln September, 1912, and joined th« 
■ fire department, where he served until 
I last Mav, when he received his ap- 
pointment on the police force. He has 
been an able officer and was consid- 
ered one of the best younger members 
In the department. 

About two years ago Patrolman 
Clendenning decided to leave "is 
fathers farm near Turtle Lake, \\is.. 
and seek his fortune in Duluth. But 
the work did not appeal to him and 
now that he has the opportunity to 
take charge of his father's farm, h4 
plans to go back and give up hia 
work here. 



RUMFORP 






.4, 



^iyys^ 



Delicious 
Layer Calce 



""^V'ilCtHoi'ImluJ^ the ; and:.1udge-Cuttlng susije^^^^^^^^ ! ^„„^„„ March 31.-.Xfter a week of 

eKhlbit* from Minnesota Is also pre- against Haker and permitted ^' | sensational' devHopments In connec- 

narlng a booklet In which will be a ; go to his home. ^,^,^ with the lister situation. he 

collection of 2.(00 or more photographs i ,^— "TTI* c hoiieii. house of commons today started the 

froin various r arts of the state show- I W«'W •?.***?/, i 'pY,,. nomina- debate on the second reading of the 

fngtbV progress of the Norwegian* in, , ^^^^^l^^.^^l^''- :^%\Xfn;^nA >•"'* for Ireland bill It was 

thi<. section of the country. It «» 1 tlon of Oliser 1^. LiicKinson ^^^^^ ^^^ , ^^^ ^^g measure would occupy 

ni«nned to ha -e about 3.000 of these Pa., to be ^ "^^^^ Sta^^* <1 "/ '*^,' ilnn- , the house for at lea«t three days. 
Cfokwfs \s«ue'l'and to place at least f-r the ne^^ Eastern d^strct of I^enn^ , the^h ^'^^^^^^^, a,,,,,,,, ^ho was 
one copv m e.ery public and private i syU aula, was piepareu 
Ub*a'y in Nor% ay. A number of other ; House toda> 
IniereatlnK feajures, puiniings, etc.. 



by President Wilson for 
transmission to the senate. 



I 1 he aosence vn-jai. .noM"-^". """ -.-^^ 
In charge of th^ "bill, was bitterly com- 
1 plained of- 'by ttie Unionist*. 



AMBROSIUS SAUER. , 

Anibroslus Sauer. former president 
of the Duluth Retail Clerks union and 
a clerk in clothing stores of Duluth lor 
twenty-one year.s, l-.as been taken into 
the firm of the Kenney-Anker Cloth- 
ng company as one of Its active meiii- 
hers Mr. Sauer has been connected 

' with the Kenncy & Anker clothing 
store for the last seven years. 

Mr. Sauer has a »arge acquaintance 
in the cltv. He has resided in Duluth 

' for twentv-one years, coming here 
from Hunboldt, Iowa He was. con- 
nected with the Fedji Clothing com- 
pany in the West end for ten years 
«nd later clerked in the Floan & Lev- 
e?oos establishment (or four years 
Mr Sauer resides with his family at 

1.1717 East Sixth street. 



Your cake will be uniformly even iu texture, of that soft. 

velvety consistency that makes it me/t in your mouth, if 

Rumford Baking Powder is used. 

Rumford makes all cakes so digestible, light 
and nourishing that it makes perfect cake. 

Rumford 

Jl^^ THE WHOLESOME 

BAKING POWDER 

Mailed Frce.-The new Rumford Home Recip* 
Book, incluilinK Firelew and C««Mf role Cookery. 
RUMFORD COMPANY. Providence. R. L 



DEFtUIIVEPAGE 



I 



I." 

'f- 






n 



Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



March 31, 1914. 



MAY CHANGE 
MNAME 

Commercial Club May Be- 
come Duluth Association 
of Commerce. 



CITY WILL TRY EXPERIMENT 

OE DOING OWN PAVING WORK 



Annual Meeting and Elec- 
tion of Officers on 
April 8. 



A proposal to change the name of 
the Dululh Commercial club lo "Du- 
luth Association of Commerce" will be 
submitted to the members of the club 
mt the annual meeting Wednesday eve- 
ning-, April 8. 

Notice of the proposed amendment to 
the articles of incorporation has been 
Jysued by Secretary H. V. Eva, xvho is 
also requesting: members who will be 
ttnable to attend the meeting to send 
proxies running to H. B. Haroldson. A. 
11. ♦'rassw eller and O. A. Sherwood of 
Ihe board of directors. An affirmative 
vote of a majority of the entire mem- 
bership is necessary to amend the 
«rlivles of incorporation. 

The mc'Vfment to ihange the name 
of the organizatic>n ha.s been develop- 
ing for Pome time. rrominent mem- 
bers of the club have felt that the* 
pre.«ent name does not carry a suf- 
flcienlly broad significance to people 
unfamiliar with the work of the or- 
ganization. In Duluth the scope and 
purpose of the Commer< iai club are 
Well known, but in many other cities, 
the commercial clubs have become 
more social organizations and to 
many people the name does not indi- 
cate the commercial and civic work 
the Duluth Commercial club is do- 
ing. 

In tlu' twelve years since the Com- 
merrial <lub was organized, there has 
bfcn a change in naming commercial 
c>rganizatii>n3 over the country. Near- 
ly bU important titles now name their 
organizations "Chamber of v?'ommerce" 
or "Association of Commerce." The 
object of the proposed change is to 
line Dulutli up with other cities so 
that when people outside hear of the 
Duluth Association of Commerce they 



The first 1 

Duluth has 

' means of da> 

. ihe city con 

I noon. The \ 

; of West Sup 

I teenth and 'I 

I A resolutio 

I Commissionei 

I works dlvlsii 

I has charge o; 

6 per ct-nt v 

! will be in ch 

well known 

member of ti 

and candldat' 

last city t-lec 

The works 

fortunate in 

conduct the 

ment the con 



and shovels. 



Ig job that the city of I 
undertaken to do by 
labor was authorized by 
mission yesterday after- i 
/ork Involves the paving ! 
?rior street between Klf- , 
hirtieth avenues. j 

n was passed authorizing I 
R. Murchison, head of the 
>n, to pay the man who 
* the paving on a basis of 
f the pay roll. The Job ] 
»rge of James Preston, a ' 
local contractor, former i 
le board of public works ; 
■ for commissioner at the 
tion. 
division feels that It is 
securing Mr. Preston to 
work. Cndt-r his agree- 
tractor will furnish picks 



will know in 
tral commert 
of the city. 

A revision 
Commercial < 
led to the 
meeting. No 
posed, but tl 
some changet 
experience of 



Uantly that it is the cen- 
tal and civic organization 

of the by-laws of the 
lub will al.«o be submit- 
members at the annual 

radical changes are pro- 
e directors liave thought 
) necessary in view of the 

ten years. 



Pubnic Dance ! 

-Given By — 

SOCIALIST PARTY, 

AVni'lOHIl .H. APRIL 1. 

AdMlssion :^6 cent.«. 
Dl Marco's Orchestra- 




T DULUTH 

HERALD BRANCH OPTICESi 

JeWM>B. SaO north BTth Arc. W. X J. Moraa. HIGH Nortli Ccatral Av«. 

Herald'a Weat Duluth reporter may be reached after 

hour of going to preae at Calumet i78-M and Cole 247^ 



MOVES INTO 

MOOEL^TOWN 

John P. McLimans First to 

Move on to Steel 

Plant Site. 



street. Burial will be in Forest Hill 
cemetery. 



Nearly 100 Residences Are 

Now About Ready for 

Occupancy. 



TO L iG HT BA GLEY. 

Several Plans Being Considered By 
Water aid Light Commission. 

Baglty, Minn., March 31. — According 
j to the figures submitted by the con- 
eer employed by the wa- 
t commission, a kerosene 
ticient capacity to light 
pump the water can be 
between $5,000 and $6,000. 
his size can be operated 
:ss than one half of what 



j suiting engih 

I ter and light 
I plant of su I 
I the city and 
; Installed for 
j A plant of 
' for a little 1 



JAMES PRESTON. 



it cost to run the old plant recently 
destroyed by fire. 

.\mon3r the different places where 
plants similar to the one suggested 
hv the consulting engineer are in use 
arp Clarkfleld, Minn.. Turtle Lake, 
Wis.. Litchville, N. D., Ulenwood City. 
Wis., French Hlver, Minn., and Fred- 
rick, Wis. 

The commission is thaking Ita 
time acting in the matter of recon- 
struction as it Is in hopes of be- 
ing able to g» t the electric light 
people of Bemidjl to build a line 
here to got some private individual 
or corporation to build and buy or 
lease the electric light lints. It Is 
understood It has made a propo- 
sition to a box factory concern to 
take over the present remains of the 
(Id plant, lease the wir*s and light 
and pump the water for the city at 
M staled amount, provided they will 
local- a bos. factory her-'. 




— — :.. ■- , :■:■:■ :^•:.■.■^^.■.■ ■^.•. 




The model city being constructed by 
the Minnesota Steel company near 
Spirit Lake yesterday received Us first 

j family. The family of John V. Mc- 
Limans, formerly residing at 5711 

, Huntington street, moved 'to the ne^* 

I town and holds the distinction of be- 

1 ing the first arrival. 

I Nearly 100 residences are now about 
: ready to receive occupants in the new 
' city. At present th«/e are alho about 
' sixty additional basements under con- 
struction a.id it is believed that before 
June 1 that the exodus to the new 
village will have lilled up the new 
homes. 

Street work and many other im- 
provements are well under waj-. The 
contractors having this work in charge 
I have already a large force of men at 
! work and claim that many more could 
I be employed if they were to be had. 
The residences are all constructed 
blocks and are modern 
Every convenience pos- 
sible has be«n installed to make the 
' houses comfortable. The houses will 
I be occupied exclu.slvely by employes of 
'the steel company. 

curlerswIllThold 
annual banquet. 

«_ 

The officers of the We.«!tern Curling 
club will meet either this afternoon or 
tomorrow for the purpose of deciding 
on a date for holding the annual ban- 
c|uot. The office jjs of the club are: F. 
H. Wade, presidfrtt; A. H. Donald, vice 
president; E. (J. Kreldler, secretary, and 



In Police Court. 

John King and William McCann were 
given three hours to leave the city 
when arraigned In police court before 
Judge Lanners this morning. The men 
had been arrested for trespassing In 
the railroad yards of the Canadian 
Northern and were considered unde- 
sirables. A sentence of thirty days on 
the work farm was suspended provid- 
ing tlie men would get out of the city 

B. Farrell, who also pleaded guilty 
to a similar charge was given six 
hours to leave the city in lieu of a 
similar sentence at the work farm. 

J. J. Ellle, a farmer residing on the 
Maple CJrove road, was arrested this 
morning on a charge of stealing a load 
of clover and timothy hay. He will be 
given a hearing in police court this 
afternoon. 

The trial of Ed Talbot, clerk In a 
poolroom at Central avenue and Ram- 
sey street, will be held this afternoon. 
Talbot Is charged with allowing min- 
ora to play in the poolroom. 
• 

Book Club Meets. . 

The West Duluth Book club enter- 
I talned this afternoon at a literary 
I .social at the West Duluth public 
(library. A feature of the program 
was a reading of Clyde Fitch's play, 
"The Truth," by Miss Mary .'^hesgren. 
The program alFo included vocal selec- 
tions by Miss Fern Brooks and piano 
numbers by Miss Esther Larson. 



of concrete 
j throug^iout. 




When W,i Were Children 



Easter morning was always associated with liiding and 
hunting eggs. And whit better accompaniment to those 
same eggs when f.)un«l than deHcions, sweet-as-a-nut 
ham or bacon, the k nd that is full of juicy, rich 
flavor, the result of Armour's "mild sugar" cure? Buy 



^tmfoui^s 





Semi-Weekly Meetings. 

Rev. A. E. Arnesen, the new pastor 
'; of the Norwegian Evangelical Free 
'■■ church of Superior, will begin holding 
1 meetings next Sunday in the church 
"On Fifty-fourth avenue west and Bris- 
I toi street. West Duluth. 
I Rev. Arnesen is planning two meet- 
ings in the week, on Sunday afternoon 
at 3 p. m. and Wedne.«»day evening at 
8 p. m., and he invites all Scandi- 
' navlans to these meetings, as nothing 
I but the Scandinavian language will be 
I used. 

j Rev. Arnesen is a graduate of- the 
Moody Bible Institute of Chicago. ] 

I ♦ ] 

Sunday School Banquet. j 

The Sunday school of the Asbury ' 
Methodist cliurch has planned a ban- I 
quot for its members on April 17. The 
banquet is the result of a membership 1 
contest between two divisions of the \ 
school, with the red divi.«ion the win- j 
ners. The banquet will be served by i 
the blue tlivision. 

The following committees will be in 
charge of tlie affair: (Jcneral com- 
mittee, Byron Brook.*?, Miss Johanna 
Strate. Mrs. Albert Meldahl, MLss Maud 
Gilbert and Floyd Williams; finance 
committee, I. G. Wollan, A. A. Mohaupt, 
Robert Clark, Byron Brool<.«; supplies. 

W. B. Getchell. treasurer. I Miss Eva McLyman, Mrs. A. A. Mohaupt. 

The banquet of the club is the big-JMi.'-s Beatrice Williams. Miss Adclia 

gest social affair given by the curling i Horman, Miss Nellie Anderson. Fev. 

club during the yeltf-. It is usually fol- i W. H. Farrell; tables. Miss Joh.'inna 



i lberstein& Pond: 

Compauiy 

Tke New Tilings 
ior Spring \\ cdx 

SUITS that will distinguish women at social functions. In- 
dividual models as low as $35.00. 

The prettiest BLOUSES obtainahle are a fitting adjunct to 
the new suits. At last the separate blouse is being accorded, 
the importance in America that it always has had in France. 
It was the French woman who first saw the charm of a tllmy^ 
lace creation, when worn in contrast to her tailored suit. 
French designers used all their skill to beautify and elaborate 
the blouse — and their creations for this new season are real 
works of art. The filmiest of laces, cloudlike chiffons, crepes 
de Chine, or the finest spinning of cottons, in every color one 
could fancy. Prices from $5.95 up. 

SILK PETTICOATS have again been admitted into the 
fashionable wardrobe, but, whispers fashion, they must be of 
the softest silks, such as crepe de chine, silk jersey and chif- 
fons, and must be cut without the leasf unnecessary fullness, 
in black and all the newest shades, $3.95 to $7.50. 

SMART CLOTH COATS of serge and golfine, corded ma- 
terials and eponge, lined throughout ; made with long roll col- 
lar, frequently in a pretty color. Prices from $25.00 to $57.50. 

SEPARATE SKIRTS in the season's finest wool materials 
as well as in Taffeta and Moire .Silk— $6.50 to $16.50. 

THE NEW SILKS. DRESS GOODS, WASH FABRICS, 
WHITE GOODS and LACES are beautiful. It would pay 
you to look them over. 






^ 



^^L<' 



,(X^^ 



^f.cS 



n; 



ft 



tv^"^^ 



y-- 



.^-45^ 






;k« 



,££dC.V.>V.V.VCV 



rr mri \ 






lowed by dancing or^other features of 
enttrtainment. The trophies will also 
be distributed to the winners on that 
day. 

The club will hold Its annual eleotion 
of officers on Tuesday evening, April 
14. The meeting wili be held in the 
clubrooms. ' ' 



Lodge Social. 

Fraternity Lodge. Xo. 860, M. B. W., 

has planned to entertain for its mem- 
ber.s and friends at ci^rds at the Dor- 
niedy hall.iCeiUrai avenue and Ram- 
sey street tomorrow evening. The 
committee in charge consists of: Mrs. 
J. Webber, Mrs. M. O'Brien. Mrs. Ralph 
Sieger. .loseph l:;ecl».s, A. L. Murray and 
M. C. Murray. 



Strate, Mrs. Albert Meldahl, Miss Maud 
Gilbert. Mis^s Eliza Reinfrey, Mr.s. A. A. 
Mohaupt, Mifs Reatrii e Williams, Miss 
Eva McLyiuan and Miss Nelli^ Ander- 
son. <■- 

West~^uiuth Briefs. >..\ 

Robert Little of Barnum returned 
home this morning after visiting his 
Bister, who is ill at the Duluth hos- 
pital. 

The "West Duluth W. C. T- U. will 
be entertained Thursday afternoon at 
the home of Mrs. C. M. Everett, 1503 
North Central avenue. 

The Ladies' Aid Society of the As- 
bury Methodist church will meet to- 
morrow afternoon at the home of Mr.s. 
F. B. Johnson. 127 North Fiftyr-foi rlh 



Make your gas range bright and clean 'with the helper 
digs in where the band can't— 

GOLD DUST 



that 



A household necegMty that is a real luxury, 
it cUans and purilles everything. ..j 

5c and larger 'packages. ; - 

EI5E:FAIRBANKss£Ei2ii 



«'/ 



'i«(i 



BOLD 



CHICAOa 
DUST TWfmS do youf 



wofk" 



'S^ 



WashinoMei 



avenue west. 

Laughton Fuperal. i i^V'-, ^- ^^V ^'- T^U"^^^,!"'^^ uP**J* J"* 

" TSa ' special services to be held at Fond du 

The fuiii^al for VMts. >fargaret ' Ljic tomorrow night. 
I.AURhton, §i years <n<i, ^jft died ^tj Anthony Erlckson of Minneapolis, 
Fond du Lac yeaterda^ mortllug will who has been vi.«!iting friends in tliis 
be held tomorrow aftijfaoon at 2 end of the city left yesterday for 



his 



o'clock from the home of^er daughter, i home. 

Mrs. C. P. CunlllT. 2005 West Fourtli Watch repairing 



commenddtf President Wilson 
stand in the Mexican situation. 

"Our attempt to n>ake this govern- 
ment responsible for the good order 
and humanity of every nation in the 
Western heml.= phere Is a job that is 
his ! too big for u.«," he said. "There are 
' other .South American republics capa- 



Hursl. <Vest Duluth. 



'TheHain>VhatA!ii 
andi Bacon too 




SEND YOUR SPRING CLOTHBNG 



TO BE 



FRENCH DRY CLEANED, PRESSED OR REPAIRED TO THE 



OUR GUARANTEE 



Send a garment today and if 
yiu ;'.rc not well plea-ed with 
ycnr \er.ture dont pay us a 
cent. 




OUR SERVICE 



One day ser\ ice when neces- 
sary. Xo shop odor or gaso- 
line smell after our sanitary 
process. 



PHONIES l?K5g"; 2442 

Rugs, Drapes, and Curtains are given new life and luster after our process. 
Our Glove Department is pleasin y particular people. 



ELKS TO HOLD 
INSTALLATION 



u-h. 



All Past Exalted Rulers In- 
vited—Special Program 
Prepared. 



) George S. Munsey. John A. Doran and 
j Frank L. Young. 

I The nevi'ly-elected officers are: Nell 
I Morrison, exalted luler; John K. Sani- 
i uelson, leading knight; A. .T. McCul- 
i loch, loyal knight; ^V. J. North, lectur- 
ing knight; George V. Heathcote. sec- 
;retary; P. B. McTague, treasurer; W. 
I H. Alexander trustee; Jerry Seaman, 
tiler. E. J. I'iliatrault is the retiring 
exalted ruler. 

Following the Installation and the 
program the lodge will adjourn for a 
so'ial .se.-^sion, for which extra prep- 
arations have been made. 



r"r-:( 

For all memberi tt the antlered 

herd, all trails will lead to the Klks' 
club at 311 West Fii.-it street tomorrow 
night. 

For tomorrow nif,ht the nev,ly elect- 
ed officers will b0 -In.vtalled by Will- 
! iam S. McCornilck. past exalted ruler, 
' and a program hits 'been prepared 
i which will make tlje occasion one long 
' to be remembered. ' 
i The newly-orgnnized Klks' quartet. 



TOWN OF OOOX 
GETS RURAL ROUTE 



ble of looking after their own Wf'lfare 
and the welfare of their neighbors, if j 
need be. There is Argentina and Brazil, ■ 
I for instance. We must not make too I 
much of the Monroe doctrine. 

"As for Mexico, tlie situation there is ' 
simply horrible. If Villa succeeds In i 
conquering Huerta It will be terrible. If j 
Huerta succeeds in conquering Villa it 
will be terrible. If either one Is left 
it will be bad. If each swallows the 
other it will be better." 

grocersTre 
the "goats" 



costs more a square foot than front- 
ages on Superior street. 

Secretary W. B. ration of the PU- 
luth f'f metery association submits th» 
ffllowing prices for graves in Forest 
Hill, which include the purchase prica- 
and cost of perpetual maintenance: 
For Single «;rave. 
child, J8 to $15. 
person 10 years or over, $10 to 



Parcel Post Is Expected 

to Boost Business 

There. 



than four 



fror» 




one: in TWBLrVC! 

According to our record.^ one out of every twelve people (men. women and children) in Duluth 
patronize our dental office. Thin wonderful business was built up by honest dealings, honest work ana 
moderate prices. We want you to take advuntajre of our moderate price service. 

Full Set Whalebone Plates $5.00 



We are strkniy one price to all. 




Don't tvorry about money — arransements can l>e 
made wlieiWy you can pay for your work wei-kly 
or monthly. 




Want Berries Shipped 
From Other States 
Repacked. 



in 



According to information received 
from the postoffice authorities at 
Cook, Minn., that industrious commun- 
ity will have a rural route May 1. 

The town of Cook and its sur- 
rounding country are reported by 
Postmaster O. J. Leding to be in a 
thriving condition, grov.ing rapidly in 
prosperity and population. Xew set- 
tlers he sa> .<? are moving in in large 
numbers this fpring and many set- 
tlers who moved out four or five years 
ago, are returning. 

Until recently hay was the chief 
agricultural product, but during the 
last year or more the raising of poul- 
try and stock has begun to get a firm 
foothold. The establishment of a 
rural route with parcel post advan- 
tages is expected to promote stock and i some 
poultry culture as never before. 



For 
For 

;.2o. 

For Intermrn<N. 

For child (.box less 
feet). $3. 

For all others, $5. 

Casket lowering device, $1. 

Lining grave with cloth. $1. 

Family lots range in price 
$S5 up. , . 

The trustees of the association serr<» 
without pay. and there are no profits. 
The receipts from lots are used In pay- 
ing for land, with the exception of a 
percentage which is set aside for a 
pfrpetual maintenance fund. 

"Mv onlv purpose in rfolving to the 

Iptter." said Mr. Patton. "is to corre-^t 

nnv belief that exorbitant prices are 

being charged for lots, or that anv- 

body is deriving any profit from th« 

cemetery." 

« 

DARiinlcan F,lec<lon«i TIelayeil. 

Washingion. Mar'-h 31.— "By the fnil- 
ure of the Doroinlran Erovprrm<=>r.t to 
make pror>or nrrannements. Amt-rican 
Minister Sullivan reported today that 
th<^ elections which were to have be^n 
held today have been postponed for 
several days. 



That Minnesota berry dealers .^nd 

growers are "goats" of the state law. • 

which provides that all boxes soTH in 

this state nnitt come up to a specified 

measure, but allows outside shippers 

i to send In boxes of any size, w as the . 

j contention of the Duluth Retail Gro- '■ 

leers' association directors at their f 

i meeting last night. The directors de- j 

I elded to take action to secure a more: 

j just regulation before the berry eea-j 

: son opens in Duluth. j 

i An effort will be made to have the i 

' comnii-ssion men repack 

ing from 



NORTHROP LAUDS WILSON. 



WHAM-BONK I^LATKS — Few people in Dul'ith ever 
heard of whalebone plates, much less know what they 
are. The great beauty of these teeth !s their clo.se and 
«!triklng resemblance to natural teeth. Their di rability l.s phenomenal in that they will wear forever 

GOLD CROWNS require skill and experit nee to obtain a perfect fit. Uur gold crowns are made of the 
heavle.st gold, 22k line, double thickness on chewing surface. Guaranteed for ten years. 

BRI1>GK WOKK — We make a specialty of gold and porcelain bridge work. This is without doubt the 
nio';! beautiful and lasting work known to d« ntal .sck*nce. Spaces where one or more teeth have been lost 
we replace to look so natural that detection is impossible. Ask to see sample of this beautiful work. \V e 
guarantee our work, not alone against breakat^e, but satisfaction for 10 years. XOTK THKSK PRICKS: 

Cold Crowns ^^"" at'^k^nT* price JJliOfl SllVSr FlllingSpnce"lncUyorelsewh^re5UC 

Bridge Work !S/l»F:$:<.OD Whalebone Plate$lS^°^:-^:, $5.00 

We specialize iu Gold Inlays, Gold and Aluminum I'lates. 



UNION PAINLESS DENTISTS 




Dr. Franklin Greer & Co.. Owners. 
317 WKST SI I'KRIOR ST., Dl LCTH. 
Open trom 8:30 a. m. to 7 p. m. SundajMt 10 t* 1«! 



WILLIAM S. McCORMICK. 



consisting of Joseph Kreimer, W alter 
f;onska, John Bierholter and John 
Doran, will make Us initial appear- 
ance. They have been rehearsing for 
several weeks under the difection of 
Thomas Sexton and a genuine treat Is 
promised. I..a lirosse's orchestra will 
be in attendance and a number of ad- 
dresses will be delivered by well- 
known speakers. Tjiese Jiiiclude Danl»* 
W. Lawler of St. Paul and Joseph B. 
Cotton, past exaltect; ruler. 
^ Special Invitation*^ have been sent to 
all past exalted rulers to be present 
and most of those in the city have 
assured the officers that they will be 
there. The old members have been 
urged to attend and the responses 
leave no doubt but what they will be 
out In force. The past exalted rulers 
Include Joseph B. Cotton, John Panton, 
J. W. Reynolds. W., W. Walker. G. C. 
Gilbert. J. L. Fuller, Alexander Mar- 
shall. J. T. Arinstead, W. S. McCor- 
mick, H. W. Andrldge, Cook Ely, 



Venerable President Emeritus of ^*i^- 
nesota U on Mexican Conditions. 

Minneapolis, Minn., March 31. — The 
United States should not make too 
much of the Monroe doctrine, declared 
Dr. Cyrus Northrop, president emeritus 
of the University of Minnesota, in an 
address before a large audience of 
ministers representing several denomi- 
natioTis here Monday. Dr. Northrop 

DRUNKENNESS 

Is a curable disease, which requires 
treatment. "The ORRIXE treatment 
can be used with absolute confidence. 
1 It destroys all desire for whiskey, 
beer, or other intoxicants. Can be 
given In the home. Xo sanitarium ex- 
pense. X^o loss of time from work. 
Can be given secretly. If after a 
trial you fail to get any benefit from 
its use your money will be refunded. 

ORRIXE Is prepared In two forms: 
X'o. 1, secret treatment, a powder; 
ORRIXE Xo. 2, In pill form, for those 
who deBire to take voluntary treat- 
ment. Costs only $1.00 a box. Come 
In and talk over the matter with us. 
Aak for booklet. 

W. A. Abbett, 205 West Superior 
street, 902 East Second street and 
101 West Fourth street. 



men repacK berries com- 
out of the state or devise 
other method of securing uni- 
form measure. 

George M. Peterson was chosen as a 
delegate to attend the national con- 
vention of grocers at Louisville, Ky., 

It was decided, also, to hold a ban- 
quet for George H. Schulenberg, new- 
ly elected president of the Minnesota 
Retail Grocers' association. April 29. 
A committee to make arrangenient.i 
for the event was named as follows: 
John Logan, M. R. Bush. Ed Strange, 
A. M. McEwen and George M. Peterson. 

QUOTE^lCES^F 

CEMETERY LOTS 

Officers of Association Re- 
ply to Letter From 
"Dead One." 

That the cost of family lots or 
ground for single graves at Fewest Hill 
cemetery Is reasonable Is contended by 
the officers of the Duluth Cemetery 

association. «. . , ^ ... 

The cemetery officials have giveft 
The Herald a list of prices in answer 
to a letter published In the "open 
court" last evening, signed "dead one." 
In which the city comraission was 
urged to make provision for a city 
ci-metery because of the alleged pro- 
hibitive prices charged for lots In 
Forest Hill cemetery. This letter 
stated that ground in th« cemetery 



ECZEMA 

Salt Rheum, Pimples. 

All Skin Disases Cured. 

By a rational method of tr.at- 
ments, we heal these diseases com- 
pletely in the average lime of two 
months. The application of our 
trratmcRtH brlngN Imniedlate relief. 
and many cases are completely 
healed within a few weeks' lime. 

No confinement from work, no 
dope. \ature"(>» KemediM applied 
seientlflrally brlnic wonderful re- 
Kultn. We invite you. kind r^-aucr, 
to come and investigate, and exam- 
ine the pictures of patients we 
have cured. Many years of experi- 
ence in the city of Dululh gave us 
the chance to cure many hundred 
people from these diseases. 

You must come to our office per- 
sonally for the treatment of these 
diseases. It's no "mail order propo- 
sliion" nor a "home treatment." 
We have only Honest Treatment to 
offer you, such that results In a 
permanent cure. 

If we can't cure you, we will not 
take your case. Vou pay for reKuflw 
only. All Blemishes of the Skin 
disappear within a short time, nev- 
er to come back again. 

''(ii\fi'' J^OU BLOOD 'Ql^" 
*'V*' DISORDERS CFJ.'* 

The most successful of all modern 
Inventions, that benefits mankind 
more than anything else, is given 
for the t^URE OF BI.OOD POISO.V. 

We Treat Men Only and Cure 
All Men's Diseases. 

Consultations free from 9 to 8; 
Sundays, 10 to 1. 

Men out of town invited to write 
for information, 

PROGRESSIVE 
MEDICAL DOaORS 

No. 1 l*>«t Superior Street. Corner 
of Luke Avenue, Dnlnth, Sllnn. 



-STP 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 





Tuesday, 



IHK DULUTH HERALD 



March 31, 1914. 



Old People Everywhere Say 



ft 





MP. W.C. HEMPHILL. 



Peruna is good for 
Coughs, Colds, Catarrhal 
Diseases and after effects 
of the Grip. 

druggist here did not keep it. Now 
thve all keep it. 

•I have lived in this place eighty- 
four years. I am a farmer. Was born 
where I live. I have three living 
children. Should ^uu publish this In 
the papers it will teach many of my 
old friends. You cau use my picture as 
you think proper. Mr. G. W. Roberta, 
R. F. D. 1, Box 36. Pickens, Miss. 

KIghty-two Years OKI. 

"I had a severe attack of grip. I 

sufTered terribly wMle it lasted. After 

mv attack 1 sent f< r Peruna. My wife 

said I must have ; doctor, but 1 in- 

upoii taking tlie Peruna. and 

a quick and perfect recovery." 

R. Prince. Jt. R. 1. Tuckahoe, 



l^'.ighty Y«»ars <.»«!. 

'I had a great deal of trouble ■with 
! .. In.wels and bladder, and pain in 
:; s !:«ht hip which felt like rheuma- 
t sm. Weak back. Constipated. Urin-* 
highly colored. Many doctors failed. 
I havf« taken I'eruna and think I am 
cured I have gained twenty pounds 
In weifiht since 1 began Peruna." Mr. 

. C. Hemphill, l.ouisvllfe, Misa. 

KISfl»ty-f«Mir Year* Old. 

•'.Vl.out nt"t->en or twenty yeir.- 
was suffering with pains in 



sisted 
made 
Mr. .F 

N. y. 



w 



b.ir':. 



s: 



my 

I could scarcely sr^t about. I 
tu' r.Tuna and was relieved of 
iius e\ er since. 

have used Teruna occasionally 
and re.'om!ii^n'i^»d it to other.-*. 

I fust know j: Peruna the 



i*oventv -eight Y»'ars Ohl. 

"Peruna has lu-e i a blessing to me. 
I had catarrh .-^o l> idly 1 had lost the 
sen.*;-* of sninll and taste. My stomach 
was also bad. I b. night a half dozen 
bottles oi IVruna and will say that I 
am completely tuied of my catarrh^ 
and the stomach tiouble." Mrs. 11. A. i 
Wea\er, Somer.^et, Ohio. j 

Seveiity-elght Years Old. j 

"I had catarrh <f the head. Com- 
menced taking P.runa and gained 
eleven pounds. Il is a great medi- 
cine. A fair trial would convince any 
one of its elticacy." Mr. F. M. Joffrion, 
Bogalusa. l.ouisiara. 

ThoM» wlio object to liqiiitl inedl- 
ciiies. t-aii now obtnin IVruua Tabids. 



Business Economies 



Stopping the little I ■ , - .f wa.ste is 
of the most essential elements in the : 
cesa of a merchant. 

Any beginner in business who does 
have this thrift instinct or acquire the h 
is handicapped in his efforts for comi 
cial success. 

I'revent waste in your business and b 
up a reserve fund in the Savings Dep 
ment of this strong banlc. 



First National Bank 

of Duluth. 
Capital, Surplus and ProfiU $2,509,030 




GIRLS! HAVE BEAUTIFUL, LUSTROU S, 

FLUFFY HAIR-- 25 CENT DANDERINE 



No more dandruff or falling hair- 
real surprise awaits 
you. 



T . S-' possessed of a head of heavy. , - ^. , „ * .. 
1>e*ulitul hair: soft, lustrous. fluttV. | dandruft and cur. Jor 
wavy and free from dandruff i^ mere- 
ly aniatter of using a little Danderine. 

It i>i easy and ine.Kpensive to have 
r - tt iiair and lots of It. Just 

g :3 cent bottle of Knowlton's 

!■ iie now — all drug stores rec- 

V 1 it — apply a little as directed 

atil wuhin ten minutes there will be 
an appearance of abundance; fresh- 
ness, fluffijiess and an incomparable 
g!..*^ and lustre and try a^ you will 



you cannot find a trace of dandruff or 
falling hair: but your real surprise 
will be after ab. ut two weeks' use, 
when you will set new hair — fine and 
down at flr.st — yvS — but really new 
hair — sprouting ♦■ut all over your 
scalp — Danderine is, we believe, the 
only sure hair grower; destroyer of 

itchy scalp and 
it never falls to stop falling hair at 
once. 

If you want to prove how pretty 
and soft your hair really is, moisten 
a cloth wiih a little Danderine and 
carefully draw it through your hair — 
taking one smal strand at a time. 
Your hair will i>e soft, glossy and 
beautiful in just a few moments — a 
delightful surprise awaits everyone 
who tries this. 



Duluth: Thomas ^. Arthur. Culver; and 
F. A. Trolander of .\lborn. 



TO ADVERTISE FOR 

BIDS ON DITCH NO. 2 AMERICAN EXPRESS 

County Board Approves En- 
gineer's Estimate and 
Viewers' Report. 



t 
(■ 
f 
t.% 



r M.iditor Odin Halden was yes- 

uiernoon directed by the boarl 
ty commissioners to advertise 
^ for the construction of Cuun- 

Ditch Xo. 2. ^ . 

After an all-day session of the board, 
tV ; ronimissioners approved the^ en- 
gineer'.-* estimate and the viewers* re- 
port. Beginning at 10 o'clock ye.iter- 
dny morning and extending through to 

5:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon. **»©,, n hese are not the dava 

board received testimony from a num- | 2^_tbe_?ue9t.lon. j hese are n^otineda>s 

ber of Meadowlands farmer.^ who ap- 
peared before the board to protest 
■ wainst the assessment of benefit* 
r -ade against their property by the 



New York. Mar h 31.— The American 
Express company, through it.s first vice 
president. F. F. flagg. denies that It 
will erect in the near future a thirty- 
two story office building on Lower 
Broadway. The statenifnt explained 
that plans for such a structure were 
filed last week, merely as a precau- 
tionary measure to provide against the 
po.^.'»ibllity of fu'ure building regula- 
tions, "which pronibit the construction 
of a building of i character which we 
had in mind." 

T?uilding plans were prepared over a 
year ago, the co npany says, "but re- 
cent re;;ulations of express business 
and reduction of rates have put further 
consideration of building entirely out 



The Political Movies 

'" An Artistic Interpretation of Somfi Features of Governor Eberhart's 
Announcement Th^at He Seeks Renomination. 



Eats Freely But 
Has No Dyspepsia 




A Little Pepsin in a Mild Lax- 
ative Promptly Corrected 
a Bad Indigestion. 

Fortunate Is the one who can eat 
"anything" without- suffering the tor- 
tures of dyspepsia, but as few are so 
fortunate, care should be taken in the 
matter of diet. Eating slowly, masti- 
cating the food thoroughly and taking 
a short walk after the heavy meal of 
the day will do much towards assisting 
digestion. Any grown-up person ought 
to know tlie peculiar foods that do not 
agree, and these should be avoided. 

When these common-sense aids fail, 
the next thing to do Is to take a mild 
digestive tonic with laxative proper- 
ties, and there is none better than Dr. 
Caldwell's Syrup Pepsin. It contains 
the greatest of all aids to digestion, 
good^pepsin. It has other ingredients 
that act mildly on the bowels, which 
together form a combination for the 
relief of dyspepsia or indigestion that 
is unsurpassed. 

Its action is to tone and strengthen 
the stomach and bowel muscles so that 
they can again do their work naturally 
without outside aid. and when that 
happy moment comes all medicine can 
be dispensed with. It is the best rem- 
edy obtainable for any disorder of the 
stomach, liver and bowels, for dyspep- 
sia, constipation, biliousness, head- 
aches, drowsiness after eating, gas on 
the stomach, etc. Thou.«ands of users 
will testifv to this, among them Mr. 
.T. \V. tJoucher. Stites. Idaho, who for 
several vears had all the worst symp- 
toms of chronic dyspepsia. Since taking 
Dr. Caldwell's Syrup Pepsin these have 
all gone, and although Mr. tloucher 




j. W. GOUCHER. 



says he is 64, he does not look mora 
than 40. 

Svrup Pepsin is sure in its results, 
and a vast Improvement over chewing 
or swallowing tablets and mint.s, or 
taking cathartics, salts, etc.. all of 
which are harsh and nauseous and at 
best do but temporary good. You can 
obtain Syrup Pepsin at any drug store 
for fifty cents or one dollar a bottle. 
Results are always guaranteed or 
money will be refunded. 

Families wishing* to try a free 
sample bottle can obtain it postpaid 
by addressiner Dr. W. B. Cald%vell. 419 
Washington St.. Monticello. 111. A 
postal card with your name and ad- 
dress on it will do. 



r 



RIGHT METHODS 
MUST PRECEDE 
RIGHT REFORMS 

zzz> 



.WORKERS UNION. 




UNIONMSTAMP 

Bdo 



Right workmanship must precede right shoes. \ 
Right shoes must precede right walking. J 

Right walking is the ideal physical exercise. *1 
Union Stamp Shoes embody all of these rights. 
Union Shoe Workers and all workers walk in the 
right and light by wearing Union Stamp Shoes. 



CUA 

T)l<&t4\fieD 



BOOT & SHOE WORKER S UNION 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

Write for list of union shoe factories and other interest- 
ing literature, telling what we have accomplished for 
our fellow workers. 



Aflillutod With American Federation of Labor. 



— From the Minneapolis Journal. 



FREIGHT NOW 
ON INCREASE 

Shipments of Merchandise 

to West Make Good 

Showing. 



INTERESTING PEOPLE WHO ARE 

DOING INTERESTING WORK HERE 



Railway Extensions Are 
Planned for North Dakota 
and Montana. 



for expansion In express business." 



The viewers' 
subject to a 



re- 



few 



l>>9r.i of viewers, 
p >rt was received 
rt-ductions. 

The big ditrh •will drain a larere area 
of land in the Meadowlands district 
rriw too low for the n:<»3t successful 
tillaffe. The lands to be benefited lie 
laelween the White Face and s?t. Louts 
rivers. The work calls for the excava- 
tion of 205,500 cubic yarda of earth; 
twenty-four miles of clearing and 
grubbing, twenty -tw^o miles or road 
gradinis and the construction of twen- 
tv-.%evon small bridges. County En- 
gineer Coe estimates that the work 
will cost $13,107. The board of view- 
ers consisted of Thomas Olafson, West 



YALE MEN DECLINE 

TO Di:BATE WOMEN 



New Haven, f onn., March 31. — The 
winning a»jti-sufl rage team of Yale de- 
baters In the re:ent triangular Yale- 
Havvard-Prlncet( n debate on woma» 
suffrage, has de -Ided to decline a 
chall^^nge sent tiiem last Saturday by 
the New York State Suffrage associa- 
tion to debate \ oman suffrage with | 
members of that organization. | 

John D. Uobb of Slinneapolls wa.<» j 
last night e'eclen president of the Yale | 
Debating assoclaiion. He was a mem- i 
ber of the wtnring team in th« tri- 
angular debate. 



CASCARETS" IF COSTIVE, BILIOUS, 

HEADACHY AND UPSET- -DIME A BOX 



No odds how much your head aches; 
IxfiW miserable you are from constipa- 
tion, indigestion, biliousness a "Cas- 
caref tonight straightens you out by i 



all other dHtre's; relieve your slug- 
gish Liver and i towels of all the sour 
bile, gases an<l clogged-up waste 
which is producing the misery. 
A 10-cent box of Cascarets keeps 



morning. | your head clear stomach sweet, liver 

Clean your stomach, liver and i and bowels regular and you feel 4jully 
bowel-s to-night; end the headache, for months. Don't forget the children 
biHousne.ss, dizziness, nervousness, tho i — their little insides need a gentle 
s<jur, gassy stomach, backache and j cleansing, too. 

^^^ CANDY CATHARTIC^ 

10 CENT BOXES -ANY DRUG STORE 

• ALSO 25 8c 50 CENT BOXES ■ 



WHILEYOUSLEE 




A. substantial increase is being 
shown in the volume of freight being 
handled here of late, according to 
statements of local officials of the rail- 
road companies. 

The snow of last week was a boon 
to timber operators in this district, 
resulting in a large tonnage of forest 
products being rushed out from the 
camps that would otherwise have been 
held up for another year. 

Spring shipments of general mer- 
chandise from here over the West and 
to points in Northern Minnesota, are 
said to be making a favorable com- 
parison with last year. That Is taken 
to prove that the purchasing power 
of the farmers has improved and that 
a larger percentage of the business Is 
being handled from the Head of the 

A gratifying feature commented 
upon today by an official of the tJreat 
Northern railroad was a steady ex- 
pansion showing in the tonnage being 
carried on its package freight cars 
being run from here to leading dis- 
tributing points in its territory in 
Minnesota, for perishables, available 
on Tu^^sdays and Thursdays, forty of 
these cars are being operated daily. 
Trairte Gala Steady. 

"While traffic has been slow In 
building up some sections, the volume 
Is gaining on the whole," he said. 
"These cars are going out regardless 
of tonnage, and while the company Is 
still actually losing money on a pro- 
portion of them, we are pleased with 
the general results. We feel that the 
Jobbing houses here generally appre- 
ciate that the service is enabling them 
to develop business at points from 
which they had been previously ex- 
cluded. Some cars that carried only 
small tonnages a year ago, are now 
being loaded to about a capacity basis. 

"We recentl.v placed in operation a 
trl-weekly package freight car service 
between here and Princeton that 
straightens out a previously weak link. 
The car Is sent out from here by time 
freight and is dropped off at Coon 
Creek, where it is picked up by a local 
freight a few hours later and taken on 
to its destination. 

KxteiiMlonN For Went. 

Additional feeders and extensions 
will probably be built by the Oreat 
Northern in North Dakota and Mon- 
tana during the present year. In that 
program is Included the carrying to 
completion of its extension from New 
Rockford to Lewlston. Mont. A stretch 
of twentv-flve miles on that line be- 
tween Showden and Sidney, opened 
last fall, is said to be already develop- 
ing a god traffic. A branch from 
Falrvlew, Mont., to Arnegord. Mont., 
44 miles la length and naother from 



Whether it rains or shines, snows | 
or halls, and whether it Is cold or hot. 
Patrolman (Jeorge Wood Is to be found 
at the corner of Third avenue west 
and Superior fstreet regulatlnir the 
traffic at Dulutii's busiest corner. 

Although he ranks merely as a pa- 
trolman. Officer ..ood has a hard 
and responsible task before him each j 
dav he is on th« job. He must not 
only be on the lookout for law viola- 
tors, but he must stand on the Third 
avenue corner and see that the traffic 
does not become congested. And while 
h< Is on the Job. it might be u^d.d, that 
it never does become congested. 

Patrolman, or he might be called. 
Traffic (Officer Wood. Is an Imposing 
figure as he stands on the corner and 
regulates the traffic. By the rais- 
ing of hln hand, he stops a 
line of traffic. In order that an- 
« ther line may have Its way or that a 
driver may be permitted to turn the 
corner. ^ „. ^, 

And besides ^tlng a.i traffic officer. 
Patrolman Wood is dally made the 
chief information bureau of Superior 
street. Hundreds of men, women and 
children step up to him daily to ask 
the location of a street, department 
store or office building. He probably 
assists more frightened women, feeble 
old people and lost children than any 
other ten men in Duluth. 

Patrolman "Wood was appointed on 
the force in 1909 and since then has 
made an excellent record. It Is this 
exceptional record that caused him to 
be stationed on Duluth's most impor- 
tant corner. 




Ho More Blisters, Ho More Uncomfortable Plasters 



Far aReetlont of the 
Throat, ChcM and 
Lungs. Stiff N»ck. 
Sprains, Congestions, 
Bronchitis. Pleurisy. 
Rheumatism. Lum- 
bago, C h i i b lains. 
Pains and Aches of 
Back or Joints and 
Earache. 



ePRNDMOTKCrft 



-REMED>? 



(5GOS-OLENE 



Goos-Olene Is Oil of | 

Goose, combined with < 

Mustard, Turpentine, | 

Camiihor, Menthol, : 

Eucalyptus, Amber j 
Oil and other [otent 

modern discoveries in I 

drugs. i 



GRANDMOTHER'S GOOD OLD FASHIONED REMEDY 

Takes the place of strong liniments and disagreeable piasters. 

I. , miM.r form for the ailments of BABIES and YOUNG CHILDREN, and called 
.nn*i*?..''rLF''NO % ?n,arable for CROUP?W HOOPING COUGH and all infantile con,|estions. 
" At" an Druggirts « L^d 50 c^nts".' or mailed on receipt of price by the GOOS-OLENE COMPANY, 
Superior Wis. TAKE NO SUBSTITUTE. 



u.- the Ktate art commission. They call ' has been a member of the state board 
for a threl-s[ory structure with a of grain appeals for two and one-half 
frontage of 136 feet and a depth of 96 



years. He is well known as the for- 
mer editor of the Fergus Falls Geblad. 
a leading Norwegian newspaper. 

The governor's appointee was born 
in Norway 56 years ago. 

Mr. Staples has served on the state 
railroad commi-ssion since 1901 and is 
acknowledged to be one of the leading 
rate experts of the country. He won 
fame during the course of the Minne- 
sota rate case litigation and liis work 
in this connection gained him the rec- 
ognition of the Interstate commerce 
commission. 



Plcntywood, N. D., to Scoble, Mont.. 45 
miles, also opened last year, are ad- 
vised to be already becoming good 
business producers for Duluth jobbing 

J H McKlnnon, district agent of the 
Oaiiadian Northern, reported a heavy 
movement of forest products from 
camps on the road's extension from 
Duluth to Virginia. Many settlors are 
going Into the country between Mr- 
Rlnla and the Canadian border and 
that they are of the best class is evi- 
denced in the fact that they are 
bringing considerable farm machinery 
In with them. Compared with a year 
ago shipments of general merchandise 
from Duluth to various points trlbu- 



PATROLMAN GEORGE WOOD. 



tary to the road are said by Mr. Mc- 
Ki.TiDn to show a remarkable increase. 



INNOCENT MAN HELD 
aUILTY OF MURDER 



MEN, When 

in Chicago 

Come and See For Yourself 



MRS. BUELL WINS IN 
AnORNEYS' FIGHT 



Will Receive $518.66 as 

Fees in Suits Against 

D. & I. R. 



• eet The cost is estimated at $90,000, 
^r s'lO 000 less than the commission ex- 
pected to expend. From $18 000 to $20.- 
000 will be spent for furnishings. 

C. F. STaPLESlUITS 
RAIL COMMISSION | 

Goes to Federal Position 

and Is Succeeded By 

0. P. D. Jacobson. 

St. Paul, Minn., March 31.— The res- 
ignation of C. F. Staples, for fourteen 
years a member of the Minnesota rail- 
road and warehouse commission, was 
announced last night by ''overnor 
Eberhart. He will be succeeded by O. 
P D Jacobson of Fergus Falls. Mr. 
cfaniAs ivill deoart for Washington i 

M^y l.^^ere he will become a member! Mattoon. HI., March 31.— Horace Con- 
of the' advisory board in the division don, an Ionia, Mich., prison convict ar- 
of valuation of the Interstate com- , nested for breaking his parole, has 
""MfstaplTs^hadtold no one but his ! confessed to the murder fifteen years 
colleagues on the commission and Gov- I ago of William Hawken of Michigan 
ernor Eberhart of his intention to re- City. Ind. George Boucher of Benton 
sign The announcement of his re- i Harbor was sentenced to the Jackson 
tireriient caused general surprise. | prison for life for the murder of Haw- 

On tiraln Appeal Board. 



Confession of Another Is 

Made Fifteen Years 

After Crime. 




Tho Pr. I.or»ni Hfotro 
IVhIjt lUttery is the great- 



In a three-cornered fight among at- 
torneys for fees for legal services per- 
formed, Mrs. I. C. Buell has come out 
a victor over J. De I-a Motte and J. 
W. Reynolds, two other locai attor- 
neys. 

In district court yesterday after- 
noon. Judge Bert Fesler filed an order 
directing the clerk of the court to pay 
1 Mrs. Buell J518.66 from funds in his 
•*'.■!' w.1-'".f''' ""''"'"hands collected in three suits against 
and drtiiay the world bu ' j^ Duluth & Iron Range Railroad com- 
erer known. No druss. no *■ " ^^'^'■•■^ »«. j..v . a 

medicine, no dieting, no i P^ny. ^ .. . .i._i. ■«»_„ ■r»,.«ii «roa 

um«u«l demands of in, ! The court finds that Mrs Buell was 
Bort. Just cease all dUi- ' employed by Andrew Mattson, Erlck 
pat!on aud this Inrentlon Erickson and Antti Salo to bring suit 
will do the work. It aeada against the railroad company for dam- 
a stream of vital life Into necs resulting from a fire which swept 
your nervea. organa »nd •• * their property during the dry sea- 
blood during the time you' °^'^^ ineir pruyci i/ 
are asleep. For tlie treat- 
ment of rbeumatigm. weak 
back. nerTousiic>s. stomachy 
liver and kidney dlsordora, 
rarlrooele. and losses. It 
Is Incomjvarable. Dr. I.«r- 
enx Dry Cell Storage Bat- 
tery 1< a hlgh-gside taUerj, requires no charging 
wlih vinegar or •Old!', b »«" Prr <^*^"' ••»'"■ ■PPJtod. 
■1«M 4i>0 per cent grealfr aerTloe. and U aold at • 
low price withmil added cost for fancy books. 
A KooHet with full partUiUara and factory prlcej 



Mr. Jacobson, the new commissioner. 



ken. He was convicted on 
stantlal evidence, it is said. 



circum- 



D. D. D. In Hospitals; 
Standard Skin Remedy 



by mall >"RKE; sealed. 

II.H.LORENZ ELECTRIC WORKS 

S2-10 UucolM Avck dklca^Oa 111. 



Judge Fesler finds that the fact that 
De La Motte and Reynolds afterwards 
were employed to take charge of the 
litigation did not deprive Mrs. Buell 
of her fees^ 

lUINOfS' FRISCO 

PLAi\IS APPROVED. 



How many hospital patients, suffer- 
ing tho frightful itch, the raw scorch- 
ing pain of skin disease, have been 
soothed to sleep by a soothing fluid 
washed in by the nurse's hand«i? 

That fluid is the famous D. D. D. 
prescription for eczema. 

TRX BVFExnsnro inmns of on« 

of our prominent Catholic institutions 
(name of nurse and Institute on appli- 
cation), writes regarding a patient. 
"The disease had eaten her eyebrows 
away. Her nose and lips had become 
disfigured. Since the use of D. D. D. 
her eyebrows are growing, her nose 
and face have assumed their natural 
expression," 

How many eczepia sufferers are pay- 
ing their doctors for reg:ular treat- 
ment and are being treated with this 
same soothing, healing fluid? 
>l>m. asO. T. SXCXABOSOV frankly 



writes "D. D. D. is superior to any- 
thing I have ever found. Soft and 
soothing, yet a powerful agenL" 

To do the work, D. D. D. Prescrip- 
tion must be applied according- to 
OlrecUoiui given In the pamphlet 
around every bottle. Follow these di- 
rections — and see! 

And It certainly takes away the Itch 
at once — the moment the liquid is ap- 
plied. The skin Is soothed — calmed— 
so thoroughly refreshed — delightfully 
cooled. ... 

All druggists of standing have th« 
famous specific as well as the efficient 
D. D. D. Skin Soap. 

But we are so confident of the mer- 
its of this prescription that we will 
refund the purchase price of the fi-st 
full slae bottle if it falls to reach 
your case. You alone are to judges 



Chicago. March 31.— Plans for the 
Illinois building at the Patiama-Paciflc 
expoBitiou wer« adopted unanimously l 



WM. A. ABBETT, Druggist. 

D.DVD. Soap Keeps Yonr Skin Healthy 




I 



i^ 



i 

I. 

1 



i 






Our Spring 
Opening Week 

During our Spring Opening we offer 
many special values in Women's Suits, 
Coats and Dresses. Here is a special 
offer in a 

WotnaiVs Balmacaan 
Spring Coot 



m 



at only 



$ 



14.75 



Made up of Genuine Donegal Tweeds. 
Absolutely guaranteed to satisfy in 
every way. This coat is making a big 
hit everywhere and is perhaps the 
most serviceable coat ever sold. 

Your Credit Is Good. 



:M 







MPVKIOMTEO 



WILL WARN 
MARINERS 

Beaufort Scale Will Be Used 

in Making Wind 

Reports. 



constitutionality of the law Is tested," 
said C. E. Maurer of the Glens Run 
Coal company. 

Keep at Work In Illinoiii. 

Peoria. 111.,' March 31. — The Illinois 
mine workers Aill remain at work un- 
til a new wag 3 scale is fixed or until 
the Illinoi.s miners take a referendum 
vote on the policy as outlined by the 
policy committee. 

This was d.-oided at a meeting of 
the ininois mine workers here. The 
present agreement expires April 1. 
John P. White, president of the United 
Mine Workers accused the operator.^ 
of pulling win s in an endeavor to ef- 
fect a strike io that the national or- 
ganii.*atlons might not be able to meet 
the demands now placed upon It by 
the several strikers in the United 
States. 

Operators hrre said that a general 
lockout was Improbable, although 
many mines would be closed after 
April 1 on account of of the limited 
demand for co il at the present time. 



Went YlrKinianM to Q.iilt. 

Wheeling, A\'. Va.. March 31.— Ten 
thousand unlcn coal minors of the 
Eastern Ohio coal llelds In Belmont 
and Jefferson counties will walk out 
tonight, pendi ig the negotiation of a 
new scale for the district to take the 
place of the S'-ale which expires April 
1, according t > announcement of offi- 
cials of the I nited Mine Workers of 
America here. 



Beginning tomorrow vessel owners 
are to receive daily wind reports, ac- 
cording to the Beaufort scale, from the 
local weather bureau. This Is In con- 
Junction with a new ruling of the 
bureau at Washington and has been 
establlsht'd to protect shipping inter- 
ests on the Oreat L.akes. 

Weather Forecaster 3. W. Richard- 
eon will include iTi his daily weather 
report an item on the condition of the 
Winds and in this way local vessel 
owners will be enabled to avoid seri- 
ous accidents to fneir ships during 
storms. The approach of storms will 
be heralded also and should aid In 
lowering the storm losses for the 
coming .season. 

The B.aufort scale is now used by 
the Brtti.sh navy and has been in use 
in England and other countries for a 
number of ^-ears to protect shipping. 
The introduction of this scale in this 
country is considered quite a step for- 
ward by .«hipping interests. 

Forecrtsler Richardson this noon 
g-Rve out the following figures us 
making up the Beaufort scale: 

Wind. Miles per hour. 

Calm to 3 

Light air S to 8 

Light breeze 8 to 13 

Gentle breeze 13 to 18 

Moderate breeze 18 to "3 

Fresh breeze 23 to 28 

Strong breeze 28 to 34 

Moderate gal© 34 to 40 

Fresh gale 40 to 48 

Strong gale 48 to 56, 

Whole gale 56 to B5 i cussed tonight by Rev. James Donahue, 

Storm 65 to 75 city mis.sionary of St. Paul, who will 

Hurricane Over 78 ' speak on "Tne Scope of Charity'' 

An example of the use of this scale j at the Cathedral auditorium, 

follows: "Increasing south wind Father Donahue had intended to speak 



WOULD REVISE 
THE ENGLISH 
GOVERNMENT 



Sir Edward Grey Says 

Country Is Likely to 

"Go Under." 



Suggests to Commons That 

Federal System Be 

Adopted. 



London, March 81. — The establish- 
ment of a Federal system of goveriv- 
ment for the British Isles was sug- 
gested to the house of commons to- 
day by Sir Edward Grey as a solution 
of the home rule difficulty. 

The suggestion was received with 
great attention by the house, which 
was engaged In debate on* the second 
reading of the home rule bill. 

•I believe," said Sir Edward, "that 
if our present difficulty is not solved 
by the introduction of a Federal sys- 
tem, the country will go under through 
the sheer inability of parliament to 
transact its business." 

Sir Edward Grey put forward a hint 
that the government was ready to go 
to the country for a general election If 
parliament would enact Its bills abol- 
ishing the system of plural voting, 
giving home rule to Ireland and dis- 
establishing the Welsh church. 

"If an election could be assured," he 
said, "on the terms of securing the 
abolition of plural voting and of plac- 
ing home rule and Welsh disestablish- 
ment on the statute books the method 
would be worthy of consideration." 



IVfATCH GAME 

VOLLEYBALL 

GRAND FORKS vs. DULUTH 
Y. M. C. A. Wednesday 8 P. M. 

A>MIiSION 25c-CHIL3Rei iCc 



PERSONAL 



I PlttKbnrK DIstrtet Affreenient. 

I Pittsburg, Pi., March 31. — A contln- 

■ nance of mining operations in the 
Pittsburg district is assured by the 

I action of the operators of this district 
and the ofttcij Is of district No. 5. 

1 United Mine ^V'orkers of America, In 
reaching an agreement yesterday. At 
a joint conference between the oper- 
ators and ml lers it was decided to 

I continue the ''levcland scale, now 
force, for another two years. 



in 



SOCIAL REFORM 

AKIN TO CHARITY 



The attitude and duty of the Duluth 
citizen in regurd to dance halls, pool 
and billiard rt oms, the theater, slums, 
and general cliarlty work will be dls- 



Paul is at the St. 
Paul Is registered 



F. L. Berry of St 
Louis. 

Matt Hayes of St, 
at the St. Louis. 

C. V. Joyce of Minneapolis is regis- 
tered at the St. Louis. 

J. L. Jenkins of Cloquet Is at the 
McKay. 

J. McGovern of Minneapolis is regis- 
tered at the McKay. 

George Walters of Hamilton, 111., is 
at the McKay. 

F, G. Culler of Chicago is at the 
Spalding. 

G. B. Geuppe of Fort Frances Is 
registered at the Spalding. 

C. S. Smith of Chicago Is at the 
Spalding. 

John A. James of Fort William Is 
at the Spalding. 

George D. Johnson of St. Paul Is at 
the Holland. 

Harry Sells of Manistee is at the 
Holland. ^ ,^ , 

S. W. Scott of Wausau is at the Hol- 
land. . . ,^, 

Federal Judge Morris returned this 
morning from the Twin Cities where 
he conducted court yesterday, and 1? 
planning to be here today and tomor- 
row. He will return to the Twin Cities 
tomorrow evening. 



shifting to moderate northwest 
or south breeze increasing to 
gale." 



wind 
gale, 
fresh 



CLOSE OHIO 
COAL MINES 



Cl 1. Ohio, March 31— "Every 

mil.- •ijio will be closed at 3:30 

this afternoon," said C. L. Cunningham 
of the 'Jo.shen Coal company here to- 
day, t'oiitlnulng he said: 

"No one can tell how long they will 
remain closed. The anti-screen law 
means the ruination of the Ohio coal 
industry. The mine run basis of pay- 
ment is absohit<ly impossible, as it re- 
sults in depreciation of the quality of 
coal, and places Ohio operators where 
they cannot compete with other states 
where miners are paid on the lump 
coal basis." 

"Ohio operators simply will sit tight 
and keep their mines closed until the 

MUSTEROJi Loosens Up 
Congesfion From Colds 

Just rub it briskly on the chest and 
throat tonight, and get the soothing 
relief this clean, white ointment, 
made with oil of mustard, gives. 

The old-time mustard plaster used ! 
to blister. MUSTEROLB 
That's why millions are now using It 



on Catholic cbajlties only, but decided 
to enlarge hi;i topic after discussing 
the matter with Duluth social and 
charity workers. 

"The point of view of the charity 
worker has ch inged greatly in the last 
few years" said Father Donahue when 
seen at tne Scalding today. "At one 
time it was considered sufficient to 
feed the hunf ry and supply clothing, 



CITY BRIEFS 



Dr Konklcr. 

Chiropractic specialist, 504 
building. 



Columbia 




Tonlftht at Aadltorinm. 

Dancing and skating party. Band music. 

WaiitM Pay for ExpIonlveB. 

The Pluto Powder company started 
suit in district court yesterday after- 
noon to enforce the collection of 
$184.23 alleged to be due from William 
H. Yawkey. as receiver for the prop- 
t rty v,f the New York State Steel com- 

iiny. Thme amount alleged to be due 
is for dynamite and other explosives 
used at the Larkin mine during the 
jears 15*12 and 1913. 

— • 

Sniphar Vapor Bnths 
Oive results equal to the Hot Springs 
and distant bathing places. Saves 
much time and expense. Parlors 426 

. ost First street. 



Northland Frlntery. 

Good printing. Call Zenith 494. Adv. 

♦ 

Spine Injured I Wants 95,000. 

For injuries to his back and spine 
I'Ceived In an accident at the Malta 
mine near Gilbert March 25, 1010, Hjal- 
mar Luoto Ltartcd suit for J5,000 dam- 
ages In district court yesterday against 
the Malta Iron Mining company, pro- 
prietors of the mine. i-uoto claims 
that while he was engaged In holding 
one end of a tlmt)er "cap" weighing 
about BOO pounds, the scaffolding on 
i which he was standing broke and pre- 
' cipitaled him to the ground several 
feet below. 



FATHER J. DONAHUE. 



but now It Is? considered fully as es- 
doosn't. ' sentlal to se. that the nfedy are 
placed In proper surroundings so that 
■'their condltU n may be permanently 
with such comforting results. It ^ bettered. 

breaks up a cold quicker than 



up a 

mustard plaster you ever saw. 



any 




Best for Sore Throat, Bronchitis, 

Tonsilitis, Croup, Stiff Neck, Asthma, 

Neuralgia, Headache, Congestion, 

Pleurisy, Rheumati.sm, Lum b a g o, 

I'ains and Aches of the Back or j 

Joints, Sprains. Sore Muscles. Bruises. ; MYORICIDE KILLED 
Chilblains, Frosted Feet. Colds of the w/\v/iiivil i_ i\ii.L.i.br 



"I am not opposed to dancing, but 
I believe dan( Ing should be conducted 
properly just as should pool and bil- 
liard nails, tlieaters, and all sorts of 
amus»>ment8. What should be bene- 
ficial Is oftei harmful, because it Is 
not properly managed and regulated. 

"As a member of the National Comt- 
mlttee of Catholic Charities and Cor- 
rections, I have heard these topics 
discussed considerably of late, and find 
they are of uatlon-wide interest. In 
charity work we are trying to re- 
move the cauf e of poverty just as much 
as we are trying to give temporary re- 
lief." 

Father Donahue is a fluent and elo- 
quent speake •, and is one of the best 
I authorities o i this subject In the 
Northwest. 



Aa«tln File* Answer. 

Joseph Austin, recently elected as 
president of the village of Chisholm, 
yesterday filed In district court an an- 
swer to the contest proceedings which 
lave been Instituted against him by 
Henry Fuger^ defeated candidate. 
Austin declares that through fear of 
punishment threatened by Fugere and 
his agents, many voters cast in>ir bal- 
I lots In Fugere's favor at the recent 
I election. In tho recount, taken recent- 
ly at Chisholm, Austin won a second 
I time. A number of the ballots, how- 
ever, are In dispute. 



Chest (It prevents Pneumonia). 

At your druggist's, in 25c and 50c 
Jars, and a special large hospital size 
for 92.50. Sold by druggists every- 
where. Accept no substitute. If 
your druggist cannot supply you, send 
25c or 50c to the MUSTEHOLE Com- 
pany, Cleveland, O., and we will mail 
you a jur, postage prepaid. 

MI.'^S M .SPU.RS. Gntduste Nun* St. Petcnburs, 
FlorlfJa. say.);. 

"I hav* found H exMllent fir ererythtni that bas 
UtjtliluK to ilo with eol(U or rhetinialli- aIT«i't!»its. I 
am a imfp^iunal mine and ttila prvUuct la Iwtter 
UUkU Uiiiiihxt i eter saw." 



BY.NE W ME XICO MOB. 

Santa Fe, K. Mex., March 31. — Adolfo 
Padllia, charged with killing his wife 
Saturday by .rutting her throat with a 
razor, was dragged from the county 
Jail here ealy today by a mob of 
twenty masked men, his hands and 
throat slashe 1 with sharp knives, his 
lungs punctured with stab wounds, 
and left lylnf: in the street in front of 
tl^ jail. He died at 11 o'clock after 
doctors had .^pent three hours sewing 
up his wouncs. 

None of th>! mob has been identified 
or captured. 




the Omaha depot here at 8:40 a. m. 
"le local employes 
Viff^tlng, and will 
or and other 
'Spooner. 

Will Set Jury Case*. 

Attorneys havirti* cnses for jury trial 
at the March terni of.the district court 
are expected to ot present In court 
tomorrow afternoon at 1:80 o'clock, 
when the third setting of jury cases for 
the term will be S^^^^. Judge Dancer 
Is in chsirge n f t i^T^y n d i r 

Leaves tmric^engo, 

A. H. King, maBKer of the North 
western Produce ^mpffny, left today 
for Chicago on a l^slnttes trip. 

. ^mr 
CoMplalilt Dropped. 

Harold D. Thoi rte.-^J^p-ears old, who 
WHS arrested yosie^Wafi afternoon by 
I'atrolman Monahai^oif a charge of 
petit larceny, was later released be- 



Our Leader, 

Steel. 4-drawer letter file. $27.50. 
Stewart Co. 



M. L 



TOO LATE 
TO CLASSIFY 

One Cent a Word Eaeh InKertlon. 
No Advertisement Less Than 15 Cents. 



FOR RENT— SIX-ROOM MODERN 
house, London road, near Sixtieth 
axenue east; rent reasonable to right 
party if taken Immediately. 606 
Palladio building. 

WANTED TO RBSt — PIECE OF 
land near Dulut^ with small house 
and barn and ."^tnie clearing on it; 
must be cheap. Address P 408. Her- 
ald. ^ 



FOR SALE— A SM^LL CASH PAT- 
ment, balance like rent, one four- 
room cottage and large shed; electric 
light, etc.; Park Point. Edmont, 18 
Third avenue west. 



FOR 



house, all newly refinished, porch 
inclosed In glass; large shade trees; 
also a five-room cottage. Park Point. 
Edmont, 18 Third avenue west. 



FOR RENT — NICE FOUR- ROOM 
flat; modern except heat. Apply 
2124 >4 West Third street. 



WANTED — A GOOD, RELIABLE 
farmer, who can give references, to 
lease or work a farm on shares; 
about twenty-five acres cleared, 
eight acres fall plowed; good soil; 
fair buildings, facing nice spring 
lake; small orchard. For further 
particulars Inquire at "206 Palladio 
building, Duluthj Minn. 

Farm lands at wholesale prices. L. A. 
Larsen Co., 214 Providence building. 



MARRIAGEaiCENSES. 

Victor Kujanpaa^g^d Lydla J. Heik- 
kila. j ..*' 

Alois De Cook akd Marie Walten. 

Theodore F. Lilwfman of (Jogeblc 
county, Mich., andWarah F. Salnovitz. 

Thomas Halsethfand Agnes Lin- 
duist. 



WEDDING PICTURES are a specialty 
with Christensen. 25 W. Superior St. 



cause the complainant refused to ap- 
pear against blm. Thorne was accused | 
of stealing a check, but this he re- I 
turned to the complaining witness and ', 
the charge was dropped. j 

— » 

Sent Back to Ranse* 
Leonard Johnson, the 14-year-old boy | 
who ran away from his home at Chis- 
holm last Saturday and who was ar- 1 
rested while wandering about at the | 
union station in the evening, was yes- ; 
terday taken back to the range city I 
by an officer. 

- — ^ .— 

Dnlutblans Get Patents. 

Patents have just been allowed and 
will .soon issue by the United States 
patent office to Herman Yessne of 
this city for a new invention in th« 
form of a dress goods steamer, and 
to Magnus Gustafson and Theodore 
.Swanson for an improvement in swamp i 
horseshoes, and also to George A. Wle- j 
land for Improvements in derricks for i 
stump pulling. These patents were 
obtained by S. George Stevens of this 
city. 

— — ^ ■ - 

Utility Men to Meet. 

The employes of the water and light 
department will hold a meeting in the 
council chambers at 8 o'clock •this eve- 
ning. They have been called by Com- 
missioner Leonidas Merritt, head of | 
the division of l)ublic utilities, to dis- j 
cuss the question of old age pensions 
and any other matters of interest to 
the department which may be brought I 
up. 



Proetor Cooper Reeovering. 

Proctor Cooper, son of Mr. and Mra 
O. H. Cooper, 1917 Jefferson street, 
who underwent a serious operation at 
St. Luke's hospital, is progressing fa- 
vorably. 



PHOSPHORUS FOR 
BOULEVARD WALLS 



SOLID GOLD WEDDING AND EN- 
GAGEMENT RIN<;S made and mount- 
ed to order at HenrigJtsen's. 



BIRtR8.fi 

DESROCHES — A son was born March 
24 to Mr. and Mrs,. Clement Des- 
rochts, 2704 We.st f'jfth street. 

DION — A daughter was born Marcb_JJ5f 
to Mr. and Mrs. Frank Dion, |.:nO 
Devonshire street. Jiif 

OBRieN— Mr. and Mrs. J./P: O'Brien 
of 118 Eighth avenue feast fti-e the 
parents of a daughter, born/ Feb. 28. 

McDOU«JALL— A son was jbWtn March 
18 to Mr. ajvl Mrs. Raluft'^MeDougall. 
1424 East Third street/^ 

HAAKIN.'^ONi— A daughter was brrrn 
March 27 to Mr. ftnd Jjfrsj'Gust Haak- 
Inson. 620 North Jk.nke atenue. 

HAUGF: — A son waj| born March 28 to 
Mr. and Mrs. RaMmttik Hauge, Home- 
croft park. • * ~ 

WII^GER — Mr. and Mrs. James A. Wll- 
ger of 1831 East Eighth street are 
the parents of a son born March 29. 

ZIMMERMAN — A daughter was born 
March 26 to Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Zimmerman, 829 West Third street. 



Park Manager Would Elim- 
inate Danger of Driving 
at Night. 

Henry Cleveland, manager of the 
park department, has conceived a novel 
scheme to be used in connection with 
the protecting walls along the boule- 
vard. He proposes to wash the inside 
of the walls with a white shell prep- 
aration which contains phosphorus. 
This will glow at night and enable 
drivers of all vehicles to easily avoid 
the dangerous places. 

The walls are built on the edge of 
steep embankments, some of which 
are exceedingly dangerous. In some 
places they are little more than a row 
of stones. It Is planned to raise some 
of these and to place stone for the pro- 
tection of others which are now open. 
The Inside lino of all of them will be 
coated with the phosphoresent prepar- 
ation. Aside from the safety feature 
the sight of the glowing walls will 
add another attraction to the beautiful 
and popular driveway. 
- Considerable stone is being obtained 
for the walls and for the rook crusher 
from the stone ledge near Seventh ave- 
nue west which Is being removed by 
the park department. 



HAS PAID ALL THE MONEY 

JohirPovsha Files Answer to Austrian 
' , Consul's Petition. 

John Povsha of Hibbing, administra- 
tor of the estate of Vikno Robnik, 
takes exception to the insinuation of 
the Austrian consul, Edgar Prochnik. 
that he has withheld money from the 
widow of the estate. The consul yes- 
terday filed a petition with the court 
asking that Povsha be required to 
make an accounting, it being claimed 
that he had remitted but $600 of 
$1,378 to the widow. Today. Povsha 
filed with the clerk of the court re- 
ceipts showing all of the money to 
have been paid. 



I Dea ths and Funerals [ 

JOH.NSd.V — Mrs. Ellen Johnson, 64 
years old, 618 Lake avenue north, 
died at St. Luke's hospital yesterday 
afternoon following an operation. 
Her husband died here about three 
years ago. She Is survived by one 
son, Herbert of Duluth, and three 
daughters, Mrs. A. S. Atter of Two 
Harbors and Lillian and Anita John- 
son of Duluth. The funeral will be 
held at 1:30 o'clock Thursday after- 
noon from the Stewart undertaking 
rooms and at 2 o'clock from the 
First Swedish Lutheran church. 
Sixth avenue east and Third street. 
Rev. C. O. Swan will officiate and 
interment will be at the London road 
cemetery. 

MENNIER — Paul Mennler, 81 years old, 
an inmate at the county hospital for 
several years, died there this morn- 
ing. The body Is being held at the 
Crawford undertaking rooms, pend- 
ing word from relatives, who are be- 
lieved to reside in the vicinity of 
Duluth. 

MONUMENTS. 



LARGEST STOCK OF HIGH-GRADE 
monuments in the Northwest; call 
and inspect before buying elsewhere. 
P. N. Peterson Granite Co., 320 E. Sup. 

funeralTflowers a^ spi^LMyrT. 

Duluth Floral Co.. 121 W. Superior St. 



Charged With Theft. 

John Olson, 45 years old, was ar- 
rested last evening on a charge of 
petit larceny. He was taken Into 
custody by Patrolman Connors on the 
complaint of his roommate, who al- 
leged that Olson stole a hat and a pair 
of mittens from their room in a West 
Superior str^\t hotel. Olson will be ar- 
raigned this afternoon. 

• 

Two "VaKs" Leave City. 

Paul Romsland and David Dormey, 
who were arrested last evening on a 
charge of vagrancy and who were being 
held pending an investigation by the 
police into their records, this morning 
changed their pleas to guilty and were 
each sentenced to forty days on the 
work farm. On their promise to leave 
the city the court suspended sentence. 



CARD OF THANKS. 

WE WISH TO THANK OUR FRIENDS 
and neighbors, also the employes of 
the Pittsburg coal dock for their 
kindness and beautiful floral offer- 
ings at the death of our beloved 
husband and father. 

MRS. JOHN A. JOHNSON AND CHIL- 
DREN 



Railroaders Will Meet. 

General Freight Agent Ober of the 
Omaha railroad, who Is here from St. 
Paul today, announces that there will 
be a meeting next Sunday at Spooner, 
Wis., of depot men. freight and pas- 
senger agents and other employes of 
the railroad. A special train will l«ave 



BUILDING PERMITS. 

To Dowling-Kirby-Hepworth 
company, frame dwelling. 
Victoria street between Co- 
lumbus and Woodland ave- 
nues $ 6,500 

To Manchester Savings bank, 
addition to frame dwelling, 
West Third street between 
First and Second avenues... 300 

To W. E. JolHison, repairs. 
Eighth avenue east between 
Sixth and Seventh streets... 1,600 

To K. Sunder, repairs, £<a6t 

First street < 2.000 

To Martell Bros., frame ware- 
house, New Duluth $ 100 

To Duluth Lumber company, 
addition to boHer house. Gar- 
field avenue 2.000 

To H. Flohn. repairs. East 
Eighth street between Sec- 
ond and Third avenue. s.... 360 

To M. Aaski, store and dwell- 
ing. Ninety-ninth avenue 
west and Rels street 1,000 

To H. J. Mullin. alter stair 
front and new floor. East Su- 
perior street between Third 
and Fourth avenues 1,000 

To W. J. Roache. frame d«nrell- 
Ing, Ivanhoe street between 
Fifty-second and Flftyrthlrd 
avenues east i . . . . . 450 

To Erickson and Olson, frame 
dwelling, Faribault jrtreet 
between Elyelan and Kolstad 
avenues 2,600 

To C. M. Hon. frame store. 
Woodland avenue between 
Mankato and Winona streets 2,500 

To Mrs. H. Domoe, stone foun- 
dation, West Second street 
between Thlrteertth and 
Fourteenth avenues ..^.... 125 

To J. Doyle, addlticp, Taeony 
street between Fifty-ninth 
and Sixty-first aveAuea 300 



POWER TO CH ICAGO. 

Hibbing's Mayor Has Gone to Wtndy 
City to Consult Specialist. 

Hibbing, Minn., March 31. — Word was 
received here today that Mayor Vic- 
tor Power, who has been in Minne- 
apolis consulting a specialist, has gone 
to Chicago to consult one of the noted 
specialists of that city. It Is not be- 
lieved here that the mayor's condition 
Is by any means serious but he desires 
to consult the best doctors in the 
country. 



COPPER STRIKER SHOT. 

Albert Salo Gets Bullet Through 
Stomach at Red Jacket, Mich. 

Calumet, Mich., March 31. — Albert 
Salo. a striker, was shot In the stom- 
ach yesterday afternoon by Peter 

Lampsa, near the corner of Pine and 
Fifth street, Red Jacket. The two 
men, it Is claimed, were quarreling, 
and Lampsa drew' a pistol and fired 
,the bullet lodging in Salo's stomach. 
The wounded man "Was carried into the 
Pine Street pharmacy. It Is not yet 
known whether the wound will prove 
fatal. 



Prinee Henry Starts for Chile. 

Buenos Aires, Argentina, March 31. 
— Prince and Princess Henry of Prus- 
sia left here today by railroad for 
Chile. They traveled in the presiden- 
tial car. A large gathering of promi- 
nent personages went to the station 
to bid them farewell. 



FILES FOR COUNTY 

COMMISSIONERSHIP 




ClK 6la$$ Block Store 

' The Shopping Cen'.er ol Duluth ' 



Buy Fine Table Linens for 
Your Easter Table for Less 

Easter will soon be here and wliat is nicer than to greet your 
family and the expected Easter guest with a finely appointed 
table. 

We have planned a most helpful sale to make your 
Easter table attractive. Our fine Cloths and Nap- 
kins are of pure linen ; newest patterns and at prices 
to suit every purse. 

Fine Pattern Cloths 

V^ery heavy treble damask, finest Irish thread linen and as fine 
as a piece of satin. I'^xquisite new patterns at very special prices. 

Rcguhtr Price. Sale Price. 

72x72-inch CLOTHS $7.50 $4.69 

72x90-inch CLOTHS $9.00 $5.69 

90x90-inch CLOTHS $10.50 $6.50 

72xl08-inch CLOTHS $10.50 $6.50 

25x26-inch NAPKINS ..... .$12.50 • $6.50 



72.\"2 Pattern Table Cloths — All 

pure linen; regularly 
$3.98, sale price 



70x70-lnch Fine Pattern 
pure linen, round de 
signs; regularly $3.. 



$2.98 

rn Cloths, 

$2.48 



72x72-inch Round Pattern Cloths; 
new patttrns; regu- 
larly $3.50, special.. 

62x62 All Linen Tea Cloths, choice 
patterns; regularly 
$2.00, special 



$2.69 

oths, choice 

$1.48 



Hemstitched I..inen Tea Cloths: 
extra heavy quality; good range 
of pattern.s; sizes 58x.j8; regular 
$2.2 5 values, sale 
price 



$1.65 



72-inch All Linen T.ible Damask 
— Fine satin flnish; good range 
of patterns; regular $1.25 value, 
sale price, per 
yard 



98c 



Linen Napkins — 20x20 inch size, 
extra heavy quality; re^^fular $3.50 
value, sale price, 
dozen 



$2.98 



Linen Napkins — 22x22 inches; new 
designs; fine satin finish; regular 
$4.00 value, sale price, 
per dozen 



$3.19 



A Suggestion io Those Sfarting or 
Adding io a Savings Bank Account 

According to our usual cu.=tom, all moneys deposited in our Sav- 
ings Department on or before the 10th of .\prll v ill be credited with 
interest from April 1st. IXTEKKST CKKDITED Jl LY 1st, 1914. We 

suggest, therefoie, that you make your deposit at once so as to get 
credit for the additional interest. 

3%-iNTEREST-3% 

PAID ON S.WINGS AND TIME DEPOSITS. 

]\J orthern Rational fi ank 

ALWORTIl BUILDING — "Look np, you can't miss It." 

.Savings Department open from 6 to 8 o'clock Saturday evenings. 



STUDY AKERICAH 
SUGAR BEET NEEDS 



Washington, March 31. — Investiga- 
tion of the sugar beet industry In the 
United States has been beguii by the 
bureau of corporations, to determine 
whether the Industry has been in- 
jured by the new tariff. 

Investigators now are at work in 
Ohio, Michigan, Colorado and the 
Rocky mountain states, and expect to 
finish their work in about two weeks. 



ASK EXTRA SESSION 
TO REPEAL TWO 



Madison, Wis., March 31. — Four state 
officials today called upon Governor 
McGovern with a petition that he call 

an extra session of the legislature to 
repeal certain appropriation acts with 
a view to reducing state taxes. The 
specific appropriations the repeal of 
which is desired, are the highway aid 
law and the public buildings appro- 
priations act. The officers were at- 
torney General Walter C. Owen, Sec- 
retary of State John S. Donald, State 
Treasurer Henry I. Johnson and Lieut. 
Gov. Thomas Morris. 

They were in conference with the 
governor for over an hour, but re- 
fused afterwards to discuss his views. 

The governor told them he would 
give the petition thorough considera- 
tion. It is intimated that an an- 
nouncement of action on the petition 
may come within the next forty-eight 
hours. 

LIFE SENTENCTFOR 
GIRL BRIDE'S SUYER 



Springfield, Mo.. March 31. — Ollie 
Blades, who pleaded guilty here yes- 
terday to the charge of murdering his 
16-year-old bride, was sentenced to- 
day to life imprisonment. 

Blades shot his wife to death last 



December, Just a month after his mar- 
riage. 

Attorneys for Blades asked that he 
be given a life sentence in the peni- 
tentiary rather than the death penalty. 
Blades refused to go to trial, declar- 
ing he repented the crime and waa 
willing to suffer the penalty. 

Blades, it was charged, shot and 
killed his wife Dec. 29 last, about & 
month after they had been married. 
The tragedy was the result of a Quar- 
rel, and occurred on a country road 
near Republic, Mo. After shooting his 
-girl bride, the youth kissed her and 
returned to his mother's home, wher^ 
it is alleged he confessed. 

$20,000 THEFT LAID 
TO POSTAL GL£RK 



Harrlsburg, Pa., March 31. — ^William 
R. Baum, aged 30, a mall clerk In the 
Harrlsburg postofCice, was arrested to- 
day charged with having stolen $20,* 

000 from the mails. It Is alleged that 
two packages, each containing $10,000 
in currency, were taken from the 
mails on July 6, 1912. The money was 
being sent from St. Paul to a bank In 
New Tork. 



FLOOD CONTINUES 

IN K ENTUCKY. 

Lexington, Ky., March 31. — ^Reports 
reaching here today from the moun- 
tain sections stated that while the tor- 
rential rains that visited that sectkll 
during the last four days had stopped, 
Hazard, Ky.. still was under water 
and that Beattyvllle, Salyersvlllo anl 
West Liberty, Ky., were threatened, in- 
asmuch as the rivers continued to rise. 
The Kentucky river and Its tributaries 
are on a rampage. As yet Hazard ha« 
made no appeal for assistance. 

• • 

To Dam Arrowwood Lake. 

Kensal, N. D^ March 31. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — To add to the attractive- 
ness of Lake Arrowwood, near here. 
Increasing its depth for bathing and 
for breeding and maintaining fish, the 
citizens will raise a fund and construct 
a three-foot dam across the lower 
point. 



JOHN CHRISTIANSON. 

John Christiansen, 831 East Ninth 
street, filed with the county auditor 
today as a candidate for the office 
of county commissioner from the Sec- 
ond commissioner district. He will op- 
pose Commissioner John Tlecher for 
re-election and other candidates. Mr. 
Christianson has been a resident ot 
the city tov twenty-five years. 




"Didn't I Tea You Dad!'* 



"I knew you could figure on bavins^ it in dozen lott^ 
when you wrote me that mother and tne giili were adl luinf 

Hair Tonic 

why Dad, you're {ost at crazy about it as any of ua. IsnH 
it ereat stuff? I tell you it can't b« beat for falling hai& 
itchine scalp and dandrufE. Do you know Dad, that I 
haven t gone on a trip for the past year idthoot tiiclring 
a bottle of it in my grip?" 

AU DnnUt9 5sff ff^oMiilsdb 





■r 






t 




DEFECTIVE PAGE 







"« 










GRAND REMOVAL SALE IS NOW ON 



IT ©FENlEi YESTEHDM USC 



km DT 





IMO 





IREIT CLOUD iUe^ST 

ITNEB! 




9 



The first clay's business during this great sale was far beyond our expectation. Today's business even surpassed yesterday s. The 
way the crowds of eager buyers flocked to our store shows that the people of Duluth and vicinity know that when we szy real remov- 
al sale prices we mean just what we say. Don't wait too long—irom the past two days' business— the way the people buy things at the 
prices marked on the big yellow tags, it looks as though we would start in at our new location May 1 without even our big electric sign. 

Everything i^ Home From Pie Fms to Gr and! atlier ClOcl(s at Real Removal Sale Prices 



*»■ 



-j 



TIHIE 



FDRST 
OHLY 

mi 




■ 



m 



For All Those 

Who Wish, 

We Con Make 

Arran^iements 

for the 

Payment of 

Purchases on 

Easy 

Payment 

Plan. 




Until IVIay 1st 





Second Ave. W. and First Street 




After May 1st at 226 and 228 West Superior Street — E"hang.'fc 



Next to American 
ank 



All Our 
Out-of-Town 
Friends Need 
Not Hesitate. 
We Have Made 
Arrangements 
to Pack, Ship 
and Pay the 

Freight on 
Purchases You 

May Make. 



mn oiLY 

IRE^L 
iEiOlOW^L 
SILE iiW 



J 




Remember 




Original Price Tags on Every Piece oi Furniture — Everything Marlced in 
Plain Figures on Large "Bemovar* Tags. You See Your Own Savings. 



(*i^ 



mv 



ITiSiac. 



rm. . iiuJMiii'Jiiiipi 



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WEST 



1 



HERALD BRANCH: 
Herman Olsun. Maaaser, 1823 W>«* Sun*Hor 9t«**t. 



WILL LAY CORNER 
STONE OF CHURCH 

Special Exercises Will Be' 
Held By Trinity Con- 
gregation. • 

Tht? progrram for th^ laying of the 
cornerstone and dedication of the, 
basement of the Trinity English Liith- i 
eran church, Twenty-aeventh avenue 
treat and Third street^, is complete. The 
leadiug Lutheran ,pa3tors of Duluth 
and Superior will tak*- part. 

The oornerstore will be laid follow- 
ing a proirram to be held in the church 
begliinin« at 2 30 o'clock j'anday. Dr. 
P A Miittson of v'anuon Falls, presi 
dent i)f the Minnes.^ia state conference 
for Lutiieran churche.i will lay the 
■ton-. He will t>e assisted by Dr. John 
A. Krantz. pastor of the Clim Swed- 
ish Lutheran church, and president of 
the conference for a number of yearss. 

r»r l-'nnk Nelson of Minneapolis, 
president of the Minne^jota college will 
be one 4)f the principal speakers dur- 
ing the .ifteraoon. Remarks will aLso 
be made by Rev. C. .G. Olson. Of the 
Bet bar. V Swedish Lutheran church. 
Rev. <". O. Swan of the First Swedish 
Lutheran church anJ Rov. J. M Xervig 
of the Zion Norwegian Lutheran 
church Rev. O. H. Nelson and Rev. A. 
Theodore Ekblad of Superi>>r will also 
take part in the proeram. 

The following Is the afternoon's pro- 

Krnin: 

Hvmn 

Congregation. 

Invocation •*■■"*. 

Rev «>. H. Nelson of Superior. 

Song — "I Will See My Flock" 

Trinity Choir. 
Addre.=(8 



Dr. Frank Nelson of Minneapolis. 

golo — "The Palms" 

Charles O. Applehageu. 

Addres-s ,; * ;,' ' 

Dr. P. A. Mattsou of Cannon Falls. 

Solo — Selected 

Mrs. A. Smith. 

Offertory ••••;• ,\'," " 

Remarks by pastors. Rev. C. O. Olson. 
Rev. C. O. Swan iud Rev. J- M. Ner- 
vlg. 

Song— "Jubilate Deo" In D 

Trinity Choir. 
Laying of th^ .•ornerstone by Dr. 
Mattson, assisted by Dr. Krantz. 

In the evening it 7:46 o'clock ser- 
mons will be givei by Rev. A. T. Ek- 
blad of Superior aid Dr. Mattson. The 
combined choirs of the First. Bethany, 
Elim and Trinity churches will sing. | 
A duet selection will also be given by 
Mrs. E. Eliason and Mrs. A. Lofgren. 
Rev. F. O. Hansor>. pastor of the new 
church announced hat special program 
, i.« also being arratiged for Easter Sun- 
day and that a large number of new 
! members would !>e taken into the 
: church at that ti me. 

Wia ENLARGE 

BAPTIST CHURCH 

West End Congregation Is 

Outgrowing Its Present 

Quarters. 

At the quarterly meeting of the 
congregation of Ihe Central Baptist 
church. Twentiell: avenue west and 
First street, the tiustees of the church 
were authori/i d t< plan the raising of 
a building fund tor the enlargement 
of the church Th<) building Is said to 
be to > small to orcperly handle the 
con'jregation and Sunday sch( ol. 

The report of the Sunday school 



slu)wed that the school had an aver- 
age' at»endt<nct; of 184 pupils and that i 
thl^ number so filled the roonus that It ; 
wa-i inadvisable at present to seek ad- I 
ditlonal members. The addition to the ■ 

'chirch will relieve this condition. 

I The report of the church treasurer 
was to the effect taht the financial 

ico-idi'ion of the church was the best 

t In its historv. The church Is free from 
debt and has a healthy balance on 

' band. , 

Plans were made for holding revival 
services for a period of two weeks 
beginning April 20. Ilev. H. Rasmus- 
son of Kasson, Minn., will assist Rev. 
MlP.on Fish in these services. 



W. 



BUSINESS 
MCCTING 

All persoim Interested In helping 

Alb«»rt DahlHtrom to light the ca.se 

1 aeuinst him kindly meet at hall at 

11911 West First St., Tuesday, March 

131. and Friday, .\pril 8. nt « o'clock. 



GULT WOULD 

AID ITS FOUNDER 



"IRENE EATS AND SLEEPS BETTER THAN 
EVER BEFORE IN HER LIFE," SAYS MOTHER 




! cures and finding that they did her no 
<r>od, I purchase I a bottle of Father 



John's Medicine. The change was 

wonderful. In a week's time her cold 

was better and now she eats and 

sleeps as she ne\er did before in her 

life. Thanking you again for the 

great relief your medicine gave and 

the wonderful g>i">d it has done my 

' little daughter. remain, your ever 

\ willing advertise" of Father John's 

I Medicine." (Signed) Mrs. Margaret 

I G. White. 21 Sea view avenue, Mai)lc- 

wood, Mass. 

It is worth knowing that Father 
John's Medicine s a safe family medi- 
! cine for children as well as older 
I people because it is free from alcohol 
and dangerous drugs. It is a pure and 
nouri:4ung food medicine that builds 
new flesh and s rength. 

Father John's Medicine is for sale 
in Duluth by William A. Abbett, 205 
West Superior street. 101 VVe.><t 
Fourth street. 932 East Second street, 
aiso Boyce Drug Store. 331 West Su- 

perior street; Virth Drug Store, 13 

"I feel it my duty to write and thank, West Superior f treet, and practically 
rou for the great good your wonder- i all other drug stores in the city. If 
Itil Father John's Medicine has done! you have any difficulty in getting 
for my little daughter Irene. She had Father John's Medicine from your 
been ailing for some time being un- druggist, write to Father John's 
able to cat or sleep, and then a cold Medicine. Lowell. Mass.. enclosmg $1 
«et in After trying several so-called! for a large bottU by expres*, prepaid. 



May Raise Funds Here for 

"Rev." Dahlquist, 

White Slaver. 

Followers of the "Hellga" cult, 
founded by "Rev." Albert Dahlquist 
in the West end. Intend coming to his 
rescue and raising funds for a new 
trial at Seattle. Dahlquist was recent- 
ly convicted under the Mann white 
slave act for his practices on the West 

coast. . . , .^ ... m \ 

A meeting will be held by his fol- 
lowers this evening at which the prop- 
osition to raise the funds will be 
taken up. , . , ^. 

Rev .John J. Daniels, pastor of the 
Swedish Mission church, who was one 
of the witnesses called against the 
man during his trial, said this morning 
that Dahlquist had claimed he had 10.- 
000 followers throughout the country. 
"It l3 probable that he has 1.000. 
but not any more." said Mr. Daniels, 
"and most of those are foolish wom- 
en The man's divorced wife. Martha, 
testified on the stand that she had 
the names of thirty-two wonien, most- 
ly girls, whom the man had married 
according to rites performed by him- 
self and that many of these were scat- 
tered throughout the country. He de- 
serves no sy mpathy from any one. 

Guild Will Entertain. 

The Rebekah Guild of St. Peter's 
EDi.'^copal church will be entertained 
in the parlors of the church Thursday 
evening Instead of Wednesday, as for- 
merly announced. Mrs. L. O. Hallqulst 
1 and Mrs. Olaf .Johnson will be host- 
I esses.. The St. Luke's guild of the 
• church will entertain Thursday aft- 
' ernoon at another of Its Lenten teas. 



Mrs. .John McCormick and Mrs. 

Leonard will 4>* hosteases. 
— .. — ..^^ 

Reyivals Attractive. 

Rev. George^ E. Silloway. pastor of 
the t;race Methodist church. Twenty- 
second avenue west and Third street, 
gave another Interesting talk last eve- 
ning at the second of a series of re- 
vival meetings beirtg held in the 
church. These meetings will be con- 
tinued every evening except Satur- 
days until Easter. 

• - 

4.arson-Daieefl. 

Mis<3 TMlie L«r.«on and Oust»f Daleen 
were marri^- Saturday evening at tlie 
rectorv of the St. Peter s Episcopal 
church, ir3 North Twenty-eighth ave- 
nue west. Rev. W. E. Harmann read 
the service. Mr. and Mrs. Daleen are 
■pending a few days on a wedding 
trip to the Twin Cities and will make 
their home In this end of the city on 
their return. 

— • 

Lectures on Norway. 

A lecture of religious conditions In 
Norway was given last night b.v Rev. 
Nils Bolt of Norway at the First Nor- 
wegian-Danish M. E. church, Twenty- 
fourth avenue west and Third street. 
Rev. Mr. Rolt is making a tour of the ^ 
irnited States for the purpose of study- | 
ing religious work among the young 
people. The lecture was illustrated 
with a number of Interesting views. 



President Tyler, to personally Investi- 
gate her case and do what he can to 
continue her as postmistress at Court- 
land. Va. Postmaster General Bur- 
leson recently appointed B. A. Will- 
iams, who has his commission but has 
not taken charge of the postofflce. 

Miss Tyler appealed personally to 
the president, charging that a clique 
of Virginia politicians had dl.<?i»laced 
her, and that If the civil service rule 
were applied Miss Sadie Cole, her as- 
sistant, who accompanied her and , 
who stood on the top of the list on 1 
examination, should be appointed. She 
was confident as she left the White . 
House thM.t .she would not be displaced, j 

Once. In the Roosevelt administration, ! 
a succijsor to Miss Tyler had been 
appointed and Mr. Roosevelt Inter- 
vened to keep her In office. 

PAROLED so' HE CAN 

SEE DYING SISTER. 



r 




LL0 4 




COilE MO @ET lY OL©TiHIES 



^ 



West End Briefs. 

The Young People's Society of the 
Swedish Mission church Twenty-first 
avenue west and.£>tcond street, will 
hold Its quarterly meeting in the 
church this evening. 

Jennie Margt<ret Schelb of Fond du 
Laj fjave a piano recital yesterday aft- 
ernoon for children of the West end 
at the CentralBaptist church. 

Cottage prayer meeting will be held 
by the congregratlon of the Central 
Baptist congregation at the home of 
O. H. Glover, 12 Osborne block, this 

evening. . ._ r^ j. 

The Parthenoe Society of the Swed- 
ish Mission dhurch will be entertained 
In the church tomorrow evening. 
Misses Hulda Lin«ie and Hilma Falk 
will be hostesses. 

Rev. H. A. fOfstie, pastor of the Nor- 
wegian Danish M. E. church. Twenty- 
fourth avenue w«st and Third street, 
will give a lecture In the church this 
evening. . ,^ . _ 

The meals are. making quite a hit 
under the new management at the 
Grand hotel. ' 

WILSON WILL HELP 

AGED POSTM ISTRESS. 

Washington, March 31.— President 
Wllsoi has promised Miss Mattle Ty- 
ler, TO years old, granddaughter of 




I 



Start the 
Cliildren Riglit 

You can open a Savings Ac- 
count at this bank for the boy 
or girl with ONE DOLLAR or 
more, as you wish. 

Young people who learn to 
save In youth form a habit that 
will prove beneficial throughout 
life. 

% Interest on 
Savings 

DDlQth State Bank 

1W4 West Superior Street. 

Open Every Saturday Evening. 



3 



Printing that must 
be out at a certain 
time can be handled in 
our sho^ .lo the best 
advant^^eboth 
saving" of time 
moneyl • 'JTry us. 



in a 
and 



pnnfin^ Service 

IC Of 

f ^ -^t 
Phone 2104 and we will call. 



.Jefferson City. Mo.. Mnrch 31. — Gov- 
ernor Mijor has Issued a parole to 
Clyde Gow, a former minister at Els- 
be.vy. Mo., convicted of causing the 
death of Miss Lizzie Gleason. a school 
teicher. who died after on operation. 
He was sentenced for four years and 
had Just forty-three days of his sen- 
tence to serve. The parole was issued 
because Gow's sister, Mrs. Colyer of 
Trenton, Mo., is dying and had pleaded 
to be allowed to see her brother. 

SUJTTOOUSTOIL 

TRUST IS ORDERED. 

Columbus. Ohio. March 31. — Judge 
Dillon of the common pleas court has 
granted an alternative writ ordering 
Attorney General Hogan to Institute 
proceedings to ou.-^t the Standard Oil 
company and Its subsidiaries, including 
the Imperial Oil company of Canada, 
from doing business In Ohio. The case 
is set for hearing April 20. 

ONE YEAR AND $500 
FOR LU RING GIRL OFF. 

Cleveland. Ohio. March 31. — Joseph 
Cronin, 24 years old, was sentenced to ; 
one year In the workhouse and a fine { 
of $500 upon being found guilty of ; 
contributing to the delinquency of 
Edith Schubert, 17-year-old Brookfleld. j 
111., social worker, who was lured to 
Cleveland by another man, for whom 
the police still are searching. Misa ! 
Schubert was located here last week. 

NO MASSACHUSETTS 

BAN ON T HE TANGO 

Boston. Mass., March, 31. — The house 
of representatives has refused to place 
a ban on the tango. A bill which 
would make dancers of the tango, or 
' so-called animal dances, liable to ar- 
: rest. line and imprisonment, was over- 
whelmingly defeated. 

iHIMES FIRM WINS 

i MI SSISS IPPI SUIT. 

i Jackson. Miss.. March 81. — Conten- 
I tions of the Edward Hlnes Lumber 

company of Chicago. In a suit involving 

$15,000,000 worth of timber lands in 
' this state, are upheld in a decision of 
! the Mississippi supreme court here. 
i The state attorney general brought 

suit against the company to enforce 
1 a law providing that corporations could 

not hold more than $2,000,000 worth of 
I land in Mississippi. The court held the 
! law constitutional, but decided It af- 
I fected only domestic corporations. 

DAHLSfROM&ETS" 

I FI VE-YE AR TERM. 

I «;eattle Wash., March 31. — United 
I States District Judge Jeremiah Neterer 
' has imposed a sentence of five years 
in the McNeil island penitentiary upon 
' Albert Dahlstrom, formerly of Mlnne- 
I Bota founder of a religious sect known 
'as ''Heliga" who was convicted two 
I weeks ago of violating the Mann anti- 
white slave act by transporting Edna 
Englund of Tacoma from Fresno, Cal., 
I to this state In October. 1913. In the 
trlaC sovernment agents testined that 



No trouble to look nice now if you have everything 
freshened up and made to look like new. We French 
dry clean the most delicate fabrics so as to bring out all 
the original colors if not faded by the sun, and without 
injury to the fabric. We also dry clean or dye Silks, 
Satins, Feathers, Feather Boas, etc., and give the great- 
est satisfaction. 

And you, Mr. Man, don't go around with your clothes 
covered with grease spots or trousers baggy at the knees. 
You owe it to yourself to have your clothes carefully dry 
cleaned and nicely pressed up. 

We have the finest and best equipped dry cleaning 
and dyeing plant in the Middle West. 

FAULTLESS WORK— QUICK SERVICE ' 
LOW PRICES 



I 



FEEBLI 



UUiO^Y 



FRENCH DRY CLEANING DEPARTMENT. 

Both Phones 428. 




Dahlstrom had used his "religion" to 
induce many young women to live with 
him. his record Including such esca- 
pades in Chicago. St. Paul. Minneapo- 
lis and other Middle Western cities. 

INDIANS RIDING TO 
INTERVI EW PR ESIDENT. 

Billings, Mont., March 31.— Bearing 
a letter from Governor Stewart of 
Montana to President Wilson, Red 
Fox, Sitting Eagle and three Indians o? 
the Crow reservation started Monday 
morning on a horseback trip to Wash- 
ington, D. C. There they will Inter- 
view President Wilson, urging the 
passage of a bill setting aside one day 
annually to be known as "Indian day. 
The Indians are well educated and are 
members of the Kansas City, Mo., 
Young Men's Christian association. 

PHILADELPHIA'S 

BOND PLANS HALTED. 

Philadelphia, March 31.— The state 
supreme court has enjoined the city 
of Philadelphia from holding a special 
election today at which the people 
were to decide whether to authorize a 
loan of $12,900,000 for municipal Im- 



provements, and the court at the sam* 
time Issued a second Injunction pre- 
venting the city from floating a loan 
of $8,600,000 authorized by the voter* 
at an election last November. 

The proceedings In both cases were 
brought by a taxpayer w^ho contended 
that the city. In both the authorized 
loan and the proposed new loan, was 
exceeding Its lawful borrowing ca- 
pacity. 

RATES ON PAPER 
PRODUC TS CA NCELLED. 

Washington, March 31. — A proposed 
increase In the freight rate on straw- 
board, boxboard. chipboard and other 
paper stock products averaging 1% 
cents a hundred pounds — about 20 per 
I cent — from Illinois points to destina- 
tions in Wisconsin. Indiana and other 
states Is held by the Interstate com- 
merce commission to be unjustified. 
The advanced tariffs were ordered can- 
celed. 



Redwce Dividend. 

New York, March 31. — Directors of 
the St. Louis Southwestern railroad 
(Cotton Belt route) declared a quar- 
I terly dividend of one-half of 1 per 
! cent on the preferred stock. This re- 
! duces the preferred annual dividend 
I rate from 4 to 2 per cent. 



IN ONE MINUTE! CLOGGED NOSTRILS 

OPEN-~COLDS AND CATARRH VANISH 



Stops Nasty Discharge, Clears 
Stuffed Head, Heals Inflamed Air 
Passages and You Breathe Freely. 

Try "Ely's Cream Balm." 

Get a small bottle anyway, Just to 
j try it — Apply a little in the nostrils 
' and instantly your clogged nose and 
! stopped-up air passages of the head 
I win open; you will breathe freely; 
■ dullness and headache disappear. By 
: morning: the catarrh, cold-in-head or 
i catarrhal sore throat will be gone. 
i End such misery now! Get the small 
i bottle of "Ely's Cream Balm* at any 



drug .store. This sweet, fragrant balna 
dissolves by the heat of the nostrils; 
penetrates and heals the Inflamed, 
swollen membrane which lines the 
nose, head and throat; clears the air 
passages; stops nasty discharges and 
a feeling of cleansing, soothing relief 
cornea immediately. 

Don't lay awake to-night struggling 
for breath, with head stuffed; nostrils 
closed, hawking and blowing. Catarrh 
or a cold, with its running nose, foul 
raucou.s dropping into the throat, and 
raw dryness is distressing but truly 
needless. 

Put your faith — Just once — In "Ely's 
Cream Balm" and your cold or catarrb 
will surely 'liisapy ear. 




\ 




\ 

I 



•'I 



»k >•- 



it. 



i 




Miss Minnie Lawson of Minneapolis, 
nn exponent of the Dalcroze system of 
rhythmic Kymnastits, lectured yester- 
day afternoon at the Y. W. C. A. 

Mlsa Lawson said there are Dalcroze 
schools in London, St. Petersburg, 
Vienna and Dresden and teachers of 
the system in many cities. The new 
system originated with Jacquea Dal- 
croze, who saw how readily children 
learned words and music if accom- 
panied by movtments of the body. 

Miss Lawson gave four chief reasons 
why the plan is beneficial to children: 
First, it leads to the harmonious de- 
velopment of the muscles; second, there 
is no tension as in Swedish and Ger- 
man gymnastics; third, the child gets 
the right Idea of physi-..'il strength and 
beauty, and fourth, a muscular sense 
Is developed. 

Notts and time are taught In a phy- 
Flcal way before a child Is asked to 
play an lnstrv»m»-nt. This develops 
concentration as a pupil must center 
her mind upon the number of beats in 
a measure and upon the notes in it. 
It has been said this concentration 
I auses a njenial strain but Mi.«s Law- 
son explained there Is no mental strain 
when an Idea la put into action at 
once. 

The two underlying principles of 
the Pakroze system are: First, time 
1» beaten with the arms, the downward 
stroke of the arms bf-lng on the strong 
beat of the measure; second, every 
step forward Indicates a note in the 
melcdy. 

]lla«itra<eii Plan. 

A small pupil of Miss Lawson illus- 
trated the manner of keeping time and 
following the melody. Miss Lawson 








< 





O'PENIHG 





C A. Duncan, 
R. M. Hunter. 
Mrs. «;. G. Har 
Mrs. D. B. Mel 
Mrs. W. C. Wl 
lUrs. C. G. Trap 
man. Mrs. D. C 
low, Mrs. S. K. 
Mrs. J. H. Crow 
eon, Mrs. Q. S. 
and Miss Anna 
The proceeds 




James Wanless. i 
rs. W. S. Moore. 
Mrs. M. L. Fay. , 
Mrs. F. D. Day. ' 
Mrs. T. L. Chap- 
Mrs. F. D. Har- 
rs. A. L. Agatin, i 
J. A. Stephen- I 
8. Miss Hoatson 
lane. ] 

the vaudeville will 



be given to the Children's home. 



Weddink Reception. 



Mrs. Frank HiUJing of 1830 East .Su- ' 
perior street has •enr out invitations ; 
to the wedding reception of her niece, : 
Miss Anna Marie Hibbing. and Dr. Her- > 
man M. Holier, , Wednesday evening • 
April 15, from 8 to 10 o'clock. The en- i 
closed card announces tne bride and 
bridegroom will ie at home at Minne 
apolis after Dec. 1. 






This sprite you will have two ear-s 
and one eye, that is If you follow 
some of the styles shown at the .Glass 
Block and he George A. Gray com- 
pany stores. You simply must wear 
your hat ov.t one eye. The latest mil- 
linery Is biilt so the hair Is visible 
all around the front and sides, and 
these hats t lat set higher on the head 
than the v\ Inter ones did, naturally 
let It be k-^own that we have ears. 
The Herald Shopping Girl remembers 
when the »tyles gave her two eyes 
but no ears. She will swap an eye for 
two ears this spring. 

One of the most unusual hats on 
display at tue Glass Clock is of rough 
straw. The shade Is on the order of a 
burnt straw but Is called the "money" 
shade. The rim of this hat is edged 
with marte \, yes a combination ot 
.'traw and fur, and a dark brown os- 
trich feather stands up in front. A 
nobby little hat shown at this same 
store Is of black straw, trimmed with 
an up-standing curly ostrich and a 
bow of Alic * blue soft taffeta. \ gar- 
land of small pink flowers In diflferent 
shades seems to almost hold up the 
baok hair. Another garland of tiny 
pink rose bids was used as the only 
color on a vhite haf, serving both as 
trimming fi r the crown In the front 
' and as a lo v band for tire hair In the 
1 back. 

I Have yciH seen the blue and 
; chartreuse hat at Gray's? A soft 
f< ather ban. I trims the front of It and 
1 a sort of pe icock blue ribbon Is drawn '• ^t^?^ t«i pV. 
over the crc wn and ends in streamers. ' ^^^' ^""P" 
I A few dellci te pink roses complete the 
color schenir. That combination doesn't 
I sound well -m paper, but the blue and 
yellow mak< a dellKhtful contrast. An- 
I ot'ncr hat nt Grav's Is black with n 
' rose garden standing up on the crown 
j and looking beaiitifully spring like. 

The Separate Coat. 
I A separat*^ spring coat Is generally 
I a very pro^nic thing, usuallv in blue. 
I black, tan »r black and white chc<^k. 
; This year t »e coits are almost as In- 
; foresting as the hat.". They come In all 
I colors snd ■ rimhlnatlons of color..* yo«i 
I could drean of or hnve niehtmare 
' about: ereeii.n, tane-o sh.Tdes, white and 
r,ll kind«» (f niaid.a. Thev are abso- 
j Intely chic, ind have an ?'Ir about t1>eni 
j that nre .eh.'wn more extinslvelv than 
I anv other kind. Both the r;io«.s Block 
i and f:r.'»v's hpvA the.«e stvllsh gar- 
I ments. .com.- with raglf^n sleeves 

r.th»>r'' In i\ e reeular ■Rali^araan stvle 
I Mist llktt t> «» coats tb»» men wore In 
I tb.» winter the ones that m>»d<» Ihem 
Irvok a» If t'tf-v had tost run ov^>r her«» 
»»ah deih bov. don't you know-. If 
vou wear a sport coat you need jiot 



"The Music Master." 

The Sunday scliool class of Mrs. R. 
B. Liggett and Mrs. S. J. Colter will 
have a sale tomorrow evening at 8 
o'clock at Trinity pro-cathedral. Mrs. 
Liggett will give a reading from "The 
Music Master." 

»-• 

Surprise Party. 

Person oj 1301 »4 East Third 

was pleasantly surprised yes- 

by a number of her friends In 

of her birthday. Those present 



Mrs. 

street 
terday 
honor 
were: 
Mesdames — 

Edward Broman, 

Carl Broman, 

Claus Broman, 
Rmil Johnson, 

Miss Edith Johnson. 



Gust Anderson, 
Pete Fred, 
Oscar Carlson. 



Serenade" 
sol 



Cello solo 
"Mikado" 






explained the child had not had many- 
lessens. This showed It docs not re- 
Qiiire long training to acquire the abil- 
ity to put music, rather the theory of 
it, into action. As Miss Lawson played 
on the piano the child beat time with 
her arms, changing from 2-4 time to 
3-4 time, and so on until she reached 
7-4 time, then down again to 2-4 time. 

The interpretation of the melody was 
also illustrated by the small pupil. 
one step forward Indicating a note 
of the music. A half note was shown 
by a step forward and a slight bend- 
ing of the body. The two parts of ; 
the system were then combined, the 
child "beating time with her arms and | 
Interpreting the music by stepping 
forward and bending. I 

The pupils of the Dalcorze system ; 
are taught to keep several different : 
tinjes at once. "Ruth" beat 2-4 time \ 
with her left arm and 3-4 lime with ; 
hf^r right. T\"hen she kept one kind ■ 
of time with her head, another with 
her arms and still another with her 
feet it reminded one of the old game, i 
"Mother went to India and bought me 
a hat, a pair of shoes," and so on. I 

The little illustrator listened to a \ 
bar of music played by Miss Lawson | 
and then interpreted the notes and 
krpt time. She then "danced" to the , 
aceompanlament of the piano an I at | 
the cessation of the music counted to j 
herself and began again with the music i 
at the length of oni or two bars, as 
had been agreed upon. | 

Miss Lawson explained that children j 
can be taught the rudiments, as her j 
small pupil had been taught, but that Mrs. H. L Gage: recording secretary. | "Resolved. That the Twentieth ren- 
in terpretive dances were Individual to Mrs. j. L. Samuelson; corresponding tury club In annual session assembled 
a person. Miss Lawson gave several | secretary M rs. John Norton; trea.-?urer, desire to place on record their sense of 
Interpretive dances. She wa.s very Mrs. \v. S. Jonat; historian, Mrs. J. D. | loss in the death of Mrs. Frances 
graceful in her Grecian gown of deli- ; Morrison; f.deratlon secretary, Mrs. R. i Squire Potter, whose lectures and 
cate gray. . I ;;_P''J',*''i, Jon«ra«"y vice presidents, ; charming personality endeared her to 

Miss Lawson came 
the auspices of the 



' bother about gloves for you must 
keep your hands in your pockets If 
you want to carry out the idea ot the 
coat. 

i The latest suit cut is that known as | 

'"dumb bell." The Herald Shopping j Violin 
Girl saw one of them at Gray's this 

; morning. The lower line of the short 
coat Is continued in an upward stroke 
until It reaches the cuff. If you stand 
with your arms on a level with your 
shoulders your coat forms a seml-clr- 
< le. The skirts of these suits are made 

! with a pocket effect. 

All suit coats are short, even the 

! semi-tailored ones. The sleeves in the 

1 dress gowns and suits .ire three-quarter 

\ length, those In the semi-tailored suits 
are seven-eighths. The inew waists 

. with few exceptions have three-quar- 

I ter sleeves. 

A Voile Froek. 

! Despite the cold weatlier some of the 
cotton voiles are In. An attractive 
frock at the Glass Block Is made of 
white voile embroidered In tango shade 
flowers. The tiers of the skirt are 
edged with a buttonhole stitch In the 

I same shade. A wide black velvet girdle 

\ adds a stylish finish. Not only cottor. 

; voiles, but wool voiles as well will be 

■ popular during the summer. Only a 
few of the summer gowns have come 

I In but most of them are either plain 
or crepe voile, used with shadow lace 

; and embroidery. There are a few Ro- 

! man stripes that will appeal to the 
woman who Is always thinking of the 

1 practical side of life when she chooses 
her wardrobe. 

i The leading 

ma 

blues, and the almost end 
less plaid combinations. Gaiety Is the 
key note of the times — gay hats, gay 
gowns and very gay sport coats. 
Hlich Neck* Searee. 
As there is scarcely a high neck 
gown In town, neck chains are very 
Important. They range In price from 
69 cents to $4.50. Some of the neck 
chains have bracelets to match. They 
are generally made of beads Joined by 
fancy metal links. Crepe de chine 
banding Is u.sed for some neck orna- 
ments, the ends being brought to- 
gether by R group of beads In a con- 
trasting color. 

With ail the gorgeous display of col- 
ors and the new st.vles that seem 
startling Just now. It Is no wonder 
window shopping Is one of the chief 
occupations these days. This morning 
a small boy grew Impatient when one 
of those exasperating women members 

, of his family lingered In front of one 
and j of the most attractive windows on Pii- 
nerlor street. "Don't be so sUiw," The ' 
Herald's ,Shopping Girl heard him sav. ' 
with th" flear-cut. emphatic way he I 
will probably use about twenty years 
hence when he asks coldly, "Henrietta, 
haven't you got your hat on yet?" 



Aftcnrp Society. 

The Afternoon society will meet to- 
morrow afternoon at 2:30 at Foresters 
hall. The hostesses will be Mrs. Anna 
Henrickson, Mrs., A. L. Henrickson 
and Mrs. C. J. Hector. 

— _♦_ . 

Tea I^rogram. 

The following pfogram will be given 
tomorrow aft>ernooii at the Hotel Hol- 
land tea from 4 to 6:30 o'clock: 

"Maritana' » Wallace 

Polymnla Trio, 

J% Herbert 

Polymnla Trio. 
'Mignonette" .., 
Miss EUer. 
"Solvejg's Song" <P»e» Gynt" 

Ko. II) <•» < 

Polymnla Trio. 
Vocal solos — 

"Lamp of Love" 

"Dearest" ......... ^ 

Miato Be«ch. 

"Chanson Joyeuse" . . ." Ravlna 

Polymnla Trio. 

"The Swan" Salnt-Saenr 

Miss Lehner. 

Sullivan 

Polymnla Trio. 



, .Frlne 

Suite 
, .Grieg 



.Salter 
Homer 



Fashion Show of Draperies 

—To You Who Are Interested In Home 
Decoration, It Will Prove Intensely Interestinfi 

For the Drapery Section is given, over to a display 
of new cretonnes and kindred weaves— scores of 
suggestions for their use. You will realize how 
pretty and inexpensive the new draperies are after 
paying us a personal visit. It might be helpful to 
ask the advice of our drapery experts when work- 
ing out your decorative schemes.. 




Bed Room Gurtain Specials 

U Excellent Patterns In Tambour Muslin 

Regularly $2.25 and $2.50 per pair, 
special at 



$1.65 



4 Dandy Swiss Patterns, 

and embroideries with hemstitched and scalloped 
hems; regularly $2.00, $2.50 and ^g /\fit 

$2.75, special at ^^» "-CJ 

2 and 2y2nnch Ruffled Hem Gurtains . 

Regularlv $2.00 and $2.50 per pair, your choice, ^g /?/? 

special at V^^* ^^ 

Good Values in Lacet Arabian and Net Gurtains 

_ Acquaint your.«elf with the newness, the completeness, the 

71 Qomplete Array of New \ individuality and the wide range of floor coverings to be 

found in our Rug and Carpet department. You can make 
most satisfactory selections for any room in your home by 
purchasing your rugs and carpets of us. 



jl %gompiete y*rray uw awcw i 

Ruj^s and Garpets\ 






GOOD 

Established I8SU 




rF€mJv/ri^£ 

First St. and Third Ave, West 



JIfurnooit Concerts 

4:00 to 5:30 
Every Wcdnesilay and Saturday 

HOLLAND HOTEL CAFE 

Music by "Polymnla Trio." 



SUFFRAG E CONVENT ION ENDS 

Three Cities After Next Conference— Wen Are Very 
Much Like Sheep, Says Omaha Woman. 



Five Hundred Party. 

Mrs. Arthur Hudson of' 15:24 West 
Superior street entertained at Ave hun- 
shades for spring: are i dred yesterday afternoon. Favors were 
iny shades— especially won by Mrs. Davis and Mrs. Syming- 
ton. The following were the guests: 
Mesdames — 

W. Humerlchous, F. D. Davis, 
W. A. Schulz, C. Pearson, 

J. H. Svmlngton. H. Rhodes, 
A. G. Mllllgan, R. E. Whittle. 



FROLIC 



STUDENTS' 
VAUDEVILLE 

OF THE .M.\TI.\EE 5IV81C.%I.B 
To be repeated (or tke benefit ot 
tlie Cklldren'a Home. TlckrtM now 
on Bale, 25e an<l SOe. LYCEUM, 
on aalr, 25e and 50e. 

Lyceum Tuesday Night, March 31 st. 



Bishop's Club. 

Mrs. A. J. Munii of Superior led the 
meeting of the Bi.shop's club last eve- 
ning and read papers on Socrates and 



Des Moines, Iowa, March 
sessions of the Mississippi Valley Suf- 
frage conference here today were to 
be devoted to the consideration of 
plans for more effective organization 
in states where the suffrage move- 
ment has not shown marked progress. 
Chief interest, however, was cen- 
tered In the probable personnel of the 
new program committee which will 

have charge of next year's conference, 
and the choice of cities in which the 
conference is to be held. 

Delegates from Indiana were active 
In behalf of Indianapolis early today 
while New Orleans and St. Louis ad- 
herents were busy. On the conference 
committee matter only certainty ap- 
peared to bo Miss Flora Dunlap, 
prisldent of the Iowa Suffrage associa- 
tion, and a prominent Social settlement 
worker, who Is elso a member of the 
Des Moines board of education. The 
election of the program committee will 
take place today. 

The developments of la.st night In 
connection with the Shafroth and Brls- 
tow suffrage amendments now before 
congress was the subject of consider- 
able discussion among delegates before 
the morning se.«slon, but indications 
at that time were that a controversy 
over the matter on the floor of the 
conference would be prevented. Miss 
Harriet Crim of Darlington, Wis., who 
is chairman of the conference, was re- 
ported to be very much averse to hav- 
ing the subject brought up. A num- 



31. — Final- 1 association was formulated. It was 

I as follows: 

"Many members of the Mississippi 
conference feel that the Shafroth reso- 
lution to amend the Constitution 
should be left in committee until aft- 

! er the next convention. Were this 
done it would avoid a chance for con- 
fusion which miglkt come were two 
suffrage resolutions ssimultaneou.sly be- 



Demosthenes. Herodotus and Xenophon | ^^^ ^, delegates under the leadership 
were also mentioned in the > ear book , ^, j^j^^ ^„^,g p^^j ^, Washington, 
for this -meeting but Mrs. Muun said president of the Congressional suf- 
that with so many famous C.reek char- , ^^age union, addressed a telegram to 
acters she was embarrassed with too ^he official board of the national or- 
much material, so she had choren two | ganizatlon. asking that efforts be 
to speak of. She reviewea the life of ! made to keep the Shafroth amendment 
Socrates and his simple teachings of i jn committee until after the next con- 
truth, as opposed to the teachings of ; venflon. 



partment of the Matinee 
arrived In the .Ity Sunday and was en- 
tertained by Miss Josephine Carey 
of 5131 London road. Ye-^terday Miss 
Carlotta .«:imcjfds of 320 Twelfth ave- 
nue ea.st entertained at luncheon for 
her and last night the visitor was en 
tertalned at dinner by Mrs. E. 
Schmicd of 2218 East First street. 

FLYNlsTsHOCK. 



C. Dryer; lonorary vice presidents, 
to Puluth under ■ Mrs. N. F. Hugo, Mrs. J. H. Crowley, 
round table de- I Mrs. O. A. Oredson, Mrs. George 
Muslcale. .She ' Stevens, and Mrs. M. Lawltzky; mem- 
bers at larg'i of membership committee, 
Mrs. R. W. NMchols. Mrs. J. H. Crowley 
and Mrs. J. F. Segog. 

The follo\-lng gave reports: Mrs. J. 



the many women In Duluth who have 
had the great privilege and pleasure of 
meeting her here." 



For Children's Home. 



L. 



' afternoon will b© repeated this 
ning at the Lyceum theater. 



^^^^^w^^^< 



Wedding Is a Surprise to Bride's 
Friends. 

Mr. and Mrs. M. J. Flynn of 1009 i of national 
East Third street have announced the 
marriage of their daughter. Marguerite 
Beatrice, to Richard Fretwell Shock. 
The marriage took place Saturday at 
Dallas. Tex., where Miss Flynn has 
been visiting relatives. 

Mr Shock Is the eon of Floyd Shock, 
a prominent citizen of St. Louis, Mo. 
The bride and bridegroom met in Du- 
hth about two years ago when Mr. 
Shock was with the Underwood Type- 
writer company. He left here about 
six months ago for Texas where his 
father has extensive Interests. The 
bride Is well known here. Her mar- 
riage will be a surprise to many 
friends. 



T. Culbertst n, chairman of the lecture , ^ ^ 

department: Mrs. F. W. De Vey, chair- i '**'''''^«<^ ^V several regular 
man of flna ice; Mrs. John Norton, cor- i ^* *he Masonic auditorium 
responding lecretary; Mrs. J. H. Crow 
ley, chairman of the department of 
home and «ducation: Mrs. J. D. Mor- 
rison, histo ian, and Mrs. H. A. Ciage, 
chairman of the evening department. 

The following resolutions were 
passed on the death of Mrs. Frances Mrs. F. L. Cowen, Mrs. 
Squire Potter, an active club worker i Mrs. E. P. Towne, Mrs. A. W. Hartman, 
note who died last week: 'Mrs. H. F. Williamson, Mrs. Page Mor- 



The vaudeville program given bv 
the students of the Matinee Muslcale, 

members, 
Saturday 
eve- 
Pat- 
ronesses of the entertainment are: 

Mrs. W. I. Prince. Mrs. F. L Barrows, 
Mrs. S. R. Holden, Mrs. H. B. Fryberper, 
Mrs. Horner Collins, Mr.-. W. M. JefTery, 

A. M. 




the Sophists who often veiled their 
untruths with rhetorical language that 
meant little, 

Mrs. Munn's account of Demosthenes 
was Illustrated by a selection, read by 
Miss Mary Shesgren. 

As usual the reading from the Bible, 
given by Miss May Hammll last eve- 
ning, was explained by Bishop Mc- 
Golrick. 

The other numbers on the program 
were piano solo (a), minuet in G, by 
Op. 14 No. 1 (Paderewskl), (b) "Spring 
Song" (Mendelssohn), Mrs. A. M. Rus- 
sell; vocal solo. (a) "Reveries" 
(Shelley), (h) "Banjo Song" (Sidney 
Homer), (c) "Philosophy," Miss Perle 
Revnolds; reading, current events, Mrs. 
Miller, I R, p. Richards. 

An IntermisFlon during the program 
gave the members of the club time 
for social Intercourse. 



Twenty-five of the women leaders 
met, and a telegram addressed to the 



, ville until 1906. when they became 
: .Altars under the management of Messrs. 
I Klaw & Erlanger in their present^ 
[ great success, "The Ham Tree," a big 
■ musical production written around the 
I talents of these famous funsters. They 
• continued in the play for three sea- 
sons. In 1909 they appeared with "In 
Hayti," another pretentious musical 
jofterlrg in whiih they, of course, 
j played black-face parts. 
I The past three years they have been 
appearing with marked success in 
vaudeville, and one year ago were 
signed up by John Cort 'for their pres- 
ent tour In "The Ham Tree." They 
will be at the Lyceum Friday and Sat- 
urday. 

• • • 
"People tell me that society crooks 
of the Raffles type do not exist, but I 
know better." said Robert T. Haines, 
who is- headlining the Orpheum bill 
this week with 



fore the country and would eive time | ^t;i,i "'=^j?^„,'^;V' « ,, «"^^ 

for mature consideration of a rn.^^^ve\'^^f'^^l^^l^''^^l-^^^^^^^ »« 

burglar, one of the smooth, well 
society" type. The burglar 



we want to act upon with dressed 



National American Woman Suffrage i begun such a step. 



which many of us do not understand i 

and which 

deliberation 

Men T.Ike Sheep. 

"Women In Nebraska seeking suffrage 
soon found that the men were like a 
flock of sheep," said Mrs. Draper Smith 
of Omaha in addressing the confer- 
ence. 

In discussing the subject, "How We 
Did It in Nebraska," Mrs. Smith said 
there was little difficulty experienced 
In getting men to sign petitions for 
suffrage when a few of them had 
started the petition in circulation. "If 
one man refused to sign our petitions, 
all within the sound of his voice would 
follow with 'Pass me up' or 'Nothing 
doing.' On the other hand, if the first 
one signed up the other did, too." 

Mrs. Smith declared she favored the 
Initiative system, which was em- 
ployed in Nebraska, over the legisla- 
tive system. 

"Indiana women feel the humiliation 
and shame of their political inequal- 
ity." said Dr. Amelia Kelly of Indi- 
anapolis, in an address en "Suffrage in 
Indiana." 

"We do not even have school suf- 
frage," said she. "In fact, with one 
exception, we are the only black state 
north of Ohio, an honor thrust upon us 
and appreciated accordingly." 

Mrs. Catherine Waugh McCullough 
of Chicago recounted the suffrage vic- 
tories since the last conference. She 
named Illinois, Nebraska, Massachu- 
setts, New York, New Jersey, Iowa 
and Pennsylvania as states which had 
either enacted equal suffrage or have 



wears evening clothes, and Is appar- 
ently a cultured man of the world. 

"The burglars and thieves of this 
type may not be as common as we 
would be led to believe," said Mr. 
Haines, "but they do exist, and I have 
to support me the statement of the 
house detective at the Astor hotel In 
New York. I have known hln»- for 
years, and he is a good friend of mine. 



Third street 
2:30 o'clock. 



Thursday afternoon at 



OBSERVATIONS 

By PEGGY PEABODY 



i^/^%«^i/^'N^ ' 



CLUB ELECTION. 



Officers Elected at Sixteenth An- 
nual Meeting. 

The sixteenth annual nieeting of the 
Twentieth Century club wa.s held yes- 
terday. The report given by Mrs. J. F. 
Segog showed the paid membership of 
•he club to be 289. 

The entire ticket elected yesterday 

vas as follows: President. Mrs. A. H. 

.Trocklehurst: first vlre president. Mrs. 

.»*onard Young; seeond vice president, 

•rs H. H. Phelps; third vice president. 



A Skltt of B— aty b • Joy Forevw. 



Missionary Societies. 

The Home and Foreign Missionary 
societies of Grace M. E. church will 
meet with Mrs. A. F. Swanstrom, 2623 
West First street, tomorrow afternoon 
at 2:30 o'clock. 



Women Should Not Have Advan- ' Being a woman, I am naturally moro 
. _ • r\\ A. • • rx' '" sympathy with my sister-women 

tagc m Obtaining Divorce. l ,han with men. I am, mavbe, limited i 
"A woman should have a divorce for j in my vision and prejudiced In my opln- 
the asking; a man If his wife is will-} ion; yet looking about me, considering! 
Ing." This Is an extract from some those who are divorced and some who 



At Masonic Temple. 

There will be an open party at the 
Masonic temple tomorrow evening. 
-« 

For Bethel Women. 

Mrs. E. A. Graves and Miss Aurella 
Smith will entertain the women of the 
Bethel at the First 
church parlors tomorrow afternoon at j 
2 o'clock. 



D 



R. T. FELIX GOURAUO'S 
Oriental Cream or 
Magioal Baautifier. 



remarks m ido by 
the noted > dltor. 

I am sun that he 
must have luallfied 
his staten ent in 
some way. other- 
wise It wov Id seem 
but a rev' rsal of 
the powers some of 
us believe Have In- 
I herred In >ne sex 
I too long. No ono 
I with a wel defined 
I sense of justice 
j wants a w )man to 
be able to i:et a di- 
vorce for I he ask- 
ing and be the ar- 



Norman Hapgood, 





wt 


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^^^^^^H 


^^^HF' .r >'''^ 


^^^^H 


^^Br ' ^^^ 


^^^^1 


^^^P i.JtKtm 


l^^^^l 


^^Hs' :-. -' ■WfL:. M 


I^^H^a 


w^m-AMM 


^^^S: 


^V.v;^ 


Urm 


Ri 








l^ij;ti.^ 


W^::''\:-'^'^M 


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1 believe would like to be, the woman 
appears to have more to substantiate 
her plea for freedom than man. 

It Is just as true, howev»r, that I 
know many women who wouldn't be en- 
titled In the least to a divorce for the 
asking, or to decide their husband's 



Church Meetings. 



The women of the First Baptist 
church will hold an all-day work ses- 
sion at the church tomorrow. 
• « • 

The Ladles' Aid of the First German 
M. E. church will meet Thursday aft- 
ernoon at 2:30 at the home of Mrs. J 



Personal Mention. 

Mrs. F. D. Pease of 421 West Third 
street left yesterday for a month's 
visit at Waterloo, Iowa. 

• * * 

Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Lorlng have re- 
turned from their wedding trip. They 
were married March 19 at Gladstone, 

Mich. 

• • * 

Mrs. Joseph Logan and Miss Jennie 
Logan of 706 West Second street, and 
Mrs. Florence Miller of 101 East 
P'ourth street left this morning for 
Moorhead, Minn., to attend the funeral | 
of Mrs. Logan's brolher-ln-law, John 

Logan. 

• * * 

Mlsa Clare Church, 116 Fifty-fourth 
avenue east, left yesterday for a five 
months' trip to Germany. She will 
join Miss Gertrude Carey In New York 
and they will sail together. 

Mr. and Mrs. George E. Lynott, 1«04 
East Fourth street, have left for New 
York and the Bermuda Islands. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Fuller, 4327 Rob- 
ertson street, have returned from a 
trip to New York and Washington, 
Presbyterian ' D. C. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jay Finkleson have 
gone to housekeeping at 613 East 

Third street. . .«„ .^ . 

Miss Gertrude Kane of 327 West 
Fourth street will 
for Oelwein, Iowa, 
vacation trip. 



leave this evening 
on a three weeks' 



1874, at the Vaudeville theater. They 
played many variety and circus en- 
gagements until the fall of 1878, when 
they organized Mclntyre and Heaths' 
minstrels. One year later they made 
their first New York appearance at 
Tony Pastor's theater, scoring an in- 
stantaneous and pronounced success. 

The season of 1880 they engaged with 
the Alice Gates company In a produc- 
tion of "Long Branch." The following 
season they again headed their own 
minstrel organization, and the season 
of 1882-3 Mclntyre and Heaths' Spe- 
cialty company went on tour. 

The fall of 1883 they were under the 
management of Hyde and Behman, and 
the following season headed their own 
company under the direction of Prim- 
rose and West, In 1886, Spencer, Mc- 
lntyre and Heaths' Minstrels toured, 




ROBERT T HAINES. 



I He Is a distinpuishf^d looking old gen- 
! tleman himself, and his duty Is simply 
; to watch for crooks, thieves and con- 
i fldence men In the hotel. I asked him 
[ one day if such a burglar as the hero 

of my sketch existed. 'Sure,' he said. 
I 'If you will sit here In the lobby of 
' the hotel with me any afternoon, I 
1 will show you from one to half a 
j dozen men who make their living by 

their wits, and who would not hesl- 



The next Important minstrel engage- i tate to turn a little trick like burglar- 
ent was with Lew Dockstader's com- izing a house. They are well dressed, 
my in 1891. Subsequently they played prosperous looking men. In the eve- 



me 
pany 

extended engagements with Hyde and 
Behmans' company and Weber and 
Fields' organization. It was with the 
latter company that their famous 
"Georgia Minstrels" was first produced 
at the Gaiety theater, Brooklyn, 
August, 1894 



nIng they wear evening clothes. They 
slip Into a room if they get a chanfce 
and lift what valuables they can get 
their hands on. In fact, the fact that 
I have been employed here for so many 
in { years Is proof in itself that such men 
exist. We never get common, every- 



Mclntyre and Heath played vaude- I day thieves in a big hotel like this.' " 




right to freedom. And, somehow, I be- i uurueLt. 1621 East Seventh street. 




Removes Tan, P miles, Freek. I biter for oi against her husband's ap- 
' " "^ "^ ' -. . . - f 1 eedoni from matrimonial 



Moth Pauh.es, Ra^h and 

kiB Dijc«ses. aa i avcry 
b!rini*h .o benut) tai tl» 
Ae« •i^t^'.tion. Ii hu >tood ' 
I) e t-M r,. ^ eat*, and lata | 
karBi.cM we tiu;« it to bo , 
tiira it Ispr^ptriy m'de. Ac- \ 
ccptno count ^r' el cf tlmiiar ^ 
a\iaa. Dr. L- A. Sayreuid I 
to a lady of the !.aiiitan (a ' 
' at cat. I •-As you'adifa will J 
ne t^m. I facoii mead 
wi.UKAirrrs CRbAM' a« 
t .east harmful c( all cha | 
is re ar<iio«a." For asia i 
V 11 druir,:ist< aal Fancy 
oodt iya<ir « la t!ie L'nlt«d 
-.tate^. Car «.ia and ump«, ' 



ttr*. T. BatklM. frtth, 33 Crcal 



peal for 
vows. 

Idolize w)men as we will and think 
as poorly of men as Individual experi- 
ences may lead us to do, the fact re- 
mains that there are bad women and 
good men ind vice versa. Strangely 
enough and for no good reason, unless 
the law of :ontrast or mayhap of com- 
pensation 111 responsible, we often find 
a shallow, heartless woman married to 
a good man, apd a fine, efficient, self- 
sacrtflclng 'ype of woman mated to a 
SUNcwYtrk. ' man without stability or conscience. 



lleve there are more of just such cases 
than my observations and experiences 
j lead me to believe. 

i To attempt the rehabilitation of such 
a m«n or woman seems useless and 
usually proves so. Nevertheless, no one 
of us knows when we may be able to 
, turn the drift of things more to our 
liking. Though It appears vain and so 
; often is, I have often meditated that 
I there is more credit and satisfaction In 
I the end in making the most of what 
j one may draw In the matrimonial lot- 
, tery. poor though It be, than In ridding 
' oneself of it and avoiding all respon- 
sibility. 

j Easy divorce for women wiU appeal 
I only to those who deserve It least. I 
I am not In the least opposed to divorce. 

I believe It has its place In society to- 
, day. But I do not think It should be 
j made easier, though I can agree that 

we might enter upon marriage with 
1 greater caution. 



The Ladies' Aid of St. Matthew's 
German Lutheran church will meet 
with Mrs. H. Schumann of 60B East 




CENTRAL 



BUSIIESS 
COLLEGE 

30 East Superior Street, Dulntli. 

SHORTHAND 

THE MACHINE WAY, 

Stenotype demonstrations every day 
at 3:30 p. m. an(^ front 7 to 9 Mon- 
day, Wednesday and Friday evenings. 

Chartler, Spene^rlan Shorthand, the 
plain alphabetic system, 

Gregg Shorthand for high school 
students and others who desire 
Gregg. 

Commercial subjects and Pon Art. 
BAKBEIR A McPHKKSON. 



TQNIGHr SATTR ACTlOr^lS. 

LYCEUM — Students' vaudeville for 
the benefit of Children's Home. 
OUrHEUM — Vaudeville. 
EMPRESS — "A Hot Old Time." 



Amusement Notes. 



Beyond all question the greatest duo 
of black-face delineators of the real 
Southern darky that the stage has 
ever known Is Mclntyre and Heath. 
They give an absolutely faithful por- 
trayal of the black man as he really 
exists. 

Mr. Mclntyre as a pessimistic" coon, 
and Mr. Heath as the "colored gem- 
men" with pronounced optimistic Ideas 
of life, are exceedingly funny in every- 
thing they do, but as the minstrel men 
in "The Ham Tree" their talents ap- 
pear to the greatest advantage. 

Mclntyre and Heath joined bands In 
San Antonio, Texas, in the spring of 






DEFECTIVE PAGE 





T !"■) ' 




Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



March 31, 1914 



i» 



GRAYHAIRED FOLKS W. T. BAILEY 

LOOK YOONG AGAIN SUMMONED 



A SPRING TONIC 



sent to Torreon by Gen. Villa to sug- 
gest to G«»n. VelaJe^ tb*t he surrender. 
CumminRs left (JbfMi£[^FHlacio Friday 
nlRht and waa e\p»'''i«l»to return early 

_,,_,. ,, ,, J, « >_».:il«> Is 'Saturday, but wh&n thL- correspondents 

Old Reliable Hoods Sarsapanlia ISioft he had not-retfmed and there 

was much speoulationlaa to his safety. 



Pleasant and Effective. 



r 



UtMa TeUYou Frot Hdw I Restored 

My Gray Hair to Natural Color 

and Beauty of Youtli. 

Results tn Four Days Wtttiout Dyes or 
Oftier Harmful Metliods. 

At ST I «•» ppwniiturely trey— »nrt ft ffclliu* be- 
•■••«• I kokrd nM. Tcdiiy at R5 I h*»« "" tr^i-o of 
grrr li«l- an.l I look younger thaji I aUi eiglit ye«r* 
aa> I rwtorert n\f ovn\ trey h*ir w «• n«ur»l , 
colour «!..1 beamy of ynith atirt am a HvJiik example | 
tba? gray hairs i\9«l no Icngrr exfcM. No «l«J'i«"US ; 
dy<«. stain* -r othe' form* of h»lr paint Me n«ct!«- 
tj ke«c T''"-"' hair young. 



Pioneer Duluth Lumberman 
Passes Away at Roch- 
ester, Minn. 






I 




Death Comes Before He 
Goes Under the Sur- 
geon's Knife. 



Your close connnement Indoors and 
heavy living during the winter, and 
the torpid condition of your Bystem 
brought about by cold weather, hsive 
made your blood Impure and weak, 
so that now eruptions appear on your 
face and body, you lack vitality, 
strength and animation, your appetite 
Is poor and you feel all tired out. 

From any druggist get Hood's Sar- 
saparllla. It comhlnea ju.st the roots, 
bark^ herbs and other substances 
that you need. It purifies and 



An American Kjjnudb nag[ied Taylor. 
Reed said, was wTytfndCd in the leg In 
the early llghtlnx, and is now recuper- 
ating at (."hlhuahua. -He was unable to 
Identify him furttibrl 




Reaame National 9rht Service. 

Mexico nty, Marc)i 31. — A presiden- 
tial decree lasued-laJit^iRht announces 
the resumption of efivicu In the mat- 
ter of the national Aebt. which was 
suspended last JflThd^ri^. This will go 
Into effect April F. t- 

The action of t*© fertrernment is the 
result of a plan receRtQ' adopted which 
Is expected to btHtg toto the treasury 
100,000.000 pesos., whUiSi. at the pres- 



strengthens the blood — makes the | ^"{^rate of exchange, Is $33,000,000 



rich red blood that you must have to 
feel well, look well, eat and sleep 
well. 

Hood's Sarsaparllla is not simply a 
spring medicine — It Is an all-the-year- 
round blood purifier and tonic — but It 
is the best spring medicine. Remem- 
ber It has stood the test of forty years. 
He sure to get Hood's. 



■y frtan* •!»«• • *er» fermerly Giey ani oU-ltoki«« 
Init w« shall never be Gr«y asaln. 

1M m* (lena you fall Infonnatl.ni tlia*. will fnaWe 
y»u to Te«(tre vour own hair to ymitlifia colour w 
taat TJii iiee.l ticv.t ha»« a grev hair again, ii « "»*"«' 
what >o>ir »f» or Uie ri\\s,o 'tt .vfur «!»>"*»• »>■ "<■'» 
long you liHve been grfy or l'.o« niai'.y thiilg-* liave 
f»il*l. My fr«. .ffer U opeu to meii aad womei. 
alike for u few ilajs lofgrr. _. . . .„„, 

S«i I no ti.oBcv. .Hut write m» t-rtay (rt»1n« JJ"" 
nam* aiMi a.l.lraw plal.'ly. stathx »lK-:l!<.-r (Mr. »m. 
n." MUSI »na m.-lo-ie two «int aiam!; fT ™'""',,f""V 
mtf aiKl 1 «<n ae.ul you Mil p.irtUl. .irs '•'»»'»»'"■ 
able you M rentora Uie natu-al colour of yotuh to 
yiur hair, makit.g It soft natural a.vl ewUy '»«"^«^ 

Apinic 41 J W. K\.li»iig» St.. t'rovia«ic«. B. 1. 



William T. Bailey. 73 years old. one 
of Duluth'a pioneer citizens, died at 
9:50 o'clock this niornli g at St. Mary's 
hospital at Rochester. Minn., where he 
went tw.j weeks. ag» for an opera- 
tion. 

Mr. Bailoy was never operated upon. 

the doctors having be* n compelled to 

postpone the use of ttie knife owing 

j to the patlent'p weak jned condition. 

j He was cared for ac the hospital. 

I where it was thought he would re- j^^^j^^ ^.^^^ ^^^ Huerta Bovernnient. 
gain his health and suf flclent^strength xhe same dispatch confirmed earlier 
the operitlon. He sank ) reports of the capture and sinking of 



HUERTA CONFIDENT 
VILLA WILL FAIL IN 
ATTACK ON TORREON 



Other decrees Issued provide for the 
removal of the 50 per cent import 
taxes Imposed late lit 1J13. and reduc- 
tions In the export t^ («n cattle. 

The decrees are ^companied by a 
statement of the minister of finance 
explaining to the pulftic the disposition 
of the money already u-sed by the 
government and giving assurance that 
the extraordinary expenses were neces- 
sary on account of the revolution. 

President Huerta iisued still an- 
other decree setting 'forth certain reg- 
ulations M-hlch will govern the presi- 
dential elections which are called for 
July. 



uth's 



Clo 
Clean 



(Conti nued from page 1.) 

I were held for trial on the charge of 




sank 
came 



to undergo the operitlon. 
rapidly, however, and the end 
this morning. 

A message to the effect that Mr. 
Bailey was In a critical condition and 
that all hope for recovery was given 






Better Dentistry 
For Less 



Money 



We have the largest sanitary and 
most modern dental offices In the 
Northwest. All the latest appli- 
ances to make denistry absolutely 
painle.s.s. 

SET OF TEETH, 8UARANTEED 

Our plates are made of the very 
best teeth and materials, made by 
experienced specialists — dentists 
who know how to make plates. 
They are made to look natural and 
to fit perfectly, so as not to drop 
or hurt the gums when eating. 
Many of our plates will last for- 
ever and vou pay double in many 
oflfices where a smaller business Is 
f<>t\du<tiil. 

CROWNS, GOLD OR PORCELAIN 

When a tooth is too badly de- 
cayed to hold a fllHug have g»ld or 
porcelain crowns put on. Our gold 
crowns are made of heavy 2'2-carat 
solid gold, and are guaranteed to be 
the best crowns, regardl'-ss of cost. 
t»ur porcelain crowns are the best 
aualitv also, and When we place 
them in your mouth they look as 
natural as your own teeth. 

BRIDGcWORK, Gold or Porcelain 

Br'dgewnrk is teeth without 
plates. They replace every tooth 
that may be missing. We^ make 
them out of gold or porcclali* and 
fasten them in your mouth so as to 
tit Just like vour own natural teeth. 
These teeth may last a lifetime in 
many cases. 

New York Painless 

Dentists Supenor^t. 

An Ironclad 20-year, written guar- 
antee with all work. 

1»R. H. W. CI..VRKK. M«r. 




TENSE EXCITEMENT 
MARKS THE CLIMAX 
OF DE BATE ON TOLLS 

the steamer Carmen, of the Compania i (Contin ued from pag e l.> 

''rnsurgeit'^offrclais denied the report ' »«f^,to repudraTe—hVo^mo-^ratlc plat- 
that the gunboat Tamplco which they j ,j,,,; administration. Representative 
captured recently from the federals i „^,^,pfj^^y declared, had been imposed 
would be dismantled. The> said the^ ..^^ carry out the international 

vessel, which was watting for coal, was ^ - - ' j- - . _ 

engaged iu scouting duty. 




confidence game by which Japan and 
England hope to seciwe the use of the 
canal without competition." 
Spc^eh by Mann. 
Republican Leader Mann told the 
house that three questions were In- 
volved in a repeal of the Panama tolls 



Torreon FoKltlve* Killed. 

Eagle Pass, Tex.. March 81.— Refu- 
gees who reached Pledras Negras. 

Mex., from the vicinity of Monclova. ^ ^^ ^ ..^^„. „.. ....„ .„ „ 

report that Gen. Murgia has wiped out 1 exemption" Treary rights, 'inorai"rights 
several bands of Federal fugitives from ^part from treaty construction, and the 
Torreon. . v » ' economic policy involved. The econ- 

Murgia has been operating between | on,ic question might be changed at any 
Monterey and Torreon and is reported uj^,^ ^g g^ld, but a decision on treaty 
to have Isolated Torreon from all com- 1 rights must be a lasting one. 
munlcatlon with Mexico City and other ^ hc maintained thaUno construction 
Federal forces at Monterey and Saltilo. ■ ^f j^q Hay-Pauncetote treaty corn- 
There has been no communication | pelled the United Stufes to charge the 
between Eagle Pass and Torreon over same tolls on Its 4mn ships or those 
the government telegraph lines for five j of Panama as wer«,levied on those of 
days. All railroads Into Torreon from | other nations. • , 

A reading of ti» «ule8 to be ob- 
served by natloas t# receive equal 



WILLIAM T. BAILEY. 



dR..„. 

the east have been cut. Gen. Joaquin 
Maas. who went to relnfore Gen. Ve- 
lasco at Torreon, made the trip over- 
land in armored automobiles with his 
800 men. 

Keeplnic A«HlKtanee Awar* 

Murpla commands a strong force of 
Constitutionalists which, while taking 
no part In the attack on Torreon. has 
been working to prevent any assist- 
ance reaching the Federals In the be- 
leagured city. He recently captured 
Monclova. confiscating large supplies 
in the railroad warehouses there and 
proceeding south, cut communication 
with Monterey from Pledras Negras at 
Esplnazo, ten miles above Roata. a 
Junction point leading to both Mon- 
terey and Torreon. He then Is report- 
ed to have burned several bridges on 
railroads which had been carrying 
supplies to both places. 

Numerouj small bands of Constltu- 



up. was received here early this 

morning from Richard R. Bailey, his, - ...,,.. „.4 \tr.nt^r^v 

son. News of the death came later by tlonallsts are active around Monterey 
a long distance telep lone message to 



several close business associates of Mr, 
Kailey. All membajri- of the family 
were at his bedside vhen death came. 

Mr. Bailey is survi ed by a widow, 
one daughter, Rebecca, and two sons, 
Richard R and Willi* m. The two sons 
are located at Virginlii, where they are 
In charge of a Uimb 'r mill for their 
father. Mr. Bailey *as president of 
the Bailey Lumber c »mpany and was 
one of the pioneers ti this business at 
the Head of the Lakes. He was very 
well known In Duluth and Northern 
Minnesota, where h» had extensive 
holdings. He lived with his family at 
1317 East First stree :. 

Mr. Bailey came t> Duluth thirty- 
four years ago from Grand Rapids, 
Mieh.. where he had also been ia tke 
lumbor business. 

The body will be brought here for 
burial by J. L. Crawford, and It Is ex- 
pected to arrive tomortow niornlng. 
The funeral arrangements 
made sonie tinie ton or row. 



will be 



WEYERHAEUSER 

MAY NOT LIVE 

(Continued from page 1.) 



MAD MOTHER'S ACT. 

Throws Baby From Mill City Car 
Into Otticer's Arms. 

Minneapolis. Minn.. March 31. — Over- 
come by some mental ailment, Mrs. Ida 
X^undin yesterday threw her 5-months- 
old baby from a street car, into the 
arms of a policeman, who was wait- 
ing to take her Into custody. The offi- 
cer made a flying catch of the child, 
which was not awakened nor Injured. 
Mr.i. Lundln was later examined In 
probate court and sent to a private 
sanitarium. 

GUIFFREY ENDS ART 

SER VICE I N BOSTON 

Boston. Mass., March 81. — Jean Guif- 
frev. assistant curator of the depart- 
ment of paintings at the Louvre, ended 
t< 
In 
A 

y 

of 
P 

th 
fo 
u 
d 



11, 1867, to Elizabeth Bloedel. 

He left Coal Valley In 1860 and 
moved to Rock Isla id, where he en- 
tered into a partnership with F. C. 
Denkman and bough the Rock Island 
sawmill, which was operated by the 
firm of Weyerhaeuier & Denkman. 
From this beginning In the business 
of manufacturing lunber. Mr. Weyer- 
haeuser's Interests r>egan to expand 
and as a result of his personal atten- 
tion to the business he was accounted 
one of the greatest >f the lumbermen 
of the country. In 1891 he moved to 
St. Paul to be nearei the center of his 
business inter<»st8, n nd built a home 
at 2S6 Summit avenue, where he has 
continued to reside since, going to 
California In the wiiter. 

Mr. Weyerhaeusei's lumbering In- 
terests were for many years centered 
principally tn F. W» yerhaeu.ser & Co., 
of which he was preildent. but he was 
also Interested In a number of other 



Saw Gomea Palaelo's Fall. 

El Paso. Tex., March 31.— A tale of 
rebel reverses and rebel luck was 
brought here last night from the front 
by John Reed. corre.'«pondent of the 
New York World, and Robert Dorman, 
a photographer. 

Their stories are the first unbiased 
accounts of eye-witnesses since the at- 
tack on Gomez Palaclo, Lerdo and Tor- 
reon began. They left the front late 
Saturday, at which time they estimated 
that the rebel loss was 2,000 In killed 
and wounded. 

"We were whipped twice at Gomez 
Palaclo," related Dorman, "but the 
l-'ederals didn't have the good sense 
to follow up their advantage and Villa 
returned to the attack after reorgan- 
tKing, and ultimately occupied the city. 
We were whipped right there, but 
Velasco. the Federal commander, didn't 
know it. 

Huorta Commander ^>nt Mad. 
"Federal prisoners whom we cap- 
tured said that Velasco later went In- 
sane In the trenches. He Is a cripple 
of previous revolutions and has a bad 
arm and a bad leg. The prl.soners told 
us ho went mad after Cfoniez Palaclo 
and went raging up and down the lines 
cursing and Issuing the most absurd 
orders. Ultimately his own officers 
put him under restraint. 

"Our attack on Gomea Palaclo was 
centered on the bill known as Cerro 
de la Pilar. It is precipitlous and we 
made several assaults before taking it. 
The result of each of six as.saults which 
were unsuccessful could be discerned 
after the battle by the rings of dead 
rebels. Their bodies distinctly marked 
the line where they were repulsed. 

"The home-made shrapnel of the 
rebels had much to do with the early 
repulses at Gomex Palaclo. Only about 
one In thirty exploded. 

Villa "Was Evrrjrwhere.** 
"Gen. VUla Is a fighting man. He 
was everywhere, and his greatest de- 
light was to join the assaults on foot 
and throw hand grenades himself. Ulti- 
mately he will take Torreon. 

"When we left Saturday morning the 
fight for the possession of Torreon was 
In progress. It was slow, stubborn 
work, as the rebels had to fight from 



in 



various nha^pq house to house, the enemy retreating 
various pnases ^ _„„!n„„ ♦« ^^^in^n tu,-n„.r>^ Vir.it.. 



companies engaged 

of the lumber and >i/bk>ii6 ^u.-nnc-a, i - ,' . ,. . ..„ .„,.j >,„,.=.>. 

and owned vast tracts of timber lands knocked through the^ mud houses 
Minnesota. Wise, nsin, Wa.shington ' which are built one against another. 



treatment," he smOi, plainly discloses 
that they are not APyllcable to the 
United States or I'ai»»tna. 

"England's attetttrC to secure her 
construction of the^r*aty at this time 
Is not for its present effect. It is for 
the long distant CUture. if we con- 
strue the treaty aceprding to the Eng- 
lish claims, it is su^ to embarrass us 
whenever we havo war with other 
countries. 

War "Inevitable." 
"War is not destrable, but It Is In- 
evitable. We cannot always maintain 
peace. ^-^ 

"If we agree n«>W to the English 
construction, it Is "certain that in the 
future, when we have a war with 
Japan, or China, or aonie other country, 
questions will arise in reference to 
their use and our use of the canal, 
especially as to war vessels, and In 
that time of stress we will be met w^lth 
the contention -Jiv England — the pres- 
ent allj*#f ^.Tainut— or bf some other 
country. fViH^ we have alraad.^ con- 
strued that ^eaty in such a way we 
cannot protect the canal %ithout bring- 
ing a protest fc^ EngHmd, or other 
countries, wlilch^will embarrass if 
not defeat us in Hie war. 

"I want to ttefciEngla^tt fairly, but 
I believe that uod># the ct^truction of 
the treaty we hav^ the right to do as 
we please in this njalf^r, and that It is 
an unfriendly acJt*'of Kr.gland now. at 
this late date, to Insist upou any other 
construction." 

C'lttrft' Cle«ed Debate. 
Speaker-Clark, c1o.sing debate against 
the repeal, dlsaj^^lnted those who ex- 
pected hlni 4* attack President Wil- 
son. He 4jJ*clainie<l any personal le^e 
with ihh president, declared he be- 
lieved Mr. Wilson was actuated by the 
highest patriotic motives, and that 
there was no breach In the Democratic 
party. 
- He argued at length against the 
president's contention, and declared 
that "the amazing request of the presi- 
dent for the repltnl. like the peace 1 have 
of God, 'passeth all understanding.'"! 

He disclaimed any personal Issue be- 
tween the president and himself, and 
added that if the president had rea- 
sons "which are not utterly unten- 
able and which compel him to make 
this request." he Kaa not given them 
to the house. He differed with the 
president's statement that toll exemp- 
tion was a "mistaken economic policy," 
but admitting dispute on that point, 
proposed that the exemption be sus- 
pended two years. 

"Read 7 to Faee World." 
He contended that the president was 
mistaken In the view that the exemp- 
tion was repugnant to the Hay-Paunce- 
fote treaty. 

"We want war with no nation. ' sala 
the speaker, "but rather than sur- 
render our right to complete sover- 
eignty over every sauare foot of our 
globe-clrcllng domain, we will cheer- 
fully and courageously face a world 
in arms." , ^ . 

He attacked the attitude of house 
Democrats who have fed the president's 
fight for the toll exenjptlon repeal 



You won't go amiss if you fall in 
line with the majority of the best 
dressed people in Duluth and send 
your clothes cleaning to the Orpheum 
Cleaners. It's a pretty safe plan to fol- 
low the majority in anything — for what 
pleases many must have merit — but it's es- 
pecially advisable in a matter of Clothes 
Cleaning. WE HAVE HAD YEARS' EXPERIENCE — that's why we do more 
cleaning and dveing than anv other establishment in the city.^ You will appreciate 
the advantages'of having your wearing apparel as well as Oriental rugs, carpets, 
drapes, portieres, etc., cleaned by practical men who personally supervise all work 
done in their establishment. Fall in line— and become one of our great number of 
satisfied patrons. 

OUT-OF-TOWN-CUSTOMERS 

Take advantage of the opportunity to deal with a reliable estabHshment by 
sending your clothes cleaning and dyeing as well as all household furnishings to be 
cleaned or dyed to the Orpheum Cleaners. We will return the articles promptly 
and with every appearance of newness. 



Our 
Auto 



win call for and 
deliver your work 
without the 
slightest spot or 
staia. 




DRY CLEAN[R5 S'CLOVE 
SPECIALISTS - " 



GF?ANDS)76 -PHONES 



MELROSE 7768 





Our 
Motto 



All work guar- 
anteed to be per- 
fect or no charge 



CORNER f^KONPAVE. EAST » DUFER»0ROT 




gun In my campaign for President In 
1916 It may surprise these obsequious 
coutlers to know that I never hinted 
to any human being that I would be 
l%andldate in 1916. and that I am not 
a candidate. Their slander has been 
gratuitous mental degradation. 

"1 never entertained the slightest 111 
will toward the president about the 
Baltimore convention. I vMsh mm weii. 
I dld^ll I could to elect him-far r^ore 
than some of those who so vociferous- 
> ^nd filBomely praise him "ow and 
for whom, deep down In his heart, he 

must entertain «"Pre'"^. ^o"\^"^P^- x,| 
steadfastly supported him until 
we are called upon to bolt the plat- 
form. I absolutely refuse to do any 

such thing." 

As to Speakership. 

Mr Clark then referred to published 
reports of a fight on his re-election to 
the speakership. 

"The New York Sun practically nom- 
inates the gentleman from Kentucky 
(Mr. Sherley). for speaker." eald he. 
"Here Is Its exact language: 

" 'Reports have It that already the 
little leaders have decided that Repre- 
sentative Carter Glass of \ Irglnia 
would be a good man for floor leader, 
and that Representative Svtrager Sher- 
ley of Kentucky, would make an Ideal 
speaker.' 

"The strange part of that paragraph 
Is that It makes no mention of my 
voluble. vehement and vociferous 
friend from Texas (Mr. Henry) for the 
speaker.<»hip. He has had his eagle eye 
on the speakership for. lo'. these many 
years. 

S*e« Possible Flnlfili. 

"I have this to .say 
I am 



PES MOINES KILLS BONDS 

(Continued from page 1.) 



will be J. I. Nyerly (re-elected), Fred 
German and W. F. Mitchell. 



Snyder Wins at Covnrll Bluffs. 

Council Bluffs, Iowa, March 31. — 
Complete returns from yesterday's city 
election show the election of M. B. 
Snyder. Republican, for mayor, by a 
majority of 180 over Thomas Maloney, 
Democrat. For city council two Demo- 
crats and two Republicans were elected 
and other city offices are about equal- 
ly divided. 

•- 

l,lcen«« Candidate Wins. 

Waterloo. Iowa, March 31. — Mayor R. 
C. Thompson, running on a "non-po- 
litical" ticket, and his entire ticket 
wer^ elected over Former Mayor J. R. 
Rector and the Democratic candidate. 
Roy E. Beed. Thompson's majority was 
743. He received 3.682 votes. Rector 
received 1,920 and Beed 1.019. 

The principal Issue was the wet 
and "drv" question, with Thompson de- 
claring "in favor of issuing licenses for 
saloons, providing the present case 
now before the supreme court Is de- 
cided In favor of the sale of Intoxicat- 
ing liquors. 

Beed polled the largest vote ever re- 
corded In this city by 3 to 1. Thomp- 
son carried the city two years ago with 
a majority of 20 votes over four other 
candidates. 



in 



, was "the opening up' of his fight for 
and Idaho. In looking after this wide- ' R^ed and Dorman. like other cor-^^e nomination In 1916." the speaker 
Iv scattered business he was assisted , J^spondents and photographers?, were ^jp<,,ared he had toM all to whom he 



Slonx City Re-elects Mayor. 

Sioux City. Iowa, March 31. — Mayor 

^^ll^"%^7,TghtTSlrr%\!l?* t.r^^o^.f^'^o^.Lt^^nri''^'n^n''^nl 
making thl-s fight for our piat I lerm^ hottest municipal campaigns in 

ihat "his- opposition to the president | career. ^ There aTe^maj?? tlKs ^worse \ the history of the commission ^plan^ of 



lumber and logging business, I from'position to position through holes j p^j;."-^^!"^^ 'io published'' declarations i form pledges may end my public 



by his st»ns. althougu he kept In touch 
with the whole hinjielf. 

The WeyerhaeMier Syndicate. 

His business grew to such an extent 
that he organized the "Weyerhaeuser 



not only forbidden to send out news ! j,j^j spoken about the 1916 situation, 
after the attack on Torreon began, but ; ^^^^ jf the president's administration 
they themselves were forbidden to | -^Q^e a success Mr. Wilson would be 
leave. re-elected; and If It Were a failure "the 

According to Reed they bribed « nomination would not be worth hav- 



syndicate" and was elected president section hand to allow them to use a j^ .. 

of the Missls'ippl River Boom and 1 gasoline-propelled rail vehicle, which > He Ca* Js H«»PT. ^^^.^^ 

Logging company, "his concern Is In- 1 carried them to Bermijillo. There they ^ ^Q ^,8 owti future, the speaker 



than being defeated for congress, or 
defeated for the speakership, or even 
worse than to be defeated for the pres- 
idencv. and one of thetn Is to repudiate 
the platform on which you are elected^ 

If mv constituents ^i'*io,ha^'«.»^"''<* ,V 
me with unshaken fidelity should re- 
Ure Bie to private life, 1 still can be 
haDi>y tn the love and affection of my 
wlfJ^ and children. In the society of my 



bookf. 



and in cuitlvatirig flowers and , polls closed. 



government in Sioux City. Smith polled 
4 BS4 votes: Brown 4,125. Rudolph 
Beerend and E. O. We?ley were re- 
elected to the council by safe rnar- 
glns John Dlneen. a former chief of 
police of Sioux City, and J. M. Lewis 
were given the other places on the al- 
dermanlc ticket. , • ^v. 

By the use of voting machines the 
result was known an hour after the 




Acid Stomach 
or Indigestion 



an. I ntu he re- i especially when the train stoppea a"a "P"""" ^T,,^ ,. necessan' to differ from 1 ;.n J*irement may have been.- 

cently gave up active control of his ^''^^^nll still otherwise in the desert us who And Un^^^^^^ T^hoS opinions, he said, differed 

companies to his sons It was business ^^^\^l wounded died they were simply him <>" **'*" ^^^'^'^ th* Parly. -y^u^ieverm'^y be the differences of 

for him from the i Ime he rose until 1 f^f^^ed out of the cars by the side o/ ..r>,,^rd* ,S wTlson docs not desire a ! orinlon respecting the merits of the 

he went to bed at right. j ?e tracks. We didn't stop to bury 'I^J^'^'in "he Democratic party. I do , ^1*1" -'h/ said. "I do President \\ llson 



Gas. Gaa. ('-us — When everything 
eaten turns to gas and we eructate 
food and acrid fluids It means wc 



A magazine article dealing with his 
Immense timber holding.^, said: "The 
question naturally arises as to how 
much timber land V'eyerhaeuser owns. 
He won't tell, and e' en his closest lieu 



them.' J ii i J 1. 

Reed and Dorman agreed that the 
suoerlorlty of the Federals' artillery 
should have given them permanent vic- 
tory but for Velasco's failure to foUov 




do not and 

think 

ast so 

own 

consequently 



Carried Every Ward. 

Keokuk, Iowa. March 31. — - S. W. 
Moorehead won over Rev. J. F. Panders 
for mayor by 830 votes, carrying every 
ward In town. Frank bchmid and J^ 
A M Collins were elected councllmen, 
t" j Hickey, present councilman, be- 
ing defeated In the final race. 

* — 

Whole Council Rc-clectcd. 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa, March 31.— May- 
or Louis E. Roth and the entitle former 
city council, comprising Louis Zika 
Fred J. Lazelle, Allen McDuff and 
James Hughes, were returned to office 
by nearly a 3 to 1 m ajority. 

Burlington SoclalUt Bt atcii. 

Burlington, Iowa, March 31.— W. C. 
Cross non-partisan candidate for may- 
or was elected by a majority of 224 
over his Socialist opponent. 

^ — 

Farver Mayor of Citnton. 
Clinton. Iowa, March 31. — W. B. Far- 
ver. Democrat, was elected mayor yes- 
terday. 



Sullivan as he took the gavel. "I am 
not going to parley around and call 
this a conference. It looks like a 
good oldtime convention. There has 
been some criticism of this confer- 
ence, but I hold that the right of as- 
semblage guaranteed us by the Con- 
stitution has not been alienated by the 
passage of the primary law." 

Jlillus Thorson of Benson was 
named secretary and Hugh McEwen 
of Itasca assistant secretary. 

The convention recessed until 2 p. 
m. to permit the credentials commit- 
tee to do Its work. 

It Is not expected the convention 
will be through before 6 or 7 o'clock 
tonight. The question of whether to 
ask candidates to file for state offices, 
other than the governorship will also 
come up and will likely be the caus- 
ing of some battling. 

Lawlcr StrAaflrth Small. 

However, when one comes down to 
figures It looks as though there will 
be more than the usual harmony in 
the ranks, and far more than would 
seem possible in viewing the matter 
from the reputed strength of the Law- 
ler forces. It is declared here that 
when the final showdown will have 
taken place, out of the 1,040 delegates 
In the convention the Hammond forces 
will have nearly 1,000; that Lawler, 
outside of the Twin Cities will not 
have over 100 delegates. Figures from 
the same source quoted are to the ef- 
fect that Ramsey county will give 
Lawler about sixty and Hennepin will 
give him a strength of about eighty. 
The credentials committee will doubt- 
less resolve to seat the contesting 
delegations from Hennepin and give 
each delegate a half a vote each. With 
Ramsey and Hennepin, every vote will 
have to be polled. and considerable 
delay is expected because of this. 

A good many delegates arrived last 
night, but most of them came in this 
morning. 

Eighth District Cancns. 

Previous to the conference this morn- 
ing, the delegates from the Eighth 
congressional district met at the Mer- 
chants hotel and decided to vote for a 
request that W. S. Hammond file for 
governor. Harris Bennett of Duluth 
and W. V. Kane of International Falls 
were chosen for the credentials com- 
mittee; J. D. Declu of Carlton and 
Michael Boylan of Virginia for the 
committee on permanent organization 
and Charles d'Autremont of Duluth and 
E. C. Klley of Grand Rapids on the 
committee on resolutions. 

It was decided also that a mass meet- 
ing of the Eighth district be held In 
Duluth on April 25 at 2 p. m. to discuss 
the matter of obtaining a Democratic 
candidate for congress. The feeling 
was unanimous that the chances for 
victory with a proper candidate are 
all in Democracy's favor. 



ARE IN 
HAMMOND 



FIGHT ON ARKANSAS 
SENATOR IS LIKELY 



from page 1.) 



'^Ha ^further states that those men 
nnTl women troubled with chronic aci<i- 
fty anHts resulting Indige.stion. Sour^ 
and Gases should take one ^- 



pled by one of the daughters. Mrs « I Dorman departed 



The newspaper he named, he said, 
I .'along with every e<)ltor in America, 



S. Davis. 




Lt!^ ,1 daughters. Mrs. S. ti„ "dents and photographers had re- , ", " hopes to be^ an ambassador, min- 

The otler children, all of : SP^^^^P" J^i'r consul-general.^ or get some oth- 

nrea(>nt lire- lr.hn o ix-o... covereCl. .^ , , . ^, Ister. coii»v»> 6 L^.. ir^^„ ^„^^^^,„^ 



to order by State 

'Brien of Crookston. 

van of Stearns 

temporary chair- 

yer of Hennepin 

Iglble because of 

county and after 

I. nominated by 

Rapids, the only 

at delegation, had 

Sullivan's noml- 

noon the chairman ap- 



eriy. " "j ""5 a, -rvin^ armv amid the i nation. Ai noon luo cii<tirm<in ap- 
!?L%r.?^ro'rrrrs ^^?Talfey"7orTe:^'nd pointed a credentials committee of one 



in whom were present, are: John P. Wey 



later consui-geiierwi. «!»«-«. nuii.»r uiii- wno ?"■' " i-i..^/< helirht<i of Vnrk- 
hatl er fat and juicy j*b. has been endeavor- the bloodstained heights or York 
entifng to place me'in antagonism to the 1 town— may «/„,^^,?,?a "\';"ir^douV^fo^^^^^^ 

Hid ' nresldent ever since the election. These ' so as to P'-^.\^"Vh .mil L^on of the 
•»a. I presiaeiii J r.nr»nsin«r thia our. lti,ia iinsoeakable humiliation oi tne 



*^^noVm"an brought back a report that 
^ " *~ son of Presid 

Bmirh'^vlce C^n**-! liapVrV declare I an. opposing this sur- | this ""Treoublic" 
Gomea Palacio w»» render to Great Britain as an opening ■ American republic. 



Mankato. was chosen chairman. Harris 



who gave 



I render 



1 



Bennett of Duluth represents the 
Eighth district. 

"Gentlemen of the coaventlon." said 



Little Rock. Ark., March 81. — 
Chances for a big fight In the Arkan- 
sas Democratic state convention at 
Pine Bluff June 3 over the United 
States senatorshlp are indicated by the 
vigorous efforts yesterday of partisans 
of each candidate to control election 
of delegates at Democratic conven- 
tions held in each county. According 
to the returns reported in the recent 
state-wide primary, William F: Klrby, 
associate justice of the supreme court, 
with 67,936 votes. leads United States 
.Senator James P. Clarke, who has 
67 762 votes. Already there is pros- 
ne'^^t of a big fight In Poinsett county, 
where the vote Is officially reported 
Ts- Clarke. 1.285; Kirby. 615. How- 
ever State Senator Clyde Going re- 
norted last night that the vote wa.^ 
Clarke. 1.621; Klrby. 460. These fig- 
ures if correct, would give Senator 
Clarke a majority of 317 on the com- 
plete vote. 



More than 3.600,000 acres of land are 
held as game preserves In Scotland. 



DEFECTIVEPAGrj 





I 



>t^ 



I. 



1^ 



Ii 



y 




--^ 



Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



March 31. 19U 



GBAY HAIRED FOLKS W. T. BAILEY 
LOOK YOUNG AGAIN: SUMMONED 

UIMt TeilVou Free Haw I Restere*' 

"• «d Se'iut'; ."'y'.!'*'" Pioneer Duluth Lumberman 



A SPRING TONiC 

Old Reliable Hood's Sarsaparilla 
Pleasant and Effective. 



I 



Is 



Results In Four Days Without Dyes or 
Oftier Harmful Methods. 




Passes Away at Roch- 
ester, Minn. 

Death Conies Before He 
Goes Under the Sur- 
geon's Knife. 



sort ti) T'»rr.'o«i hy iIi ii. VM1'< l(» PUg- 
Rost to •'.•»ii Wlnm^n tiiat hf siirre'idf-r. 
t'limxiii'.a ^ If^fl <}f>n>oj t'll.Tio I'ihIiiVj 
nlylit !>ii<J wn.i p\ !i.'.|i'<f (<• i>«t!irr «-.irlv 
Siiin<l'i\. l>ii'. wl.iui itw i<>rri'SiMiiid«-iits 
left h«> JiHil not r>>tii'f it'll anJ th« r-^ 
was iiiiifli .H|»'<'\ii;iiiiiri .'tM to hi.H safi-lv. 
A>i AiinTi> iti K;iiiii>iii: i.>im''<l TMylxr, 

UiM>«l K.ii'l, w«H w nunJC'l in tl>*' !'•>> '" 

tlirt Piirly MKtitiii<. ami i-i rii>w r 'i-up'-r- 
YiMir < los'" f<>ntlriM>i<^ni lnil<»ors .mil aUng mi t hiJuial-.ua. Ho wiva unaola to 
, hoavy li\ iiii? duritiK th«i whiter, ami lUt'iitify liim further. 
th*> tt.rpid .-ondition *.>t your Hystom C ."^ . \ . ^ 

Ihr.MiKht Jib.. lit l>y rnl.1 w,>utJi.M-. l.axM llr^um,- \«il.,m.l |»rl.l S^r»ic^. 

, 11 I 1 ^•.. mill w.»tk MfX».-.i t 11... Mmi.- 1 :; A t»r.>.s|.|'Mi- 

is., that now or.iptions appeal on >.mr,,^^^ r.-su..u>tlon ..r i,ervi. . in t»io mut- 

fai-c and body. y»Mi la'K Miaiuj. j,.^. ^^^ j,^^ national di'bt. whi-h wh» I 
isd-.'nKlb inul aniinaiion. your aj»pt'i»t»' suHp.MKlod lint bniuary. Thin will go 1 
lis poor and >ou f«'»'l all tlr^-d out. i into efiV- t .\i>rll 1. 

l-'roiii uny tlrusKl^l K''t Hood's S.ir- 'Vh*' Hrtloi> of t^»» Rov.Tiinii'nl i.-* tli« 

.saparilla. It combin-v-! .Inst th«« roots. r<^.sult of ,» pinn rt.-.>nilj- i»dopt<'d whb h 

I l.:irk« hMrb<< and othor .««ubsiauri-!» 1^ exp.-.|.>d to bririg: Iqio tb*' trtasury 

• It purlfit;* an. I !"'*."'>". '"b) p-so^. vlil,ii. al lb" W''^- 



lb:lt you H>'imI. 

sn>-imIh.Mi)< 1U<' Idooil — inak.'H th.- 
rub r.d blooti ihat you nuisi l-.:iv.^ t^> 
f.',-l wi'll. look well, cut and i^loep 
well. 



■ vnt rat.- «t f^tchaiig.". is ;>33,00O.000 

«oH 

otb»»r d'*fr»»>'s l-isned pro\-id.- for tbe 
I removal of tii.^ 5.) per < <iit import 
I t.i\.^s Inipoicd l-il.. in ^9\^l, and reduc- 






'.:. .1 *' If' 



AVjiiPini T. I^Hiby. 73 y -ars obi. ono 
of i>iiiutb'i» pb>n>*tr iilizon^. d'o-tl at 
3:5rt o'.bx'k Itiis iu.«rnliiit at St. Mar.s":* 
b.«.-»pl'.il Ht lt.."b.»!»i<'r. Illin.. wli.-r.* ba 
V ■•' ' f.N ' w !•.•'.»-; «m. for im (.p'T.i- 

M;- r.ail. y \\-a.«< r^v.-i op,rnt.>d upon. 

iu- do»t..r.s bavins be. ri compellt'd to 

i.m- tilt' ll^^.» of t ..* knife owinii 

t . liie pHti. -nf.- wak tned oondilion. 

Hrt wa.-« "ni.-d f..r nt tbf hos^pital. 

wb>*r'> it «>».■* th.iuKii* li.* woui'i r»'- 

■'^ gain his i.%-H!tli nid su fiti^-nt .<tr«>iiRih 

, . to un.lorRi. til- op.^ Ui.ui. H«? sank 
rapidly, iiosv.-v.-r, and tbf t-nd cam-* 
i Ihia moriiMiu. 

A m.'..isic.. tn tb<> eff.^.t tbat Mr. 
-..libw was in a . liii.-tl i-.in.lii !..n and 




Better Dentistry 
For Less 



Money 



SET OF TEETH, GUARANTEED 



,a.l'< i>y 

l-'lUKSt.-i 

- at' --. 

., ;inl 

i«"P 

i t ' 1 1 fi 

A .'n last f'f- 

doubl« in many 

,««all«r bualr.eas is 




WILLIAM T. BAILEY. 



CnOWMS, GOLD OR PORCELAIN 



'1 

1 '.r 

.1.1 
; lo I).' 

.-..-St. 

.. bf.-ii 
•» |»!a'-o 
l.iuk ajj 



BBIDGE^OHK, Gold or Porcelain 

^ ■ wi'tiout 

i.i, . • y tooth 

■ make 

1 and 

• -i.!* to 



New York Painless 

Dentists Superlor^t. 



tm. II. w 



■ -> ••HI', \ 

w M r k . 
I I MtKI 



I-!'. '.■■I': guir- 



'• v«.\3 re.eivtj.J N»»re early this 
i; from Kl.iinrd K. l?alU-v, his*: 
. -ws of th'> dentil cam" lat'-r by 

I I ^ tiistaiii'« tfl''|itioin> nie.'».sai;>' to 

s.»\ i; . •Hf l.usiM»*s>.-t a.ssofiai.'.s of Mr. 

I!)tii<:. . All meml>.irn of til." family 
w**!'* m hi* b.'d.-'i.l'- \. b.Mi di^atb I'.inn*. 

Mr. Hxib-y is .«urviv.-d by a ^^ i<iow. | 
• oi" .l;HMKlU»r. It.-b.i < a. and tw<» .sons. 
i:(. hird 11 arid AVilliim. Th«> two son.s 1 



i h 



w. 



lo. rit.'d at Virninii. wIum.' th»'y ;ir« 
rl ir«x ..f a luiiilj r mill for tb«-ir 

I Mr. l!ailt-y v^aa pn-sid-iit of 
r..iil«»y I-umb.'r « omp.any and wa.^ 

• •■r tli.» pjonf.'r.s in tbi.H busin.-.-»s nt 
H.-ad of tiu' l.al rM. Ilf vva.s \ k-ry 

II known i!i Diihith and Nortli'-rn 
I Si1ni..'.-<ota, wh'-ro Iks had f\ten.<ive 
[ li.>l.liri«.s. H- livfd wltti hU family at 

l.'Jl 7 K-ist I'lrst atri-.'t. 
• .M: Uaii-y (-Hm» lo iHilutb thirty- I 

r.,1 y-ar-i HKo from <;ranl llapid;*. 
: Ml' h . wh.»rH> ii>' lia<l also b'-en in the 
; ItiliiH-r Wusirif -S.-3. ' 

1 I ls.3 bodv will b*» brousbt hfia for 
! burial by j. I., fiawford. an I it Is ex- i 
' p.'.'i.vl io arrive t..rnono\\ jM.rnittKr 

Tb-5 fan.ral arranj. '.•m<*ii t s 

:',i.1>' .son.' lini.' foiiorrovv. 



Hood'.-* Sarsai»arill.i I? not simjily a tlon.s In th.. export tax on <attl 
sprltiK iiu'di<in»' — it Is an all-tlu'-><:ir- , 'i he d.'fr.i.s art> ar<ompHnled by • 
r.tund blood purifi.-r and V>u\r- — but It | ptni.MiaMit of tho minist.>r of tinanptf 
i-! tht> bo.st spriuK inodicino. It muciu- ' i-X!>l.»inii-.if to ih.» public ih.- disposition 

b.r It has stood ,h. ..St of furt> y— u!;,..!!';:,^^;:;"::;;, ^/^ .^i^;:;^,,,!!^ tilr; . 

' th" extraordiiiaiy expi^nafs w.'re noi-o3- 
I jsary on aci'o.int of th»» r-'Volution. 

I'r'-.slJ.Mit lluf-rta iss'iod ^<tlll an-; 
I rtht>r dtMiet' s.ttln»; forth .-ortain rt'ff- ! 
I nlation-i wbbh will Kovorn the prosl- , 

denHal «.'l'Htl<jns wliii<-i» are talied for 
I .Uily. 

TENSE EXClfEMENT 
MARKS THE CLIM.AX 
OF DE BATE ON TOLLS 

(t'»nllnu«^d fr.im pag.; l.i 

' Ing; Vi rfpudiale th« Dcmotralic plat- 

forM. ! 

The administration, nopro.^^entative i 
Humphr.) df-.-laiod. b^d been iinpo.s.d ! 
up.jn "to larry out tii."; inttM-iialionai 
lonlldome g'^nn! by whi<b .Jai<an .and 
I 17tiKl'ind hop.' to .socurt^ the u.-u of ttio 
, canal wilbo^it comp.o.tion." ! 

Sprpcli by >lniin. I 

ll.'publirari L'-ad'T Mititi told the 
hou.-^.' ttiat thrc.' *|^t.•^^t io!i.< "Wfre In- | 
solv.'l in a r^^ppul of tin- I'anama tolls 
•'X'lni.tiiui: 'I'roaiy riniit-s, niorui rinlit.s 
apart from treaty consuu'ni.m, and th-* 
tM'oiionitt- [toiiry involved. 'i'lie ecnu- 
omlo uui'.siloii miRht b..; eliansed at any, 
tim>'. he .said, b'lt a d»'<M.sion on treaty 
riwht.« niu.st »».- a la-trms one. I 

11..' koaint!<inei itiaf no eoiLstruf'tion 
of the Hay-J'aiinpi'fot" treaty t-om- 
pelb'd ii'..> I'iiit.'.l Siate.s to « har^e tlie ; 
."'ame toll« on ita Own sbip:^ or those t 
i»f ranama a--* \vcr<» levied on thoae of | 
otli<>r natlon.s. i 

'A r.-Milinj; of the rul.'.s to be ob- ! 
I serve'l by nati.ma to re.-eivo eqiial ; 
tr.?atment." h? said, "plainly discloses i 
that they are not appii<'able to the 
I Lnit-d .Sta'e.s ...i ranama. ] 

I "Knuland'et aii'-napt to secure her 
I construction of tie* treaty at thi:^ tlrie' 
Is not f.ir it'' preiient etVert. it is f or ^ 
iho long di.siant futur--. If we con- 
sini',' tiie treaty aecordsMj? to tl)*» IJni?- ; 
llsh claims, it la sure lo emliarrasa us 
whenever \v.j have war with other 
c'ouiitned. 

War 'Inpvltublf." 
"War is not d.'strable. tjut It is in- 
evitable. We cannot always niaintaln 
pea.--*. 

"If w-" «j;ree now* t.'. tlie Knglisb 
• on.struction. It !.■» crtaln that in the I 
fultire. wh.'ii we hav.,- u war with 
Japan, or China, ur aoii'e other country, ' 

iti r.'f.'rence to ' 
th.-ir u.^e and our us.i of th»3 canal.) 
I .'spo.M.ally «■* t.j war ve.ssels. .and In 
I iliat tim*; of sire.=!.s we will he met with 
1 the c'.Tiieiir i..t: tfv i;iii<ljn I- the pre.s- ' 
: «'nt ally of .lapnii- -..r by sime other | 
■couniry. th^t^ we have already lon- 
.<tru.-'l ill. It tr.-aty iti .*;u<li a way we 
_ •aniiot t>roi.M-i the cHinl utti.out bring-' 
I iiiu a pr.'ie.-^t from Kngland, or other 
i.)untn.-.s, V hb-h will eiibarrasa if 
'not defeat us in th" svar. 

"I want to tr.*at lit :.;itnd fairly, but 
' T believe that under it;' <onHt ru< tioii of 
til'.' treaty we have tli.» right to do a.s 
I Wrt please in this inaur, and tiiat It 1.^ 
Ian iinf rl.'ndl,\- act i»f i;i:s{Iand inw, at 
1 thU lat" dale, to insist upon any other 
construction." 

CItirk Clowrd l>«-ltale. 



Ill- sure to !?.»t Ht»od's. 

HUERTA CONFIDENT 
VILLA WILL FAIL IN 
ATTACK ON TORREON 

M'.jntinucd fr.on pa ge l .> 

wer.i held for trial on the charge of 

bavins aid.d tlic Hueita «..verrini.-nt 
The same di.<pat.-ii confirmed eariitr 
' reports of the c.iplure and sinking of 

the steamer I'arm.-n. of the Compaiiia 
j Xavira d'l Taeitlco. 
' Insurgent otYiciil.s d- nb d the report 

that tlie Bunboat Tauiplco. wiilch tiiey 

capture 1 rccetitly fiorn the Federals. 

-voubi be ilismantled. They said lie; 

vessel, which was watlin4 for coal, waa 

engaged in scouting duty. 
-^ 

Torrfon I-'iikHI^cs KlUert. 

Eagle I'a.ss. -r.'\.. M.ii- »i :tl.- Ref.j- 
Rees who reached IMedra-i N.-sias. 
Mex.. frtim the vi.itiity of Mon. 1 .va. 
report that (o-n. Mur^ia has wip"<i out 
s.-ver'il bands of Federal lugiilves from 
Tnrreon. 

Mur«i.i has b.-en ..peratlrB between 

Moui.iey an.l 'I'.n n and is r-pofe* 

to b.iv.- isolated 'r..rr.'on fr.>r!i all c.»m- 
nniiii.allon with M.\i.o lily ar.d otli'-r 
Fed.'ral for.-es nt M-mterey and Saltil .. 

There hH'^ b.'fU no comiiiunication 
betw.'iMi llnffle I'ass an<l T.>rre..ti ov.t 
the Roverntnent i.-b-craph line.- f.ir live 
dj'vs. All railroads inl.« I'orreoii from 
the oast have been cut. tl.n. loauuln 
Maa-i. who went to rei»if.»ro tJen. Ve- 
ins.-., nt Torreon. made the trip over- 
land in armored automobiles with his 
Sot) m-ii. I 

Keeplncr \*sl>.tance Vway. I 

Murtria commantis a slroii;; force of ( 
»'.oismuti..nalisis whl'h. wh'.b' t'lktrm , 
n.» part In the atta« k on 'I'.ureon. has . 
be.n working t-> prev.-nt any assist- ! 
i.n.-e renehinw the Fc<l"ials in the be- 
leauiur.'d city. He recently capuir.-d 
M.iiolova. eunfiscMtini? larRe .'<ui>plle-| 
in the railroad war.'houses tle'r-* and 
proce.'dins south, cut comnrini. ati.m ■ 
with Monterey from IM-dras N'"«ras at 
Kspinaz.*. t. n miles above Hoata. a' 
iun.tion point leadiiit; to both Mon- 
terey and Torreon. H'' tlieri is report- 
ed to have burned se\eral brl.lees on 
railr..:i.ls whii b ha-l been carryins 




You \s'on*t go aniiss if you full 
line with tlie majority of the be 
th-cs.^ed people in Duluth and .^ei 
\oiir clolhei", cleanin<4- to the * -^r 
Cleaners. It's a pretty safe plan 
low the majority in anythin;;? — 
please.-, many mu--t have morit- 
pcciallv advisable in a nntt-r of Clothes 
Cleaning- V/E HAVE HAD YEARS' EXPERIENCE — that ^ why we do more 
ek-an.nLTand dvemg than anv ...ilier .-.laMi^hnK-nt in ihe eily.^ \ on will appreciate 
the ad^"nta-es'ofhavincvvou^ wearing apparel as well as Oriental rugs, carpets, 
drapes, portieres, etc.. cleaned by practical men who personallx' supervise all uork 
L\on^ m tlieir c>iabli>lnneiu. Fall in Ime-and become one ut our great number oi 



>ati^fied ;)alron; 



OUT-OF-TOWN-CUSTOMERS 



Take advantage of the opp'jrtum 



lily 10 deal with a reliable establi-hmeni by 
.sending your clothe^ cleaning and dyeing a^ well as all household furni>hings to be 
cleaned '»r dyed to the Orpheuni Cleaners, 
and with every appearance of newness. 



W'e will return the ariicles promptly 



suppli-s lo b'">' /•>';» 'j;-^. . ron,titn. I questions will arise 
Nuinerou.i small bands of « onstitu- i 7^_ ,_ _ ., 

tionalists are active around Monterey 



Saw <;oine« l*MlHrio'n Full. 

F.l fa^ .. T. \.. Marrh ul.- A I'lle of 
r.-bel rt'v.Tses and rebel huk was 
br..ui,'hl h«-re last iiinhf from th.- fi.nt 
bv .John lleed. < cirr.'stio!i'J"nt of the 
I New York World, and Koberi Durman. 
a ph<>t..gr;ipher. 

'Ihclr st'.ries are the fir.'it unbiased 
I aceounts <jf eye-witn.-.-^ses since tlie al- 
: la. k on Oorie/. I'ala.io. l.erdo and Tor- 
reon began. They left th.; front lat^» 
Saiiudny. at which lime th.-y fSliniatcd 
that the rei."l losa was J.'P.i'> In killed 
and woiind.-d. 

"We Wire whipped twbe at Oomez 
f Pala.'io," related l>orn:an. "but the, 

good s 



Our 


Auto 

1 


; will rali f T and 
deliveir your work 
w 1 t h i» u t the 

, sll«hle3t spot or 

, sluin. 




DRY CLEANERS S^CtOVE 
SPKIALIS^S -" 



GRAND 976 • PhON£5 - f-ltLR0 3E ;/68 




Our 

Motto 



All work guar- 
nnleed to be per- 
!■ 1 ! or iio charge 



COR-NEF? 5LCQNDAV£. CA5T » I^UP^RiORQT 




1 .-.t. rais <li.ln't hav.- the good S'-nse 

to f.iHow up their a Ivanrage an«l VHla | Speaker-Clark. cb'sinK .bbate against 
r.'iurne.l io the atta'k after i ."»rKan- | the r;'p.jal, dijiappoliit.'d tlu.se v.ho ex- 
lainsr. and ultimai"ly o.. iii»ied the city, j pected him to atta.-i; IMfsideni \N ii- 



will be 



WEYERHAEUSER 

MAY NOT LIVE 



I from page 1.) 



>l«r. 



MAD MOTHER'S ACT. 

Throws Baby From Mill City Car 
Into Officer's Anns. 

X n -, M: 'If M " ' 'V.T- 

c ■ - - ■ ■ ■ . ■ ■•:• - ' i . 

oM •■'•■■' ■..-■■ ■>!•,. 

j.,^ IV. The ofr'i- 

. ■' the child. 

, : r Injured 

imlne! 
a pri V I . 



GUIFFREY ENDS ART 

SERVICE IN BOSTON 



i: IS.^T, to F.lir.abeih IMoedel. | 

H' left r'>al Val ey in IStfO and 
M.i.v.'d t.> ll'n-k Isia ml, where he en- I 
teiel into a partn. rship with F. C. j 
li.'iikniHn and n.uyiit Ihn Hock I.-Jland 
.sawmill, whi'ii wh.s op. -rat' d by the, 
firm of Wt-yerha'user & li'tikman. 
From tiiis b-i;innini: In th" business 
of manufaituriim; lumber. Mr. Weyer- 
lia"us"r's inter. 'Sts l>.'Kaii to exi)and 
Mild as a result <»f I is personal atten- j 
U''; lo the biisin.'ss h.- waa a.-c.iunt.'.l 
one uf tlo- Ki'-Htest of the luml^ermen 
..f the country. In 18HI he moved to 

.Sr. I'aul to he lo-at the c.-nter of his 

b'.'.siness itUeresla, iind built a home 
It ;?•>»> Sumtnlt a vet vie. wber.- be has 

■ ntinu.'.l t'. r.'sld. since, g..>ing to 

• lif.rnia in the wiit-r. 
Mr Weyerhaeiiser's lumh.rin;; in- 
'• ifst.s wvie for mnriy y.-ars .-entered 
prI t;'-ipal! ■ !■ 1'. ^^'.•yerh»»eus».•r tSj Co., 
of \\h''-h 1: • \v 's prtsbb-nt. but loj was 
als.i int.Te.^lr'.l in a nunib.>r ..f oih.'r 
.'..mpaaies • tiifai;.'.! in various phases 
• f th'i Uimh.'r an. I loktuint; bu-sitiess. 

'.I owned v.'ist trai ts of tlmb.-r ItihIs 
; •! M i (' n. .-..I'n. Wiscinsin, AX'a.-iliinptop 
.:, I !■! .!'- - ■ - 



M'lT' }'' 



t- 
I 
I 
i 



Soda For Gas, 
Acid Stomach 
or Indigestion 



w\. 



i 



I 



.1 



' '-ryUiinR 

ervi'laie 

ll means \\ c 

-HV.s a noted 

h\dro<-hl'>rlc 

nmi-i» starts f'.o.i fer- 

I>r.\eriis .•'Uinilete dl- 

"ui 111. -.'MS .-.otir in the 

m a Chin. 

the 3tom- 



< , as, • ■ 1.4. 
«>!»t"n I : ; 1. - ' 
B'jur '•'.nl aii'l 
are troui»l.'d ■ 
DTI t hoci I .V, .\ :. 
a..'ld I'l '^"■ ^' 
liientafi"!! -.na 
Srestion. i'd'ri 
Ptorna.-h lik" >;arl>M.i" ^•.>: 
f..rmin« nas.-s v\ hi. h iittt;. 

h lllie a toy balli>oii. .'iiu.-!!;i; a h"avy 



pro-kaRc of I'l Kraln Sodae—n 
hmI take one tabl.-t any tini 



8.'-. 

1-impv ini<'-i'V in th.- ■ lesi w .• bel. h 
Itas fp'iv.- .s'.iir ri.<itiK.-. ii'-a r-, i.urn. flat 
ulenc.' uater bra.-ih and iiius.a. 

He i". lU us to put H.-i.le all diij.stiv 
bMs a-nl instead Ket tr-.m .-iny piiar 
111 a. V a 

f.illowf-'i ''■ 1 t luibler of v.at.r whi. h 
' ,11 insiaiitly neutrali/.e a.idMv: .-t..p 
f ,,-ntation. abs..rb the ^ ,.,. s ai..l 
L,^...lt.■n ll>e entire diKestiv.' tra. t 

furth.r stat.s tint th'.se m. ii 

,Mi'f troubled with . l.r.'nic a'-i.^- 

j'l". , ie.-ju''inc IndiM'-sli'Ui, f-ous- 

i.ases fihould take or,-' 10 

tablet recrularly aft.r 

id. as this antacpi i> 

beinK con;po.-~.-.l .>f 



I 



f! ' 

H.'.-!.s and 
grain .^..d..gen 
fneals for a peri-K 



riiil'' 



^od* VlMKncsla ami Calcium Carbonate 



!"i i ': 1 >okl i)ir after tiiis v. bb 
s ilc-r.-d bu>iri".^s he wa.s assist. -il 
- sons, alth.iimh he kept in touch 

I he who].- hill .-i'-lf. 
Ttie \\ fycThaeM^er S.vndlcate. 

1 ~ i-i!.''in.->s Lir.-u lo s'i'h an extent 

..ruaiiiz.-.l th" " W«-v erhaen.'^er ' 

■■" and wa.^ elfii^d pre.sidetit 

.\H.Jsls-ippl Itiver I'.o.mi and 

■m I'MTTiTci iiv. This c.->nc..rn is in- 

' 'ly t very limib"r c.Tmp 

-St »i nd paid $^.11(10. .100 

ihi' « '. .\. .Velson cojn- 

.■ •. Minn. He i ..ntrolled 

- .AtWdod I. limb. -r cotn- 

ii. I.uii b.-r company. Mis- 

> i:i\i-r l.o;;srlnj; cn'nipanv. 

I fine lonpany. Fine Tren 

l.iii.i.'! i-impHtiy. «'hipt>"Wa Valley 

I,.>t;:' !t;^; i ..iiip.i n\-. .M us.s.-r-.'<;uin t rv 

."nii-any. W«'y.Th.-i '^u.-j.'r - H.-nkm.-ni. 

• lo.iip't I.timber ( ompan\-. Itonner's 

I'lrr.v l.iitT.ber conn .my and the Supe- 

ti..r 'J'imbet- <ompa;iy. 

\,.. \\ ..> . .1, .,.,,.^,., 1^ j..,),^ ^„ ^^ 

'.'hii n. Ttoi k.f.ll.r. He 
I. - : .1.1 piilili.' Ratb.iinp.s and 
n.v.'i- mad" a social call. Fmil he re- 
."i.tly nave tin a<tj\e .-cntr.d of his 
. .inipanles t.> his s. ris It was business 
{•>r him from the time ho rose uulll 
!i" vv"nt t<i bed at iilnht 

.\ masizine art!.' e. d. aling with bis 
Unue-tise tinib.'r leddlnK's. said: "The 
(jU'-sllon naiurilly >iri.s.-.s as to how 
nu. h timber Ian. I \\ eyerha.-u.>,er owns. 
H.' wont t.'ll. and v\>-n his d.iscot lieu- 
ttnants a.lmit that th.y can only spec- 
ulate There are '.0.000 .sqii:ire miles 
of tlinb.r lan.l in he j^iat" of Wasb- 
inm.in al.ui<\ Fret y much evcr.vthintf 
o.itside of the k.iv "rnnieiit forest rc- 
s. rv.' is tributary t-i W.'yerb.ieuser. 

".<u.-h Is trsio ..f '>renon's Kr.-.it for- 
>-t IiJids als.i In 'he ternt.iry arouiul 
v\'is. ..nsin. Minn.'s. t.-i and tlui Ml.s.«»l8- 
sippi river distrbt he has r. i8:ned f«>r 
\ >-:i va ur.disnut.'d. 

•'It is estimated by those who have 
snidi.'d Wey. rh:i. iis.'r'.H wi<b'.-:pr"ad 
bu-ihi. s< inter, sts that fully :iO.OtiO.OoO 
:o r»'.< ..f timber hinds are und. r liLs 
...iitr'.l. an ar.-a si < times ti» larfje as 
tl." state .pf New .l.rs.'y. 

I; l'.»o7 Mr. and Mrs. Weyerha.-user 
, . .. hrated their Ko den w.ddin;; at Ihe 

,,1,1 honi'i in K." k Isl.md. then u- 

t.icl by on." of th. dauKhters. Mrs. S. 
.^ l>jvis. Th..' otuer < hlldren, all of 
\% h.MU wer.' pre.seni. ar.-: .lohn I*. Wey- 
.'rhaeuser and F. I-'.. Weverhaeiis.-r ..I 
St. Fau'. F --^ W" .•erhaeiL-.-r of Fittle 
Falls. U. M Weye- hat-user of iM.xiuet. 
Mr- ' 1- .l.'W"'t "f «'biiac.» and Mrs. 
\\ ll. Hill of I'oarfhkcepsie. N. i'. 



W .' were whipped rieht tn«»re. but 
V.l.i.-Jco. the Federal commander, didn't 
know It. 

Iluerta C'ommnndor W<>nt Mad. 

"l".'d"ral prison"!.-* wii.un w.. cip- 
tiir.'d said that \'"l's.-o lai.'!- w.Mil ii i- 
satie in ilie trencb.-.s. He Is a .-rioril'' 
of pr.'vious r.'voltitiotis an.l has a b.a.i 
I rm 'in. I a bad 1. »;. The prison, r.i l.iM 
us h.' w.'iit ma.l after O.ti.ie:; Fa!a.-lo 
and went rayinij; up and down th" lines 
i"ursii;g anil i«suin>f tie! most absurd 
order.-;. ITtimately bis own officers 
put him under restraint. 

"Our attack on O.unez Palacl.t was 
centered on the bill known as Ceir'i 
de la Fll.ar. It Is precipit i.ms an.l we 
made sev.Tal as.saults bef.ire takint; it 
The result of each of six assaults which 
Wt-re unsuccessful cetld be dis.-.irt:ed 
aft.r the bsttle by the rJiitfs of dea.l 
r«'t»els. Their bodii'S distlm-tly mnrkeJ 
the line where they were repulsed. 

"The hmne-made shrapn"l of th« 
rebels bad mmh to d.i with the early 
repulses at tlomex Fala.io. Only about 
.ine ill thitt> exiilod".!. 

Vlllu "Wan Kvrry where." 
"Cen. Villa Is a fit^htinn n.an. H« 
was everywhere, and his preaiest de- 
liBhl was t.j j.iin the .assaults <»n f.).>t 
anil throw hand i;rei\aile..j himself, llti- 
mat.'U he will lake Torrc-ui. 

"When w»» left Saturday morn!?>.sr tip' 
fight foi the possess:. >n ..f Torre. m was 
■ in pr.iKr.'fs. It wa.-; slow, stubborn 
work, as the rebels had to flKht fr.un 
h'.iise to bouse, the enemy retreatinif 
from p.tsiib.n t.» pi^sitiou thr.>ugh h.ib s 
kno.-ke.l throuiih the mud h<ius.>s. 
whi'h are huiU one asainst another." 
Tleed and f>orman. like other cr- 
respon.buits and p|.'.t..nr iph"rs. xvere 
pot oiilv forbi.lden to send out r.-ws 
after th • attack on Torr-joti boK'ii'!, but 
they themselves xvere forbidd-n to 

*^ Ac.'or.llriR- to T!eed they bribed « 
section hand to allow them to uax> a 
(^asolin. -j.ropelled rail vehicle, who b 
."irrie.l th.-m t.« H.-rmi.iill.t. There thev 
caueht a hospital train, whb h carried 
th.>m to Chihuahua. All along the line 
thev wer.' stopped an.l qu.-stloned. but 
tli.-v still had their safe conduct pass.-s 
from Villa and niaratfed to eet 
thr.»ugh as the verbal or.ier against 
their departure hiid not b.-.-n pr.>p- 
t-rlv promulKate.l. In .Tuar.'7. they were 
slopp"il twice, but their passes carried 
them thr.>m;h. 

Slept on r.iltonse noor. 

"We sb'pt-^ actually .«!.'pt- .'i the 

of of n cab.iose to iliihuahui," r.-- 

d. It Is tru.^ the sleep was 

but still we slept. In 

we could h-ar 



j 8on. H.» disclaimed any per.sojial l.-<sue 
I with the piesideni. d.'.lared lie be- 
I lieved Mr. \\'il~oii wa.s a.nial.>d by the 
I ii!gh.'st patii'Jtii- m'.l:\k.'s. and ihal 
' th-re was n.> breach in the l>eiuocratic 
, party. 

' He ar^fued at length agttlnst the 
I)r.siilenf..j cont.'ntlon. and declared 
tiiat "the amazing rctvie.st of the presi- 
d"ni f.»r the repeal, like the p'->a< e 
of Ood. "passeth all understanding.'' 
j He dis.'laimed a»iy personal iss'ie be- 
I twe.Mi the pre.sld"nt and himself, and 
[added that if the president had rea- 
sons "whi.-h are not titt"rl.v un.ten- 
' able nti'l v hlch compel him lo iuak>J 
this i-.*i|uest." be had not given them 
I I. J the b.iiis.v He diff.-red with tiie 
president's siatement that toll txemp- 
i t!t>n was a "mistak.'ii c '(mjniic policy," 
but admitting dispute on that point. 
prot>ose.l th;»t th.' ex 'mption be »U3- 
peiided I W'> \ .'ars. 

•■Hradr to F.are World." 
ITe coiit'ueJ.'d that the presid.'ut was 
mistaken tn th.- view that the exemp- 
|ti.>n was repugnant to ilei Haj -I'aunce- 
' f.ite treaty. 

"We want var witn no nation.' said 
the spi'ak"r. "but rath"r than sur 
i r."nd"r our rieht to complete sover- 
eignty oviM" every s(«uare fo.>t of oi 
Klobe-clnllng d.'maln. we will chee 
fully an.l courageously fa. e a wor 
111 Hrms." . , ^ , 

H.' aitn-'ked the attitude of h'->u 
, lieiiio. r:Ms who have l.d tt!" pi. sid.-tit 
fight for the toll exenjpti'.n r.pe 
' Itef-rring t.> published dedarsitio 
that, his onpositton to th" preside 
was "tlie ..p. Ting Up of his f'uht f 
the n..nilnation In F.»16." the speak 
declare.! he had t..bl all to whom h 
had suok.-n about the lftl6 situati 
that if the prei^ldetit's a.lmlnlstratio 
W'T'* a s'lcess Mr 

re'-ei.'.i»d. anl If it W"ie a failure "th 
,n.>mtnaii.m would n-.t ba worth hav- 

**■ lie Can ll«» Happy. 

A, to J. Is own fii'Mre. the .(speaker 
insisted ho c.>ul.l be happy with.-ut the 
pr.'sid'n"y. th.> speak'-rship <.r 
with r.-urement t.> i)riv:it 

.onstituen.-v so ib-i.TUun 



irun In my campaign for president In 
m" It may surprise these obsequious 
coutlers to kn'>w that I n;ver hinted 
huu;«n being that I '-vould be 
I'l Hi, and that I am not 
a can.lidate. Th-lr slander has been 
m-atuitous mental degra-lation 

"I never entertained the si. finest 111 
will toward the prosi'F-tit about 
F,a!iimor.» convention. 



^DES MOINES KILLS BONDS not 'go'i'nK'*topa'rVeV aVound'^and call 

I this a i-oTifer<'nce. It l.»oks like a 

There 



to an.v 

a candidal. 



|goo..l ol.ltiine «'onveniion. There Ir^-* 

'been s.uiie <-ritii-isin <if this confcr- 

I. Nyerly (re-elected), Fred j ence, but I hold that the right of as- 

semblag" gutirante.-.l us b.\ tli 



f.'ontir.u.'d from paga i.'> 
will b^J 



th« 

1 wish h.im well. 



'Cierman and W. F. Mitchell 

Snyder Wins at * ouncH niuriH 

r>-.!ii.-;l Fluffs. JowH, March 
I'-upplet-j returns fi.ir.i y-.'storday' 



31.— 
city 




HU.'b thtiiEr" . ,, 

\% to Speakership. . ,. . . 

Mr. flark then referred t'< p ib ished 
reports of a fight or. his re-election to 
the speakersh.ip. 

"The New York Sun pra.-tlcally n.orn- 
Inates th^ gentleman fr.)m Kentu.ky 
I Mr Sh.»rl"V>. f'>r speaker." s?aid he. 
"il.-'re is its e.xa.t language: 

" 'Iteport-s have It that already the 



l.lrenae Candidate Wins 

vVaf-^rlo.i. I'jwa. M>»r.-.h ?.l. -Mayor R. 
r. 'ihomps.in, running or, a "non-po- 
lUiral' ticket, and h:s entire ticket 
vi',.re elected over Former Mayor .1. P.. 
He tSr and th.? Democratic candidate, 
R'jy K Beed. Thomps-in's majority was 
'W. He received ;-;,68- v.<t"s. Rector 
received l.SlJO and F.-ed 1,01^. 

:h- principal Issue was the "wet 



Utile leaders have t;".lded tha' ^^'^P'"?- | and "drV nuesti.>n. with Thompson de- 
s.-ntatlve Carter Olass of ^ '/S'u'a i ,.; ,ring in favor of issuing ll<en.-;es for 
w.nild be a a^-yi man for fhior leader, g.j],, ,p.s, providing the present case 
and tliat Representative Swager i'^n«?r- ,^,,w h.'fore the sui»reme court is de- 
lev of Kenlu-ky. would make an Ideal ,.j,j...j j,. favor of the sale of intoxical- 



speaker." 

"The .stranate part of tliat paragraph 
mak"s no menti'.ti of my 



' lug li'iuors. 



R-ei polled the largest vote ever re- 
cord-.-i in this city by 3 to 1. Tliomp- 



gu;jranle>-il us b.\ tlie dn- 
siituti.Mi has not be.-n ali.-nated b\' lh>' 
passage of the primary law." 

.lulius Tliorsj'm of l'..'n::;on wis 
named seeretar.v and HiUfh M< ^^w.-ii 
.if Itasca assistant secretary. 

The co!i\'*ntion r.-ressed until " p. 
m. t.» p.'rmit ih..> credentials cojiimit- 
tee to do Its w.irk. 

It 1.^ not expected the convention 
will be through before tJ or 7 o'cl.j.-ic 
t.Milght. The rjue.stlon of wh.'ther to 
ask caielhlates lo file for state offices, 
oth.-r liian the e..vi'rn.>rsiiip will al.s.j 
come up and will likel.v be the caus- 
ing of a.>lti" bail!;r.ir. 

I.awler Klr^iiBtii Small. 

However, when <»iu^ comes down t."* 

' figure.^ It bioks as though there will 

j be more than the usual liariiioiiy in 

I the r.-inks, and far more than would 

I seem possible in viewing the matter 

from the lepuicl slreii«ih of the Uaw- 

ler forces. It is dcelared here that 

when the final sh.uvdown will hsv.* 

tak.'M pl.ai-e. out of the l.iilO delegates 

in the i-onvention the Hamm.uid for.-es 

will have nearly I.ih.hj: that Fawler. 

I outside of the 'I'wln Citi.-s will juit 

I have over 100 delcRates. J'"lgures fr.un 

the sanp» s.)urce qu.>led are to the ef- 




lift 



even 
should 



tire uie to private life. I stu. can be 
•iimv in the To.'" -.Tid affe.ti.m of my 
■if. a-'d ch'.idr-n. la the so.iely .f my 

book.^'atid m cultivating flowers and 

tree.-" , ^ , 

Ass.-rting that h™ 



hid no rrltl.'lsTTi 



d'?rmani . 

By th-» us.j of votmar macmnes 
re.--:'.' was known an h>ur afi.-r 
polls closed . 

Carried F.very Ward. 

M !:.->' ■" 



tlie 
the 



chants hotel and dc.-id»d to vote for a 
recpp'st that \\'. .^. Hamin.iuil file for 
governor. H.arris Bennett of Dululh 
and W. V. Kane of Int.'rnaiional I'alls 
w.'re chosen for the i rt lUtii lahs com- 
mlltei-; J. D. L>eci\i of t"arll'ui ami 



hU 



h'»tween 



ro.">r o 
l.Tted Ree 
muih broken 

our waking m.>m.'nts «e v..u..j ...«. , 
(he nio.ius and cries of the wounded, 
esne.'lallv wh. n the train sL-pp-d and 
it w .s ail still otherwise in the de.sert 
\s til.- wounded died they were simply 
.slioved out of the .nrs by the sid- .^' 
the tracks. AVe didn't fclop to bury 

them." J ., . ,, 

R.ed and P.^rman acr-^ed (hat Ine 
^uneriorllv of the Federals' artillery 
should btive given them p.'rmancnt vic- 
tory but f.»r V.lasco's failure to follow 
up his adv.mtane.s. 

Th.- rapid lire gun.'». accurately 
trained on obi-tades j.ut in the way of 
rebel advan--". did the m.»si dam- 
said. Th.' rebels sitnplv fell 
before the barbed wire 
time, howecr. 



th 

ag.'. tluy 

in win.lrows 

.ntanglenunts. l.a.P 

Villa was able t.> retreat wuhout pur- 

s.iii and ref..rm his men. Th.'ir \alor 

was iinafi. .led by their repulses, ur 

by thlr>l and hung r 

All of th.' .-orrcsp.ind.-ii's w.i..- mad-' 
si.4v by drinkintf conLaminated wat"r 
fr..m th" irriualion dit. he.s. aiel John 
Iv Fob. Its. c..rresp.,ndcnt of the KI 
j'Vso M. .ruing Tim,--, was cnfin-d to 
ih\. ho«P*i"l at th.' time i:,.,.d HPd 
l?.rm in departed. The other corr.'- 
s,'i,nii.nts and photographers had re- 

brouKht bai U a report that 



Do'ie Is no per.son il Issu.; 
the pre.si.lenl '^f the Fnlred States and 
mvs.-lf h" .-ai'i- "1 tru.st there never 
'vill be I h«vc at no time utt"red on- 
■w-or.l of .riii'-ism of the i.resid.-nt. At, 
no tim- s.) far as 1 am infortned or 
h..!i,.v" ' has the i.resiueiit said one 
word .^V i-riiieism of me. 1 n.'ver have 
.Miteriaitied the opinl.)n thai Frc.ldeni 
Wi's..n Is actuated by other llian the 

'*'i^hr! not'i^'ib-ve tb.t Fresl'leni Wll-^ 
„.,„ »-v"r his entertained any ..ih.r 
i.T.inion as to the <ondiict of tb'.s.' ..f 
„, who tlnd it ne.^essary to difter from 
him on thi.* np^a.-ur.-. 

>o Breaeh In «h«- Parly. 

"Pr.'-bbnl WiiS'.u do, s leit d 

■breich m the Hemocraii.- parly 

.t d'-sire a brea.h In th.' Democratic 

aiv.and ihere is no breach In th..^ 

I "luo ratic party. 1 v.-..wl.l .s. .>rn to 

..lie ., l.u' Fiesid-nt W.l.pui coun- 

, .'nances the efforts ..f some of the 

'jackal press to repr.-senl that we are 

iVJ\ iuii t.> disrupt the D. niocratic 

nnri ^V^tb m-.st of th...e who have 

Lss.'rted that T am seeking to disrupt 

the wish IS falh- r to th-.* 




th it 



trans- 



Rallros 

He c.niend.'i. flr-t. 
.'ontlnenta! raihoa l.s "^•'•''<' /^« ^^^ 
..>.,..f benefii^isr.es -r_ '^^J;'^^^^^.^ ^^^, 

d tliat 
entered Into an engage- 



Further referrinar t'-. .Tespl.-ni i 
...n's attitud". Speaker ^ l-^rk '•^^ ; 
"if we have entered Into an en 
nent whhh forbid, us to '"^"i'f,'', "^'^ 
,.., n'fiirs tV-er. we must a.>lde by 
i^liowev'^r- foolish or unnc.e.sary that 



Whale Council Ki— elerted. 

rei.ir Rapid.^, I'>wa, M .r-h :;i. —May- 
or Louis F. Roth aad t:ie eninv fornur 
cliv council, comprising L'^"''',.. '^''^'*- 
Fred .r. Lazelle, Allen McDiitf and 
1 m- s Hughes, were r'-turned tu oftlc.J 
by n^'Hrly a 3 to 1 m ajority. 

Burlington SoelalUt Beaten. 

low t. Mar.-h ;n. - W. C. 



riiiluth on April '2.5 at - p. ni. to discuKs 
tlp» matter of olUainiiiL; a D.-m..cratlc 
candidate for congress. The feeling 
was unanimous that the chances for 
vi.'tory with a proper <andidate 
all in IteiiPicr.acy's favor. 



are 



-lire a 
I do 



ejiiraKement may hive n^^r 

Honest opinions, he .said, differed 
r mav h^ the differen.N-a of 

- merits of the , or^ w^^^.^ ^_^^.^^_^^ opponent. 



th.* parly, 
tiiuiclit." 

R. 'Plying .It l-ngtn t- ... 

•j.iirj^ilous and .slan.b'roi.s arti.l" in 



what he . alh'd 



•:B^^•V:;::id:^•^"d.!'Vresi.lent^V,lson 
hotpir for his net. But I do not 
casp.ot indors.. his judgment 
he Is wh-.Uv 'I- the wr.tng. at 

ih,. tre.itv bear.^ upon our own 
aituatloT., and . onse.uuMttly 
„ff..rs noju.st cans- for the breaking 
f « -w'll -^onslder-d pariv pl-dg"/ 
"Mean. Kn« of Monroe Uortrlne " 
."Ihe r"P.--a'..'' >'" •-'"'• 
nra.ti.al ab.md 
do, trine, whi'-h 
will m.iint.iin nt 



F.".rl!nt;ton. . . . „ 

Cross non-partisan camlidate for iray- 

r\s elect. "d by a maj.>rity of U2i 



far as 
dotnes'i 



■:A of 



UP 

th> 



and 
T think 
least so 



ans the 
M. in roe 



;.n>. .- . 

til" Ame-uan people 
all hazards. Th.jae 



Farvrr Mayor of Clinton. 

Clinton. I'lw-a, Mar.h 31. — W. B. Far- 
V'»r. I'emocral, was ele-?ted mayor yes- 
t-rday. ^ 

DEMOCRATSAREIN 

FAVOR OF HAMMOi\{D 

^r-.^ntlntt-Jd from p.<ge 1.> 



FIGHT ON ARKANSAS 
SENATOR IS LIKELY 



a 



covered. 

Donna n - # ,. , 

Col Vi< lor Hucria, s.-n of Fr.'sidem 
Hu.-rta was among the I'.-deral de-id. 
s'li.l also that British Vi. e C.,n. 



He 

aul C-uuuuiugs 



the New "York World." t!i" speaker 
1.1 1 the rharne that he had b.'en 

:w;v.-.i f-'v«'d the bill by the "ship 

s'lb.-iidv inter.'sf«' w a.s "a bas..' and ;ipoea 
■.••il^,' irisinua!i.>n." .... 

* '-li- anv man here belb-ve., that .slar- 
,1..," vtoiut-d the yp.-.ikcr. "I.-t hlin 
m.ii",d up here an.l n.-w .-,. th-it h- n.ay 
r.. .sen bv hunlr. ds of vitP"-;scs: 
|-i(1l(or« "^^ l«o lIop«>." 
Th** newspaper he n.ui.l. he said, 
"ab.iig with every .'tlii'.r in .\meri.a. 
«h.. h->pe3 to b.' an «mbassad..r. min- 
1st"- consul-gen<-ral. ..r r.'I som.- oth- 
er fat an.l iuicy Job. has been endeavor- 
1,'r- to pla.'-e me In ant.i«oni.-m to the 
idem ever Sin.e the election. These 
le.'l-ir" 1 am oppo.-lng this sur 



who asV;rt\h.u the Monro.^ doctrine Is ;;^;;z~,,^, being called to order by .'^late 

dead reck.m ,«;.'S* ;^"%\ ^-'^A'?,^.;.. doc- I Chairman Martin .VBri-n of t;rookston. 

After ^l'«''>^''''^,*\^. i'l with this .Senator J. D. Sullivan of Stearns 

trine, the speaker co,KU.d"d witn th.a . |>-n*\ elected temporary chair- 



man, after James Dwver of Hennepin 
iiad be-.n de. lare-l ineligible because of 



pres 

p.ip.-rs I 



or Gomel Falacio wa* render to OSreat Brliaiu a^ an opening , AmevKau 




T.lttle Rock, Ark.. Mareh 31. — 
Chances for a big fight In the Arkan- 
sa.i Demo.-ratlo state convention at 
Pine Bluff June 3 over the Fnlted 
St.ates senatorshlp are indicated by the 
v1.;orou3 efforts yesterday of partisans 
of each candidate to control election 
of delegates at Democrati.- conven- 
tions held In each county. According 
to the returns r-port, d in the recent 
state-wide primary. William F. Kirby. 
associate justice of lb • supr.'m- court, 
with 6T,'J3U votes, leads I nUed States 
Senator James V. Clark.-, who has 
tJT 75* votes. .Mr.ady iher.! is pros- 
p,-''l of a big fight in Poinsett county, 
where the vote is ofli. ..illy reported 
Hs- Clarke, l.::S5; Kirby. 615. How- 
ever State Senator Cly.b- Coing re- 
I,ort.'-d last night that th" vote was 
Clarke. 1,621: Kirby. 4.';o. These «g- 
s, if orr^'ct, would Kive Sen.-it.>r 
Cl.ar'ke a majority of 317 on the com- 
plete vote. 

More than 3.500.000 acres of land are 
held as game prtsservea in Scotland. 



DEFECTIVEPAet_J 




INTENTIONAL DUPLICATE EXPOSURE 



- I 




I^ietday, 



THB^ D0LUTR HBltALD 



lliii£ 



SCORES "ONE 
MAN" RULE 



Attorney McKeon Flays 

Council in Appeal for 

Saloon Keeper. 



FOR GREATER EFFICIENCY 
INHPEWRITING 



You II Do Bitter at Kelly s 



Matel Must Close Saloon; 

Timlin Expected to Do 

Likewise. 



New and Important Policy Recently 
Introduced By a Leading Type- 
writer Company — Valuable 
Prizes Offered to Efficient 
Typewriter Operators. 



.■*« 



•\\\ 



IllfSi 






-:i^V' 



"Efficiency" I« the latest Idea— th« 
very last word — in business. Greater | 
Efficiency is the demand of the age. In j 
nianufacturiuff. in selling:, in office i 
raanaerement, in ererythingr. 

Several big concerns have already i 

giving I established themfelvea as leaders in i 

I j 

the new efficiency movement, and nat- . 

urally, among these leaders is the , 



That the city council Is not 
I>uluth commi>'sion government but | 
that the administration consists of i 
five one.man «"vcrnment^s.^^was ^^\^^^^ which • .feneration a^O start 



df>iftr«tjQn of Attorn*^}- 

it. on at the counciTmeeting yesterday 

afternoon. 

The attorney was appearing for Al- 
exander Matel, proprietor of the saloon 
at 419 AVt-Pt Miihigan street, whose li- 
cence was up for consideration. Com- 
niipsioner W. A. Hicken had announced 
that he would recommend that the li- 
cense be not renewed and following 
the discussion his application was de- 
nied by unanimous vote. 

A»k!i Week's Delay 

Attorney McKeon 



asked the com- 
mi.osicners not to act upon the report 
of one man but to lay the matter over 
f.r on*' week and do a little Investi- 
gating for th.nipelves. He asserted 
that he was an ard. nt exponent o. the 
cf.nimlssion plan and still believes In 
ci-mniission government, but that ne is 
c.ppos'Ml to five one-man governments. 
He said that the commissioners are 
supposed to get togeihrr to confer on 
the various subjects coming before 
them and to exercise their individual 
judgrment on each of them, rather than 
to ratify the recommendations of one 
anr ther. He stated that he had inter- 
viewed Superior street and Michigan 
s'reet busintss men and that all or 
them had t. stilled to the reputableness 
of Matel and the place he has been 
running:. He pointed out that a saloon 
catering to the roughest element could 
rot be a Delmonico and that disorders 
were bound to occur. 

Commissioner Hloken stated that his 
Investigation convinced him that the 
place was improperly conducted; that 
when his investigator was there, 
drunken men were b»ing served with 
more liquor; that several drunken men 
w» re Iving on the floor, while others 
■Were in chairs, unable to hold up their 
heads; that the man presiding over the' 
l.mch counter was Intoxicated, and 
that the place was Insanitary. Chief j 
Tr"ver corroborated the report, say- 
iiK'that that was the general charac- 
ter cf Matel's bnrroMm. 

Action It rnMiitinonii. 
Attorney McKeon repeated his re- 
quf.«t that the council postpone a. tion 
for a week, but Commissioner Hicken 
fisked for a vote and the license re- 
newal was turned down without a dis- 
senting vote. 

Mavor Prinf-e told th<» attorney that 
it would be impossible for the mem- 
b»-rs of the oouneil to Investigate each 
of the 170 saloon licenses coming up 
for consideration and that the council 
was obliged to rely largely upon the 
commissioner Into wlrtre special juris- 
•ii. tion that duty f » 11. as was the ease 
with many other questions upon which 
the council must pass. 

Action wa.«= postptmed one week up- 
on the applicalltm of M. R. Timlin for 
a renewal of his licmse at 306 t'entral 
«v*nue. West Duluth. Timlin has en- 
pasred Attornev A. E. MrManus to rep- 
je-ient him. so that it is likely that 
r.ext Monday s meeting will see an- 
«ther display of oratorical pyrotechnics 
based on the saloon question. Com- 
missioner Hick«n has announced that 
he will recommend that this applica- 
tion al.so be refus.d. 

CROW WINGlriAS" 

MORE LIVESTOCK 



Eralnerd. Minn.. March 31. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — The livestock indus- 
try In Crow Wing county is growing, 
particularly in the dairy cattle line. 
Four vears ago there was liardly a 
Holstein animal in the rounty. Today 
there are six or se\en herds. The 
Holsteins of today are not what they 
wer Itwenty or thirty years ago. They 
ha- llmprovcd to a great extent, both 
In qtiantity of milk produced and in 
fize. This was evidenced a few day? 
ago when J. M. Elder sold six cows, 
that from one cause or another, had 
proved to be unprofitable milk pro- 
ducers. The six head weighed 7.875 
pounds, an average of 1.312 pounds 
each. Thes*» cows were replaced by 
eight from the W. S. Moscrip farm and 
are daughters of the great .'^ir Beets 
Cornucopia Xetheriands. F. H. <Iruen- 
hagen has a sire from the same great 
produ-:er. 



ed the era of time and labor saving i.. 
the business offio-. 

"For Greater 3fficiency in Type- 
writing" is the new slogan of the 
Remington Typew rlter Company. This 
slogan describes in extended program 
adopted by the Company in the in- 
terest of the tyrewritcr user, a pro- 
gram A\hlch repiesents a big invest- 
ment of time, labor and expense. 

The idea whicU underlies this new 
program is that '.he Interests and the 
duties of the mai ufacturer do not end 
with the mere t fficiency of the ma- 
chine it manufactures and sells. It ex- 
tends to every other factor which may 
increase or dimiilsh the efficiency of 
that machine and its value to the buy- 
er. In the case of the typewriter the 
three principal f ictors which contrib- 
ute to the net r« suit are the machine, 
the operator and the conditions under 
which the operator works. 

First of all it is necessary to cor- 
rect some erronei'us notions as to what 
constitutes cff ii lency in typewriter 
service. One of these notions is that 
the sole test of efficiency is the speed 
of the operatoi. Nothing could be 
further from the truth. There is only 
one test of tht operator's efficiency 
and that is 



•:>' -j-^ 



^ 



Kelly Always 
Sells It For Less ! 



m 






Solid Oak 
Bullet 

This fine buffet is maae 
of selected oak and fin- 
ished fumed. The de- 
Blgn is Arts and Crafts. 
There Is a large linen 
and two silver drawers, 
^\9.o a roomy double 
door cupboard in base; 
a French bevel plate 
mirror on top; buffet 
Is 43 Inches long — a 
regular $24.50 valine — 
Kelly's 
price. . . 



Youll get better prices on good fur- 
niture here l>ccausc our gigantic buy- 
ing power enables us to secure great _, , « a i. m 
once concessions We buy a carload to the minor stores' dozen. These low prices we offer you and a : 
^^x^ZttoT^^tv^^ V^t^^. Mere talk means NOTHING. See the partial list of values below 
and come to KcUy's-thc store that ALWAYS sells it for less. . . ^. „, . ^^ 

Light Wefgbt 
FoldlngCard 
Tables $1.95 



r-^;f^1 



:^- 



^«.ou \»iuc— 

$14.50 



Another shipment of 
light weight Card Ta- 
bles just arrived. They 
come in fumed oak and 
mahogany finishes — 
brass-bound corners; 
tops covered in green 
imitation leather with 
a heavy frame around 
same. You cannot du- 
plicate them for less 
than $3 — 
special .... 



,11 4W» »«;s=» 

$1.95 



$ 



WILEY LAUDS OFFSPRiMG 

Pure Food Advocate Tells About HiSj 
23-Month-Old Infant. ] 

Madison. Wis.. March 31.— Dr. H. W. | 
"Wiltr. pure food advocate, who is here ] 
this week, says his 23-months-old boy 
speaks Latin as well ns English. "The 
propt-r traininp for infants and young 
fhildr*-n." he said, "consists \r\ pure 
food and eood lane-tiace. His greatest 
delight — from the standpoint of his 
father — Is when he groes walkinp with 
his father and receives his daily lesson 
in T.atin which he much fnjoys. 

"Harvf-y AV. Wiley 11 has never had 
anv meat or poultiy. He has never 
had anv oandv, susar. it^e cream, sweet 
rf>ok;ts or other foods of that kind. 1 
need not add that he has never had 
any t*-a. coffee, chocolate, beer, wine 
or wh;.<ky. He is a perfectly developed 
Ix.r, fnjovs life Immensely and calls 
M.s 111. .".Is by the uniform name of 
dinner." 

AddreN«eM BrAlnrrd NurKe*. 

Bralnerd. Minn.. March 31. — (Soeclal 
to The Herald.) — Miss Helen Wads- 
worth of Minneapolis, a representa- 
tive of the state association of ernd- 
\iate nurses, addressed sixteen of the 
lo« al .tfiirsts at a meeting held In the 
parlors of a local hotel, speaking on 
state registration of nurses. The 
nurses w»re her guests at a noon 
luncheon at the hotel. 



the ».U« of the day** work, ■ 

and this Is detei mined by several fac- 
tors, the chief of which is ACCURACY. I 
Your so-calle.l fast operator, who i 
makes a mistak* or two on nearly ev- j 
ery page, loses so much time in cor- j 
reotiug these mistakes, or, worse still,! 
in rewriting mrtter which cannot be i 
corrected, that Her day's work is al- 
ways smaller th.tn that of the operator j 
of only moderat ! speed whose work is, 
accurate. A fair measure of speed Is 
taken for grant, d in the case of every 
experienced operator, but there l» nev- { 
cr any guarantee of accuracy unless! 
the operator hns been tr»laed to be 
accurate — either self-trained or trained 
by others. It Is along these lines | 
therefore that the Remington Type- 
writer Company's new program Is di- , 
rected. with th.^ Id^a and purpose of i 
increasing the efficiency, the value and 
the earning po^\ er of every operator of i 
the Company's product. 

How are these results to be ob- ; 
tained? There are several features of 
the program, but one of the most Im- 
portant is a series of awards or prizes 
for proficiency In typewriting, which 
will be given b/ the Remington Type- 
writer Company to all operators of 
Remington, Smith Premier or Monarch 
Typewriters wlio are able to qualify. 
This system of prizes, which is very 
comprehensive, includes awards to stu- 
dents of typewriting in the beginner 
class, the Intei mediate class and the 
graduate class, to teachers of type- I 
writing whose pupils show a high per- 1 
centage of effi. lency and to operator* j 
In (ceneral. The prizes offered by the I 
Remington Typewriter Company to j 
the latter are cf very substantial val- \ 
ue and they aie open to every typist 
except those entiployed by typewriter 
companies. The conditions are simple 
— the malntena «•«•*. of a »peed of alxty 
wordR per mlimte for fifteen mlnntea 
«\lthoat error. The plan includes the 
holding of thc^e contests twice a year tochci»e 
at every Remington branch office; the 
months chosen for the tests are Jan- 
uary and June Full particulars con- 
cerning the coi ditions of the tests and 
the prizes oflfe ed mny be obtained at 
the Remington office, 20 Fourth avenue 



This Quartered 
Oak Dresser 

$12.75 

This handsome drcFscr 
Is made of genuine 
quartered oak, finished 
a rich golden color. 
P'ull swell front draw- 
ers, two large rooniy 
ones and two small 
ones. There is a large 
French plate mirror on 
top. See this big value. 
Dresser is 41 inches 
wide and mirror Is 22 
by 28 Inches; a regular 
124.00 value at 



12.75 




Pictures at Less Tlian Cost 

Manuf acturers* Surplus Stock 

Wc took a manufacturer's entire surplus stock of framed 
pictures and we ar.e offering them to you for less than you 
could buy the frame for. There are three lots as loUows: 

LOT NO. ONE— Etchings, size of glass 13 by 27 i«-.J^a|""t 
finished frames worth $2.00; Sepia colored prints worth ^50, 
and a number of colored studies. Your choice QXP 

of the lot ^^\^ 

LOT NO. TWO— Brown prints, size of glass 12 by 24 jn., 
walnut finished frames, worth $3.00. Brown studies, mcludmg 
many classics, heavy gold frames, size of glass 14 by -»»"-. 
and many others worth up to $3.50. \our JJ ^Q 

choice at 

LOT NO THREE — These pictures are worth up to $6.00. 
They consist of pictures as large as 20 by 28 in. Ji^ ^^^"^J^ 
prints, dull gold, circassion walnut and 
enamel frames. Your choice of the lot at. 



Curtain 
stretchers 

Adjustable Pin Curtain 
Stretchers — heavy wood 
frame, nickel plated brass 
pins; frame riiled and 
numbered so that curtains 
may be stretched perfectly, 
even; easel back; regular 
12.00 value— ^4 Q9 
Kelly's price. . ^'••VO 



:^^& 



p6 '':x§S'- : :• ••i'.'"--*:-! 



tiv&U^ 









1^ 



Go-Carts, Baby Carriages 

and Sulkies 



$1.9S 






Kelly's Special Felt Mattress 
Full Weight $ff Aff 
Full Size, at...9#e/e9 

For this week we are offering a full size Cotton 
Felt Mattress, weight 48 lbs. Covered with art 
ticking; has heavy roll edge, round corners and 
is carefully tufted. The kind you pay tfjff Qff 
5^8.50 for— Kelly's price ^OmWfP 

Your Credit is Good 




All the 1914 models of Go- 
carts, Carriages and Sulkies 
are here for your Inspection. 
You'll find this store head- 
quarters for all the best 
styles. 

Special Folding- Go-cart, ad- 
justable back, folding hood, 
rubber tires; worth 
|6.60 — Kelly's price. 

FrinecMM Collapsible Go-cart, 
has folding foot hood, adjust- 
able back and seat, good 
springs, large roomy body, 
heavy rubber tires. A regular 
$10.50 value — Kelly's i 
price 



$3.60 



$8.75 



V 



WE GIVE 
& REDEEM 
SECURITY 
VOUCHERS 



part of the house connecting the two 
wing3 win be a big corridor, four bed- 
room.'? and an entrance under a port 

from a driveway. 

Siirinountrd By Tovrer. 
On the second floor will be the ser- 
vants' bedrooms and living room and 
a big billiard room. At the west end 



er laws, higher taxes «nd 
pense items caused these ' 
which are not peculiar to the Pennsyl- 
vania railroad. These causes still ex- 
ist, and in addition the groes revenues 
of the eystoni have been steadily de- 
creasing since last October." 



west. Phones: Melrose 230, Grand 181. 

G. A. GOJKGDON'S^ 

NEW RESIDENCE 



How to Look Years 
Less Than Your Age 



The ni<,>st aged fu'»; wiU look years 

younger after the use of ordinary mer- 

collzed wax for from trn days to two 

week?. This remarkable substance, be- | 

cause of Its peculiar absorptive power, 

actually removes the thin veil of faded j 

or withered outer cuticle, a little at a i 

tim*> <;radually the fre.«iher, more; 

youtiiful skin underneath is revealed. 

This absorotion process being a purely , 

hygienic one, an entirely natural com- | 

plexion is acquired — quite different , 

from the artificial complexion, which 

appears anything but girlish, though 

often bearing painful evidence of 

childishness. An ounce of mercollzed j 

wax, obtainable at any drug store. Is 

sufficient to rejuvenate any complex- , 

Ion. It is put on like cold cream at ' 

bedtime, and removed mornings with ■ 

warm water. i 

To eradicate such age marks as ; 

wrinkles and furrow.", make a wash 

■Pti<in by lUvulvirig' 1 uz. |M>w<.frf<l saxulite In >, pt. ' 

»i«oh huzfl. TliU li«.s KfiuUfrful aMrinxent and 

Irnio prolixities. U QuUkly rffai-es aU kintb of 

• rtiiMoi. r.o m.itter 



Work Started on House in 

the Wide Hollow 

Valley. 

North Takhia, Wash.. March 31. — 
(Special to Tie Herald.) — Ground has 
been broken oa the Immense residence 
which Chester A. Congdon of Duluth 
will build on lis C6ngdon orchards of 
400 acres in the Wide Hollow valley, 
four miles weit of North Yakima. 

The house ■will be approximately 180 
by 100 feet in Its two dimensions, built 
in Mission style around a court. It 
will be built of the Yakima county 
'< rock, a basalt formation, of which sev- 
1 enty carloads have already been de- 
' livered at the site. Practically all 
of the materi.il will be from the Ya- 
kima valley m the lumber will be 
purchased from the Cascade Lumber 
, company of tlils city. The work will 
be done unde • the direction of F. M. 
; Melzner, who is now completing a 
I $70,000 fruit warehouse and refriger- 
i ating plant oi the I'ongdon orchards, 
'and the labor will all be employed In 
■ this valley. 

On Crest .f a lllll. 
The house ^vill face a sweep of the 
Wide Hollow valley, a mile and a half 
wide, and wl 1 stand on the crest of 
a hill with a drop of forty-five feet 
before it. The hill will be faced with 
retaining walls of 



a tower will riae twenty or twenty- 
five feet above the rest of the build- 
ing 

The cost of the building Is estimated 
between $65,000 and $100,000 and it will 
cost, bv the time it is finished inside 
and furnished, approximately $160,- 
000. The architects are Kenyon & 
Maine of Minneapolis. 

TWO EMPLOYES OF 

B.&O. ARE SHOT 

Akron, Ohio. March 31.— Jesse Arm- 
strong, baggage master employed by 
the Baltimore & Ohio railroad, died in 
a hospital last nlghi and Frank Moran. 
a detective of the road, is suffering 
from a wound in the leg as the result 
of a gun fight with an unidentified man 
here yesterday afternoon. The man 
committed suicide. His body Is at a 
morgue awaiting Identification. 

TEN PENNSYLVANIA 
TRAINS TAKEN OFF 



and its striking employes were re- 
sumed today. The jvorkmen. in addi- 
tion to agreeing to return to work In 
an open shop, are willing to work on , 
short time, providing ail strikers are . 
reinstated without prejudice on ac- j 
count of union affiliation. | 

Sheriff Becker said that unless ser- i 
ious disturbances occurred at Depew , 
he would request the withdrawal of ; 
the troops within a day or two. 



Erie AK. Cattliigr D.wii. 

New York, March 31.— The Erie raU- 

i road, through A. J. Stone, general man- 

: ager, today announced the enforcement 
of a general order including a reduc- 

' tion in the clerical force, wage cuts 
and lessening of working hours to aid, 
according to the statement, in offset- 
ting declining revenues. About 6.000 
men have been laid off since Decem- 

"irsually at this time of the year we 
Increase our maintenanc eforce grad- 
ually until we get to the maxlmtim In 
the middle of summer, but we will not 
do that this year.' Mr. Stone said. 
••We now have about 18,000. fewer men 
at work than at the height of our 
maintenance work last summer. Our 
retrenchment Is shown better by the 
fact that we are putting on l^sf ^^^ 
than in laying them off. ^„^\';;i%^^;| , ,„giy ^azed at the seriousness of the 



EXPECT iNSANin 

WILL BE PLEADED 

Accused Minot Wife Mur- 
derer Expected to Offer 
That Defense. 



«10-eil Alworth BIdg., 
Duluth, Minn. - 



Minot, N. D., March 
The Herald.) — Broken 



31. — (Special to 
in spirit, seem- 



are anxiously hoping 

in rates, the retrenchment progress 

due to quiet business." 



is 



"Retrenchment Policy'' Al- 
so Is Adopted By the 
Erie Railroad. 

Pitt.sburg, Pa., March 31— Retrench- 
ment on the Pennsylvania lines wjjst 
was extended today with the announce- 
ment that ten passenger trains were to 
be taken off the Pittsburg, Fort Wayne 
& Chicago railroad next Sunday, six 
of them suburban trains. Shop forces 
are also being reduced. 

__ m 

Rea Exphilns Action. 

Philadelphia, March 31.— Higher 
higher taxes and recently en- 



RESUME WORK FOR 

PEACE AT DEPEW 

Buffalo, N. Y., March 31.— Negotia- 
tions between the Gould Coupler works 




will be on tie level of the sub-base- 
ment of the hous*». Above it will be 
•e first ba«» ment. 

The first f oor of the building w^lll 
contain a living room occupying the 
entire wing it one side of the court 
with dimensi )ns about 3S by 48. In 
the other win«r will be the dining room. 



CTcluJr^,^", ?hr.ki;;; dining porch, butler-s pantry servants 



AroL tmuQlix ftud >o>u>s luokiiig. ^A w er i isrmeiu. 



i 



dining room and office. Along the 



said * 

••The decision to reduce train service 
and working forces of the Pennsyl- 
vania system, while apparently sudden, 
should not be considered surprising, as 
the published monthly statements of 
the svstem have shown the largest de- 
creases In net operating income the 
svstem has sustained. 
' "Higher wages, extra crew and oth- i Ohio. 



To Sore Feet Victim* 

Here Is Welcome News 



The following is absolutely the sur- 
est and quickest cure know n to science j 
for all foot ailments: "Dissolve two' 
tablespoonfuls of Caloclde compound I 
In a basin of warm water. Soak the | 
feet in this for fully fifteen minutes, . 
gently rubbing the sore parts. The ef- 
fect is really wonderful. All soreness | 
goes instantly and the feet : 
feel delightful. Corns and | 
callouses cari be peeled right j 
off. it gives immediate re- 
lief for sore bunlpns, sweaty, 
smelly and aching feet. A 
twentv-five cent box of Cal- 
ocide is .said to t>e sufficient 
to cure the. worst feet. It 
works through ; the pores 
and remove^ -the cause of 
the trouble. , Don't waste time on un- 
certain remedies. Any druggist has 
Calocide compound in #tock or he can 
get It in a few hours from his whole- 
sale house. Prepared by Medical For- 
mula Co., Chicago, lU., and Dayton, 



charge hanging over him — wife mur- 
der — Joseph McPeek will probably 

make his fight for freedom on the plea 

of temporary insanity. 

McPeek lies on his cot in the county 

Jail, seemingly unaware of anything 
1 going on about him. 

Crvstal McPeek, his 8-year-old 
I daughter, on whose evidence the state 

expects to tend McPeek either to the 
1 gallows or to penitentiary for lif^, 

wound her arms around her father's 
; neck, and kissed him again and again. , „ j-.^.. K.»t 

at the close of the dramatic reunion i touch with one another 5pd^ oirer oer 

children for the ' 



Did you take advantage of the opportunity that the 
Lake Vermillion Summer Home Company is offering 
on the townsite known as Vermillion Grove, situated on 
the beautiful Lake Vermillion? If you have not, write 
for information before prices go up. We will send you 
a beautiful folder and literature describing this town- 
site and Lake Vermilion, the future playground of the 
Northwest. 



I 



♦r.«-n of Cro«bv This bridge will i Nester Mattson. Oilva Nasanen, Adolph 
o^?r,?.ct th^ ?ance communities in this Paajanen, Oscar Skut, Kaarl Jalonen, 
Xinti wfthth^e M^sXn Lake farm- Adolph Katka and Charles Montin. 
IngterHt^ry From all Indications the I The first officers are: President Wal- 

Go^od Roads' association will be ^ i t^':,^'""^^ ^ JohS'' Kark 

prominent factor in the development j secretary John Ivarkkalnen. aua 

of this part of the Cuyuna range. It treasurer. Jack Hill. 

will bring the farmers and business! ■MiailOTm 

men of the range towns ,in_^ closer [)ULUTH MINISTEn 



of the father and his 
tirst time since he killed his wife. 
Were Married Ti*t€c. 

Mr. and Mrs. Mcl'eek were married 
twice, getting the first divorce about 
five years ago, on her complaint. He 
persuaded her, however, to again wed 
him. and during the last four years 
they had lived at several points in 
this section. 

McPeek's aged father and step- 
mother are Inmates of the state home 
for old soldiers at Usbon. N. D. They 
visited their son in jail, and both 
broke down ard cried bitterly. 



t<^r facilities for marketing dairy prod- 
ucts and produce of the farms in Cros- 
by and ether towns along the range. 



BRAINERD SOCIALISTS 
PLAN BUILD ING HALL 

Bralnerd, Minn., March 31. — (Special 
to The Herald.)— The Finnish Socialist 
Local Hall company, has been organ- 
ized by Finnish Socialists to promote 



AMONG SPEAKERS 




BETTER CUYUN A ROADS 

Expected to Result From Efforts of 
Cuyuna Good Roads Association. 

Crosby, Minn., March 31. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — At the last meeting 
of the Cuyuna Good Roads association, 
the various committees reported prog- 
ress made. A site has been chosen for 
the proposed ferry and bridge across 
the Mississippi river, west of Bear 
Lake and about six miles frora the 



Brainerd, Minn.. March 31. — (Special 
to The Heralds) — The Finnish Luth- 
eran convention was held In the local 
church and was addressed by five 
speakers. Rev. Antonen of New Yoric 
Mills, Rev. Sarvela of Duluth, Rev. 
Mr. Keranen of Eveleth, Rev. Mr. 
I Kotesmaki of Hlbbing, Rev. KoivumakI 
of Ely. Rev. Mr. Kotesmaki spoke on 
the Socialist movement and to build \ Sunday school work and gave helpful 
a building with a capital stock of i instruction for Sunday school teach- 
$10 000 The board of directors con- ers. The next convention will be held 
sists of Mike Setula, Oscar Wisuri, In Eveleth on May 31. 



i 



Protect 

Yourself 

Ask for 
ORIGINAL 

GENUINE 




The Food Drink for aO Ages— Otiiers are Imitatioiit 



.« ! >'( 




— »' 



-my - 



^m 










ID 



Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



March 81, 1914. 



THE DULUTfl HERALD 

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER 
PabtUlM-fl e\rry evcBl«»r rxrept San- 
day by The^ Herald CompaBy* 

Both Telephones — Husinoss Office. 324; 
EdiloriAl liooms. ll^i*. 



oflV-» unch* Uie »ct of congress of M»rch A i». »• 



eFFIQAL PAPER, OH OF DllLUTH 



■rilSCRIPTIOX BATES— By Mail, pay- 

abi'' 111 advance, one month. 36 cents; 

thrt-e months. »1; six months, $i; 

one year. ?4: Saturday Herald, Jl per 

year; AVeekly Herald. $1 per year. 
X>ailv by carrier, city and suburbs, 10 

C'f'nts a week; 45 cents a month. 

Sii!«;Til>ers will ronfer a fa^'or by maklns known 
»iiy nimrlaiiit of service. 

\\]\fn rl\an«1ii« the »(1.1r»M of your paper. It b 
Imyortam to g1»e botli oM aii .l new addrgaatM. 

The Duluth Herald accepts adver- 




lar and a half foi a scat in mo\ing 
picture houses. 

It would be vcnturcsotne indeed to 
set a limit on the development of the I 
movie, but reqiti "es a very elastic 
imagination to picture the fulfillment 
of this prophecy. 

In the first pla :e, there is no ex- 
pense to justify il. While the initial 
expense of a movi ig picture film may 
be large, the suhiequent expense is 
small; and the mi Itiplication of films 
from the same pi rture makes it pos- 
sible to show the same feature all 
over the world at a trifling additional 
cost. 

In the second i lace, though Amer- 
icans are pouring nickels and dimes 

tu^.. cor;'aV'ts^ur^he*Snct'^;?ua;: into the coffers of the owners of the 
amy that it has the largest circulation j ^j ^^^.^ ^^^ t],^!.^ quarters, 

In Minnesota outside the Twin Cities. .,-,,. v . « c^ *.n 

. — ^ they are not likely to become so en- 

fatuated with the moving picture as 

to pay a dollar at d a half to see it. 

But maybe if the dollar and a half 
movie came about, it would be a 
good thing in s way; certainly it 
would stimulate he business of the 
legitimate theater, which undoubted- 
ly has suffered greatly from the com- 
petition of the n otion picture. And 
we cannot afford to lose the drama. 

The motion picture has come to 
stay, and it will be expanded and de- 
veloped. Moreover, it is becoming 
cjear that it will have to be regulated 
more, too, because it is profitless to 
forbid our young people to read con- 
taminating and deteriorating litera- 
ture, and then le* them get the same 
stuff into their minds more vividly 
through the sen .ational motion pic- 
ture. 

But it takes a very far-fetched flight 
of the imaginatii n to see many peo- 
ple paying a dollar and a half to see 
the best motion picture show imag- 
inable. 



Shrubbery in Every Yard A Lyricc^l Gqpher Governor I Statesmen, Real and Near 



From tlie Ne^» York Post. 




Editorial In Uie New Tork Sun. 




By rred CL Kelly. 



Evorv place needs shrubbery. Shrubs 
are to the yard what the irregular 
conformation of the earths surface is 
to a landscape. Lanier, living in the 
flats after coming from the hill coun- 
try, wrote. "What a heartache! Ne'er 
a hill'.' and the poet might Just as 
well have made this exclamation over 
a yard bare of shrubs 



The Hon. Adolph Olson Kberhart 
(born OlsonT, governor of Minne.sota, 
has announced that he will be a can- 
didate in the Republican primaries for 
a third term. The Democrats of Mc- 
Leod county, known to some geogra- 
phers as the, sUejof Buffalo Creek and 
the South 5^prk of the Crow river, 
emitted thiip ribald resolution on 



All famous and beautiful gardens j Thursday, his "arMiounclng" day: 
are alike in this respect, in that they i ..^.^ con<l*inn the ituv, blatant. tcmI and maudlin 
make use of Slirubs. They serve at » .daUnlstratlon of tl»e ^lalc by (luvemor Kberhart 
once the deman 

may be. of pracv.^-.. «..v, — , ,„,, ^^mp — - 

boundary. Moreover, they are among j ^„,„^ „, ,,, thinking men snj uiaae the state aa 

those gracious things that grow from 

year to year, and grant to the gar- 
dener the boon of increasing beauty. 



Ida of beauty and, it whose Junketlnt. tangoing, turkeiy tmttliig. ballad 
f. I , of „a Br^rr^on or' «'"K»'"«. »""« «-i^'l>i« kntlo and lack of Jntereet lu 

^tlcal use as screen or ^„^^^, ,h, ^o..- 



and that final charm, the sense of es 
tablished place 



uiliiUtratlou the laughing at-xk of the natlou. 

"Silly, blatant, venal and maudlin" 
is a fine string of adjectives: "venal" 
Is of course purely conventional. The 
unterrifled patriots of Buffalo Creek 



It is a common objection to hear ^^^ really embittered by the aesthetic 
your gardener say that hia yard Is iiot ^^^ nterary talents of Mr. Eberhart; 



"ECONOMY AND EFFICIENCY" IM 
POLITICS. 

x\nd now, as one of the queer de- 
>re opments of political exigency, we 
hear from the supporters of the Eber- 
liart administration that there isn't 
B J very much to this talk of waste and 
extravagance in state affairs after all. 

Just a little while ago all these 
Eberhart supporters were joining in 
the chorus of amazement and disgust 
jpit the revelations of high state taxes 
gr -wing out of waste and improvi- 
ficnce in the state government. 

It was unanimous, then. 

But these partisans to whom a fac- 
lion's prosperity weighs more heavily 
than the state's good have discovered 
fcomething— they have discovered that 
Jiiuch of this tremendous increase in 
State expenses has come about while 
Wr. Eberhart was governor and they 
V-ere in power. 

So now. their voices in un.„ -- . ^^j^^.^^ 

the notes of an organ operated byi ' , 

^lachinery. they are loudly declaring i XHE NEED OF A CITY AND COUNTY 
that there isn't so much to all that! HOvSPITAL. 

talk about waste and high taxes as j Have those vho are now first 
there seemed to be. j studying the need of a city and county 



Wisconsin Is s'^nding convicts to 
build the new reiormatory at Fond du 
Lac. Something after the prinoiol© 
ison like'**' "ending a na\ ghty boy to cut the 



large enough to accommodate shrubs 
This Is a first rate fallacy. There is 
no yard too small, and none which 
cannot be improved by careful selec- 
tion and planting. Think for a mo- 
ment of that bare front corner to your 
lot. How much its appearance would 

be improved if there were '^^^Jed ! <ellow. who matriculated as 

stance, three spreading shrubs planted farmer's hired 

in an "L" In that spot, marking the i*""^"*^ 

boundary, and under the spreading 

bush the lawn disappearing In most 

engaging recesses of light and shade. 

Think, too. of all the other places that 

might be made more attractive with 

shrubs — the demarcation between the 

front yard and the back, the outline 

of a curved walk or the corners of a 

straight one. Then. too. there must be 

some unsightly pole or rail where a 

taller shrub could serve Its secondary 

purpose of screening such things. 

In shrubbery, as in all other things 
pertaining to the garden, the observa 
tlon of experiments and attempt will 
repay the planter. Look about you as 
you go, observe and learn. Do not be 
in too great a hurry to buy and put 
your shrubs In f.ie ground. Fore- 
thought is more needed in this venture 
than in the planting, say. of small 
flowers. A season of careful thougnt. 
seasoned with Imagination, is an ex- 
cellent preparation for the selection 
and arrangement of your .shrubbery. 

One dare not risk advising you to 
plant thf-s or that. Perhaps it will not 
be suited to your place at all. But 
here are the names of some which will 
do well, with proper care; it will not 
be a bad idea to remember them; tiie 
several kinds of lilac, of varying col- 
deutzla, the graceful spirea, for- 



ors; 



hy- 



synthla. rhododendrons, azaleas 
drangeas— beware of the colors in all 
these brilliantly showy ones!— laurel, 
bush honeysuckle, Japanese quince and 
red maple. 



talents which have awakened sympa- 
thy, not derision, in more enlightened 
regions. Adolph Olson, who annexed 
the name of Eberhart because Man- 
kato, where he first put out his shingle 
as a lawyer, was so crowded with 
Adolph Olsons, Is a "great big" healthy 

cow- 
man 
arid put himself through school and 
college. If he dances it is from joy in 
life and to "keep solid" with the farm- 
ers' daughters and votes. He has, in 
fact, something of the melodious ac- 
complishment and adaptability of 
Honey Fits of Boston. As to his "?ong 
writing antics," his "'Tis Only You," 
some stanzas of which were made in 
the dentist's chair, all anthologies 
should contain. It is a song of courage 
as well as of love; it pulsates with the 
will triumphant over the accursed 
tooth-tinkering steel. Take home a 
specimen: 

"If serrowj oowe anl tears shouM dim the eye. 
6baoir!u(t tisioim nf the realms that Ua 
Beyon>1 the fUadowa It. tlie azure W"*.,, 
lliere'* atill oue beaioii light— 'lU you." 

Strutting and tumid critics sneer 
that it is a mixture of Dr. Watts and 
"all the latest popular songs." It Is 
excellent good verse for a governor, 
and coming from a tortured soul with 
a fiend plavlng on his ivory keys it Is 
sublime. To be sure, Adolph Olsoifa 
enemies say he ha4 the proof in his 
pocket before he went to the dentist's. 
Throat-scalded be the tongue of envy. 
Whatever be Governor Eberharfs 
grasp upon state affairs, he grasps 
the lyre as' manfully as he did the 
hoe. He put (iopherdom Into the lit- 
erary belt. Honor be his. 

"EP. A." and ''B. LT:' 



Washington, March ?1. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — When Josephus Daniels, 
secretary of the navy, was attending 
school down at Wilson, N. C. it was 
customary every Friday afternoon for 
one section of the school to give 
declamations from the platform. One 
Friday a dozen of the boys, comprising 
all that were to speak that day, got 
their heads together and conceived the 
merry prank of all giving the same 
speech, one after another. 

The speech they were to give was 
the one that starts: "On Linden when 
the sun was^ow, all bloodless lay the 
untrodden snow." etc. 

By the time eigi^t or nine of the jocu- 
lar youngsters had given those imper- 
ishable lines, the schoolmaster was 
aroused to a considerable state of Ire 
and dignity. 

lie sat through one or two more and 
then when the twelfth boy was about 
to speak, he promulgated these tid- 
ings: 

"If another one of you dares give that 
same piece he will remain after school 
and I shall give him something that 
will act him thinking." 
* * • 

Josephus Daniels was the next boy. 
He and his companions had entered 
into a solemn compact all to give that 
same little piece, came what might. As 
he ascended the platform and gazed 
at the eager young faces of his accom- 
plices, Josephus greatly disliked to be 
untrue to his pledge. And yet a glance 
at the grim countenance of the school- 
master suggested to him that pledges 
were made to be broken when unfore- 
seen circumstances warranted. 

It was a trying situation. For some 
m.oments he stood there wavering, dis- 
cretion yanking at the anclior of 
duty. 

And, lo, duty held! 
Manfully the little chap began: 
"On Linden when the sun wa.s — " 
But he got no further. The teacher 
laid his hands on him. 

Josephus had been brave but foolish. 

• • • . 
Here Is an example of the way false 
reports get started. 

You have heard that William Jen- 
nings Bryan goes to market with a 
market basket. He doesn't. He goes 
to market frequently, and buys rad- 
ishes and cheese or whatever strikes 



1904— Echoes of 

Harmony— 1914 

T!ie State Press on the Republican BpUU 




I 



Twenty Years Ago 



rrom The Herald of this date, INI. 



fhlH In One View of It. 

Albert Lea Tribune: It is hard work 
for them to do so, but slowly the 
Smith-Eberhart machine adherents are 
quietly admitting that as a result of 
the recent co-^ference of progressive 
Republicans, their man is going to 
have a hard time in getting back. This 
is a virtual admittance at this stage 
of the game that the machine lf» 
beaten. 



And ThIJi Is Another View. 

Northfield News: The Eberhart 
dailies In the Twin Cities, in an at- 
tempt to put up a bold front. Intimate 
that the anti-machine conference In- 
dorsed the weakest candidate in a field 
of four. In the primaries of two years 
ago Lee polled 859 votes and Eberhart 
842 in Blue Earth county — the gov- 
ernor's own bailiwick. Nothing weak 
about these returns. 



And This Is a Personal One. 

Princeton Union: How proud the 
father of the nine-tenths-dltch-and- 
one-part-road-law must feel over the 
magnificent indorsement he received 



•♦•At the annual meeting of West- 
minster Presbyterian church at West 
Duluth last night, H. P. Smith and 
James A. Connery were elected trus- 
tees for a terra of three years, and 
D. C. McDonald and J. P. Weir eldora 
for six years. 



•**At the annual business meeting 
of the Hazelwood Park Sunday school 
the following officers were elected: 
Superintendent, Neil Kennedy; assist- 
ant superintendent, Mrs. E. H. Cole; 
secretary. Charles Davis; treasurer, 
Mrs. W. B. Greenshields. 



••*J. A. Sutton has sold his grocery 
bu.«lness at West Duluth to Frank 
Greene. 



•••Fred L. Ryan will succeed S. I* 
Frazer as receiver of the United States 
land office at Duluth tomorrow. Some 
time ago the official head of Register 
Monroe Nichols fell into the basket 
and A. J. Taylor succeeded him. Tho 
clerical force in the office is as fol- 
lows: Receiver's clerk, H. \V. Cheadle; 
register's clerk, C. B. King; register's 
bookkeeper, Thomas Garvin; proof 
clerk, G. Henry Lesage; contest cleric 



at the Minneapolis conference last and stenographer. Miss Florence Coffin. 



week! Out of 1,000 votes he re- 
ceived 11! 



The Tlsses Was for iTerson. 

Roseau Times: The lato Republican 
conference convention was made up of 
delegations, headed from the several 
counties by representative men. How 
far the.3e men represented the vot- 
ers of their respective counties re- 
main to be seen. The indorsement of 
William E. Lee for governor will 
strengthen the candidacy of Governor 
Eberhart. 

Will He Make the Most of It. 

Red Lake Falls Gazette: The Gazette 
believes that it would be a fine thini. 
for the state of Minnesota if the peo- 
ple should elect to the governorship a 
man of Mr. Lee's refreshing Independ- 
ence of thought and action. This 
opinion is more firmly established by 
the fact that with the open indorse- 
ment he has received and the with- 
drawal of the other candidates in his 
favor he will, if elected to the gov- 

hls fancy, and samples some of his ^'•"^^^^^P'/^L"'^""'^?^^!^ and l^ 
purchases as he goes along, but he pediment to clean-cut official and PO 



Mr. Cheadle is a Republican and wlM 
probably be succeeded by a Democrat 
at an early date. 



•••George Bliss arrived yesterday 
from Gran'd Forks. N. D., to take the 
position of chief clerk of the Spalding 
on the retirement of John H. Langtoa 
on April 1. Mr. Bliss was for several 
years with the Headquarters hotel at 
Fargo, and for two years past has 
managed the Dacotah at Grand Forks. 



It is simply another example of 
i»hat happens to important questions 
yhcn they get into politics of the 
sordid, self-seeking, machine-promot- 
ing and machine-promoted kind. 

The facts are not changed. Minne- 
Bota still stands supreme among the 
ptates tor increase in state expendit- 
jUres and for increase in the state tax 
fate. 

The issue is not diminished in im- 
portance. The introduction of meth- 
ods of efficiency and economy in state 
feo.ernment is still the most vital is- 
sue before the state. 

These facts must not be obscured 
by t!ie later fact that a political fac- 
lir>ii >)incwhat belatedly has discov- 
trcd iliat it had better not let the high 
tax rate talk get too prominent, be- 
cause it reflects on the public service 
of that faction, which dominates the 
State government. 

For instance, one Eberhart ncws- 
|>aper says that no consideration 
should be given state revenues other 
than those from direct taxation, "be- 
cause these do not come from the 
jie >ple as taxpayers. This is not what 
they complain about." 

These revenues — which are consid- 



Mother and Modernity 



hospital ever stepped to realize how 
narrow is the nurgin that separates a 
great many people all about them 
from the ignominy of pauperism? 

When they aie well and able to 
work and have vork to do they can 
struggle along, in a fair degree of 
comfort. But th ;y are not able to lay 
up a store against the day of ad- 
versity. 

These unfortunates — and it would 
be distressing t > count how large a 
proportion of u- they constitute — are 
particularly liab'e to the adversity of 
sickness because they are not suffi- 
ciently nourished. 

And when ihcy get sick— what 
then? Their h )mes are not proper 
places for the care of very sick 4)eople. 
They haven't iioney enough to go to 
a private hospital. What then? 

Let those who have not yet been 
convinced of the need of a city and 
county hospital investigate that ques- 
tion. 

A local social worker gives The 
Herald an exai iple. 

A working ^voman, the principal 
wage-earner an I support of a family, 
confided to this social worker that 
her small boy of ten, who had always 



crably larger than the revenues from been exception. illy bright in school, 
'direct taxation— do not 'come from j was showing si^ns of nervousness and 
the people as taxpayers." but they DO uas lagging m his studies. She 



tome froni the people as consumers. 
Indirect taxation is the most cun- 



thought that a slight operation would 
cure him. And that little operation 



tiingly deceptive institution ever de- meant to that lad the difference bc- 
vised. It seems as though we get all i tween success ind failure in life. 



this revenue from the railroads and 
other corporations — and we do. But 
before tliej' pay it to the state, THEY 

gi:t IT FROM u.s: 

And the taxpayer is quite as much 
"concerned in what is done with these 
indirect revenues as he is in what is 
done v.iih direct revenues. 

The more the state gets from rail- 
toad taxes and other indirect taxes, 
the less the taxpayer ought to be 
called upon to pay. 



But the won an had no money for 
the operation or for the hospital care 
of the child. Finally the social work- 
er had the operation performed 
through the pu >lic school system; but 
of course the »oy had to go to bed 
for a time. Tlie mother had to stay 
home and care for him because there 
was a drunken husband whom she did 
not dare to tr ist. And in this way 
the mother los the price of a ton of 
coal — which is as though the ordinary 



Youth's Companion: Dora, following 
he- mother and cousin, Allison, up tlie 
stairs to the guestroom, had two red 
spots in her cheeks. She had worlied 
so hard over that gneatroom. and now 
if Courtin Allison should not like it! 

But Cousin Allison stopped in the 
doorway, and looked round with de- 
light, "it Is exquisite." she said, warm- 
ly, "as green and white and lovely as 
a snowdrop. How did you contrive 
anything so dainty?" 

And mother's voice, quick with pride, 
answered. "It was Dora. I never should 
have thought of it." 

A day or two later Cousin Allison 
spoke of the pretty, sunshiny p.irlor. 
"It's all Dora's dolnc," Dora's mother 
said once more. "I was so used to the 
haircloth and black walnut that I 
never thought anything about it. Wo 
used to think It handsome, and I had 
kept on thinking so. although I know 
better now. Dora has worked hard 
over the house, but I'm afraid the 
hardest work of all was getting her 
mother educated." 

The words wt-re merry, but some- 
thing in the voice made Cousin Allison 
understand. It Is not easy to feel that 
your daughter thinks that you need 
to be educated! Cousin Allison turned 
to the girl with a quick smile. 

".\nd how about Dora?" she asked. 
"Is she being educated, too?" 

Two pairs of blue eyes met hers in 
questioning surprl.se. Cousin Allison 
smiled again, but this time to her- 
self. 

"i:ver since 1 was a girl." she said. 
"T have thought of Cousin Dora's as an 
ideal home. I liked the horse hair, too, 
not because it was artistic, but because 
it was associated with so many happy i 
memories*. If 1 had had a daughter. I ^ 
should want to send her to Cou.««1n Dora i 
to be tatight how to he a neighbor and 
a friend and a blessing to every one i 
who came to hey door." 

A soft color crept into the older 
Dora's face. Had It really meant that? 
Was there something, after all. In 
which she was not old fashioned and 
behind the times.' Hod was good to 
let her be comforted so. But the girl, 
slipping a hand into her mother's, 
looked straight at i'ousin Allison. She 
understood— a little tremor in the 
young voice showed that— but slie met 
it bravely. ,. ^ » 

"It is easy to be 'educated about 
chaiis and tables." she said, "but to be 
•edu<-ated' into a woman like mother — 
that will take all my life!" 



In the "Interesting People" depart- 
ment of the Anril American magazine 
appear photographs and sketches of 
Franklin P: Adams and Bert Leston 
Taylor, the two most famous newspa- 
per paragrapners in America. Mr. 
Adams sigi^fe himself "F. P. A." and 
conducts a column In the New Tork 
Tribun<-. Bert Leston Taylor runs a 
column in the Olii.nso Tribune signed 
"B. L. T." Each writes a sketch of 
the other. Mr. Adam.s' piece alwiut Mr. 
Taylor, who used to work In Duliith. 
is dpne In verse and Is as follaws: 

"In Gosliatt, Massachusetts, he. 

Some eight-and -forty years ago. 
The subject of this cameo, 

First saw the 1. of d. 
I mean— wh.v Truth attempt to 

smother? — 
Bert Lestogi Baylor, aftd none other. 



"Soon eftetti'ths* ('thst' means his 

birth) ... * 

He took to writing things for print. 

Replete with, inerr'lment and mirth — 
A dailv column stint. 

Duluth, New York, and points connect- 

Were places of his young selecting. 

"•How is your job?' a man Inquired 
Of Taylor, in Duluth. 'Oh. grand! 

A pIp-V .'-aid r.ert . . . 'Aha! you're 
tired. 
I am the bos.<». You're canned.' 

So Taylor left that land hibernal 

And made for the Chicago Journal. 

"Where, penning trifles light as air — 
And healthful ss the air and pure— 

The public sal-J; 'The guy is there. 
His stuff U Lit'rature.' 

So now he runs 'A Llne-o'-Type or 

Two' in Chicago's Grytest Pyper. 

"One day I went to B. L. T. 

•Tell me some facts — but four or 

I begged. 'Well. I was born, said he, 

•And 1 am still slivo.' 
Yet comes this magazine suggfSting 
A man like that, is Interesting! 

"So I shall bo compelled to state 

What he elected to omit: 
He is the utter ultimate 

Of hodiernal wit. 
Be better? — Well, a column could not; 
Although I do say so that should not. 

"He's gentle, niodoat. noble, kind. 

Retiring, nnassitiming. plain- 
He has "no malice in his mind' — 

In brief, he's wiiolly sane. 
He looks a bit like a professor. 
Being the world's Most Awful Dresser. 



has the stuff all delivered. There is 
never any basket on his arm. 

Some months ago as he was walking 
down town from his Washington home, 
he saw some white radishes in front 
of a little grocery. He paused a mo- 
ment and ordered a little mess of them 
sent to his home. 

The grocer was so pleased over ac- 
quiring so celebrated a customer that 
he began to talk and press-agent him- 
self. In a few days it was in the pa- 
pers about Bryan going about with a 
market basket. Bryan is no crank on 
the siRjject of dignity but he was not 
greatly pleased over the market bas- 
ket tale. He wondered how it got 
started. 

About a week later a woman stopped 
at the same little grocery to look at 
some radishes. 

"They are very fine," said the gro- 
cer; "Mr. Bryan, the secretary of state, 
stops here every morning with his 
basket on his arm and buys some o* 
those." 

"So you're the man that started that 
market basket story!" exclaimed the 
woman, "i happen to be a neighbor 
and a good friend of the Bryans and I 
know he will be Interested In learn- 



litlcal action resulting from political 
deals. No previous candidate for gov- 
ernor has had a similar opportunity. 



How Can It Fall? 

Virginia Daily Enterprise: The Eber- 
hart press Is sorely distressed over the 
recent anti-machine conference and 
calls It by all kinds of names. There 
is a fine and dandy row on in the 
ranks of the state Republicans. Those 
are the things that make for the suc- 
cess of the Democrats and they have 
been taking advantage of them with 
surprising alacrity recently. Repub- 
lican dissension in Minnesota elected 
John A. Johnson and if the present row 
will give us another man just as big. 
even though a Democrat, it will not 
be wasted effort. 



•••Speaker Charles F. Crisj» was 
notified by a telegram from Governor 
Northen of Georgia that he had been 
appointed United States senator to 
succeed the late Senator Colquitt, and 
that the governor favored him for the 
long term and would not be a can4l- 
date himself. Mr. Crisp wired the gov- 
ernor declining the appointment on 
the ground that party considerations 
force him to remain in his pro.«ent po- 
sition of speaker of the national house 
of representatives. 



••♦M. *S. Burrows was unanimously 
elected president of the Duluth Cath- 
olic club last evening. 



♦♦*A marriage license has been Is- 
sued to James A. Toulan and Kate A. 
Beauclair. 



the 



Perhaps the Wish Ii» Father to 
Thought. 

Brainerd Tribune: Does elimination 
eliminate? According to reports from 
the capital city, the recent "elimina- 
tion conference" was anything but a 
love feast, and many of the delegates 
returned home determined to "elimi- 
nate" Lee at the primaries. 'Twas ever 
thus! 



•••Victor D. Wardwell left yester- 
day for New Haven, Conn., to join hla 
brother. F. S. Wardwell. 



•••Mrs. Ella Barker and children 
have returned from California, wliere 
they have spent the winter. 



Made Toa Much Work. 

Cincinnati Enquirer: "V\hy don't 
you advertise?" asked the editor of the 
iiome paper. "Don't you believe In 
advertising?" 

"I'm agin advertising," replied the 
proprietor of the Hayville Racket 
store. 

"But why are you against it?" asked 
the editor. 

"It keeps a feller too durn busy," 
replied the proprietor. "I advertised 
in a newspaper one time about ten 
years ago and I never even got time 
to go fishing." 



ing how that got started! For you 

know very well that It isn't true." w«„i.i-.» 

And the assumption IS that Bryan ^„^,,,»';:J:';;,r;e:'S,ml";-apers are 

bought his radushes there no lo"S«r.i C^kato^Lnterptise.^ ^^^ Elimination 

Otis Wingo member of congress convention was "packed" for Lee and 
fr?m Arkanrs. has been addicted all that only Lee «X'"i\nn%rpoHs 'me"t '' 
his life to the habit of reading things j as delegates to .^»'*^^/,""f *P°;f„,,'r^bie 
that the average reader never .sees- ■ Ing. Jhis sounds entirely Pla»s^bl« 
odd. esoteric stuff like the Congies- ] according to the wa> 5^%^p;^'^^j" 
sional Record and presidential plat- j voted, and it may be the real anti 
?.rms. He began reading the Congre,- Eberhart fight will ."j^;^! ^^^ ""J^f^^J 
sional Record almost as soon as he Democratic banner If it is proNed the 
had finished the third reader, and kept , gentleman from Long Piairie has or- 
t up wi hout missing an issue, until ganlzed a formidable machine of his 
he came to congress. Then-Just when own. There rV^'^J^^^'^^^^'^ZlnTy 
average representative would be great Interest taken in the county 
his first acquaintance with i conventions, if reports 



AMUSEMENTS. 



But tlie fact is in Minnesota that | household lost six months' salarj'. 
while tiicsc indirect revenues were be- | So, in the natural and inevitable 
jng nuiltiplied by two. the direct state ' course of events, that mother had to 
tax was also being multiplied by two 1 ask the charit;ible agencies for relief 

— which, whether it came from private 
generosity or through taxation, was 



"Vet were T recreant to my trust 
Did I neglect to shout his shame: 

He golfs— O Truth. prevail thou 
muBt! — 
And plays a rotten gnme. 

Savs Mrs. Tavliir. who's delightful 



or mr>re. 

It n((;nT to be that the more in- 



I 



direct revenues the state enjoys, the ; an economic loss that could have been 
less direct taxes it would have to avoided. 

levy. If there had been a city and county 

But the FACT is that the largar ' hospital, the boy could have been 

the indirect revenues have grown, the j sent there an I treated, the mother 

larger aUo have grov.n the direct I could have kept up with her work. 



AgaiMiU and the Herrlnic. 

Worlds Work: A student enrolled 
In Aga.«»»i2' clas.><. For several days 
Agassis paid no attention to him what- 
ever. At length, tired of standing ^^^_ 

around idle, the student asked Agasslz .j^j,^,^^ j^to his home life frightful.' 

to give him something to do. Agas.^izs ' 

reply was to hand him a herring and to ,•••••••• 

.^tudy this." The student was | ..^j, j,,,^ for him -O grateful heart!— 

This lot of mine had been far worse 
•Cut Lif»^ Insur.once out for Art,' 
He said. * • • I took to verse. 
•The student replied that it had two 
eyes, so many fins and such and such . 

markings. ....... .♦ ' 

"No, no," Aga«slz cried, "study It 
more.' Those things are not Import- 

The next day and the next the ex- i 



gay, ^ , .. 

bewildered, but set about 'studying 
it. The next day Agassiz asked him 
what he had learned about the herring. 



the 

acquiring 

the Record — Wingo quit reading it. 

"It doesn't seem as worth while any 
more, now that I know all the au- 
thors." said Wingo. 

Wingo knows by heart every presi- 
dential platform that has been drawn 
up in the last thirty years, and he is 
probably one .if the lew men In the 
country who ever took the trouble to 
read one clear through. 

However, this little habit of his 
cfime in handy when he ran for con- 
gress. He was in a joint debate with 
hU opponent and the latter used a 
phrase that Wingo immediately recog- 
nized as a part of the presidential plat- 
form on which McKinley ran in 18t»6. 

"Oh. ho." cried Wingo, "you're trying 
to get the nomination on the Demo- 
cratic ticket and you're borrowing 
stuff from Republican platforms. Do 
you think the people will stand for 
that?" 

And at Wingo's urgent behest, the 

people didn't. • 

• • • 

David F. Hou.*ton. secretary of agri- 
culture. Is a good deal of a plow horse 
In his methods of work. He goes just 
so fast — and no pressure of business 
can make him go any faster. Nothing 
ever ruffles him. Infinished bu.^iness 
toward the clone of the day does not i 
appall him. When he thinks he has I 
done a day's work he knocks off. And j 
having left his office behind hlin he 
thinks no more about hl» tasks until 
the morrow. 
(COtyiil'". I'll- Ij" ^r*" *^' Kelly. Ail ri«1>U reserved) 



This might, instead of thi? avowment. 
Have been a twenty-year endowment." 

. • — - 

ShowlBK H«" Edacatlon. 



Tlie Fanaer'* Handicap. 

E. M. Chapman in the Yale Review: 
The farmer suffers, too, from a ten- 
dency to apply that honorable name 
every 



if reports are true; but 
the great public dislike of the Eber- 
hart administration was magnificently 
reflected at the meeting, and great 
good was accomplished by the other 
candidates agreeing to withdraw from 
the race. 

The Modern <;irl. 

We knock and criticize her. 
We scold, apostrophize her. 
We wish that she were wiser. 
More capable and kind. 

Her path we're always stalking. 
To criticize her talking. 
H«=-r clothes, her ways of walking. 
Her manners and her mind. 

We say. "Oh, highty-tighty! 
She's frivolous and flighty. 
And all her ways are mighty 
Undignified to see; 

She dances and she chatters, 
our golden rule she shatters. 
And laughs at serious matters 
With unabated glee!" 

■We chide and we correct her. 
We shadow and detect her. 
We study and dissect her. 

With all her smiles and tears. 

And find, on looking o'er her 
(And learning to adore her). 
She's just like girls before her 
For twenty thousand years! 

— Peoria Journal. 



LYCEUM 

FRIDAY AND APRIL 3 &4 
SATURDAY Ma.inee Saturday 




HelrleMM Dead KIngn of Finance. 

C M Kev-s in the World's Work: In- 
dividual opportunity in commerce and 
finance reached Its climax, one may 
sav In the School of the Magnates— j 



JOHN CORT 

PRESENTS 



MclNTYRE 



AND HEATH 

in ft maonlflesnt ravival of their 
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Youths Companion: There is a cer- ; j^ ^verv ne'er-do-well who owns or during the three or four ^rjef years 
tain old German of Wilkesbarre. P*, 1 rents two or three acres, keeps a cow i when e^^rv Jn^u^^^ry ^or ^ K^ea ^ 



who«»e pride, like that of many .s.lf- ^^ a spavined horse, a 
,.«^i"in..p "was repeated. The fourth day ' made men. leads him at times into a through the year in nondescript 
aVr^sIz again demanded information sort of patroirlzlfig condpscen.*ion to- ,o„_ attempting many things in gen- 
^won. th.^ now rotting specimen. In ward those thin?, he did mt "have ^al and doing nothing In particular, 
about in /" ^ , »„, »,„n,.^r tho time for" when he v.as making his way i j^ j^ difficult to see ^ 

jn lire. . 'should be classed as a farmer at all: 



at humor the 



taxes and the direct state tax rate. 
fllu- 11!. 10 money the state got to 
fipeiiil. die more it has demanded. 

Tlie state mustn't let a squabble 
lover th 

^lost important issue of this year of 
liinetecn fourteen. 



and the chai itable agencies never] 

would have ha I to help her solve her' ^\', 

sides, an 

problem. 



, . , , . , . The nr.ore on ' sees of Champ Clark's 

governorship becloud thisj^^,^^ ,„, ^.^j^ , ^„^, ^^„, business, the 

less we feel soi rj- for that dawg of his. 



And agf.in. why not Import Col. 
Seely to be police commissioner of 
fsew York city? 



POLLAR AND A HALF MOVIE SHOWS. 



The SoHahIc Neishbor. 

Kansas City Journal: •'Now don't 
talk too much when you go to call on 
our neighbor. You may answer ques- 
tions, of cour.'*' ." 

•'That Is al I ever do." said the 
child. •'And Ihey ask a great many 
questions. La U time they a.'^'Ked how 



a desperate attempt 

student replied. "Well, It's the sam-i 

on both sides." 

"Thafs tt!" shouted Agassiz. "That? 
A starfish isn't the same on both 
oyster isn't, thousands of 
specimens of the sea are not. When 
you find one that \». you've found a 
starting point In a new stage in the 
evolution of life." , 

Obviously that student learned more now 
from that one lesson about the scien- 
tmc method of study than he would , 
have learned In a years reading and 
The text books would have 



' '" "'"■' ■ "• keeps a cow ! when every industry of great im- j 

nd muddles i portance was he.^ded by A Man Just i 
lescript fash- ; as certainly as Morgan, son of a bank- | 
or became the King of All the Banks, 
so' certainly did Harriman, son of a 
poverty-stricken clergyman, become 
King of All the Railroads; Havemeyer, 
absolute Boss of ^ugar; Ryan and 
Brady Twin Tyrants of the Tractions; 
Duke, the Lord of Tobacco: Rock- 
pfeller, the Omnipotent In Oil; Car- 
negie, the Caliph of Steel — etc. In neat- 
becau^e ly every great line of individual en- 
" e man or family or group 

A"fd ■vot'/dlr''k"lgeVa"^ for potatoes 'kVow^^^ profe.o.sional ; of frienis came up and seized auto- 

And \ots der aifecora lor p j fdeals or those standards of crafts- i cratic power._ and a wealth j:ommen- 

. « ' manship without which no calling can 

Sahtle Advertising. ! adequately maintain itself. The b^'st 



I'pon the occasion of the graduation y^t he i^ot only i.'» so classed, but too 
of a nephew, he asked: i often he is chosen as the representative 



e 

"Veil Wilhelm. vol did they teach farmer by the n'-w.*<paper writer and 

vou up there." the illustrator of magazines. The in- 

" '•t;reek and Latin." said the boy. justice wiT.ught is more fenous than 

and C.erman and algebra." j the casual ob.<«erver fancies: 



"So. so!" murmured the old German. I n has militated strongly against t*'® ^eayor some 



lectures. 



T^lectricil World: A firm believer . farmers have often felt this and with 
In the Influence of .euggostion. an elec- n>ore keeniTees than they have been 
In Ohio turned on his v illing 



to admit. They have been 



leciures. 1 •■'= '^--"- ....o-v,. tric-liaht man in (.»nio turnea on "is v illing to aunui. i n^.. 

taught him the facts; Agassiz taught ir^c^is ^^ ^^^^^^ ^^.^^^. ^^^^^^ during skillful, .-elf-reliant, judici 

him the method of learning an lacis. n^onth of December. He gave no oircumsta.nros of whose li 



surale with that power flowed In upon j 
li'.em. 

Havemeyer died. No man came to 
take his place. Harriman died. No i 
man succeeded him. Rogers died, and • 
ious men, the ' with him passed his power. One by one ! 



NEW 



Both Phones 2416 




THEATER 

Second Atc. El. and Superior St. 



MATINEE 

EVERY 

DAY 



Robt. T. Hainet A. Co. 

In "The Man in the Dark. 

Jamet McCormack and 

Eleanor Irving. 
J. Hunter Wilson and 
Effie Pearson. 
The Kramer*. 
Nina Barbour. 
Florence. Lovetf Co. 

Bellclair* Bros. 

Hearst-Selig Pictorial 

Review. 



It is related that in Europe the mu'h salary papa sot and If he ever 
great moving picture shows are rated 1 i"=^"«»ed witii 
as high class entertainments, on a par! Hero 

vith the theaters, and that corre- 1 ^^ITZ t^. 
Sponding prices are charged. Hence eclipsed by 
pomes a prediction that in a few j -J^Vn^Th. 
years Americans will be paying a dol- ; deal more tha 



Har^-est. 

Tohn Fright: There l.«5 much shower 
and much sunshine between the sow 
of seed and the reaping 



of the 



the month or ue.emoer. nc g^vt- ..« oircunu^ian- .-. - -ife and work the School of the Magnates slipped 

reason to his m?ighbors for so doing. I have tended to accentuate their Indi- away, some Into re.st. some into en- 

nor did he mention to them the fact viduali.sm. Living by them.selves and forced idleness, some into various 

That he was operating this lamp con- thinking for themselves, they have havens of safety from public vvrath, , 

tlnuously However, by the 11th of often come-and with some reason- s<,me into death. As the ring broke, [ 

tlnuousi>. ghbors on both sides ' to suspect all schemes which would at last. Mr. Morgan, too. died quite. 





EMPRESS rm^\ 

The Tcatilng. TIeklIng Mtaslral 
Farce Play, 

A HOT OLD TIME 

By EdKar Selden and Gvo. M. Cohan, 
Wit h a Br\y of BeantUul Olrlw. 

Coming Thnrnday, April 2, New 
Shoiv — The Three Dnsty Roadn, 
John A. West * Co., W na. P. Bart 
4. Co. and Lillian Doone. 



Bnt I.lttic Dlirrrence Anyhow. 

Houston Post: "I get a pretty little 
rug with every package of cigarettes." 

"I know it." 

"How did you know it?" 

"By the smell. You have made a 
mistake and are smoking the rug this 




I 



3 



^ t' 



-•v 



Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



March ^1, 1«14. 



XI 



THE OPEN COURT 

fTti!ai«p» of Tt* -.er»J<l ar» InTtted to onak* tn» 
Ma "f ihl.i roUiiun to Miirem their kle«s about th« 
topic* of senftal InKfrast, but discussions of «octJUlin 
rrltcl'iti!) cliffetvncfs are tmrred. Letters murt not, 
•xofil ?oo woriis- th« shorter th« better. They must 
be wrltt.-n on ona »lde oi lite paper only, and they 
MUAt b« a.vompau In e»«ry cb»« by the nana aad 
■ddn«4 of the writer th.ugh these need not be pub- 
Il4!iM. A stsoed letl« W always more elTecUTe. Uow- 
•v«r.) 



AH! HOW "TIZ" HELPS 
TmED,_ACHINe FEET 

Sore, 



Nothing Like 'Tiz" for 
Sweaty, Calloused Feet 
and Corns. 



"FUGITIVES FROM TAXATION" 



By SAVOYARD 



PERHAPS HE'S RIGHT. 

To the Editor of The Herald: 

Permit mo to suggest as the correct 
■.nswer to the horseshoe nail problem 
In vour column of this evening's paper 
the following figures: J42,94».672.»6. 
I^>«pectfully, 

S. M. DEARBORN. 

Ituluth, March 30. 

THE SMOKE PROBLEM. 

T» the Editor of The Herald: 

The following is an extract from a 
book "recently written and publlshetl 
In Chicago. 111., which you may print 
la the Open Court or any place in the 
l>a.per you wish: 



•*Pun, Jofconf, ^vur 




Ah' what relief. 



feet; no m< re burning foei; no more 
I swollen, bad smelling, sweaty feet. 
Lack of space la probably the most | ^^ more soreness in corns, callouses, 
conuuon of all the causes of smoke, n^y^j^jn^ 

Tlv grates must be at such a distance] j^^^^ niatt* r what alls your f^^t pr 
l>..1.>w the heating surface of the I ^.j^^^ ^^^j^r t^^ gijQ yoii^e tried wlUi- 
boller that the tlames will be burned q^j getting relief. Just use '11/.. 
«ut before the relatively cold metal la j "TIZ*" Is the only remedy that draws 
rt>acht-d. Take any cold Eubstanco, a j ^m ^11 t le poisonous 
piece of glass for Instance, and hold it j ^-luch puff up the feet, 
in the tlame of a gas jot. There will 

h^ a d< po.-^it of carbon at once. If you . _^ , f^^t 

sr,.»;<.- is caused by the snuftlng out of shoes won't seem tight and your leei 
the cold surfaces of | •^iil never, never hurt or get 



^' I your fool trouble so you'll never limp 
""lor draw up your face in pain. Your 



T'v 



ilinie upon 

l..,il.r. you will find very 
i:i the gases perhaps none what- 
, r! although there may be a gr;;at 
u'i iiuity of soot. 

•Smoke means waste, of course, but 
t!i.-re is very little fuel value m 
tlii*ly divided carbon that colors 
thininey gases. 

-K f hitnnev that is making no smoke 
m* ill niMv be throwln*? out more ac- 
ti .1 . ..nil>ustible gas than one that is 



little 



the 
the 



and swollet. Think of it. no 
foot miser >•. no more agony 
corns, call! uses or bunion.s. 

Oec a -5 cent box at any drug store 
or departri ent store and get instant 
relief W 'ar siuaHer shoes. Just 
once try " I'lZ." Get a whole year's 
foot comfort for only 25 cents. Think 
of it. . 



answering my inquiry as to why these 
were not p it In a safe condition, stat- 
ing that tt»e city would grade down 
the hills if the county would put In 
the culverts or vice versa, but the 
coiamlsaloners were evidently 
the Stock Farm road to 



i> ul smoker. 

• i:ut issuming that there Is an ap- 

i.i.l- quantity of real combustible 

.• chimney gases, can we d'J"- 

wllhout sustaining a loss that 

i the saving? If you save J'- ' too bu^y *<n 

the combustible gases | give this neglected and out^^of-the-way 



county 



Washington. March 81.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Here Is adme stuff with 
which they are trying to Intimidate 
congress. It Is printed In a local pa- 
per and purports to be a London dis- 
patch to a leading New York paper: 

"Two prominent Americans, as a 
protest against the tax. have already 
become British subjects. They ar.J 
Isaac Seligman of Sellgman Bros., 
bankem, and Frank E. Bliss, a former 
Standard Oil magnate and former 
president of the American Society of 

London. 

"A memorial protesting against the 
Inequalities of the act has been signed 
by the leading American residents of 
London and will be forwarded to Sec- 
retary of State Bryan through Mr. 
I Page, the Amefican ambassador. It is 
No more tired ] igj^^ned from several of the signers of 
this document that if the memorial 
does^not produce results a large nuin- 
ber of them will become British sub- 
jects. - .. 

••F. C. Van Duzor, secretary of the 
American society, declared today that 
•if the memorial Is not heeded a large 
number of Americans here will fol- 
low the example of Messrs. Sellgman 
and Bliss and become British subjects, 
much as we dislike to do so.' " 
» ♦ • 
If vou will read "Ivaiihoe" you will 
find in one place that De Bracy at the 
siege of Tarqullstane, then aflame, was 
In a sword duel with Richard Coeur 
de Lion, and it was a most unpleasant 
situation, for It appears that In fi'ont 
I of him was the devil and behind him 
1 hell, and there was no line of retreat 
on either flank or base of supplies 
anywhere. Well, this here old »*^''K- 
I man. concerning taxation of wealth, is 
I In the fix De Bracy was on that occa- 
I slon touching the Issue of arms— in the 
' middle of a mighty bad fix 
I I am now reading a wonderful book 
I —the works of H. M. Hyndman, an 
English Socialist, and this day his 
ideas are more threatening against 
English capital than were 
earl 



exudations 
'TIZ" cures 



sore 
more 
from 



self In life like a cannon ball, and 
Bcorns to gild* through It like a pesti- 
lence. ' 

• • • • 

Well, Ben has just saved to the pub- 
lic treasury $200,000, How many of 
his fellow solons by their Individual 
endeavors have done as well? He did 
It by persistent atid Inveterate demand 
for Justice and his efforts were re- 
warded with success. 

Would It not be a good thing for old 
Kentucky If th« old commonwealth had 
a governor who could make a like sav- 
ing now and then? I don't know that 
Ben has further ambition to be gov- 
ernor. But Kentucky needs a man like 
Ben to overhaul her accounts — to stop 
the waste at the bung and put an end 
to the leak at the spigot. 
• • • 
Historically speaking— for arms, for 
laws, for letters, for eloquence, for In- 
dustry—nay. for what we call manhood 
and womanhood, physical, intellectual 
and moral, the world has not yet pro- 
duced the match for England. >> e 
mav do so when we get grown, for we 
are" not yet emerged from the callow 
vouth It Is possible that in some re- 
spects Germany, since Bismarck, has 
surpassed England; but in the main 
Germany is miles and hiiles behind 

England. ..„..„«♦•. 

England's influence upon our great 
is immense. If you will read a hor- 
rible story by Balzac, yet fasclnat ng 
for Its very horror, you will find that 
among tMte collectors of the articles of 
"virtue" — the masterpieces of art— or 
Paris there is no sense of honor and 
every man a thief. 

• • • 

Well, the late J. Pierpont Morgan 

was a "collector" of works of art and 

is rated that his "bag" is valued at 



$100 000.000. Among those precious 
"pieces" was one that had been stolen 
from some car.tle in Kent— 1 believe It 
was— In England. As soon as It was 
ascertained that the owner. 




bii.-iiru-.-^s.' 

Ituluth, March 30. 



go for repilrs on the Stock Farm road 
favoring t le large Interests. 

Trustini! that our commissioner wUl 
this sumrier have a few moments to 
spare aft* r the Stock Farm road has 
received lis attention to be able at 
least to took over the Howard and 
C.nesen rosd. and if any of the appro- 
priation it left over, to take off a few 
of the b< ulders that were put down 
on the ro( d right in the heart of Ken- 



ployment and propertyless poverty for 
w:.orUM suinmer. so that one can at I the workers are the two maltistays 



leait dil>d over It. or give us some 
Intlmatio! that he at least knows that 
we are oi the map. and thanking you. 
I am. y »i r.-* very truly. J- B. P. 

Duluti.. March 30. 



THE GARBAGE PLAN. 

To the Editor of The Herald: 

S.Mue time ago a certain laboring 
rlass was facing a problem of taxing 
and tagsing in order to make their 
living vhich at that time seemed to be 
bid .,'nough. but now there Is another 
that .•»eems to be still worse, as those 
facing It are likely to be deprived al- 
together of the mean.s by which they 
make the bread for themselves and 
th'lrs. Mr. Hlcken has a job that 
Rives « fairly good salary and perhaps 
wouldui miss a few dollars very 
much, but I am sure that tho.se who are 
■working at garbage and dirt removing 
V .itldnt feel the same way If they 
v^r:> .'Stopped doing It. To all appear- 
ini. r-3 it .s<em3 to be a rather Impor- 
ts lU fMft in their existence, and it 
(.'riainlv does not seem right that a 
HKt.avtr, or any other payer for that 
matter, shall be forced from making a 
living as long as he makes it in an 
hont'st and lawful way. 

«Hher cities have experienced 
the less work done on a contracting 

basji** the bettor for all concerned. . „ ...-. 

does not need that experience. 6. Who is the congressman from this 



stitu- 
ex- 
r re- 
sired 
Id 
;eorge 
sharp 
party 
be- 
fore this century Is hair aone «.v.. this 
world. Lloyd George is Intensely con- 
servative. The day Is not far ahead 
when the wealth of the world will be 
taxed to bear the expense of the gov- 
ernments of the world. Then w-ar will 
cease- shut up like a jack knife. 

* * * 
Here is a preachment from Hynd- 
man that must strike us all: "Unem- 
«v,^ r.rr>rkj»rtvless noverij I 

of 



who had 
the 1 been robbed of it, was an Englishman, 
where the house of Morgan had some 
social standing as well as financial, 
this article of ,vlrtue was returned to 
the ovner by the son of Morgan. 

But in Morgan's collection Is the will 
of Washington, stolen from the public 
records of Fairfax county, Va.. by van- 
dal soldiers of the war of 1861-65— and 
voung Mr. Morgan refuses to consider 
knv proposition to return that. 

i doubt not he would do it for the 
price. As a grandson of Virginia I m 
down for 55. Let us make up the purse 
and buy it back. The "fence" Is worthy 
his profit. 



Still another woi 
f 2imous scientist 



says light is harmful to beer. 
Read what he says, then order 
a case of SchUtz in Brown 
Bottles. 

"It is a known fact that sun- 
light and daylight influence 
unfavorably the taste and 
flavor of the beer and care 
must be exercised in the 
selection of the bottles." 

j. Brand (Zeitsckrift fiir das getamte Brauwesen, 1908. p 



333). 



SOME QUESTIONS ANSWERED. 



that 



To the IJitor of The H.^rald: 

Would you please publish In 
evening (laper answers to the follow 
Ing quest iotis: 

1. V.'ho are the principal officers 
% town? Village? City? 

2. Who are the principal officers or 

thl3 county? 

3. Who is the chief justice 



your 



In 



of su- 



the entire organizatiftn of moderti pro- 
duction for exchange and profit Ln- 



consciously. I have no doubt It was 
that condition that made the labor 
union, that bull In the china shop that 
breaks and bursts things, 
main has mended more 
torn. 

In a discussion with a 



but In 
than it 



the 
has 



DRIED BEEF IS 

m SCARCE 

Packers Have Had Little 

Surplus Stock Which 

They Could Cure. 

a scarcity, of dried beef on 



Robert Wahl, President 

the Wahl-Henius Institute 

Fermentology, quotes 

d in corroboration of 

opinion recommend- 

Brown Bottles. 



own 
the 




ing 

See that crcivn 



or cork is branded ''Schlitz,*^, 



r nones -JQ^and 35 j 
t Jos. Schlitz Brewing Co. 
i 351 St. Croix St., Duluth 



preme court of the United Slates? 
j 4. Wh.i are the two United States 
concerned, senator* ^-om Minnesota 



r>uluth ,„. 

W- .ill know it If we want to. When 
Mr. Hickcn talks about saving money 
f.jr the city, he is surely joking. There 
Is no indication of such a thing what- 
ever In any way by different things 
c) .11^ and undone in the past. Hoping 
1 .iin not offending In giving my opin- 
1 ,M I !iin vours for a right and pros- 
p,.V.i>.s cit.v. A READER. 

JHiluth. March 27. 

THE KENWOOD ROADS. 



lieutenant governor 



district? 

6. Wh. I'' the 
of \.\\\» s ate? 

7. Wh.. are the members of the state 
legislature from this district, includ- 
ing the state senator and the member 
or members of the state house of rep- 
re.^^^ntati ves? 

Trusti ig that I will see this In print 
at your earliest convenience. I am. 
A CO.VSTANT " 
Duluti . March 31. 



would be "flanked." He 
damned and swore that 1 was an enemy 
of labor." I think that what he really 
resented Is that my Idea would tend to 
put him out of a Job. 

• • • 
But getting back to England^ There 
Is an income tax in that country that 
supplies a great deal of the rev.e.iue to 
carry on the government. T\h> they 
ever had the audacity-and the Inde- 
cency-to tax a part of the Income of 
our own dearly beloved J- T^'^'P""^ 
Morgan, who bought some of the bondg 
issued by England to pay for that un- 
fortunate and unnecessary war against 
„ __ ti'u„.» Morgan came to get 



READER 



however, now have a large supply ou 
hand and are not worrying about con- 

** A^promlnent wholesale house of Chl- 
go Is now writing local dealers urg- 
g them to obtain their supplies at 



there 



cai 

om-e"fbr'the coming ««as?"^a8^ ^„., 
la a limited supply to be had. Condi- 
tions may be even worse later on, the 

^''ln''pan';^*the letter to local dealers 

'""Au'indlcatlons are that dried beef 
will be very scarce this season. 



scar-^er than even it was last season. 
"Beef for dried beef has to lie in 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

A.-« an aftermath of the meeting 
th- Kenwood Park club last Saturday 

1 i- it this might be an opportune time | ^j^^ meiiiber* of 
t. ^ iy a few words regarding the' 
t .Is and bridges and general repairs 
of tli^^ Howard and Gnescn road. 

Fr.im my observation, having gone 
practically all the roads 



of 



council. 



OVtT 



around 
iHiIulii within "the last couple of years, 
thl.s i.^ indeed a very much neglected 
r>»d The Stock Farm road, which 
lias about one-half a.i many farmers 
living on it. has been put into the 
>i .»- class with our Boulevard, having 
au .xtraurdinary wide roadbed, with 
. ruslied rock surface, massive con- 
trete bridges, and with the hills prac- 
tical! v all taken down. Now. I cannot 
Sf» til.' reason for this unless it is to 
f iv.ir the large intere.sts like the stock 
fill'' '.r that our county commissioner 
1* a ir;>e to being Jarred (such as he 
•w ould be If he traveled over the How- 
ard and Gnesen road) 
out t.i his own farm, or where his own 
i!<;.i -^t-s center. 

.1, the Howard and Gnesen road. 
V'ithin six blocks of the Boulevard, 
are two old dilapidated bridges, evi- 
dentlv built before the war, that are 
unsafe .nnd in every waj^ unsatisfac- 
tory with a big steep hill right above 
It. Now I have a letter from our city 
c 'inmlssloner, written 



1. The principal officers of a town- 
ship are the members of the board of 
sui.ervisjvs. the treasurer and clerk. 
The priticipal officers of a village are 

tlie village 
The principal officers of a city are 
may.ir and council or. under the com- 
mission plan, mayor and commlsslon- 

^ •> Coiintv auditor. Odin Halden: 
treasun»r. "g. H. Vivian; sheriff. John 
R Mein ng; register of deeds. Charles 
t'lUlgai : probate judge. S. W. C.llpin; 
county attorney. AVarrcn E. Greene: 
clerk o. di-strlct court. ^. V John«°": 
county commissioners. Nell Mclnnis. 
Alex I raser. John Tischer. A\ . A. 
Swanstiom, Grant McMahan. Charles 
Kauppl and R. S. O'Neill. 

I 3. EdJvard D. White. 

i 4. Knute Nel.^on and Moses E. Clapp. 

j 5. Clarence B. MUKr. 

, 6. J. V A. Burnquist. 

1 7 Yojr letter gives no address, so It 

lis imp..sMble to know which district 
when he drives i y^^ j^^^ j„ if you llv.> in the First, i 



the Boers. When 
his interest on his bonds those 
mannered Engll-'^h deducted frorii 
check the "income tax" on the inter- 

* No Englai^d Is no place for a fugi- 
tive from taxation. Intll Ben John.'»on 
got to be chairman of the district Corn- 
ell iroittee this town was a very city "' 
tie i Refuge for those chaps, but l^-^J V^lnH ^ Sas ' 
the income tax-and Ben-and depend has 
on It they will be routed out of here. 
There will be an exodus 



111- 
his 



Beer 



64 




the winter 



• • * 
The folks that have axes to gr 
this town and the unthinking rabble 
cuss Ben Johnson. That Is not a very 
good way to deal with Ben Johnson. 
He Is a superior man in many respects 
_a strong character, honest as the 
day. an able lawyer and a fine business 
man. 
"Lofty and tour to them that love him 

But to those men that seek him sweet 
as summer." 
Perhaps It were better for Ben John- 
son if he had the trick of flanking a 
proposition and taking the place by 
strategv, but Ben Johnson prefers as- 



gra^s ,_-- 

cheap. It 'cures' during . 
and Is ready to dry and slice In the 
spring for summer trade. «»,,»,„ 

"For the pait two seasons there 
have been no surplus 'grass ^^a^t'e but 
to the contrary there has not been 
enough meat, to go around. ^^,^j 

"Thj comequnece. rtgardlng dried 
was that none of the packers 
has put down anything like normal 
8to-:Us. The demand for It fresh and 
In aausage and in other ways, where It 
is (lulckly consumed, has been so keen 



That Made Milwaukee ramous 



. , . anl insistent that Pra^^^t'cally tlie en 

indlni^tpj supplv ha# bten used that way 

" and very little put down In cure. 

"Bv selling fresh they make a fair 

profit quickly (for fresh beef -^J ';.'' a^^ 

cash or weekly terms) with little or 

no rlijk caused by market changes. 

"If put away for dried beef 



„ It re 

aulr.«3 an enormous investment tied up I 
from six to nine mtmths with the ris* 
of lojs ciused by not getting properly 
cured or dried with a heavy shrink- 
age Dried beef shrinks nearly 50 per 
cit.t from raw weight. \nd always a 



BEHER CALL 
FORMONEY 

Movement of Timber Pro- 
ducts Is Given as the 
Cause. 



.- — - Duluth bankers aver that a slight 

serioii^rTsk of loss on account of mar- j improvement In the call for money has 

noticeable during the last few 
pen?lve to make 



^*'"D'Sed%*eef Is high because it is ex- ] been 

uriea tjeti .» ynke a piece of meat 1 days. The extra inquiry has come 
pound raw. Shrink it I ^^^j^^j^ from timber operators who 



dried I "^»*"'>' ''■^'^ 



last summer, 







Tf you are a ckiin mor.il man 
th** Camels want you to join them, 
and if you are contemplating do- 
ing so, they Invite you to their 
hasicet social on Friday evening, 
April 3rd, where you will have an 
opportunity of seeing the Camels at 
their oa.^i.s. Call for invitation at 
t'Hiiiol onio*" — eiO Alwortli Bldg. 



The Quickest, Simplest 
Cough Remedy 



Eaailr *»* Chraplf Made at 
Saves You %2. 



Home. 



Second or Fourth wards, your senator , ^^^^^j^ ^^^ j^ont and so he propels hlm- 

Is Heny W. Cheadle and your repre- \ 

^entatl-e A. L. Warner. If you live in \ 

the Third. Fifth or Sixth wards, your 

seaatoi is Thomas M. Pugh and your 
repre^ ntatlves E. R. Ribenack and 
Anton B.irgen. If you live in the Sev- 
enth o- Eighth wards, your senator is 

I Tames P. Boyle and your rcpresenta- 

' tlves Ckon T. Knapp and John Hoaly. 

I Theie ha.^ '.k- n a legislative reap- 

I portlonmeni. h.>wever. and the districts 
have l»een rearranged. Senators and 
repre-* -ntatives to fill the new dlstrlct.s 
will b.- selected this year— The Editor. 

CHILDREnRTREAL 
DIVORCE SUFFERERS 

Report Is Made After Exam- 
[ ination of Records in 
I Chicago. 

divorce 



Rt 15 cents per ^ 

50 per cent in drying »"'*/"t^ ^"r" 1 have been in the market to finance the 
lJx^^p;n^«;'^^f'?ur;\!^g.^7noTl^ig'a.^d''lt!>V" | movenTnVof forest products from the 
'Ing. slicing and packing in glafs jars , 

by hand at d you can read.ly see where 

the coatcomes in. „,.j5nary 'season j for hauling to delivery points, has been 



fening up Is looked for once spring 
operations Are well under way. j 

A similar financial condition exists i 
at Chicago and New York. An inter- 
esting development noted in commer- 
cial paper circles at New York is the 
entrance into that market of inter- 
national bankers, who are attracted 
by the more remunerative rates pre- 
vailing on this side. 

Discussing the situation, Vice Presi- 
dent Wald#ck of the Continental Com- 
mercial National bank. Chicago, Is 
quoted as follows in an interview: 

"With the prospect of good crops, in- 
crease In freight rates and a greater 
degree of certainty as to the Mexican 
situation, the coming months should 
see marked Improvement in both senti- 
ment and business. 

"Money is steady at rates ranging 
from 4 to 6 per cent, with best volume 
of business at 4I2 per cent. Country 
banks for Vv-hom we act as 
poudent are not buying commercial 
paper freely at low rate. They prefer 
to build up branches with correspon- 
dents, and in consequence there is fair 
increase in volume of our cash country 
credits." 



various camps through the district, 
which, on account of favorable weather 

We doubt it the .... 

contracts' will be much good this sea- , ^p^^ ^ larger scale of late 

son. Many of them were >V» S«of„**"* | considerable money Is now being dls 

aA.«r.n for wl-en the packer has no ».oiisiut.« ^ 

bt-f and catrt b"iy it. because no one ; bursed to cover repairs upon and 



out- 



EXCEPTIONS FILED 
TO $160,000,000 SUITS. 



h^J anv hiw Is he to fill his contracts. , ^tlng of the steamers In the harbor 
his intentUas are the j^^ preparation for the opening of navl- 



This plan makea a pmt of coufrb 
gyr„,,_enouph to last a family a I0112 
time. You couMn't buy as mucli 



or as 



even 
best. 



though 



Kood couc'i Bviup for $*2..)n. 
• pie as it is, it give 
stant relief and u-iually conquers 



THE PALM ROOM 

AT THE SPALDING 

MOST DELIGHTFUL AND LUX- 
URIOUS RESTAURANT IN 
DULUTH. 



I Chi. ago. Mar.h 31— No 
shouM be granted any Pf son who has 
a miitor child unle-ns the child shall 

' have ueen provided for t.» the satisfac- 
tion «f the court. Is the conclusion of 
Adelor J. Petit, chief justice of the cir- 
cuit lourt. in an analysis of the first an- 
nual report of the new municipal bu- 
reau '>f dlvorc and marriage statistics. 
Tht close relations between divorce 
court I and the juvenile court, as Indi- 
cated in the number of 
the . are of dep»ndent o 

child.cn. is tho «V^''-*"'*V'^,..'.fn\"^nnri preparations 
.ludg... Petit^s analy.Ms.^ Ju^v^ejiile cot.rt ^ JJ,i„,tion. 

re 



Si"mple""a3 it is, it givea altnost m- 
ant relief and inuallv conquers an 
ordinary cough in 24 l»m'rs, Y«>» 'J 
pnrtlv due to the fact tliat it is sli^'litlr 
laxative, stimulates the appetite and 
has an excellent tonic effjHt. 
pleasant to take— children like 
excellent reinely, too, for whooinn;/ 
couch, spasmodic croup and bronchial 
astliiua 

M 
u, 

minutes. Put 'IV2 onnc - 

cents' worth) in a pint bottle, ami add 
th<^ Sugar Svrup. , It keeps perfectly. 
Take a teaspoonful every one, two or 

*^'rfne"i9"one of the oldest and best 
known remedial agoiita for the throat 
membranes. Tinex »^ a '"o^t valuable 
concentrated cotupoun.l of Norway white 



Piles Cured in 6 to 14 Days 

nn.R«iM., rermul ...uu.y If J'-*™ •"^''■^",, ^ '^''i* 
to c.iVe I.cl.lnB. l^.fiU. n!e#dii« "r Pf.iUuJi.a Pil«. 
Flnil «wlli-«tiou glvf* rvUtt ■'O':- 

G. 0. pT-BUuTiJiobsE 

UNION PUN FAILS 



fix one pint of srraniilated sncar with 
pint of warm water, atid stir f-jr J 
m+p« Put •'».'. ounces ot Pmex (fifty 



An i Nebraska Parties Each De- 
cide Against Any 
Amalgamation. 



fiTd-tlon. 

Regarding mining. It Is predicted 
that operations on the ranges will be 

1 upon about the same scale as last year. 

I This will be the United Slates Steel 
corporation's final year of Its lease of 
the Hill Iron ore lands, so it is taken 
as assured that every effort will be 
made to get out a large tonnage. 7 he 
amount of ore taken out "n^^er that 
lease ianst season was about 6,150,000 
tons, which left the corporation ap- 
proximately 5:;5.000 tons short of the 
minimum tonnage provided for up to 
the end of 1913. The minimum set 
under the lease for this year Is 6,000,000 
tons, so that 6.625,000 remains to ba 
mined before it Is surrendered. 

Money rates locally are easier for 
the season now than In some tim« 
back, according to bankers, but a stlf- 



oui i. iia iiiui- conceiiliaKvi vi'..»K""". , . - - ■ ■ % «.«,1 

petitions for 1 pj^e extract, and is rich in euaiacol and 
nr delinquent ^*i,pj. natural bealinir elements. tJtiter 
ng feature of ' „^pparation3 will not work m this 



..c-^rls since .Tuly: ^''^/i^^.^f.^.^S'^'^^.? ""Tha^rompt rosiilta from this mixture 
petitions for the^ca^e^ of^ch.ld^r^en^^J^^^ , have'eiideaJJd.irto tl..pt..ands^of^hotise- 



BLOOD POISON 

•ii^.' f»UinB b».r. twue pmina. latarrh, rtc, i-t 
^mp-O'.^ OcUjs .r. d..n«erou.. Send « ,.0'^« •• 

BlAKiD TllltATMENT. Convluclug proof In • U-9t 

fcoiiie— •«*•" * month. „,^. ,, a.-— « aun^iai 

Sold 111 Duliilb by Max WlrtA. U »•» SiW«lai 
Kieei. aud tur all «lnisglat» 



these reports .. 

h T5<» cas 'S were the direct result of 
fi voices or the neglect <'f P^r*'"* 
thiol gh drunkenness or desertion 
whic I would have constituted suffl- 
.'icnt ground--* for divorce. 

Th i rep.^rt showed tliat approxi- 
iv 6 000 divorces a year were 
■ and that In 



Lincoln. Neb.. March 31.— The two 
rival Republican state committees that 
met yesterday in the interests of har- 
mony failed to effect a union. Instead, 
each committee voted to maintain Its 
separate identity, but each extended 
the olive branch to the extent that 
the chairman of each was asked to Is- 
sue a call for a state convention on , 
the same d:ite— at Lincoln. July 28—' 
and each was emp<»wered to Invite the 
others to co-operate In the holdings of 
this state convention. . ,^ , ' 

The »-ommittee» met simultaneously. 1 
but In separate rooms. The Taft corn- 
offered a compromise on 



New Orleans, La., March 31. — Ex- 
ceptions to 186 suits demanding dam- 
ages of $160,000,000 against the Amer- 
ican .Sugar Refining company and 
Jackson T. Witherapoon, local man- 
ager of the company have been filed 
in Federal court here. Each is an- 
swered separately by Mr. Wiiherspoon ! 
and the sugar company, although they 1 
are jointly named in all of the suits, j 
The principal contention of the com- j 
pany is that the United States district i 
court here Is without jurisdiction, j 
while Mr. Witherspoon charged that 
the petitions contain "irrelevant, scan- ; 
dalous and impertinent allegations." j 
The suits have been filed from time : 
to time by individuals and firms in j 
Louisiana, and attack the corporation , 
as operating in violation of the Sher- , 
man anti-trust law. Mr. Witherspoon 1 
is named In the petitions as a party 
to the conspiracy which the plaintiffs 
charge exists to Injure their business. 

AUTOPSFESSHOVir 
MANY BAD DIAGNOSES. 



will lag behind that of Europe and ad» 
vancement necessarily will be slow, 
says the report. 

FISHERMBTgET READY 
ALON G NORT H SHOR| 

Grand Marais. Minn.. March SI. — All 
of the north shore fishermen are pre- 
pared for the opening of the fishing 
.season, and are waiting for favorabW 
weather to launch their boats and 
get their rigging into the water. 

Charles Sjoklist and John Samskaf 

have formed a partnership to engag« 

1 iu the fishing business here this suni- 

i raer They will use the gasoline boat 

Red' Wing, with which they arrived 

from Duluth Sunday afternoon. 

While splitting wood at his home «l 

Red Cliff A. J. Scott, Jr., nearly 

corres- I g^vered his left thumb at the first jomi 

1-. ^^^ accidental stroke of the at. 

Owing to the severity of the cut, tl^i 

thumb will remain crippled. 

SlMm Will Exhibit. 

San Francisco, Cal., March 31.— Th* 
commission appointed by President 
Wilson to visit the Antipodes and th« 
Orient In behalf of Panama-Pacific in- 
ternational exposition, report by cabl« 
from Shanghai to the exposition di- 
rectors that Siam has accepted an In- 
vitation to participate and that Prmai 
Rajani has been appointed commis- 
sioner to San Francisco. 



The Joy Of 

.Coning Mofherhoo^ 

A Wonderful Remedy That is a Natural 
Aid and Relieves the Tension. 



the 



matt 



wives in the United States atidCaiiada niit tee ...^ footing In power and 

which explains whj the P^«"J'«» ^fT" Teadership. This was rejected by the 
imitJited often, but never successfully. | progrresslve committee, which declared 
A cuarantv of absolute satisfaction, | i„ f,^vor of going alone. The laft 
or monev promptly refunded. Roes with committee In turn voted to continue Its 
this preparation. Your dnijjcist has ] "'■f.;;,'j[|^*;;';"Epperson of the Progres- 
ex. or will get jt for y oil. It j»o^' [ give wing jnada an sxtended ad- 



KHEUMAr/^ 



cure* you of rheomatlmn or yonr money 

Is refundwl. Tlili >• »n absolute guar- 

antfe tUat applies to CTery c«t.f. Aslc 

your fnemls about 6C«it-remeinl>er Jt 

contains no "dot**"'— no liabit forming 

drui;9- Writa«.>w for Free Uook "Mail ic» 

^AdTlce on Hlipuraatl8m."lt tells, 

Fhow to alleTtttta p.iln.how to diet, 

bow to CiniE. A'liJreM 

■ATT i. jouasoN ro. 

Bert. F St.J'aoI, 



Mother's Friend is the only remedy 
known that is able to reach all the different 
parts involved. It ia< 
a i>cnetrating external 
application after th« 
formula of a noted 
family doctor, and lu- 
bricates every muscle^ 
nerve, tiseue or tea* 
don involved. 
By its daily uss 
New York. March 31.— Nearly one- ! LJj^_^UHHLl there will be no paio,^ 
half of the clinical diagnoses made in i uo distress, no nausea, 

Bellevue hospital were not confirmed .qq danger of laceration or other accident, 
by subsequent autop.sie,s, according to ^nj j^g ppfi^jj ^ni be one of supreme cow 
a report of the hospital's investlgat- ' - 

Ing committee 
to the board < 

rr>itt(>n Inaiilred into conaitions at me ,»"• «»•• "••h--"* •— "-- — — • --- - j:,,..:^!* 

^ V hospitals over a stated period, and i birth of all its agonies and dangers, diM>el« 
found the percentage In which there 1 all the doubt and dread, all sense of tear, 
was discrepancy at Bellevue between and thus enables the mind and body W 




I «i. i»-.K"'^". .*^..^.N....B ..^^ ; ana me perioa win ue one «». BUi»»^— ~ .,— _ 
:he hospital s investlgat- : * j. a ^Q.-ftil anticipation. 
'oT'ilSeSl?' TJi'e'i'o'.^^ ^'MoTher's' I'rie^d u'one of , the greatest 
.d'inlf conditions 'at the 'of all helpful inflnences. for .t r..bs chad- 



Eran.ed In Cook county and that in pinex. or will get it lor yoti. n ""J;' 1 give 
more than two-thirds of the cases the , ^ ^ j]^^ pi^^X Co., Ft. W avne, lna.^dre»*. 
actio M were brought by the women, j "^ « - - — 



diagnosis and autopsy to be 47.7. I await the gr:?atest event in a woman si Ufi^ 

The committee recommends a new 1 _^jjjj uQ^pammeled gladness. 
law. broadening the powers of hospl- Yon will find it on sale at all drug stores 
tals to perform autopsies within forty- ' . j^ qq „ i,ottie or the druggist will gladly 

^u'n^d'eV ^r^o^^ro?^ " ^'\^^f. ije\VtKC4^tr^j'^^'^^ 

under t*^® j.^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^t to medical only by the Bradtiold Regulator Co.. 23T 
ithout an autopsy. Lamar Bldg.. Atlanta. Oa.. who wiU raalt 



bodies at 
colleges w 



"So long as It is impossible to per- ^^q instructive book to expectaat motbw^ 
form a larger percentage of autopsies, -YVrite for it lo-day. 
medical knowledge m the United States l 



-i 



_______ - V » 

pi— — ^^^^iM^— ^M^M^Mb^i— w»^-*ifc^— ^ I ^^^l^mmm^ttmmmy^am^mam I f II I 1 « ' I . T 

I 

[ I — T 1 \ ] ~" 

. . . ■ I . ■ .■ "— I III 




xa 



Tuesday, 



THE DtTLUTH 





SiQ2 and 204 East Superior Street 

our Great Removal Sale 

I'v« 1 vthiiiK ;:"<^. notliinp rcservcMl. all at hij,' rli>counts. Yes- 
t. I.!.;. W.I 'II' ..! (lur larjifst day?, (luring our entire sale — that 

sj.rak 1- I itcli. 

One half former prices on all COUCH COVERS, DRAPERIES. 
LACK CURTAINS and CURTAIN MATERIALS— all /a price 

98c 



TO RECOVER 
FRAUD LOSS 




COUCH COVERS -Oriental paitcriib; regularly 

$1.96, I « in<»\ al ^alc price 

COUCH COVERS ( )riental paitrrM; regularly d^| AA 

$2.40, rdunval -ale price ^i.AlV 

COUCH COVERS Oriental 1-;.! I. rn. regularly ^| OO 

$2.75, r. !u. . al >ale price ^ J..OCF 

COUCH COVERS -Oriental part, ins; regularly 

$4.35, r< inn\al sale price 

COUCH COVERS Oriental patKrn-; regularly 

$5.00, r« 111... al -ale i>rive 

COUCH COVERS Ordinal pattmi- ; r.-Kularly 
$6.50, :■ ; ! al -ale piK. <• 



$2.17 
$2.50 
$3.25 



City National Bank Files 

Suit Against Surety 

Company. 

Two Actions Are Brought 

to Collect Claims for 

$4,247.67. 



i-.i 



1 , ■ • \v 

v.; : •, 
,1 : $«.«>0 

!.(.■■. ■ ! 1 I \ 



.lu. • , 



I,... 
V illu. 

I'l.l I I • 

1 1 1 » W ■ ' . i i 

I "I . M I • • 
11 . • V. < . I 1 I ' 

r<.i 11' I. 

t : < 1 vv oil 

I'oj !!■ I- 
1 1 1 . v\ < ■•■ 

I ■..111. I. ■«, »Z*» 
now •iil.v . 
r..iii. I. . *2I 

1 1 . . W ' 1 1 I \ 

liii|M>ri|< mI I i-i IK Ii iiiuI i;ii(cilsli .'^rt 

Nrt.*, — i:u- I" fl.ir>, all KO "i ("iT 

i«rii<i\.il .11 <.u. half- or, iM-r yanl, 



:*.', at 

N I.. 



.I'il' 



$1.50 
$1.85 
$3.00 
$4.50 
$6.50 
$9.25 
$1.75 
$2.50 
$4.00 
$7.50 
$10.00 
$12.00 



;'.K. 



.-.Hr. 



EXTRA SPECIAL— Art Nets, per yard 




I), iti't (..<il....k .air lii),' l\uj; 't.'k S< me ^'reat «^a.in^j<i. 

• Mil i<a < lilt lit IS lull ..1 hargaiii- i!u_\ will a^;reeal ly ^urpri-o 



"nt-Fpll.! the fan that the City Na- 
tional bwrik wan Innurt-d aKHln^t all 
Iff* ♦•8 from forKc-fl (hi-.ks and houuH 
papfr, It haa b.-en unnble to collect 
'triiiln loi>.i<-M of lhl« < li-'iraotiT atconl- 
UiK to fiult bcKiin in dlittri. t court }i-M- 
i«-rday afternoon. ^ 

Two x«T>Hrat«^ <-aufl.a of af^tlon hnvr 
I < < ri .•.lartt-d by tb<> bunk MKalni't tli«- 
Natioiiiil Sur«-ly .'.inipany of New ^■<^rk 
til whii'h JudK>*i«-iit for 14,247.67 if 

Hhki-<1. Tb'- bank i-hilnia that th«i 
»>ur«*ty .'otiipiiny r..-.'lvi'»l nioii« y for 
v> birh It i»Kr...l l<i liidtmnlfy thi' bank 
tiorn lowK.'.M of au.'b kind;., tint I bat In 
two tnxtun. i-M It bit.t falli-d to niaki- 
Kood. 

hoih loa><ca may b«» trar«-d ba.k to 
fn«' <'p« rati, na of i'. .1. u'liomull of tbf 
n< w d*'f'in. t Itarlnian-* >'l»onni-ll 

itK«'n<'y. wbo after bf.'.inilnjc b«-avlly 
Involva-d I. ri tb«t .liy about a year 
aK". ScvtTiil Dulntb bnalrKaa nivn 
V. »-Tf lift llnaiiilMl obilKall.iiiN wblili 
ili.y bavH aln..'- b<;rn obilifid to llqul- 

tiMt<". 

In one a'llon. thn bank In puint; for 
$4!.«!»7.«7, lli»i MUioiitit of a .b." U |.ay 
al>l<- to lamiiii .\. Aii.stbultz, wblcb. II 
l»< 'lalm..!, ,\m* forK»-d and . aah.'d by 
1 ( )'|>onrnll. 'I h»' <b«<'k waa a d«*alb 
. laltii dii.- Mr».. A ii>..'bultii fr.iiii tb«- 
Aii.'l. itt Or.l.r of lnH«-d Woiktmn. 
VVb«-ri thii f.tr^'.ry .iinif to tbc altt'n- 
(loii of tbf frat'-rnnl order. It liiatl- 
liii.a Mill iiKalnat tb« M«r< banta' Na- 
tl. •nal lliink of .'^t. I'liiil and rc.ovt rtd. 
In vl.w "f ih.- fa. t that IIk- . In -k waa 
.■aKb.-d III iMihitli by a l<-ll<r at lb<- 
Cily National bank, tin- local bank waa 
obllK.'d to rt•lnlbur^u ibu Ht. I'aui in- 
.'l If III Ion, 

III lb"- oth«r anlt, lb*- aiirety company 
1h ank.-.l to pay ll.ira*, Ibe amount of 
two <'b..kH, t.i wbli h o'l>orin.-n la al- 
li'Kcd to have forK'd tbo nann- of 
i;<.irt<< na.'l.rh. administrator of tb<- 
..'tale of |ianl«-l .lurl.'hi'h. The bank 
fil.'«o riiiid)^ KO'i'l tbI.H lo.MH. 

UNEMPLOYED 
FLOCKING IN 




-ASHIONS 



INJUNCTION 



Mrm. »'utl<i. 111.- witlov. will 

t:ii'»;,T4y.hh, <i i.ii imu jio.ooo. 



r«««;l ve 



IS REFUSED 



City 



Not Restrained From 
Enforcing Sholund Li- 
cense Revocation. 



dirilii' ( 



I 



II II noil II • 



..I I. 
tbal 
of 



!)it«- 
M- 
li. 
tll< II 



Jiid^'.- I'liiit In 

yfiili'l'ila •, fi fl «■ Ml- • 
. '. . V ,v, I III ll^•^ II, lit I .'I in-> K, 
U iMiia <1< ii ; I III' II |i|ill< it t loll 
.111 111. . liiiil.H .Sliolini.l. ."alii..!! k«T|l- 
11, for u l.iiip'irary Injun. -I I. >n re- 
nt mini n^ III. 'Ity iiiitliol III* H from rn- 
fi.i.iiiK I I . '. •■ ill I..I1 ..f bla ll.rna*' t«» 

.|..int. Iiln ml lit I'H Ka.st Mkbl- 

j:iui Mill. I iluiiiiK III'- p«ndan<y of 
I •■! I iiri III I pr.H (I .1 III). '< liivoKliiK the 
^«iii«> liiM' b.r.ii.- III.- mipremc 
.l.iij 



foiirt. 

tl|. lllJUlK - 

tifcn alKni <i 



.lanien .F. «:odfr«y of \\ *ft iMiliith. 
n bo dW d !•■< b. I'li last, h-ft an t-ntat« 

■ .iiihi.s|lnK of rial and p«r».onal pr«ip- 
. rfv \alii.«l at l-..'H»0. i.cordInK to a 
l>flit|..n for It-Ill ra of adminlHlratlon 
t)l«<l In pr.ibati' <'.>iirt nday by bla 
willow. Marl.. «.odfr< /. '(•;> North 
i-'irty foiiitb a\.i»u«- W«i«t. •;odfrey la 

■ urvlvi'd by .1 v..r< and two anmll chtl- 

dii a. 

• • • 

.l..hn t«aalcHon of Htltblns today pe- 
tltioni-d tbf probate « i url for W-ttr-ra 
of adiiilnlftrallon on tl*. ei.tiitc .if bla 
tM.illi.r. Karl Wllb.lm If-aakaoii, who 
dl'd al liibblnH. Ian. 1! I!*14, aK'-d 2». 
Ixaukaon'M »-Hlal<- .-oiihl*" t«-d of }6T 40 In 
ta>.h. wbl.ii win bo .lint rlbnt. «l pro 
rata anioiiK a \\lf.: an.l four .blldrt-n 
In .''"w.dcn. 

DINNER FOR 

BIBll CLASS 



Fifty New Comers Seek 

Work— Likely to Get 

It Soon. 



I li.' fiM iiuil III ill r >l.ii> liiK 
ti'ii. Il..^v.■^^^, lui.i not y.t 
by t Ik- ■ mill. 

rill ..lint il.iil..i III)- Injiini-tion on 
tb« oii.^ Kroiind iirK«-d by altonieya for 
HboliHi'l. Ibla b.liiK that tb<' writ of 
< • rtl.li iiii vvbl.li i.s rcinrniibUi b.-fore 
till- Miipr. III., .•oiirt .'11 April 7. op. rated 
MM a ?.(ip.i .■•-.leaa or htay of fiirtln-r 
pill. > . .Iliiir.i an.l i<iiKpeiid/«i I b*< .'tty 
I'.iun.'irH ju.lt£ni<-nl of r.-\ o.-at ion. Al- 
tbouKh Ibtt < Ity'a a.-tlon in r<-voklnK 
tbo II. «nr^i' and in iittempiInK to pre- 

V«nl Sllolilli.l from .I.'IhK buMllie«.t 
I» n.ilnK tbf I el urn of Itie writ of <-er- 
ttorarl wiiH alia. 1..-. I .>n Ibreei nepa- 
rate Kri'Uinl.^, arKiinniita weri- beard 
by .Iii.Ik'' ■'ai'l onl> on tbe <|iie»<tli>n of 
wbelli. r .1 not III.- wilt .>f .ertlorarl 
opeitit.'ti Jia a ^tay an.l Minpi-nd'-d tli*> 
jMdument of revi».-atlon 

Tb«- . liber two KroiiiHl.M preneiit.-il to 

tbe .-.ilirt ».-re lloil tin- lotion of tbe 

(onn.ll III re^iiKliiK the H.-enae whm 
tll«-Kal itiid tbat tbe urdlnan.-e under 
will, b ttie r«- vixiit loll |i|-ii.'<-t'dl iiKa W«T.- 
bit.l N 11 n.'oii>4t It III loiiiil TIiIm .imII ii.'in.'*- 
Im known aa tbe lilt ken ordlnan.-e. 
Till- eoiirt bad pn-vlonnly Indbated to 
Kholiind'a nttoineyN tbat mIioiiI.I It iII.h- 
poac of tbi' tli»t pbaae of tlie i|iii-.>it Ion 
III fiiMir if tb<^ >-lt>, It would til. II bear 
aiKiimeiitft on Ibv otber two ^-roundfi. 
tf dexired. before ttrantliiK or d.-nyiiiK 
the i iijiini t Ion. 

Y««t.-itlay afterno.in, tbe i-oiirt In- 
dl.-at.-d I.I lb.- Ill till ii.'>'.< tbat It would 
be iii-i i-;iHar> for tin- pleadltiKa to be 
aniendi-il to < tiiiform witb tb«i motion 
i-ov«-rliiK tbe oibi-r Krounda of alta.-k. 
.IimIk.' *'aiit i\\yi> ..itateil Ibiii In view 
of t b.- fit. I tbat 111.' Kami' iiui-Mtlona 
would iti'lne mIioi'IIs In tbe certiorari 
pro.'eedlliKn b.-fore tbe ..iiipreiiH- I'.iurt, 

II w.>uld be ail a. I of mor.- or l.-.sn Irii- 
pr.>prlrty on bla part to n.tw pa.sM upon 
iluentloiiM over w bl.'b tb<- biKber court 
baa alrea<ly laki-n Jurl.vdK't|on. 

t'barlea V. M«-«'o>, aliorney for ."^ho- 
luiiil. today Htated that In all probabili- 
ty lb«i rei-ond and tblrd Kroundti of at- 
ta.'k on tbe ronii. ll'a a.llon w.'iild not 
lie urKi'.l In III.' Injunction pr.K-.-.-iilnira 
but liiki-n up Iti tbe certiorari caae be- 
fore the aupreiiie court. 

PAYS INHERITANCE 

TAX OF $8,727 

Total Valuation of the D. J. 

Cutler Estate Is 

$336,749. 

.lane Tborn I'utl. r. widow of tbe 
late PwlKbt <;. t'litlir, w boat, death 
oceurreil In thi.i . ity on May I'l, i;tl3. 
-will pay « tax of $8.';27.4S on b«T In- 
heritance. Tbe amount of the tax waa 
determined l>y JudK'- S. W. taiiiln In 
probate court today. 

Dwlg:ht «;. Outlcr, Jr., a.>n and only 
other heir. I--* exempt from tbe pay- 
ment of a tax on his Inberilamc (n- 
der the w'll of hla father be waa left 
$10,000, all of which I.h exempt from 
taxation under the inherllam-o tax 

The Cutler estate, after dodwotliiR all 
exi>en8e.4 of adminlatration. waa f.mnd 
by the court to be valued at |3:i«.- 
«<9.88. Undtr the term* of the will. 



The \..uiiK Ml na Itlble <'laK« of the 
Flr^t Metbodlct ciiur.-h gave n dinner 
fur Ita inembera ut « JO o.-Io. k la.nt 
evenlim at the Y: M. t'. A. A bualneaa 
ineetlnK waa held follow InK the dinner. 

Wllb. r U. S.-binimf. In.strmtor at 
Central hiKb «.bo<.l. who Is In .-barKe 
of tin . Iiiaa, pn-.-ildeil it tbe ineelinn. 
He ad.lreaa. d the bo>H 
tbe orKHiilzallon 
W'alKon 
talk. 

A I tbe eloae of th«» bualneaa meeting 
.Mr. S< bllluiK appointed tbe followliiK 
alaii.tlni; commllteia f 
.Memb. r^blp, l-'. .N.irwk 
.MmltbleH, 
Tbi-mpaon 
Wnilaina, 
chalrmuii. 



on tbe w-orK of 
and waa followed by 
Moore, who aiao tave a t*bort 



Many unentployi-d men are flocking 
Into the city. ai-eordliiK to a report 
wblcb haa be«n aubmllted to Mayor 

I'rlncu by Frank llleka, manager of 
tbe wi-lfar.- d.-pa rlmi-nt. 

He atiitea tbat Saturday afternoon 
and jeatenlay more than fifty Job- 
li-aa men /ipplled to bim for aa.Hlatan.'e. 
tie gave aonie of tli.-ni ti-mp.irary al.i 
In tbe way of a tl.ket for a meal or 
a bi-d but W'ua ubllfci-d to turn away 
mofit of tli'-m. He explained that moft 
of tboae wbo appli.-d at bla offl.-e bad 

I come III iMilutb wItb tbe expectation ..f 
getting work with the opening of navl- 

' gatton, wbl.-h la etill two or three 

I weeka away. 

Th« nuiyor .nald tbat he does not 
cf»nalder the altiiatlon a.-ute and that 
within a comparatively abort tinie It 
la probable that moat of them will be 
able to get work If limy want It. Not 
only will the Khipping aeaaon be atart- 
Ing liut the .'Ity will begin Ita im- 
provemenlH for the aeyaon. It wa.^ 
puggeated that nome nilghl get work 
on the rock pile, but aa the man In 
charge there will In- shift, d to otb.-r 
work aborlly It waa decided not to 
put any more men t.i work there. The 
rock pn«) baa be.-n furnl.-'hlng work 
til ahiftiiig cr.wM of five or ten men 
alme the mid. II.' of the winter, but 
It win be (tloaed In a few daya. 






We thought the be.stwas none 
too good for you — that is why 
our Easter Opening presents 
so much that is elegant and 
distinguished as well as highly 
fashionable. 

Welcome to try on— we 
want you to see fiow be- 
coming tlie new styles are. 

Will you not honor us with 
your visit tomorrow. 



TIIIO HTOHl': FOU SKKVICIO. 

113-1 15-1 1 7- tin Wc^t Sii|Mrlur St., 
Dulutli, Miiiu. 



/f 



t 



i^#i>^ 



«». Vivian; 

, chairman, A 

and .'laan lo 

I* Ta>lor am 



• r the y.-ar: 

, .-hiiirman, II. 

\lHltatlon, I-: 

ArmatroiiK. J. 

tivlty, t'^. Neir, 

H. Wahlgii n. 



NEW PAVING PLANS. 

Murchison Would Improve Part of 
West Michigan Street. 

«'omml.Msl«>ner 1(. Mur. blaoti, head 
of the work.i dlvlNlon, baa been con- 
aid, ring plana for liii|irovlng Wes» 
.Mil liigan htreet and Superior atreet 
liont Twi-lfth to Fifd-entli avenues, 
where the highway rou>id» tb*- Point of 
llo. k.M. The highway l» now paved to 
'Iw.lfth avenue lUiil will be Improved 
b.'lwetn l-'lflcititb and riilrleenth avt - 
nil. H tbia Mimm.-r. Tbli- woiilil leave a 
Kail w III. b the .iffl. Iab> feel ahould be 
paved. Al III.* i-oilio II iiieelliiK Monday 
a r«'aolulloii may be i anaed directing 
the work, a.-tlon being taken under 
that ae. lion .>f the cba'ter, which pro- 
vidta that Improvemei ta may be or- 
d.-ii (1 without petition. A big part of 
the ixpen,-4e will have to hv borne by 
tbe •Ity. Itui If no protect l.s llli-d, (he 
remand.-r will be aecuied through as- 
HcHMiuenta. 



JURYCONSIOEFING 
THREE DAMAGE SUITS. 

Tbe Jury In .liitlge \ i rt Fe.iler'a dl- 
vlalon of tin- illKtrlct court whi.h la 
Jointly tr.Ning the three eauaea of ac- 
tion wblcli .loaeph Miisfar and lila two 
ehlldri-n have iiKalii-.( thti M 
I'Mt.trli* .'ompany and 'onlractor 
l(iini|u(Nt 



ii ADDITIONAL I 
SPORTS I 

SOMMER OUT 
OF BASEBALL 



P. J. Schroeder Is Elected 
President of the Su- 
perior Club. 



the flrat ball In the game at Sacra- 

m.-nt.i between the I'ortland .Imm- 

l>l.>iia of 1913, and the Sa< raniento 
team. 

Umpire for Feiierals. 

ChU-ag.i, March 31 i:d. Hoeckel 
waa added to the Federal league ataff 
.•f umplrea t.i.l.-iy by I'reHldt-nt Cil- 
more, making nlim arbltera. «:o«-ckel 
made a good reiiut.itl.ui on lo.-al aeinl- 
profeaalonal diamonda laat year. 




MAYOR KONKEL 

OPENS CAMPAIGN 



•'tired to << liHider 111.' caiie 

liil.' tbiM afternoon after having bei n 
. Iiarg.'d aa to the law In the caau by 
the court. 

■ •amag.a aKgregatlig $32.DOO are 
aaked by Miiatar for liijurlea re.-cl\ed 
by bla two ehlldri n, . oaeiili an.l An- 
gela, 11 and V. while pla>lng with a 
(lynamlte cap which lad been care- 
leaaly lift, It la < lalmi-d, by contra.- 
t.ir.H wh.i built the elecirlc railway llii«* 
(laat the Mu.Htar home on the Croxtoii 
location near Kubl lutit aumiuer. 

Th«< t(irl loal the ali;ht of on«. eye 
and Wanta |lfi.OOO. The l»oy wantn 
$ri.<ilMi for the liiaa of a thumb and tw.i 
fliigei'H and III a third a. -Hon, Mualiir 
la aeiklng $l!,riliO .lama^'ea for hl>i own 
loaa by reaaon of the acclilent to the 
(.'hlldren. 



r. .T. Schroeder haa been elected 

preflilent of the Superior llaaebaU club, 

aueceedlng W. J. Sommer. i'lirl Hanton 

la the new vice prealdent of the elub, 

{ P. C. Hoyle, aecrctary, and James 

|Tu<ihv, treaauier. 

Theae ofl'lcera were elected by the 

atockholdi-ra of lb.- ..lub. The major- 

tltry of atock own.il by Mr. Sommer 

and Kiirwln .s<-ooii waa piircha.^i-il by 

Me.-i«r»". Schroeder and Tu»ili.v. who 

alao aaslated In the reorganization of 

I the club. 

.labii I A<-cordlng to lb.- pfafement of aev- 

lobn eral of tbe new ofTl. lain. Ih« re will be 

no change In the plana thai have been 

formed for .some lime pnal In regard to 

the spring tnilnlng trip, 

.(a.k l-imdry will bn retained a^ 
manager, the only .-bange nf polh-y be- 
iiiK In r.-gard to the tlnanclal affalra. 
W. J. Sommer baa heavy Interi Nta In 
t'dllfornla and will return to the coaat 
rounlry In the near future to give bla 
bu.iliU'."'a affalra bl.i peiaonal attention. 



Prepare to Launch Yacht. 

nrlat<d. H. I., Man h 31. — A aeore T)f 
elect rli- pollahing buffera began tlie 
fliiHhlng toui-hea on Ihe cup tlefemler 
yacht Iteaolute l.iday. The pollahing 
probably will be llnlMhed by th.' «'nd 
<if the week, and 10 or U' daya will be 
neceaaary to put the yacht In com- 
plete ahapi* for. I be launching, which 
la MCheduled for April 17. 

Coast Season Opens. 

San Frain-iHoo, Cal., March 31. -The 

.■■»- Pacific coaat baaeball league opened 

Huliith club will att.nd the annt- ' Ita aeaion today with threo gamea be- 

vcrmirv I tlnu of He Superior Ho- ' tween Ihe atTC cluba compoalng the 

larv .liib, tomorrow evening. The ' league at San Francisco. Sacramento 

loial rotarlm.a will n » et at the Soo ; wnd L<ia Angeles. 

atatloit and go over In a body. i (iovernor Ulraiu \\ . Johnson pitched 



Rotary Club Meets. 



t^lnly routine biialn.!t.a 
acted al the meeting of 
Holary .lub, veMleida>' 

Ab.iul thirty nv«< mtmbera 



waa trana- 
the Imlulb 



of the 



M.I J or .1. .S. Konkiif opened bin cam- 
paign laat night by giving bla firfit 
aildreaa aliice the atartlng of tbe recall 
movement. The mayor aald that the 
preaent admlnlat ration bad done more 
In street Improvemenla, cauaed more 
arreals for law v UilatUm-* an«l given 
the (Ity .-I bi tier adiulnlatratloti than 
any two admlniatratlona prcvloii.s In 
the hUt.iry of Ihe .lly. He aa'd that 
the re. all movement had been atailed 
aa si-oii aa h<* got Into office an.l h.^ 
laid the blame for the retail on a haif 
dozen meii. w h.im he named. \lo -vild 
that vbe liiiiiiatora of th« inov.'ment 
claimed lie hjio not lived Uj) to bis cam- 
paign luonnaef. The mayor .suUl h'* 
did not deny ibla, but th.'t hi- had 
been nnabi.! lo accompllab all of nis 
piomls-.H niiide t<» jover .six years In 
tbe two ycavs that he hid been In 
office. 

WILL REMOVE RUINS. 

Work of Clearing Normal Site Will 
Begin Wednesday. 

Work on tearing down the walla 
and I baring the alte of the burned 
."Superior mirmal will begin tomorrow. 
The regents w. re In the city thla 
morning and de. Ided th«t this work 
• hould begin al on.e 

A n«'vv lire proof building will bo 
ere.-ted Immediately, whl.-h will be a.s 
extenalve aa the limited fund.H will al- 
low. It la prtitmaed to have thla 
building ctiinpleted and ready for use 
by .Sept. 16. 

Slate Inaurance adjuatera who have 
been In Ihe city diaagretf aa ibe the 
value of the bulUllng. It la aaiseited 
that the board of regent^ placed the 
value of the building at $l»0,0(iO and 
' Ita .-ontcnta at $16,000. The regent'* 
I aay that the value waa about $:'50.000 
and contents over $76,000. . 

BOY I S^ SHOT. 

Runs In Front of Target Used By 
Watchman on Steamer. 

Albert, the 13-year-old .&«« <if Mr. 
and Mra. A. Fapiueaui oA Wisconsin 



Point, waa aerioualy injured about the 
cheat and face from a (barge of ahol 
fired by a w'at.-linmn on th« at'-amer 
.John A. Albright laal evening. The 
wat.-hrnan, w lio.se namu th<- police have 
not yi-t ae.-urod, was ahoollng at a tii\ 
can with a abot gun. The boy waa 
playing In thi^ vUlnlty and ran In front 
of the can Jtiat an the man fired, ll'j 
wa.s taken to St. l-'inncla boapita', 
where today It Is believed the boy will 
recover. 

Allen Fined $53. 

Charlea Allen, proprietor of the 
"Itlack l)\ick" .saloon who wn.s ar- 
r. Mted Sunday for violating tin; .Sun- 
d.-iy . loalng l.aw, paid a line of $63 In 
pollci; .'ourt yeaterday afternoon. The 
saloon waa fiuind doing a thriving 
bualne.is by Patrolman CIreelcy early 
■'-'uiulay fort-noon. 
- ■» - - — 

I OBITUARY I 

KMlle <.rnlll, former commlaaloner 
general in the Charl dlatrl. t of the 
Krench Congo and well Known a.s an 
explor.-r. dU d In Hord.-iiux, Krance. 
March 30. After aervlng In the Kren.-h 
arrny, M. Centll went to Afrb-a with 
Count de Hrazza and t-xjilored a great 
region of the French Congo and l.,aU« 
Tchad, bla trip covering vaat areaa of 
land under the French protectorate. 



Troyer asking him to locate hia 
brother, Frank. He believed that the 
latter was at a local hoapltal and upon 
Inquiry the authorities here learned 
that the younger brother la now re- 
covering from an operaton at St. 
Mary's hoapitul. Thia information was 
then wired to Mr. Colltna at Winter- 
haven. 



usually occurs between April 25 and 
May 1. The company begins rec<Mvinjr 
freight for delivery from the ports of 
the lower lake April 20. 



WEDNESDAY WILL 
BE ALL FOOLS' DAY 



END ADVANCED RATE 
HEARING THIS WEEK 



Rubber cigars, cotton-stuffed randy 
and deceitful bats are all In sea.Htui 
tomorrow. I-'or tomorrow, April 1, is 
All Fool « day. 

Fr<im early morn until late at night, 
any hariiileFa firank is «-xcu»:able. 

The origin of Ail l-'ools day Is un- j 
known, but It has been the occasion 
for (-elebratlon In almo.^t all the coun- 
tries of the world. The . u.stoma, of 
courae. are different In the various 
Kurop<-an countiica, but the general 
inethoda are the same. 

Candy dealers and cigar makers 
cater «'sp»f(-ially to this day and pre- 
pare all kinds of April fool candy and 
cigar.s. 



Rev. .lamra Rovre, who la said to 

have raised more money to pay the In- 
debtedness of small Methodist Kplsco- 
pal churches than any other man, died 
suddenly at bis home In Chicago, 
March SI. For six years he had been 
corresponding secretary of Ihe Chicago 
Homo Missionary and Church Kxten- 
alon Ko.-lety of the Methodist churi-h. 
In this capacity he is .-redited wllh 
raising more than |>', 000, 000 to pay off 
chnr. h- mortgages. 

TiiH<»<h>- DanlelH Nalllvan. Irish pa- 
triot and author of "Cod Save Ireland." 
died In inibllii, Ireland, Man-h 31, aged 
87. Sullivan, a journallHt by profe.s- 
alon. was a native of Hanlry. County 
Cork. He was on»? of the most promi- 
nent agitators In favor of home rule at 
the time when Parnell was in his 
prime. For twenty years he was a 
\atlonaIlst member of the house of 
comnnin..<. and for two years was lord 
mayor of Dublin. On one occasion Mr. 
Sullivan served two months In Jail for 
an offeiue ag.-iliisf the coercion act. 
n»i was prose. -uled on several other 
occasions, but es.-ap( d punishment. Mr. 
Sullivan was u prolific writer of versa 
and prosf. 



COMMiSSION WILL 
NOT BE REPR ESENTED. 

The city commission will not be 

repre.^ented at the meeting of the In- 

j ternailonal Joint commlslon when it 

I meets .it ^\'a8hlngton, April 7, to con- 
I sder furthier the applcation of the 
i Michigan .\orlhern Power company for 
nt-rmlsslon to rais<? the level of I^ake 
Superior. Manager D. A. Keed of the 
water and light <lepartment, who at- 
tended the hearing at Detroit, has 
corresponded extensively with the 
various persona and concerns Inter- 
ested. The general opinion Is tbat the 
efforts of the objectors should be 
entered to insure ample protection 
against the water rising too high. It la 
bt-lieved that this can be done by 
building sluiceways sufficient In num- 
ber and size to gu.irantee control of 
the lake level. .lulius H. Karnes will 
be in Washington at that time on 
cither business and h«- will appear be- 
fore tbe (-ominl6si<»n at the representa- 
tive of Duluth. 



Commerce Commission 

Grants Plea of the Erie 

Railroad. 

WnshlRgton. March 31. — To facilU 
tale consideration of the advancecl 
rate case, <'halrman Harlan announced 
today that the interstate commerco 
commission had decided to grant tho 
request of tbe railroads to hear their 
concluding testimony today and Thura* 
day. 

The request "w.is made by Vice Pres- 
ident Hromwell of the Erie, who 
pointed out that what he declared was 
the serious ilnanci.-il condition of th» 
carriers warranted them and the com- 
mission to extend the hearings in every 
way. 

The commission had assignments 
made for Wednesday and Thursday, 
but concluded that it would be better 
to hear the final testimony of the 
roads now than to wait until the latter 
part <if April. 

In that connection it was said to be 
not unlikely. In order further to facili- 
tate consideration of the case by the- 
commission, that counsel for the rail- 
roads might submit the case to th» 
commission without oral argument, re- 
lying upon their testimony and brief» 
fully to Inform the commission as to 
their position. 



ORANGE BLOSSOMS 
FOR THE POLICE 



SPECIAL GUARDS AT 
KANSAS Gin TRIAL 



r. I., i'olllns of Wlnterhaven, Fla., 
waa so gratified w h«-n the local police 
department aided hlin In locating his 
brother. Fi;uiU, at .Sl. Mary's hospital 
last week, that he sent a box of orange 
blossoms to Chief Troyer as an appre- 
ciation. The blossoms were received 
at head<inarters this morning. 

Laiit week Mr. Collins wired Chief 



BUILDING NEW DOCK. 

Marquette's New One Will Be Ready 
When Navigation Opens. 

Marquette. Mich., March 31. — All 
piles for the Spear & Sons' new pas- j 
senger and freight dock have been ! 

driven and everything is now in readl- j 
ness for laying the decking. Work- ' 
men engaged in building the dock have 
kept constantly tin the Job, and when 
the decking has been finished, the 
railroad .tratks extended the entire 
length of the dock will be put down. 
There Is now no doubt but what the 
dock will be ready for the opening of 
navigation by the Anchor line, which 

i 



Jury to Try Alleged Assail- 
ant of Nurse Is Being 
Chosen. 

Kansas City, Mo., March 31.— Selec- 
tion of a jury for the trial of VIc 
Ciueringer, who with five other men 
Is charged with luring Mrs. Gertrude 
Shidler, a nurse, to a Grand avenu® 
rooming house and attacking her, vca9 
begun here today. An extra force of 
deputies was on duty, prepared for a 
repetition of threats of violence such 
as were made by a crowd that surged 
about the courtroom at Uueringer's 
preliminary hearing. 

Mrs. Shidler for a week has been 
under the care of physicians becaus« 
of a nervous breakdown. The prose- 
cutor said she would be able to appear 
In court and tell her story. 



'•»■ ^ 



>i 



!>. 



,.i! 



HH* 




'^mf 



Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 




March 31, 1914. 



ON THE IRON RANGES 



OFFimAL MAP OF THE WEATHER 



business will be th« sf»1ection of dele- 
gates to the state camp, which meets 
at Stillwater on Miy %. 



SEVENTH AVENUE 

WILL BE PAVED shERIFTRICIY 

NOT CANDIDATE 



Two Harbors Council De- 
cides to Go Aiiead With 
Improvement. 

Tvv'> Hurbors, Minn., March 31. — 
(So". i>l t'i The Herald.) — A communl- 
«au.»n was read from W. C. Colver at 
the city council meetlnfr last night 
off-rmg to sell a certain timber claim. 
' ..<vn-d by the city, for $1,500. The 



the proposl- 
better offer 



Cohen, a shoemaker, in the arm Fri- 
day morninK. was fined |7.50 In mu- 
nicipal court yesterday by Special 
JudRQ «;iilespie. ^^n proniisinB to 
muzzle his dog his sentence was sus- 
pended. 

The dog will be watched for twelve 
days to see whether hydrophobia de- 
velops. Cohen says he \Till swear out 
another complaint and have the dog 
killed. 



; (.ouucll. however, turned 
[ tlon down ia view of a 
f In l:h«> future. 
i. The coal loader which was sent here 
; on approval some time ago was de- 
Itlar.'J t>ntiiely unsatisfactory. The 
« oiuii'il has decided tu take advantage 
t of th.« r>^jcetlon clause and turn it 
!>-i k t • tlv company. 

I>uluililan Recommended. 
W. .S. Mi>rri3 of Dululh was recom- 
TJiended to succeed Mr. I^awson, re- 
i Rignfd. «s city engineer to look after 
: the grniiing work. 

t A date for advertising bids for pav- 
llng Sevi-nth avenue was set. This 
f^;lr^»et was brought to sub-grade last 

ssuirii'.'r. but it was not macadamized. 
L Th^ tiuestion of purchasing a new 
{ motor truck for hauling coal and 
t trushed rock was discussed, and tho 
J fouii'il df^cided to send for bids on 
■ u.;h a innchine. It is believed that 
«u-h a truck would be a splendid 
thing for the city to use in the grnd- 
liig Inuuovements it expects to carry 
out tills summer. 



Itasca County Official 

Springs Surprise By 

So Stating. 

Grand Rapids. XInn.. March SI. — 
(Special to The Herald.) — A surprise 
was sprung in local political circles 
this morning when Sheriff Thomas T. 

Riley announc^^d that he would not be 
a candidate for i ►'nomination, giving 
as the reason that his private business 
affairs niad«* the <tep advisable. Mr. 
Uiley has served six years and has 
been one of the n ost popular and ef- 
ficient officers Itatca county ever had. 
Charles C.unders >n, deputy sheriff 
during Mr. Riley's term, this morning 



FARM TEACHER FOR 
VIRGINIA SCHOOLS 



OLD GOING OUT; 

NEW COMING IN 



! Mayor Murphy of Virginia 

to Give Way to Michael 

Boylan. 



^r: 




p. L. Johnsrud of Spring 

Valley, Minn., Engaged 

for Work. 

Virginia, Minn., March 31. — (.Special 
to The Herald.)— P. L. .lohnsrud of the 
state agricultural school, a native of 
Spring Grove, Minn., who has had a 
wide experience In teaching agricul- 
ture, was selected by Supt. P. P. Col- 
grove and Chairman W. H. Katon for 
the position of agricultural Instructor 
here. Supt. Colgrove and Mr. Katon 
have returned from Minneapolis, where 
they interviewed Mr. Johnsrud. 

Mr. Johnsrud will arrive in the city 
Wednesday morning to visit the 
schools and confer with the school 
board. He will also Inspect the state 
eighty to be used as the experimental 
farm. His position will pay $1,500 a 
year, according to present plans. Mr. 
"johnsrud was picked among three can- 
1 didates. 




AFTER STRAY STOCK. 

Tower Will Not Allow Animals 
Around City After April 1. 

Tower, Minn., March 31. — <Spe<Mal to 

Tlie Herald.) — Stock la prohibited by 

the city council from running at large 

after April 1. The state law 
generally disregarded, 



FRESH AIR AND HEALTH 

M^ntiLl work calls an unusual sup- 
j ply of blood to the brain; the process 
of digestion calls the blood to the 
stomach. Brain work immediately 
after a hearty meal often causes in- 
digestion because the brain has first 
call on a supply of blood that should 
be helping the stomach. 

Wherever, in the economy of th« 
body, work is to be done there is a 
demand for bright, red blood. Thia 
blood or blood dark with impurities 
will not do because it is the oxygen 
carried by the blood that does the 
work and oxygen -bearing blood i« 
bright and red. This life-sustaining 
oxygen is taken up by the blood fronft 
the air which meets in the lungs. 
Hence the great need of fresh air 
every hour of the day and night. 
But fresh air is useless if the blood 
cannot take up the oxygen which It 
gives. Dr. Williams' Pink Pills en- 
able the blood to take up more oxy- 
gen because they increase the part of 
the blood that carries the oxygen. 
This corrects the lassitude, palpitation 
of the heart, shaky nerves and tho 
pallor that are the results of thin, 
impure blood. 

You must have pure, rich blood t« 
enjov complete health. A booklet 
"Building Up the Blood" will be sent 
free on request by the Dr. W^illiams 
Medicine Co.. Schenectad.v. N. Y. AU 
druggist? sell Dr. Williams' Pink Pills. 



FOREC'A.ST TII.I. 7 
l«E:DXt:»OAY 

For Duluth. Supeilir at: 1 
Irii-ludtitg itie M<:s«t>» aiifi Vn-millon 
Irjii rang«B: Cftiomlljr cloudy wetUier 
tnr.lflit tnd Wednw lay wlih tHotxblr 
i»lii «.r »ni)w; luwent tenipenaure to- 
nittit about 3« de« at Duluth- Supe- 
rior ai^J S3 d«C' 01. liie tr^jii raiig«t; 
UiixJerate uartltcasteily wiruU. 



EXPLANATORY NOTES. 
Air prtmn retfoced to »«» I<%«1. I.OBAr..(c<«i!inaou» liocj) pu. tkro«j:li_pottiU •f.««l"»' »".P"^»^ 



r^^?r'^?^i^^s, npo'trjr.^. prccip-Lioa of 1 ia.U I more (o, p>,t ?« boM»: IhirJ. n.»i«u.wmd velocity. iJ| 



Always Level 



CLOUDY 



more 



has been | 
but the city 
inclined now to 



Virsin t. Minn.. March 31. — (Special 
to The H-rald.) — It will be a case of 
rnig out the old. ring in the new" la 
th- city hall tonight wheo Mayor M. A, 
' Murphv will step out and turn over 
'the official reins to Mayor-elect 
I Michael Boylan. The old council will 
I wind up its affairs and the new one 
will take hold. It is expected there ^ ^ .^ , „, ^,i.„,^ 

wMl be a large attendance of specta- I filed for the placo and others , , 

win be the usual doubtedly follow i^ soon as Mr. Iliio> a 



will un- 



tors and there 
speeches. 
t Ar^uJred AVatrr Plant. 

During hi.si term Mayor Murphy had 
th« water and light plant acquired. He 
was t^iected on a municipal platform 
arid was urged to run for re-election, 
but declined. During his administra- 
tion the police and fire commission did 
I )u -idv'rable work. 



MINING WORK IS 

BEING STARTED 



decision becomes generally known. 
Bovejr Man File*. 

Frank Provinsl e of Bovey has filed; 
for commissioner from District No. 3. 
in which is incl jded the villages of 
Bovey and Coleraine. It is understood 
that Andy Ncl.son present commission- 
er from that district and chairman of 
the board, will * so file for renomina- 
tlon. Thi.x is th» second commission- 
ership filing in the county, J^hn u. 
Shellman of Naslwauk having derided 
to again become <- candidate in District 
No. 5. 



Shenango Furnace Com- 
pany Gets Ready to Open 
Chisholm Property. 

• linn.. March 31.— (Special 

to 1 nt^ ii-iald.) — The Shenango Fur- 
n.ice company is putting the tracks to 
the dump in condition for beginning 
fif spring *'ork. Crews today were 
milled to tlie pit gangs and the forces 
wlli be increased until the full force 
1.-* again working. 

Thi.s i7»eans renewed activity, as 
otti'T mines will soon follow the ex- 
wniple of the She ango. 

Many Sc-ek Work. 
Many mt-n are besieging the newly 
created offices of the bureau of com- 
plaints and statistics of the village, 
; one branch of which covers the book- 
ring of men for the season's work, 
fc^upt. Harry O'Brien has been busy 
; getting the necessary details from ap- 
plicantii for both day labor and team 
work. The street work will probably 
' mot start for a couple of weeks yet 
«-•• the frost Is still in the ground. 
Small crews are being employed keep- 
ing ditches open and assisting In re- 
! iiK.vlng tlie snow from objectionable 
I iilaces. 

;many woodmen 
are expected 



SCARLET FEVER 

EPIOEMIG IS BAD 



officials seem 
enforce it. 

Beginning tomorrow the leading 
stores will close at 7 p. m.. except on 
Saturdays, pay days, and the evening 
before a holiday. 

Word has reached here from Pitts- 
burg. Pa., that parties will soon ar- 
rive to open the Vermilion hotel for 
the season. „ . ^^ 

He v. D. F. Thompson of Eveleth con- 
ducted servli^es at the St. Mary's EpKs- ^ 
copal church Sunday morning. It is 
expected he will also conduct a service | 
on (Jood Friday. . . I 

Prof. A. H. Kraft of Virginia was i 
here on professional business Monday. 

STRIPPJNGJLIVER. 

Butler Bros. Continue Removing 
Overburden From Property. 

Virginia. Minn., March 31.— (Special 
to The Herald.) — Butler Bros, 
sumed stripping operations 
Sliver mine 




the M. A. 
operate the mine 



have re- 
at the 
and when the property is 
relieved of its overburden 
Hanna company will 
on a lease. 

The company has purchased a nev. 
steam shovel and two Baldwin loco- 
i motives for use in mining ore at the 
' pit. Only one shovel will be worked 
I during the coming season. 
I 



The weather man 
does not hold out 
much hope for 

more spring- like 
conditions for the 
n^-xt twenty-fo u r j 
hours at 1 e a s t. | 
Cloudy we a t h e r ; 
v.ith snow or rain 
is predicted. 

A year ago to- 
day it • was fair 
and mild. 

The sun rose 
this morning at 5:49 and will set at 
6:35, making twelve hours and forty- 
seven minutes of sunligbt. 

Mr. Richardson makes th*» following 
comment on wealh«T conditions: 

"The temperature continues moder- 
ate to mild in nearly ah districts and 
no Important changes occurred during 
the last twenty-four hours. In the 
meantime precipitation occurred over 
Eastern, Central and Southern states 
and the Far West, rain being the 
rule." 



warmer in west portion; Wednesday 
unsettled and warmer, probably rain. 

« ■ 

Temperatures. 
Following were the highest temper- 
atures for the last twenty-four hours 
and the lowest for the last twelve, end- 
ing at 7 a. m.: 

High l.ow 
72 61 



<;enrral 

Chicago, March 



Foreeanta. 

31. — Forecasts for 
hours ending at 7 p. m. 



Alillene 72 

.\ll>oiia 42 

.\inxrlll<i 

UatUi'lord -« 

Itltmairk 'H 

Bol« S4 

Boston ti 

Buffalo 44 

taJro 

CiUnary 4< 

ttiarle* t1ty 

Cliarle-^lon 76 

ChJcairi «• 

roiicorilla 

Dareti|k>rt 

Ueiiver 52 

IHM MnlnM 40 

Ueiila Luk* 38 

Dodfe 4» 

Dubuque 44 

OULUTH 30 

ndmoiil'in ■'•'i 

EM-uiiaba 40 

Kort .SniiiU 

Ciah'Mioii 68 



Two Harbors Officials Con- biq DAMAGE CASE 



[Virginia Will Do Honors 

to County Members 
I Wednesday. 

Vir;;inia, Minn., March 31. — (Special 
to The H'rald.) — The county conven- 
sti iri of the Modern Woodmen of Amer- 
ica will be called to order In the 
Hawkinson hall at 2 o'clock tomorrow 
afternoon. A special train will arrive 
from Duluth about 11 o'clock and it 
is expectf-d that about sixty-five dele- 
gates and a large number of members 
will come from the Zenith City. 

Other camps to be represented are 
Hibbing. Chisholm, Buhl, Kinney, 
Mountain Tron, Piveleth, tJilbert, Biwa- 
blk. Aurora, Winton, Tower, Ely. Sou- 
dan, Proolor, Midway, Kelsey and Du- 
luth. 

Street Parade. 
There will be a street parade and at 
least two bands and several drill teams 
will take part. The Duluth delega- 
tion will be out in large numbers as 
that city expects to land the next 
rounty convention. Many matters of 
Intert'st to the order will be discussed 
at th ivention, but the principal 



siderabiy Worried Over 
Oiitlook. 

Two Harbor*. Minn.. March. SI. — 
(Special to The Herald.)— The scarlet 
fever epidemic c mtinues to worry the 
city board of health. Twelve new 
cas<>3 were rep« 'ted last night at the 
city council me ting. U Is evident 
that the disease has not been checked 
in its dii»astrou- advance. Rent wed 
precautions are >elng taken and near- 
ly all the publlv places have been fu- 
migated. ... J , .♦ 

InU's.s the epiilemic is slopped short- 
Iv the citv boa-d of h'^alth may de- 
mand the closiMS of all public build- 
ings. Onlv on'* dt-ath has resulted — 
Roy Bjurriian, a>)out two weeks ago. 

SUETf OR $10,000. 

Nels Larson Seeks Large Sam From 
Winston-f)ear Company. 

Hibbing, Minn. March SI. — Claiming 
that on April 
chain on the 
was operating a craner at the Buffalo- 
Susquehanna ni ne here broke, while 
propelling the dipper and that he had 
.to jump to av>id being hit by the 
broken chain, ^ els Larson, a veteran 
emplove of the mining company, has 
filed suit in district court again.st ^^ iii- 
ston-Dear for If 10.000 for i"J"r'^s al- 
leged to have been sustained in the 
fall and In a tecoad accident at the 

"*The second (ccld'-nt Is alleged to 
have occurred on April 23. 1913, two 
days after he lad returned to work. 
Although suffe-ing from injuries to 
his ankles an. back he claims he 
operated the .-hovel from a sitting 
posture and thit while operating the 
shovel the hoisiing chain again broke, 
a piece strikin { him above the fore- 
head. He averi his eyesight was im- 
paired and iha. he is suffering from 
headaches. , i^ «„ 

He was earn ng $1 a day while In 
the emplov of t fie company with which 
he had been co inected since 189.. He 
now does odd jobs here and asserts 
he earns only : 2 -5 a day. 



IS NEARING END. 



twenty-four 
SVednesday : 

Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa and 
N'orth Dakota— Unsettled weather to- 
night and Wednesday, probably show- 
ers; not much change In temperatnre. 

South Dakota — Unsettled , weather 
tonight and Wednesday,-^' probably 
showers in east and central portions. 

Montana — tJenerally fair tm>lght and 
Wednesday; not much chanxe in tem- 
perature. ^^.^'"^ 

Lower Michigan — rTovrdy tonight 
and AVednehday, probably 'rain. 

Upper Michigan — Cloudy tonight. 



Grand Haren 

Urefii Bair ... 

HHvr* 

Helena 

Hoiuiliion 

Huron 

Indianapolis 

JackviiiTllle . . 

Kainloups .... 

Kan'ix.i Cit>' . . 

I Keokuk 

1 Ki oxtUIe 

I La 4'rt>s»o 

Lamier 

I LotiL-irUla . - . • 

Madison 

I Maj-qucue . .. 
I Moilk-iiie Hat. 

Memplil^ 

Milan <lty . . 

Mlln-aukee ... 



..44 
. .4U 
..M 
..50 

!.44 

!.84 
..'.4 
..Sli 

'..iik 



..70 

.4»j 

..31 



.74 

.62 

..40 



:iO 

38 

84 
ti 

34 
34 
.V» 
iS 

:{6 
Mi 
S8 
48 
S8 
3t* 
4( 
32 
44 
88 
26 
2« 
J4 
58 
64 

28 
3* 
?-J 
24 
36 
44 
«« 
32 
44 
40 
58 
3i< 
26 

34 
24 

.■?o 

06 
34 
34 



HiKh I 


ow 


Miiiuerlo^a 


.41) 


... 


Modena 


.50 


26 


Mont jomery .... 


.S-i 


b6 


SI. iitreal 


.34 


28 


Na^lniHe 




58 


Xew l>rlean« . . 


.S4 


68 


Nevr York 


.:<« 


36 


N.irtU Platte ... 


.40 


r.i 


Oklalioma 


.62 


48 


Uiiialia 


.44 


40 


FaiT.v Sound ... 


.44 


24 


Plioenii 


.68 


44 


Pierre 


..42 


3H 


Plllsburg 


..68 


40 


Port .irtliiir 


..36 


14 


Poriland. Or .. 


.46 


40 


Prinro Albert . . 


..t4 




Qu'AppeUe — 


.:t« 


M 1 


it-iii>iffii 


76 


54 


lUpifl City .... 


..50 


32 


Itci^ebunc 


..46 


43 


Koswril 




42 


St Ix).ils 


.56 


44 


Kl. Paul 


.44 


34 


Salt I^ke City. 


..hi 


36 


Kan L>lego 


.m 


48] 


San Frandsco. 


. .■.« 


.'fO I 


Saiilt StB. Marie. 4 8 


28 


Seuille 


..50 


36 , 


SlierlOan 




38 


Slirevepiirt 


..:« 


62 


Sionx City 


..42 


4« 


StHikiine 


..44 


•^ 


sprhmllel.l. HI 




43 > 


.SprliiKfleltl. Mo 




M 


Swift Current. 


.40 


36 


T:>nil>a 


..82 


62 


Toledo 


..52 


:!6 


Valentine 




36 


Wa.s1iington . . . 


..30 


40 


WIfliltfl 




50 


Willlstnn 


.44 


■•t 


Wlr.iiemiK'ca . . 


..4« 


??> 


Wliintiieg 


..56 


30 


Yellowsiona . . - 


..44 


26 



Relnhardt was killed yesterday in an 
aeroplane accident. He was a passen- 
ger on a biplane, which in making a 
landing tried to avoid a collision with 
a monoplane and capsized, dropping 
sixty-five feet. 

THETEmOF 
THE PASSOVER 



Jewish People Will Observe 

Anniversary for One 

Week. 




—never "runs over" — because 
you can chanee it from heel to 
heel. Thiseqnalizesand doubles 
the wear. Guaranteed not to 
work loose. 






Doubts -Wmmr 
Ruhhmr Umml 

— of best resilient "live" rubber- 
eases the strain from standine 
and reduces wear on shoes and 
hcJse. No nails or holes in the 
bottom. Harmless to floors. 
Absolutelr saoi- 




v> 



t\ 



rorMen.Women"^ChildrGn' 



Unleavened Bread, Bitter 

Herbs and the Roasted 

Lamb Bone. 



IT. 1913, the hoisting 
s earn shovel which he 



Hibbing, Minn.. March 31.— The trial ; 
of the big damage case of Luke Likich | 
vs. The Mahoning Ore & Steel Com- 
pany to recover $50,000 damages for 
alleged personal injuries Is still on 
In district court and will probably be . 
given to the jury today. As Mayor \ 
Power is at Itochester. Joe Austin of i 
Chisholm and C. H. Crocker are look- 
ing after the plaintiffs Interests. 

VIRGINIA CONCERN 

CUT 7.000.000 FEET. 

Virginia, Minn.. March 31.— (Special 
to The Herald.) — The camps of the 
W. T. Bailey Lumber company near 
Cook were closed for the season yes- 
terday. About 7,000,000 feet of logs 
were taken out during the wint.T. 
Sawing at tho company's mill In this 
city will probably be commenced about 
the middle of next month.* 

• 

Goea to River FalU. 

Virginia, Minn., March 31. — (Special 
to The Herald.)— Miss Marion O. West, 



_ ^ _ _ . imt 

of tlie sixth grai<fe. 



I who recently resigned as teacher of [ ment has struck this section of the 
'The sKth grade in the Roosevelt state. One of the plans proposed Is 
; schoo left vesTerday fi>r her home In , for a line straight north, st«yting one 
River Falls, "Wis., where *he will take ' mile west of town and running direct 
a special course in teaching work at ( to Moflflt on the main line of the 
the stafe nof^al. Mis^ Ina .Nelson of I Northern Paclrtc This would connect 
Pavneaville, Minn^is.Uw. new teacher | with the Burleigh county road ?-urin ng 
• -^ "^ r- -- , east from Hismarck and would Insure 

3r1L lautolsts and others a splendid route tQ 

the state capital. 



MESAM COUPLE - _,„,,,_-,„ „ 
WED « Wll.8ll.tt W^llg SfEMR^ 



to 



Virginia, Minn., March 31— (Special 
Tho Herald.) — Mi.'^s-vKdna M. Dane, | 
daughter of William Dane of Mesaba, ' 
and NicholauB Williams of Mosaba, 
shift boss at the Vivian mine, were 
quietly married at thb Methodist par- 
sonage yesterday afternoon by Rev. 
Thomas (Jrice, pastor of the church. 



IN ALL OUR 
NEIGHBORHOOD 

There Is Hardly A Woman 
Who Does Not Rely Upon 
Lydia E. Pinkham's Veg- 
etable Compound. 



GAME MEET POSTPONED. 

Mr. Myers Will Meet Virginia Gun 
Club at Later Date. 

Virginia. Minn., March 31. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Fred E. Myers of Bl- 



Former City Attorney of 

Virginia Passes Away 

at Toppenish. 

William Shea, Jr., former city attor- 
ney of Virginia and well known In 
this city, died at 1:50 o'clock yester- 
day afternoon at Toppenish. Wash., 
where he has been making his home 
for several years. 

The message announcing his deatk 
was received last evening by Thomas 



wabik, range memt>'ep' -of the state | Clark, his father-in-law 



game and fish commis.^lon. who waa to 
have had a meeting V't^ the Virginia 
<Jun club yesterday lo discuss plans 
for the enforcement of the game laws, 
was in the city briefly d\iring the day, 
and In talking with members of the 
club It was decld<sd td- postpone the 
meeting until after Oie next meeting 
of the commis.sion Uk 91. Paul. This 



will be the first n»»^Ui»%: attended by 



I Mr. Myers since hi.-! iiapointment. 

itasca'coIinty 

school money. 



ow! 



Right N 



Make it a point to 
drink freely of WHITE 
ROCK. 

Let it become a habit 
with you— a habit which 
will grow throughout 
the year. 

There's vim, vigor, 
and virility in every 
glass of sparkling 
WHITE ROCK. 



GAMBLERS LEAVING, 

Card Gentry Said to Be Going Away 
From Hibbing. 

Hibbing. Min i.. March 31.— The strict 
enforcement of the order r -cently is- 
sued by Mayor Power prohibiting the 



Princeton, 111. — " I had inflammation, 
hard headaches in the back of my neck 
and a weakness all 
caused by female 
trouble, and I took 
Lydia E. Pinkham's 



for 



playing of an: gam.^ of chance 
money has alrt ady result.-d In a large 
number of the gambling fraternity 
leaving the viltage. and more, it Is ex- 
pected, win "pi 11 up stakes" when they 
are convinced that the order is to 
stand. Some of the more optinilstlc 
of the fraterniiy hav.> been circulating 
the report that the lid will be tilted 
within a few vet-ks, but the officials 
evid»-ntly take a different view of the 
matter and as lert that it is clamped 
for goc»d and hat the dealers of the 
pasteboards ra:iy as well seek' greener 
fields. 

chishoTm miner 

borne to grave. 

Chisholm, Minn., March 31— (Special 
to The Herall.) — ateve Pernar, who 
was f^uffocatei* to death Saturday In 
the Chisholm nine by a cave-In, was 
buried yesterd ly in the Catholic divi- 
sion of the 1 'cal cemetery. The St. 

I Joseph's soclet >', to which he belonged. 
turned out ii numbers and accom- 

1 panied the reiialns to thf cemetery. 
Services were held In the Catholic 
church R<^v. l r. Schiffror oftlciaiing. 




Grand Rapids. Minn., March 31. — 
(Special to The Herald.) — The division 
of the school fun»f.^ apportioned to 
Itasca county shows that $8,733.83 will 
be added to the various dii^lrlct funds 
by reason of the rate apportionment to 
be sent out in the near future. Of 
the total amount the various districts 
in the county will receive the foUow- 
.,- ^ .\ r^^^ I ing sums; District No. 1. $4,778.03; 

Vegetable Com- [ district No. 2, $2,:.'73.05; District No. 5, 
DOUnd with such ex- $108.24; District No. 6. $1,305.07; Dis- 

cellent results that I itriot No. lo, $123.70; 

am now feeling fine. ' 
I recommend the 
Compoundand praise 
it to all. I shall be 
glad to have you 
publi.sh my letter. 



$145.35. 



District No. 



CHISHOLM YOUNG 

WOMAN IS CALLED. 



Mr. Shea is survived by his wife, twr 
children, his father and two sisters. 

The widow was formerly Miss Jessie 
Clark of this city His father has 
been In West F.aden on a business trip 
and is now on his way to this city. His 
sisters were at his bedside at the time 
of his death with the other members 
of his family. The telegram conveying 
the sad news did not state the cause of 
death but it is believed to have been 
due to Bright's disease. 

Mr. Shea was one of the rising men 
of his profession. He was held in the 
highest esteem by the members of the 
bar in Minnesota because of his ability 
and pleasing personality. The news rf 
ills demise will be a shock to a wide 
circle of friends and acquaintances. 
At the time of his death Mr. Shea was 
citv attorney of Toppenish. 

No arrangements for the funeral have 
been made, as far as was known here 
thls morning, but it was thought that 
the body would be brought to this city 
for interment. 



Aeroplane Pai»«eiiger Killed. 

Strasburg, Germany, March 31.— 



Capt. 



There is scarcely a neighbor around ma j aged 20 w 
. , „-^ / ^j:^:«^ "_Mr« ni.sh peoplt 



Chisholm, Minn., March 31. — (Special 

'to The Herald.) — MUs Hilma NIkunen. 

well known among the Fin- 

. , j-„:„„ " Um ' ni.sn people, died yesterday of tuber- 

who does not use your medicine. — «"• ; culosis from which she had suffered 

J F Johnson. R. No. 4, Box 30, Prince- ; for several months. The funeral will 

T.!- • 'bo held here Wednesday. She was a 

ton, Illinois. I daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Nl- 

Experience of a Nurse. 1 1'""*^"- ^ 

Poland.N.Y.-"In my experience as a, T^7^*,»V*rrMin^n."* M^^h' 3i.- 
nurse I certainly tnmk Lydia b,. fink- (Special to The Herald.)— The Lake 

elected officers 



« 



There 's Health in 
White Rock 



»t 



MUST MUZZLE DOG 

OR PAY UP FINE. 

Virginia, Minn.. March 31. — J. P. 
Denyes. a loca meat dealer, whose bull 
dog Is allege. I to have bitten Ben 



ham's Vegetable Compound is a great C^.un^ty^Farmers;^club^ ^_^^^^ ^^^^_ 
medicine. I wish all women with te- 
male troubles would take it. I took it 
when passing through the Change of 
Life with great results and I always re- 
commend the Compound to all my pa- 
tients if 1 know of their condition in 
time. I will gladly do all I can to help 
others to know of this great medicine." 
—Mrs. Horace Newman, Poland, Her- 
kimer Co., N. Y. 

If you are ill do not drag along until 
an operation is necessary, but at once 
take Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable 
Compound. 

if you want Hpeolal advice write 
Lydia E. Pinkliam Medicine Co., 
(conlideutial) L<yiui,Masa. 



dings; vice president, Herman Kahler; 
secretary. E. K. Cavllen; manager and 
purchasing agent, Fred Thias; sales 
agent, Charles Larson. 

• 

I.esTea FbhHt- Deatltate. 
Mountain Iron Minn.. March 31. — 
Charles Stone, who -died-here of tuber- 
culosis, was buried tt>day by the 
county. He left a wlfe%nd three chil- 
dren penniless and the county will have 

to provide for then*. ''• 

• — I — i 

Sell Aurora Stork. 

Aurora. Minn., NTarcS 31 —The Au- 
gu.st Toratti banki>ipt vtock was sold 
here yesterday by tho trustees. The 
stock was sold tor Carl Krikson for 
$3S0 The sale must be confirmed by 
the court before q?»K of the articles 
can be removed from the building. 



Plan iioo4 Roada Work. 

Hazelton, N. D.. March 31— (Special 
to The Herald.)— The good roads mov«» 



THROAT 
TrouMes 

'Dangerous 

because the swollen glands 
and inflamed membranes 
often affect other tissues and 
impair their healthy actiotL 

Scoit't Emulaion stands alons 
as nature's corrector of throat 
troubles; Its cod liver oil is 
speedily converted Into fftrm.- 
resiatlnff tissue— the glycerine Is 
curative and healing, while 
the combined emulsion up. 
builds the foreee to vrvti 
the weakening influence 
which always follow 
throat troubles. 

SCOTTS EMULSION U 
(••( ^or thrmt Impmrtant 
r«a«on«— ft r«fl«p«« thm 
trmmblmt it mrmmmntu m mlapfmi 
it U mot tkmrtmd with aicohml 
or BtuB^rutg drut». 

Shun aobotitutae mod 



DratsQi 

cwu«iatit 



Within a few days, Tesach, the an 
nual Feast of Passover or of unleav 
ened bread, will be celebrated In Jew- 
i ish homes and synagogues. 

This, the oldest feast of the Jewish 
calendar, dates back 3,300 years. The 
awakening of spring has its normal 
appeal and its practical symbolism to 
every primitive people. The agricul- 
tural aspect of this holiday Is seen in 
the phra.se "That it Is to be kept in 
the season of the month of ripenings," 
when the barley sown In winter has 
become ripe and when an offering con- 
sisting of an omer (one-half gallon) 
of barley was brought in :€:ratitude to 
the Giver of all good. 

The historical significance of the 
festival has over-shadcwed its agricul- 
tural aspect. As the Feast of Free- 
dom it commemorates the emancipa- 
tion of Israel from Egyptian bondage 
and the people's entrance into the dig- 
nity and destiny of national life. It 
thus marks the birth of the Hebrew 
people. The main characteristic of its 
celebration has always been domestic; 
In the homes the families and the in- 
vited friends gather on the first eve- 
ning (in orthodox homes also on the 
second evening) to recount in song and 
story and amid appropriate symbolism 
the deliverance of Israel. The main 
symbols of this seder service are the 
roasted lamb bone, reminding them of 
the lamb that was slaughtered as a 
sacrifice of the covenant; second, the 
matzah or unleavened bread, to be 
eaten during the whole week, recalling 
not only the hasty preparation with 
which the Israelites hurried out of 
Egypt but also their absolute reliance 
upon God and readiness to trust In His 
leadership of them; and the bitter 
herbs, suggesting vividly the bitter 
life of their forefathers in Egypt, 
which, even today, have not lost their 
poignant application. ' , ^, , 

Two other svmbols of the table dec- 
orations should be noted, namely, the 
four cups of wine allowed to each one 
are symbolical of the four-fold phrase 
In which God couched the first "dec- 
laration of independence," and the cup 
of wine meant for the prophet Elijah, 
who always present in spirit, brought 
over anew the message of undying 
hope of the Messianic resign of uni- 
versal Justice, freedom and peace. The 
Feast of the Passover has not lost its 
thrilling significance to the modern 
Jew To those still pining in slavery 
In Russia and Roumanla it sings the 
song of ultimate redemption while to 
tho«»e living under the flag of freedom 
it teaches the undying lesson of .grat- 
itude together with an appreciation 
of the higher civic and religious lib- 

'^Vhe Feast of Passover will begin 
Friday evening, April 10, and last one 

Local services have not been an- 
nounced. 

APPOINTED^ BY HANNA. 

North Dakota's Governor Isues Sev- 
eral Commissions. 

Bismarck, N. D., March 31— Gover- 
nor Hanna baa made the following 
appointments and commissions have 
been issued: 

Dr. Nils Tronnes of Fargo, Ole 
I.ovdakken of A\ alcott, N. D.. and 
Peter Stromme of Grand Forks as spe- 
cial representatives to represent the 
state of North Dakota at Christlania, 
Eidsvoad and Trondhjem. Norway at 
the one hundredth anniversary of the 
adoption of Norway's constitution on 

May 17, 1914. 

Thomas F. Craven of Wllllston, and 
E E3. WDeber of Haley, delegates 
to the irrigation conference to be held 
in Denver, Colo., April 9. 

Dr C L. Tompkins of Grand Forks, 
member of the North Dakota board of 
medical examiners 
L. Kckman, whose 
26. 1914. ^ ^ 

Dr J. W. Robinson of Garrison, as 
member of North Dakota live stock 
sanitary board 



Electric Repair Shop 

We have the leading Shoe Hos- 
pital of the city. Rank Order* and 
waiting Jobs a pleasure. 

POPCLAU PRICES, 

ORENSEN 

SHOE STORES 

SAINT PAUL-MINNEAPOUS-DULUTH 

The Big Shoo Stor* — At the Sign of 

the Dove*. 

12S \V'K9T SUPiSRlOR STREET. 




tioQ mustered into Civil war service, 
is dead here. 

Wooley was a resident of Traverse, 
Nicollet county, when the Civil war 
broke out, and he spent a year in that 
strife. Later he served with Minne- 
sota companies in fighting the Indiana 
in that state and in North Dakota. 

Mr Wooley formerly made his home 
at St Peter. Minn., and Hutchinson, 
Minn., coming to North Dakota in 

1893. 

, •— 

O 

Oil 



DAMS BOTHER FARMER 



Obstructions Built for Logging Are 
Menace to Beltrami Soil Tillers. 

Bemidji, Minn., March 31. — So many 
dams have been b'lilt in P^ltrami coun- 
ty along rivers and streams so as to 
assistologging operations that farmers 
and other interested in fishing have 
requested that the law as to fishwaya 
or ladders be more rigidly enforced. 

In telling how all dams should be 
equipped S. C. Bailey, inspector of 
game wardens for this district said: 

"These ladders must be three feet 
In length for each foot in heiarht. The 
crib and bulkhead constructed of oak, 
using 6 by 6 material and the corner* 
being mltered and bolted. It is filled 
with rock for anchorage. The t^P of 
the cvrlb stands out of the water 
about a foot higher than th« main 
chute, which extends from the crib 
to the water below the dam. 

"The" chute Is constructed of two- 
Inch mat^'rlal. It extends to within two 
feet of the bottom of the river and 
into the pool below the dam. It ia 
placed in the channel of the stream, 
and when the greatest depth of wa- 
ter is found the chute is supported 
from the bottom of the stream by 
"horses" or similar supports." 

Settlers claim that deer and moose 
are plentiful as are other wild game. 



IS-107 






to succeed Dr. L. 
term expires April 



to succeed 



himself. 



FORMER GOPHER 

S OLDIER CALLED. 

Center N. D., March 31. — ^Special to 
The Herald.)— Daniel D. Wooley, vet- 
eran of a Minnesota cavalry organiza- 



ECZEMA ITCHED 
FOR 20 YEARS- 
RESINOL CURED 

All Over Face, Arm* and Handw. Would 
Walk the Floor All Mght. 

Dec. 8, 1913: "I had eczema for 20 
years. It started on me when I was 
but 13 years old and am now 34, and 
have suffered all these years. It start- 
ed with small pimples all over my face, 
arms and hands. M.v hands would 
swell up so that I could not shut them, 
and I was almost blind. It would itch, 
then burn, and I had to keep the af- 
fected par,ts wrapped up so that I 
would not scratch them. I couldn't 
sleep at all — just walked the floor a 
whole night. 

"I have tried many different reme- 
dies, a'nd spent a large sum of money, 
but had no relief. Reslnol Soap and 
Resinol Ointment were recommended 
to me. They gave me great relief after 
the third application, and after usingr 
four jara of Resinol Oinment and three 
cakes of Resinol Soap, I am complete- 
ly cured." (Signed) Mrs. H. E. Flea- 
ger. Box 13. Dauphin. Pa. 

Resinol Ointment and Resinol Soap 
quickly heal skin eruptions, clear 
away pimples and blackheads, and forna 
a most valuable household treatment 
for aores, burns, boils, piles, etc. Fop 
trial size free, write to Resinol. Dept. 
10-R Baltimore, Md. Sold by all drug- 
gists'. Prescribed by doctors for It 
years. 




iMsaaBBM 




> 



vi 






f 



-^-i - 



mm 



14 



Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



March 31, 1914. 




The Latest 

News Published 

on This Page 




WMTER 





The Herald 

Sporting Gossip 

Is Reliable 




TO PLAY DULUTH 



vi 



LIVE SPORTING GOSSIP 

By BRUCE. 



WORLD'S liiHAMPION 



COURT TENNIS STAR 



Toe 



OK TINKER called the mem- (points of the game than Carr. To 
bers of the Chicago Federal ' is one of the strongest boys of hi 
team together and t weight in the wrt* stling game — but the 



n 

■i ■ league - „ 

r^ m after a stirring and inspiring : same thing was true of bailor Jack. 
' ' talk, declared that . there I Strength alont will not suffice 

must be harmony in the club. 'After i against leverage properly and expert- 
the experience Toe went through at i ly applied, and the Wamo one knows 
Cincinnati, it is small wonder that the use and let ui also say, the ahur.- 
the thought of harmony is ever a 
pressing one with him. 



Grand Forks Volley Ball 

Team Is Coming 

Here 

The Grand Forks Volley ball team 
and the Duluth Y. M. C. A. team will 
play at the local association tomoriow 
evenlng^. 

'Inis will be iho third eran^e betw<*en 
the two teams, both of the former 
games having bo* n won by Diiluth. It 
mieht be a^aed that Capt. Jamar is i 
also conddent of winningr the third I 
game. ! 

Sceret.iry ilraves of the Orand Forks ' 
Commprcihl club, captain of the visit- 
that tiis 



of leverage — as ipplied to an oppon- 
ent. 

George A. Barton has often de- 
Ain't This Just Terrible? plored the fact that Toe would not ing club, has written here that lii 

|«(^YCE A TRArHAGEX. one of j take better care >f himself. Possibly ;--,i«, -;'^n^eSif niin^iS^^^^ 
pi the star linemen of the 1013 Mich- j xh\s fact has pre ented him from be- 
igan football team, failed to study ; ing a worlds champion. Joe is 
hard enough and has been '"canned"' ^ strong, terribly strong, and a tough 
from school by the unfeeling profs , one to beat. H; made Mike Yokel 



of Latin and meaningless Greek. 



Turning the other Western cheek j know that he las been up against 
to a blow, we perceive that Raymond ! some game — son e game. 
Eichenlaub. the sterling Dutch full- i ^* * A v j 

back oi last years Notre Dame team. | ^^Come Over in Our Yard 
nay have to give up football because , IJ|i|n\\ that the Duluth handball \ 
of failing eyesight. \lM ^rs have lost the scries of p 

NoAv were Michigan and Notre | with the St. Pail players on the St 
Dame to play Minnesota, there would j Paul courts, some of us will hold an 
be some small portion of joy mixed open mind still open and await the 
in the load of football sorrow; but as I result of the s< ries of games that 
Michigan has a date with Harvard : will be played on the local coiirts 
this coming fall and Notre Dame one 
with Yale, the studes of the West will 
cry out with genuine regret and rising 
alarm. 



e j 
nd j 
that the Xrrth Dakota crowd fully ex- | 
pects to win. 

As Duluth ha."j one of the best vol- ; 
ley ball teams in the Central West [ 
and 'ts members have been practicing 1 
for the last three weeks for the con- ' 
test of tomorrow everifng, the <jrand 
Forks aKgrejjaticn will havt to travel 
some to win the contest. 

Henry Xolte. T. A. Fall, Lane Mc- 

Gregror, A. Anderson and M. F. Jamar 

lOW' that the Duluth handball play- i are the members of the Duluth team. 

games 



travel some to \\\n, and \Vaino will 



WINNING CLUBS 

START POORLY 







i 



He Should Worry— Yes? 

RROM London comes the informa- 
tion that Danny Maher is to quit 
the turf. Danny is not a horse — rath- 
er a rider. Scanning the record of the 
diminutive United States Irishman it 
might be stated that he is some rider. 

Daniel has led the list of wifining 
mounts for several years, over on the 

broad accent side of the brine, has • Michael cites the battle on the iron 
been riding for something like thir- ' range, when Til man took the count 
teen vears. has a fortune estimated at 



Few Opening Day Games 

Have Been Won By 

Leading Clubs. 

Ba.ceball dope Is a very peculiar 

thin^. Looking over the major league 

openings for the last ten years, one 

finds that the Firate.s, who In this 

time ha\e won only one flag, have 

[ohnny Salvatore. declares that i landed eight of their opening contro- 

I \ .1 -r^,.. „-„»K t:ii^,^., ;^ ,1^.1^:^,, ' versles and so have the Braves, who 

John Tecumseth Tillman 1^ dodging , g^^^rally have finished way doWn in 

a match with lis German protege. ' the ruck. The Naps, also non-pennant 

winners, have done splendidly at the 
kick-off. capturing seven contests. The 



John Kay. who gave our William 
Wentlandt some decisive beating, lost 
five straight ganes to Bill, so they 
say, on the Duluti courts last summer. 

This goes to show that the hand- 
ball habitat has jomeihing to do with 
the case. At least there is the chance 
for the local lights to convince us. 

They Are Squabbling. 

^•■KE McNL'LTY. manager of ! 



m 



several hundred thou — and has shaken 
hands with two kings. Even if stern 1 
physicians tell him he can't ride any | 
more — he should not be in the least j 
peeved, considering everything. j 

Some Won't Believe This. ' 

H HEADLINE statis that "Rain' 
Spoiled the Yankees' Game." 
S'une of those who watched the Yan- 
kees play last season are inclined to 
believe that there is nothing in the j 
world that could spoil the Yankees' ; 
game — it coukl not be any worse. 



of nine, and declares that when the 
Minneapolis John thinks of it he hesi- 
tates. 

It is true that Salvatore knocked 
Tillman down, a id it is also true that 
Tillman-won the decision. Tillr'.an is 
by far away the lest boxer and Salva- 
tore is the touffhest kid. 




O'BRIEN ARRANGING MORE 
PRACTICE GAMES FOR SOX 

With the Exception of the Orator, There Will Be 

No Veterans on the 1914 White Sox 

Inner Works. 



President H. A. Blume of the Duluth \ stop position and Menelce is not to 

While S.1V vesterdav received a wire PJ^aJ' "'■»*• ^^'^^ '" ^'^^^^^'^"'^ ill. '■^^"^"f 
\% hite box >esteraay receuea » '^'^*^ according to Dame Dope. This will 

from Darby O'Brien, who is at Cleve- l leave the O'Brien countenance as the 
land, stating that the Orator was ar- . one familiar guide post in the first 
ranging a number of spring exhlbi- cordon of defense, 
tion game dates, and that in all prob- 



BROWN MAY 
TAKE A REST 



Range Lightweight Reported 

to Have Undergone 

Operation. 

According to a dispatch published 
in Minneapolis today. Pal Brown will 
be out of the fighting game for som« 
time. 

As the dope speeds, as the crow 
flies, the range youth has undergone 
an operation upon his nose and right 
ear, and declares that he will not box 



ability games will be played at Madi- 
son, tJreen Bay and Rockford, in addi- 
tion to the games that are to be playeo , young players generally hustle, so 
with the 0.shkosh team. | that if the youngsters show real form 

O'Brien figures that with the series it looks as if we are going to have a 

,_,,.. . i,.^,.., to 1^ woi-.. ball team that will be in the game 

of exhibition games he expc-cts to ha\e ,, , .. 

completed betore the members of the ^" '■"*' "'"''• 
squad leave for Oshkosh, that his re- 
el ults will have a lot of conditioning 
before reluming to Duiuth for the final 

I workouts before the opening of the 

I Northern league season. 

Although the first game with Osh- 
kosh does not come until late next 
month, nevertheless the White Sox 
leader wlil have his men out on the 
<'leveland lots and will get some Idea 
of the worth of some of the young- 
sters before the spring training trip 
formally opens. . „, , . 

As there is a host of Cleveland 
voungsters signed up, and as the Ohio 
brand of weather is" unusually mild, 
part of the training will be done at the 
sixth city, though many of the recruits 
will get their fir."t glimpse of O'Brien, 
v-hen they hit that poetic little village, 
Oshkosh. ^ ... 

It is not known as yet whether 
Samuel Sycamore Menelce will be with 
the team this season or not. As a mat- 
ter of fact. It is said that Samuel does 
not know his Intentions at this precise 

Brarkett for Ootlield. 

will 



We have a host of candidates, and 
in the event of half of' them showing 
the promise that they have been 1 

tagged with, there will be a lot of | The story of the operation came out 
! hustflng to make the crew. 



' until these members are fully healed. 



BOyVLI^G SCORES 



Henry Ilillard Brackett will not 
White Elephants, with a record of four ^ pitch this year, if the last expre^sslon 

pennants In ten years, have broken free agent. The commission granted of the Dook before leaving Duluth can 
away in front just six times and the the player's requ^^st. be taken as the say so. ^. ^ - 

cJiant.s, who have annexed five gon- Last fall the player was released by O'Brien has lots of pitchers — that is, 
falons, have had only an even split In ' the Cleveland club to the Toledo, Ohio, hosts of youths who profess to be able 
their pry-off combats. The Mc<irawltes, j club, which later desired to release ] to pitch — and for this reason Is going 
moreover, have been blanked on open- Young to another league and gave the 
ing day on four occasions. Six times ' Charleston, W. Va., club an option on 
have the Cardinals had to be content I his services as a catcher. According 
with one tally in their first champion- ' to previous findings this option should 
shfp contests. [ have been exercised by Feb. 1. 1914, 

Star pitchers do not always fare well > but the player did not receive a con- 
when real hostilities commence. Cy ' tract until Feb. 26. 

Young was the twirlor for the Boston | The commission holds that the fall- 
Red Sox in four of their openers and ' ure of the Charleston club to